The World Bank's global practices and climate change cross cutting solutions

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  • 1. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 1 May 9, 2014. GLOBAL PRACTICES AND CLIMATE CHANGE CROSS CUTTING SOLUTIONS AREA ONE-PAGERS
  • 2. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 2 EndingPoverty&FeedingaGrowingPopulation • 75% of the world’s poor live in rural areas, most are involved in farming. • Food production must increase by at least 50% to feed 9 billion people by 2050. • Ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity cannot be achieved without more and better investment in agriculture, food security, and nutrition. Tackling Climate Change • Agriculture is vulnerable to climate change and it is, with associated deforestation, the largest contributor to greenhouse gases. • Agriculture can also help to stop a 4°C warmer world – it is the only sector that can suck car- bon out of the atmosphere. • Climate Smart Agriculture has the potential to deliver a “triple win” of increased productivi- ty, enhanced resilience, and lower emissions Global Engagements • The Global Agriculture and Food Security Pro- gram (GAFSP) supports country-led agriculture and food security plans and helps to promote invest- ments, especially for smallholder farmers (approx. $1.3 billion pledged over three years). • The Global Climate Smart Agriculture Alliance promotes the application of scientific solutions, information and policies conducive to increased and sustainable agricultural production, while increasing resilience, reducing emissions, and capturing car- bon. • The Global Food Safety Partnership is delivering a five-year program for training and capacity develop- ment, supported by both public and private sources. • The Consultative Group on International Agricul- tural Research (CGIAR) is dedicated to reducing rural poverty, increasing food security, improving human health and nutrition, and ensuring more sus- tainable management of natural resources (approx. $1 billion per year).. The World Bank Group’s Role • The WBG is by far the largest provider of development finance for agriculture glob- ally. Other MDBs have largely moved out of agriculture and UN technical agencies don’t have the means to finance transfor- mational change. • As a multilateral, multisectoral institution, the WBG is uniquely positioned to support farm-to-fork integrated landscape solu- tions with IBRD/IDA’s policy, productivity, smallholder focus and IFC’s support for the agribusiness sector. • The WBG can help increase agricultural productivity and farm income, especially for smallholders and women producers, through sustainable landscapes approach- es and transformational engagements such as Climate Smart Agriculture. • The WGB can help link farmers to markets to increase food availability and stimu- late general economic growth by using a value-chain approach including on-farm inputs, land, water, financial services and post-harvest/agro-processing. • The WBG can work with governments to: reduce risks and increase resilience through more effective (and gender-sensi- tive) policies that achieve better food and nutrition security; promote responsible agricultural investment and new risk man- agement tools; reduce post-harvest losses; and improve human health by reducing zoonotic diseases and improving food safety. AGRICULTURE GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 3. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 3 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $1.883B 324 $1.874B 38 $50.38M 210 $6.471B 110 Supervision Supervision $13.797B 256 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $255M $13M $19M $27M $30M $1,531M $2,672M $1,442M $275M $1,059M $86M $926M $10M $4,525M $1,309M $550M $2,212M $137M $5,062M $3M $561M $52M $31M $52M $34M $1,093M $59M $16M $4M $6M $2M $2M $5M $15M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 62 27 26 15 5 19 54 10 3 4 2 3 16 137 23 20 31 13 53 47 101 32 22 42 11 47 1 47 21 8 17 4 12 1 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU ECA 25 161 61.2% % AFR 78 EAP 27 SAR 45 SDN 52 263 ECA 10 3.8% EAP 16 6.1% AFR 42 16.0% LCR 29 HQ Based Count CO Based TotalTotal Regions Anchors and Other Ops LCR 8 3.0% 4 1.5%MNA MNA 7 102 263 SAR 21 8.0% 38.8% 100.0% GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC GPP GP 1 31 133 43 11 1 5 23 1 1 8 Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Global Distribution Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 69 32 161
  • 4. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 4 Education is a powerful driver of development and one of the strongest instruments for reducing poverty, raising incomes, promoting economic growth and shared prosperity, and for improving health, gender equality, peace, and stability. It is also central to the devel- opment strategies of all WBG clients. With 57 million children not in school today and 250 million more not acquiring basic skills neces- sary for work and life, ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity depend on more and better investments in quality educa- tion and learning. The WBG is a global leader in education, es- pecially in building evidence for a systems ap- proach to education reforms and investments, a position it can retain into the foreseeable future. WBG clients and development partners view the WBG as a source of cutting-edge knowledge, a convener of critical dialogue, and a financier of innovative operations. Qual- ity education and learning also align the WBG with the post-2015 education agenda. Being