-194310-73660<br />INTRODUCTION<br />This homework talks about some characteristics of Northern United States.<br />It’ll ...
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
The Midwest USA
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The Midwest USA

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Este trabajo contiene algunos puntosimportantes sobre la cultura de los países de la región media oeste de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos.
Incluye la localización, población, clima, religión, lenguaje hablado, entre otros aspectos de cada uno de los estados en cuestion, tales como Michigan, Dakota, Minnesota, Indiana, Illinois, Nebraska, Iowa, etc.

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The Midwest USA

  1. 1. -194310-73660<br />INTRODUCTION<br />This homework talks about some characteristics of Northern United States.<br />It’ll help us to improve our knowledge, because every country has different traditions, customs, location, and the most important: culture.<br />It’s not necessary go to this states to know about them. Just you have to long for knowing. So you can get the information by books or magazines, because look up in books sent you to another world.<br />Also the technology gives us many tools to find out information about other countries.<br />TOPIC DEVELOPMENT<br />The Midwest United States is one of the four geographic regions within the United States of America. The region consists of ten states in the north-central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Dakota, Ohio and Wisconsin.<br />2891790245745<br />Location<br />The geographical exact position of the state is clearly indicated in the South Dakota location map. Located in the western front of the north-central part of the United States of America, South Dakota encompasses total area of 199,730 square kilometer. <br />History<br />North Dakota was settled first by Native Americans Several Thousand Years Ago. The major tribes in the area by the time of settlement were the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Sioux, and Chippewa. The major Tribes in the area by the time of settlement were the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Sioux, and Chippewa.<br />Climate<br />Due to location in the center of North America North Dakota experiences temperature extremes characteristic of a continental climate, with cold winters and mild to hot summers.<br />Winter in North Dakota is characterized by cold (below freezing) temperatures and snowfall. Snow is the main form of winter precipitation, but freezing rain, ice, sleet, and sometimes even rain are all possible during the winter months.<br />Spring is a time of major transition in North Dakota. Early spring commonly sees snowstorms, but by late spring as temperatures begin to moderate the state can experience tornado outbreaks, a risk which diminishes but does not cease through the summer.<br />Summer heat and humidity sees predominate in the east, while hotter and less humid conditions are generally present in the west. These humid conditions help kick off thunderstorm activity 22–34 days a year. <br />Autumn weather in North Dakota is largely the reverse of spring weather. <br />Customs and Traditions<br />Dakota clothing was made of animal skins including buffalo, deer, and elk. <br />Buffalo hides were used to make robes, tipi covers, clothing, moccasins, bags, and carrying cases. The working of hides was generally done by women who remove the hair if necessary, and transform them into useful items.<br />Many bands traditionally would meet in the summer and engage in group including political activities council meetings, religious ceremonies, sporting events, marriage, and coming-of-age ceremonies. Summers were a special opportunity to see relatives who were members of other bands. <br />Because the Dakota initially had very few horses, dogs were used as pack animals when traveling. For travel on water, the Dakota used dugout canoes made of logs. They would burn out the center of a log and scrape out the charred wood to create a place to sit.<br />Religion<br />Dakota Core to the concept of spirituality is Wakan, meaning holy, sacred, and mysterious. Wakantanka (literally " Great Mystery" ), or God, is the Creator of life. <br />Every form of life, including what westerners would categorize as animate and inanimate, has a spirit and is Wakan.<br />Spoken Language<br />Dakota has two major dialects with two sub-dialects each one; Eastern Dakota and Western Dakota.<br />The two dialects Differ phonologically, grammatically, and to a large Extent, also lexically. They are mutually intelligible to a high extent, although Western Dakota is lexically closer to the Lakota language.<br />Population<br />The United States Census Bureau, as of July 1, 2008, estimated North Dakota's population at 641,481.<br />Most important Places<br />3215640723902476572390<br /> Monte Rushmore Deadwood<br />5715365125<br />Location<br />Minnesota is the northernmost state apart from Alaska; its isolated Northwest Angle in Lake of the Woods is the only part of the 48 contiguous states lying north of the 49th Parallel. The state is part of the U.S. region known as the Upper Midwest.