3.2 analysis

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3.2 analysis

  1. 1. CALIBAN: Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custom with him, I'th’ afternoon to sleep. There thou mayst brain him, Having first seized his books, or with a log, Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,(90) Or cut his wezand with thy knife. Remember First to possess his books, for without them He's but a sot, as I am, nor hath not One spirit to command—they all do hate him As rootedly as I. Burn but his books.(95) He has brave utensils, for so he calls them, Which when he has a house, he'll deck withal. And that most deeply to consider is The beauty of his daughter. He himself Calls her a nonpareil. I never saw a woman,(100) But only Sycorax my dam and she; But she as far surpassethSycorax As great'st does least. STEPH: Is it so brave as lass? CALIBAN: Ay, lord; she will become thy bed, I warrant.(105) And bring thee forth brave brood. Pick out the violent verbs that Caliban uses here. What does it suggest he feels about Prospero? What does Caliban promise Stephano as a reward for killing Prospero? What does this make you feel about Caliban? What does this suggest about the status of women? What do you think Caliban plans to do with Prospero’s books? Why is Ariel present in this scene? What does she make the audience aware of? What does this scene tell the audience about power?

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