visible in education makes the WBG a credible champion of its twin goals. The WBG’s work in education, guided by the Education Global Practice’s strategy, Learning for All, helps meet these goals by building more rele- vant skills for productivity and employment, better health and more education for future generations, and better citizenship and stew- ardship of natural resources. The Education Global Practice helps clients achieve Learning for All through financing, knowledge services, and strategic partnerships designed to enable children to learn and create the human capital to reduce poverty, accelerate growth, and boost shared prosperity. At the country level, the Education Global Practice is supporting a systemic, equitable, and inclusive approach to education reform across all levels of schooling, from early childhood education to work- force training and tertiary education; as well as across all contexts, from fragile settings to high-in- come economies. It is also promoting innovative solutions to improve the delivery of education services, including through learning measurement, multisectoral approaches, and public-private partnerships. At the global level, the mandate of the Education Global Practice is: • Building effective education systems, including through SABER (the Systems Approach for Better Education Results). • Creating and deploying global knowledge, including through EdStats, learning assessment, STEP (Skills Toward Employment and Productiv- ity) Measurement, Impact Evaluation (including the Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund, SIEF), the Simulation for Equity in Education (SEE), and the Out-of-School Children Initiative. • Developing the capacity to deliver, including through ESDP (Education Staff Development Program) and strategic partnerships including multilateral, bilateral, and CSOs. For example, the Global Partnership for Education, UK, Austra- lia, and Russia, the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation, Arab World Initiative, Building Evi- dence in Education (BE2), IWGE, Early Childhood Consultative Group, Global Compact on Learning Donor Network, Inter-Agency Network for Educa- tion in Emergencies, Learning Metrics Task Force, and UN agencies (UNESCO, UNICEF). EDUCATION GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 5. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 5 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $2.345B $2.903B 33 $146.91M 298 $5.802B 68 Supervision Supervision Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $228M $178M $75M $57M $59M $2,307M $1,478M $415M $961M $1,176M $148M $1,623M $2,644M $1,276M $315M $1,952M $519M $3,791M $1M $1,235M $264M $17M $97M $45M $472M $215M $25M $60M $16M $7M $12M $3M $25M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 72 39 39 46 18 26 58 4 6 3 3 4 13 106 44 24 31 14 32 34 53 22 16 30 15 27 1 24 8 12 11 4 9 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 171 61.3% % ECA 15 5.4% EAP 30 10.8% AFR 23 8.2% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other Ops Total LCR 10 3.6% 7 2.5%MNA 108 279 SAR 21 7.5% 38.7% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR HDN SDN 62 43 33 38 16 44 42 1 279 164 $10.498B 285 GPGI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 24 115 73 20 10 24 1 12 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 81 24 171
  • 6. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 6 Providing reliable electricity to the un- served and inadequately-served people of the world is central to efforts to eradicate extreme poverty and create shared pros- perity. • Poverty Reduction: Energy is a key input to economic growth needed to end ex- treme poverty, while extractives generate substantial revenues for poverty reduc- tion and socio-economic development. • Shared Prosperity: Universal access to affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy is key for ensuring economic op- portunity and prosperity. The extractives sector, if managed well, can boost shared prosperity through co-development of infrastructure, local economic develop- ment, skills, and jobs. • Sustainability and Climate Change: An environmentally and socially responsible approach to energy and extractives is critical to attain sustainability objectives. The energy sector contributes about 40% of global CO2 emissions, making the transition to a more sustainable energy mix critical for climate change mitigation. World Bank Group energy teams play a critical role in this process. • Sustainable Energy for All: The WBG’s co-leadership (with the UN) of the Sus- tainable Energy for All Initiative leverages support for clients to achieve their 2030 goals: • Universal access to modern energy services. • Double the rate of improvement in energy efficiency. • Double the share of renewable energy in the global mix. The Energy & Extractives GP delivers com- prehensive energy and extractive industry solutions . Energy: Financing program of around $7 billion per year, complemented by Climate In- vestment Fund operations, a sizable Technical Assistance program, and a strong track record of One WBG engagements with MIGA and IFC to scale-up and leverage greater resources. Energy priorities are: • Achieving universal access to reliable modern energy: generation, transmission, electrifica- tion, clean cooking solutions. • Shifting energy systems to a more sustain- able path: renewable energy, natural gas, energy efficiency. • Improving the investment climate for energy: sector reform and governance, strengthening utilities, enhancing investment framework and encouraging private sector participation, rationalizing