<br />History<br />Before European settlement, Minnesota was populated by the Anishinaabe, the Dakota, and other Native Americans. The first Europeans were French fur traders that arrived in the 17th century. Logging and farming were mainstays of Minnesota's early economy.<br />The state's iron-mining industry was established with the discovery of iron in the Vermilion Range and the Mesabi Range in the 1880s.<br />After World War II, industrial development quickened. New technology increased farm productivity through automation of feedlots for hogs and cattle, machine milking at dairy farms, and raising chickens in large buildings. Planting became more specialized with hybridization of corn and wheat, and the use of farm machinery such as tractors.<br />Climate<br />Minnesota endures temperature extremes characteristic of its continental climate; with cold winters and hot summers. Meteorological events include rain, snow, blizzards, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and high-velocity straight-line winds.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />43967403175The Minnesota State Fair, advertised as The Great Minnesota Get-Together, is an icon of state culture. The fair covers the variety of life in Minnesota, including fine art, science, agriculture, food preparation, music and corporate merchandising.<br />Various salads including, dessert salads, potato salads and pasta salads are popular in Minnesota.<br />Religion<br />57157620.<br />Although Christianity is dominant, there is a long history of non-Christian faiths. There are now appreciable numbers of adherents to Islam, Buddhism, and other traditions. The majority of Minnesotans are Protestants, including a significant Lutheran affiliation, though Roman Catholics make up the largest single Christian denomination.<br />Spoken Language<br />The Minnesotan accent is a slight variation of North Central American English.<br />Population<br />From fewer than 6,100 people in 1850, Minnesota's population grew to over 1.7 million by 1900. Each of the next six decades saw a 15% increase in population, reaching 3.4 million in 1960. Growth then slowed, rising 11% to 3.8 million in 1970, and an average of 9% over the next three decades to 4.9 million in the 2000 Census.<br />Most important Places and Dates<br />4488815330835Minnesota's art museums include the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Walker Art Center, and the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum.<br />Some places to see when visiting Minnesota are the Fort Ridgely and the Mall of America, one of the largest malls in the world.<br />571563500<br />Minnesota's first state park, Itasca State Park, was established in 1891, and is the source of the Mississippi River.<br /> Today Minnesota has 72 state parks and recreation areas, 58 state forests covering about four million acres (16,000 km²), and numerous state wildlife preserves, all managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.<br />359600513335Location<br />Wisconsin is located in the north-central United States and is considered part of the Midwest. It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Upper Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north. Wisconsin's capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee.<br />History<br />Wisconsin has been home to a wide variety of cultures over the past twelve thousand years. The first people arrived around 10000 BCE during the Wisconsin Glaciation. These early inhabitants, called Paleo-Indians, hunted now-extinct ice age animals exemplified by the Boaz mastodon, a prehistoric mastodon skeleton unearthed along with spear points in southwest Wisconsin.<br />Wisconsin became a territorial possession of the United States in 1783 after the American Revolutionary War. However, the British remained in de facto control until after the War of 1812, which finally established an American presence in the area.<br />Climate<br />Wisconsin's climate is classified as humid continental. The highest temperature ever recorded in the state was in the Wisconsin Dells, on July 13, 1936, where it reached 46 °C. The lowest temperature ever recorded in Wisconsin was in the village of Couderay, where it reached −48 °C on both February 2 and February 4, 1996.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />Citizens of Wisconsin are referred to as Wisconsinites. The traditional prominence of references to dairy farming and cheesemaking in Wisconsin's rural economy have led to the nickname of " cheeseheads" and to the creation of " cheesehead hats" made of yellow foam in the shape of a block of cheese.<br />Numerous ethnic festivals are held throughout Wisconsin to celebrate its heritage. Such festivals include Summerfest, Oktoberfest, German Fest, Festa Italiana, Irish Fest, Bastille Days, Syttende Mai (Norwegian Constitution Day), Brat (wurst) Days in Sheboygan, Cheese Days in Monroe and Mequon, African World Festival, Indian Summer and Arab Fest.<br />Religion<br />-38102540Christianity is the predominant religion of Wisconsin. <br />“The Roman Catholic Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe, in La Crosse, Wisconsin”.<br />Spoken Language<br />Although English has always been the predominant language in Wisconsin, German and other languages remained in common usage well into the early 20th century.<br />Population<br />As of 2009 the state has an estimated 5.6 million residents and contains 72 counties.