Mississippi

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Mississippi

  1. 1. Mississippi
  2. 2. Mississippi, constituent state of the United States of America. Its name derives from a Native American word meaning “great waters” or “father of waters.” Mississippi became the 20th state of the union in 1817. Jackson is the state capital.
  3. 3. Mississippi is smaller than most of the U.S. states and is bounded on the north by Tennessee, on the east by Alabama, on the south by Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico, and on the west by Louisiana and Arkansas. Mississippi is naturally well suited to agriculture; its soil is rich and deep, and its landscape is laced with many rivers. Until the mid- 20th century the dominance of a rural, unhurried lifestyle generally worked to the state’s advantage. This way of life was manifest in part in a culture of gentility, the legacy of which is still evident in the many historic mansions located in such old towns as Columbus, Biloxi, Natchez, Vicksburg, and Holly Springs.
  4. 4. With increasing urbanization and industrialization, however, the leisurely approach to life in many ways became a hindrance to Mississippi’s economic and social development. For decades an unusually large dependent population, a predominantly agricultural economy, and a prevailing resistance to change have kept Mississippi’s per capita income low and created an inadequate standard of living for many families. Moreover, the state has been the site of intense interracial conflict, sitting centre stage during the civil rights movement of the mid- 20th century. In the early 21st century roughly half of all Mississippians still lived in rural areas—though not necessarily on farms—and the state continued to rank low in many economic indexes. Area 47,692 square miles (123,522 square km). Population (2010) 2,967,297; (2012 est.) 2,984,926.
  5. 5. LandLand Mississippi is a low-lying state, its highest point reaching only about 800 feet (240 metres) above sea level. Except for its hilly northeast corner, Mississippi lies entirely within the eastern gulf segment of the broader Coastal Plain physiographic region. It has generally low topographic elevations and extensive tracts of marshy land. Its major soil areas encompass hills, plains, prairies, river lowlands, and pine woods.
  6. 6. Relief and soils In the northwestern part of the state, the great fertile crescent called the Delta is the old floodplain of the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers, comprising some 6,250 square miles (16,200 square km) of black alluvial soil several feet deep. Once subject to disastrous floods, the land is now protected by levee and reservoir systems. On the eastern rim of the Delta are the loess bluffs, marking the beginning of the highlands. On the Delta’s western rim a highly fertile band of lowlands parallels the Mississippi River from Vicksburg, south to the Louisiana border. A brown loam belt of varying width extends from Tennessee to Louisiana. Most of southern Mississippi lies in the gently rolling Piney Woods. The coastal area, sometimes called the Coastal Meadows, or Terrace, borders the Gulf of Mexico. This region’s soil is sandy and not well suited to crops.....
  7. 7. DrainageDrainage Mississippi has many rivers, creeks, bayous, and other natural drainage networks. The state’s principal river systems include the Tombigbee, now joined with the Tennessee to form the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, which links the Tennessee River with the Gulf of Mexico; the Pascagoula in the southeast; the Pearl in the south-central section; and the Mississippi and its tributaries, notably the Yazoo and the Big Black, in the west. These streams all empty into the gulf, either directly or through the Mississippi and other rivers.
  8. 8. ClimateClimate Mississippi’s location endows it with a favourable climate for agriculture. The growing season is long (virtually year-round on the coast), precipitation is abundant, and extreme temperatures are unusual. Summers are warm, with daily temperatures typically rising from the upper 60s F (about 20 °C) into the low 90s F (about 33 °C) in July and August. Autumn’s bright, crisp days have the least precipitation and are considered by many to be the most agreeable of the year. Daily temperatures in January generally range from the low 30s F (about 0 °C) to the mid-50s F (about 12 °C). Snowfall is rare but does occur. The state’s annual precipitation averages more than 50 inches (1,270 mm), varying by region. The coastal area is subject to tropical cyclones (hurricanes) from June to October; in 2005 the cities of Gulfport and Biloxi were heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina, one of the strongest Atlantic storms on record.
  9. 9. Population compositionPopulation composition People of white European ancestry—primarily British, Irish, or northern European—account for about three-fifths of Mississippi’s residents, while African Americans make up nearly all of the remainder. Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans each constitute just a tiny fraction of the population, with Hispanics being the largest of the three groups. The vast majority of Mississippians were born in- state, although in the late 20th century there was a wave of immigrants, mainly from Vietnam and India.
  10. 10. Until about 1940, people of African descent constituted the majority of Mississippi’s population. By the late 20th century, however, they had become a minority (albeit a large one), owing primarily to a very high rate of out-migration. Nevertheless, in the early 21st century Mississippi had a greater percentage of African American residents than did any other state. The small Chinese population, concentrated mostly in the Delta, is descended from farm labourers brought there from California in the 1870s. The Chinese did not adjust well to the Mississippi plantation system, however, and most of them became small merchants. Many of the Southeast Asian immigrants of the late 20th century were attracted by the state’s coastal fishing industry. Much of the Native American population lives in the central section of the state. The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the state’s only federally recognized Native American group, has reservation lands in the vicinity of Jackson.......
  11. 11. Resources: http://www.sartainsheritage.com Article source: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/385567/Mississippi

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