<br />436816551435<br />Most important Places<br />The Little White Schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin held the nation's first meeting of the Republican Party.<br />26289061595<br />647700167005<br /> <br /> “Milwaukee Art Museum” <br /> <br /> “Miller Park” <br />1491615163830<br /> “House on the Rock”<br />Location<br />1524067310<br />Nebraska is a state located on the Great Plains of the Midwestern United States. The state's capital is Lincoln and its largest city is Omaha.<br />The state is bordered by South Dakota to the north; Iowa to the east and Missouri to the southeast, across the Missouri River; Kansas to the south; Colorado to the southwest; and Wyoming to the west.<br />History<br />Native American tribes in Nebraska have included the Omaha, Missouria, Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, and various branches of the Sioux.<br />Long before the Lewis and Clark Expedition, French-Canadian explorers traversed the territory of Nebraska, including the Mallet brothers in 1739, on their way to trade in Santa Fe.[4] European-American settlement did not begin in any number until after 1848 and the California Gold Rush. On May 30, 1854, the Kansas-Nebraska Act created the Kansas Territory and the Nebraska Territory, divided by the Parallel 40° north. The territorial capital of Nebraska was Omaha.<br />Climate<br />Two major climates are represented in Nebraska: the eastern half of the state has a humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification Dfa), and the western half of the state has a semi-arid climate (Koppen BSk). The entire state experiences wide seasonal variations in temperature and precipitation. Average temperatures are fairly uniform across Nebraska with hot summers and generally cold winters. Humidity also decreases significantly from east to west. Snowfall across the state is fairly even, with most of Nebraska receiving between 25 and 35 inches (65 to 90 cm) of snow annually.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />Arbor Day was found by J. Sterling Morton. The National Arbor Day Foundation Has Its headquarters near historical home in Nebraska City. <br />The swing in the Hebron, Nebraska city park at 5th and Jefferson streets is Claim to Be the world's largest porch swing, long enough to fit 18 adults or 24 Children.<br />Nebraska Huskers. Football Influences Many of Nebraska's residents. During home football games, memorial Stadium in Lincoln, with a Capacity of 85.500, becomes larger than Nebraska's third-largest city.<br />Job's Daughters was founded in Omaha in 1920 by Ethel T. Wead Mick. There are now bethels in Canada, Australia, Brazil, and Philippines. <br />Job's Daughters International is a Masonic sponsored youth organization for girls and young women aged 10 to 20. The organization is commonly referred to as simply Job's Daughters, and sometimes abbreviated as JDI (or IOJD, referring to its longtime former name). Job's Daughters focuses on the Holy Bible but celebrates and welcomes many religions and cultures.<br />Religion<br />The religious affiliations of the people of Nebraska are:<br />Christian – 90% <br />Protestant – 61% <br />Lutheran – 16% <br />Methodist – 11% <br />Baptist – 9% <br />Presbyterian – 4% <br />Other Protestant – 21% <br />Roman Catholic – 28% <br />Other Christian – 1% <br />Non-religious – 9% <br />Other religions – 1% <br />The largest single denominations by number of adherents in 2000 were the Catholic Church (372,791), the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (128,570), the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (117,419) and the United Methodist Church (117,277).<br />Spoken Language<br />Nebraska English, except for a slight South Midland influence in the southwest and some Northern influence from Wisconsin and New York settlers in the Platte River Valley, is almost pure North Midland.<br />Population<br />The estimation of the population in Nebraska in the year 2009 is 1,796,619.<br />317754078105Most important Places<br /> " The Orpheum Theater" , Omaha, Nebraska.<br />3502660212725<br />Location<br />Iowa, bordering the states of Minnesota and the north, western Nebraska, South Dakota to the northwest, with Missouri in the south, to the northeast Wisconsin and Illinois to the east. The Mississippi River forms the eastern border of the state, and the Missouri River west. Iowa has 99 counties. The state capital, Des Moines, is located in Polk County.<br />History<br />The United States won Iowa as part of the Louisiana purchase in 1803. The Patowatamie, Oto and Missouri, had sold their land to the federal government before 1830 and in June 1833 Iowa Official colonization by the United States began. Most of the early settlers came from Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Indiana, Kentucky and Virginia. <br />Climate<br />Iowa, like most of the Midwest region has a humid continental climate throughout the state with extremes of both heat and cold. The average annual temperature in Des Moines is 10 ° C, for some positions in the north is below 8 ° C, on the Mississippi River, averages 12 ° C.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />The “arts” include creative activities such as graphic art, music and literature. The “culture” of Iowa includes the beliefs, customs and behaviors of different groups of people who live in the state. These two ideas (Arts and Culture) work together. The arts are a way to represent the diverse cultural traditions.<br />Performances of plays and dances, concerts and movies make up the arts. Books and Native American talk stories are part of the arts too.<br />Religion<br />The percentage of population of Iowa for religious affiliation is:<br />Christianity - 86%<br />Protestant - 62%<br />Lutheran - 17%<br />Methodist - 14%<br />Baptist Church - 5%<br />Presbyterian - 3%<br />Other affiliations Protestant - 23%<br />Roman Catholic Church - 23%<br />Spoken Language<br />English is the most common language used in Iowa, it is used by 94% of the population.<br />After English, Spanish is the second-most-common language spoken in Iowa. The third-most-common language is German, spoken by 17,000 people.<br />Population<br />As of 2008, Iowa has an estimated population of 3,002,555. Iowa is the 30th most populated state in the country.<br />Most important Places <br />46291595885<br />“Grotto of the Redemption, Iowa”.<br />510540137795<br /> <br />“Battle Hill Museum of Natural History, Iowa”<br />Location<br />571533655The Northeastern border of Illinois is Lake Michigan. Its eastern border with Indiana is the Wabash River and a north-south line above Post Vincennes, 87°31’30” west longitude. Its northern border with Wisconsin is fixed at 42°30' north latitude. Its western border with Missouri and Iowa is the Mississippi River. Its southern border is with Kentucky and runs along the northern shoreline of the Ohio River. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan.<br />History<br />The history of Illinois may be defined by several broad historical periods, namely, the Pre-Columbian period, the Era of European Exploration and Colonization, its development as part of the American frontier, and finally, its growth into one of the most populous and economically powerful states of the United States.<br />On December 3, 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. Early U.S. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents.<br />Climate<br />The climate of Illinois is continental, in that four different stations are distinguished, with hot summers and cold winters. Nevertheless, the atmospheric time changes enough of station to station. The time in Illinois is relatively unstable, and can change suddenly, specially in winter.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />The game-day traditions series marches on with Illinois. Although Illini football has struggled to sustain success the past few decades, the history and tradition in Champaign is easy to see. Memorial Stadium remains one of college football's great relics, and the recent renovation has preserved the history there.<br />Religion<br />Catholics and Protestants are the largest religious groups in Illinois. Roman Catholics, who are heavily concentrated in and around Chicago, account for around 30% of the population.<br />Spoken Language<br />The Miami-Illinois language is a Native American Algonquian language formerly spoken in the United States, primarily in Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, western Ohio and adjacent areas along the Mississippi River by the tribes of the Inoca or Illinois Confederacy. Since the 1990s the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma has worked to revive it in a joint project with Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.<br />Population<br />As of 2008, Illinois has an estimated population of 12,901,563, which is an increase of 75,754 from the prior year and an increase of 481,903 or 3.9%, since the year 2000.<br />Most important Places and Dates<br />403479017780The state of the art Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield is the largest presidential library in the country; numerous museums in the city of Chicago are considered some of the best in the world.<br />Because of its large population, Chicago is the focus of most professional sports in Illinois, though St. Louis sports teams and Indianapolis sports teams are also supported in areas of the state in closer proximity to those cities.<br />The Illinois state parks' system began in 1908 with what is now Fort Massac State Park, becoming the first park in a system encompassing over 60 parks and about the same number of recreational and wildlife areas.<br />13011159525<br /> <br /> <br /> Fort Massac State Park<br />358711569850<br />Location<br />The state is bordered on the north by Michigan, on the east by Ohio and on the west by Illinois. The Ohio River separates Indiana from Kentucky on the southern border. Indiana is one of eight states that make up the Great Lakes region.<br />History<br />The first people to live in what is now Indiana were the Paleo-Indians, ingressing about 8000 BC after the melting of the glaciers at the conclusion of the Ice Age.<br />Climate<br />Indiana has a humid continental climate, with cool winters and warm, irriguous summers. The extreme southern portion of the state is within the humid subtropical climate area and receives more precipitation than other parts of Indiana.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />Namaskar or Namaste is the most popular form of greeting in India. It is a general salutation that is used to greet or welcome somebody and also for bidding farewell.<br />Tilak (Tika) is a ritual mark on the forehead. It can be put in many forms as a sign of blessing, greeting.<br />Aarti is performed as an act of veneration and love.<br />Religion<br />Although the largest single religious denomination in the state is Roman Catholic (836,009 members), most of the population are members of various Protestant denominations.<br />Spoken Language<br />The German of Pennsylvania is a variant of the German, spoken for approximately 225.000 you present in North America (more specifically, in the Canadian province of Ontario and in the conditions of Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania).<br />Population<br />As of 2008, there were an estimated 6,376,792 people residing in the state. The population density was 169.5 persons per square mile. The racial makeup of the state was 88.0% White, 9.1% African American, 1.4% Asian, 1.2% from a biracial or multiracial background and 0.3% Native American. Hispanic or Latino of any race made up 5.2% of the population.<br />435864050165Most important Places<br />St. Meinrad Archabbey, located in the town of St. Meinrad in northeastern Spencer County, Indiana, is one of only two Archabbeys in the United States and one of 11 in the world.<br />-22860149860<br /> <br />Lucas Oil Stadium<br />The Lucas Oil Stadium replaces the now demolished RCA Dome as the home of the Indiapolis Colts NFL team. <br />3853815120015<br />Conseco Fieldhouse<br />The Conseco Fieldhouse, also located in downtown Indianapolis, is the home of the Indianapolis Pacers NBA team. Aside from basketball, the stadium hosts big-ticket concerts (such as Metallica) and trade shows. <br />-2286011430 <br />Indiana Dunes State Park <br />The Dunes are a top vacation spot due to the natural beauty of the area and the close proximity to Lake Michigan.<br />742950184150<br /> Brown County State Park<br />Brown County is Indiana's largest state park, featuring numerous trails for people of all hiking ability, beautiful fall colors, and historic covered bridges.<br /> <br />Location<br />571543180<br />A state that joined the Union in 1803 as its 17 th member, Ohio, which in Iroquoian means 'great water', is seen on the Ohio State map towards the eastern side of the United States. With a total area of 107,044 sq km, Ohio is one of the smallest states towards the west of Appalachian mountains. In addition, the state controls around 3,457 sq km of Lake Erie, which borders the state in the north.<br />History<br />The first European explorers to explore the region were the French. Until 1763, the Ohio region was part of the French colony of New France, from then British control. With the independence of the United States in 1783, the United States came to control the region. Ohio became the first territory of the Northwest Territories to be elevated to statehood, and the 17th to enter the Union on March 1, 1803.<br />Climate<br />Ohio's climate is temperate, which are four distinct seasons with warm summers and cold winters. However, the weather varies greatly from season to season. The weather in Ohio is relatively unstable, and can change suddenly, especially in winter. The main reason for this instability is the absence of geographical barriers in the state and its vicinity, allowing the rapid movement of air currents coming from any direction.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />New Year Traditions in Ohio involve many age-old traditions and practices. In Cleveland, Ohio, the socialists organized a big New Year's Eve celebration speeches, poems, musical violin performances.<br />On the New Eve people attend festive parties; organize open houses and lit fireworks.<br />Religion<br />According to a Pew Forum poll, as of 2008, 76% of Ohioans identified as Christian. Specifically, 26% of Ohio's population identified as Evangelical Protestant, 22% identified as Mainline Protestant, and 21% identified as Roman Catholic. In addition, 17% of the population is unaffiliated with any religious body.<br />Spoken Language<br />The German of Pennsylvania is a variant of the German, spoken for approximately 225.000 you present in North America (more specifically, in the Canadian province of Ontario and in the conditions of Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania).<br />Population<br />From just over 45,000 residents in 1800, Ohio's population grew at rates of over 10% per decade until the 5358765102235census of 1970, which recorded just over 10.65 million Ohioans.<br />Most important Places and Dates<br />The 708-foot tall Terminal Tower, pictured at right, is the best-known part of the Cleveland skyline and the city's number one landmark, although it is no longer the tallest building downtown.<br />-381069850<br />Squire's Castle, located in the Chagrin Reservation of the Cleveland Metroparks , was intended to be merely the servant's residence for an elaborate, sprawling mansion on over 500 acres of land that was never built. <br />1276350378460<br />Little Italy Altta House was established by John D. Rockefeller in 1900 and named after his daughter, Alta Rockefeller.<br />-3810253365<br />The Barton Center opened in 1964.<br />3663315250190<br />Location<br />Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north; Missouri on the east; Oklahoma on the south; and Colorado on the west. The state is divided into 105 counties with 628 cities, and is located equidistant from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The geographic center of the 48 contiguous states is located in Smith County near Lebanon.<br />History<br />The region that now constitutes the state of Kansas was inhabited by four American Indian tribes, prior to the arrival of the first European explorers in the region: the Kansa (hence the origin of the name of state), the Osage, Pawnee and the Wichita who lived by hunting buffalo and corn and soybeans.<br />On January 29, 1861, after the secession of 11 southern states of the Union U.S. (which formed the Confederate States of America), Kansas became the 34th U.S. state.<br />Climate<br />Kansas has a temperate climate with cold winters and hot summers. In general, the average temperature decreases as the state in which one travels northward. In summer, temperatures also decrease as it was traveling westbound. However, these temperature differences are not very large.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />People of Kansas welcome the New Year with parties, fun, lights, foods and fireworks. New Year decorations are put up everywhere, right from shops, streets and houses.<br />New Year Traditions in Kansas include customs that dates back to good old times. Having black-eyed peas on the New Year lunch or dinner has been a popular tradition. <br />Religion<br />Percentage of the population of Kansas by religious affiliation:<br />Christianity - 82%<br />Protestant - 60%<br />Methodist - 14%<br />Baptism - 14%<br />Lutheran - 4%<br />Presbyterian - 3%<br />Other affiliations Protestant - 25%<br />Spoken Language<br />The official language in Kansas is English.<br />Population<br />The national census of 2000, the Office of the United States Census, the population of Kansas set at 2,688,418 inhabitants, an increase of 8.1% compared to the state's population in 1990 of 2,485,600 inhabitants. An estimate made in 2005 estimated the population of the state in 2,744,687 inhabitants, a growth of 10.4% compared to the state's population in 1990 of 2.1% compared to the population in 2000, and 0.4% in relation to the state's population in 2004.<br />3253740250190Most important Places <br />567690370205<br /> “Don Kracht Castle Island”<br />571553340<br /> “Kansas Underground Salt Museum”<br /> (Hutchinson, Kansas)<br />Museum transports visitors 65 stories below ground to tour vast salt galleries.<br />Location<br />-2286029210.<br />Michigan borders in the northern part on the Lake Superior, in the east on the Lake Hurón, in the south on the states of Indiana and Ohio, and in the west on the Lake Michigan. The Canadian province of Ontario is located in the north, in the east and in the extreme south of Michigan, the states of Wisconsin and Illinois are located in the west and Minnesota is in the northwest of Michigan. Detroit, located to the north of Windsor's Canadian city, is the only great American city located to the north of a great Canadian city.<br />History<br />His name comes from the lake Michigan, which name is an adjustment to the Frenchman of the term mishigani from the ojibwe, whose meaning is " great " or lake " great water " . Michigan was colonized initially by the Frenchmen. The French settling of the region nevertheless was limited. France yielded Michigan to the United Kingdom in 1764. In 1783, after the end of the War of the Independence of the United States, Michigan happened to form a part of The United States, turning partly of the Territory of the Northwest into 1787, one independent territory into 1805, and raised up to the category of condition on January 26, 1837, since 26 ° American condition in entering the Union.<br />Climate<br />Michigan possesses a moderate humid climate (Köppen Dfa's climatic classification), with four definite well stations. The summers of the condition are soft due to the presence of big masses of water in the region, whereas the winters are cold. The temperature descends as one travels towards the north.<br />During the winter, the everage temperature in the south region of Michigan is of-6 °C. In summer, the everage temperature is of 22 °C in the south end, of 20 °C in the central region and of 18 °C in the Top Peninsula. The rate of average annual rainfall of rain of Michigan is 80 centimeters, changing between 95 centimeters per year in the Top Peninsula and in the extreme southwest of the condition, up to 68 centimeters in the north-east of the condition. The rates of average annual rainfall of snow change between 100 centimeters in the south to more than 400 centimeters in the north of the condition.<br />Customs and Traditions<br />Midsummer<br />Solstice occurs twice a year: once when the sun's elliptic reaches its extreme northern latitude and again when it reaches its extreme southern latitude. In the northern hemisphere, solstices occur around June 21 and December 22 and are called midsummer and midwinter.<br />4282440179705Low-Riders<br />The low-rider culture is one of several subcultures focused on the modification of automobiles. The low rider is a car defined by a low, sleek, luxuriuos look that contrasts sharply with the spartan look of the street rod. The raw material is commonly an American muscle car of the 1960s, especially the Chevrolet Impala.<br />Homecomings<br />Homecoming celebrations in schools, churches, and communities are a way for current and former students, members, and residents to celebrate their affiliations with each other and certain places and activities. Homecomings are a time for people to participate in traditional activities that create a sense of identity. Each time they participate in a homecoming celebration, the sense of belonging is renewed.<br />Pigeon Racing<br />2476562865More than 700 people in Michigan practice the traditional sport of raising and racing pigeons. To compete with each other, pigeon flyers belong to a local pigeon racing club and the national American Pigeon Racing Union. Although associated with Belgians, who probably introduced the sport to the Detroit area, pigeon racing also attracts other ethnic groups including Poles, Italians, Germans, and others.<br />Religion<br />The largest denomination by number of adherents, according to a survey in the year 2000, was the Roman Catholic Church with 2,019,926 parishioners. The largest Protestant denominations were the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod with 244,231 adherents; followed by the United Methodist Church with 222,269; and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America with 160,836 adherents. In the same survey, Jewish adherents in the state of Michigan were estimated at 110,000, and Muslims at 80,515.<br />Spoken Language<br />Michigan is one of the states in the USA without official English; there are others spoken languages in this state such as Arabic, German and Polish. However, English is the most common between citizens.<br />Population<br />Michigan had 9,969,727 residents in 2009 according to new population estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau on December 23 2009. This represents an increase of 31,000 since the 2000 census but a decrease of 33,000 from 2008. Michigan remains the nation's eighth largest state.<br />4311015407035Most important Places and Dates<br />2139315412754381541275 Journey to Old Mackinac “Cranbrook Educational Community” Highland Park Ford Plant<br /> Point Lighthouse <br />91440290830<br />MAY 17th, 1673<br />Jesuit missionary Jacques Marquette, fur trader Louis Jolliet and five voyageurs leave the recently established Indian mission at St. Ignace to explore a great river known by the Indians as the " Messissipi." <br />JANUARY 26th, 1837<br />In Washington, D.C., President Andrew Jackson signs the bill making Michigan the nation's 26th state.<br />Michigan celebrates its 150th anniversary of statehood. The day's festivities begin in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan's oldest continuous settlement, with a 26-gun salute and a bitter-cold dogsled ride. In Lansing, the official Michigan Statehood Stamp is issued. At noon, ceremonies are held in the State Capitol and in every county in the state. Despite economic setbacks during the late 1970s and early 1980s, Michigan has rebounded. Michigan—with more than nine million people—ranks twelfth in population among the fifty states.<br />CONCLUSION<br />The Midwestern United States (in the U.S. generally referred to as the Midwest) is one of the four geographic regions within the United States of America used by the United States Census Bureau in its reporting.<br />The region consists of twelve states in the north-central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio and Wisconsin.<br />A 2006 Census Bureau estimate put the population at 66,217,736. Both the geographic center of the contiguous U.S. and the population center of the U.S. are in the Midwest. The United States Census Bureau divides this region into the East North Central States (essentially the Great Lakes States) and the West North Central States.<br />This work is very useful for our future because we learned more about the different states of The United States of America.<br />In this work we compile descriptive information about the states located in the Midwest region, to know more about the culture of other places.<br />We investigate different aspects as culture and traditions, important places, events, location, and more, if some day we need to go to these places we will have the necessary information and previous knowledge about them.<br />It’s important to know other places, for example if we need to do a work, study, or only a visit travel, we will have the needed information to go to these places.<br />BIBLIOGRAPHY<br />MARTINELLI, María Teresa. Inglés nivel medio. 2ª edición. Puebla, México: Instituto de Inglés, 2006, 188p.<br />http://www.city-data.com/states/-Languages.html<br />http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnesota<br />http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/folkpatterns/Michtraditions/<br />Brill, Marlene Targ (2005). Indiana. Marshall Cavendish. ISBN 0761420207<br />http://www.michigan.gov/<br />http://www.vuelaviajes.com/lugares-que-visitar-en-michigan/<br />www2.illinois.gov/<br />http://www.yhchang.com/DAKOTA.html<br />http://www.nebraska.gov/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois<br />www.wisconsin.gov/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisconsin<br />http://www.in.gov/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iowa<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio<br />http://ohio.gov/<br />http://consumer.discoverohio.com/<br />http://www.kansas.com/<br />

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