subsidies. Extractives: Technical Assistance lending, advisory services, IFC investments and partner- ship programs to pave the way for transparent, responsible and productive development of extractives industries. Extractives priorities are: • Enhancing sustainability, transparency in revenue management, inclusive job creation and growth opportunities, and addressing resource-related conflicts. • Supporting the extractive industry through investments/interventions by IFC and MIGA such as early equity in mining and oil and gas companies in fragile states, promoting domestic companies and developing trans- formational projects. • Knowledge sharing and exercising a con- vening role with a view to promoting a best practice approach to sustainability. ENERGY & EXTRACTIVES GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 7. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 7 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.703B 579 $0.797B 35 $104.88M 462 $13.752B 180 Supervision Supervision $31.916B Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $152M $15M $82M $16M $26M $505M $3,899M $2,332M $2,707M $536M $1,090M $3,188M $12,640M $4,898M $3,476M $1,273M $2,969M $6,661M $238M $162M $26M $47M $33M $157M $39M $33M $15M $11M $4M $8M $3M $30M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 139 59 60 38 36 28 102 9 4 6 1 3 12 184 135 59 52 42 61 46 140 70 48 37 28 31 65 35 25 19 8 28 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 235 75.6% % ECA 12 3.9% EAP 18 5.8% AFR 23 7.4% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other... LCR 4 1.3% 4 1.3%MNA 76 311 SAR 15 4.8% 24.4% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based IFC HQ Appointed & Based Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR SDN 66 37 38 18 15 33 103 310 354 GPP GP GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 44 1 10121 67 8 14 9 22 3 2 8 IFC Staff by VPU 1 1IVP Total IFC Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 54 1 22 234
  • 8. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 8 Sustainable environment and natural resources management (ENRM) is at the heart of the WBG’s poverty agenda. Biodiversity and natural resources constitute the social safety net of the poor, representing a food bank and often their only source of livelihood. For example: 47% of the GDP of India’s rural poor comes from natural resources, while wild-capture fisheries constitute 40% of total animal protein intake for countries in West Africa and sustain over 3 million people. Sustainable ENRM promotes a green, clean, and resilient world where natural resources – from forests to fisheries, freshwater, oceans, and eco- systems – are managed to support livelihoods and strong economies. It shares prosperity by transferring wealth from downstream bene- ficiaries of ecosystem services to upstream communities who carry the opportunity costs of protecting nature. It reverses the grow- ing trend of urban areas becoming unlivable because of waste disposal problems and air, landscape, and water pollution that threaten human health and labor productivity. It builds good environmental governance supported by credible institutions, coherent policies, and the capacity to implement them. Sustainable ENRM builds a world better pre- pared for shocks and global challenges, helping countries limit their exposure to more-fre- quent natural disasters, more-volatile weather patterns, and the long-term consequences of climate change. It prevents ecological collapse and the large-scale descent into poverty and conflict that would follow. The Environment & Natural Resources Global Practice has three broad and dis- tinct functions: 1. Provides clients with lending and non-lending services aimed to support (i) sustainable natural resources manage- ment with focus on forests, fisheries, bio- diversity, watersheds, coastal areas, and oceans; (ii) pollution management; and (iii) environment, natural resources manage- ment, and climate change policy reforms. 2. Works closely with other sectors, including by leveraging GEF grant financing, to main- stream environmental considerations into their policies, strategies, and operations and address policy, governance, and infra- structure failures that lead to boom and bust economies. 3. Provides technical input to other sectors to implement the Bank’s environmental (safeguard) policies and ensure develop- ment interventions do no harm. Global Engagement • The Pollution Management and Environmen- tal Health Program targets communities and cities to improve the health of their vulnerable populations. • The Program on Forests supports catalytic in- vestments in forest governance, forest health and knowledge management to build strong local economies and deliver sustainable livelihoods. • The Global Partnership for Oceans drives growth through investments in ocean health. • The Wealth Accounting and Valuation of Eco- system Services Partnership supports natural capital accounting in countries to inform more sustainable decision-making. • The International Consortium for Combatting Wildlife Crime invests in credible institutions with the capacity to implement good policies. ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 9. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 9 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $1.045B 465 $0.538B 26 $121.42M 295 $3.348B 174 Supervision Supervision $6.806B 288 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $96M $4M $21M $85M $4M $197M $130M $820M $988M $388M $533M $403M $206M $9M $1,425M $2,061M $458M $1,916M $378M $536M $32M $300M $295M $47M $172M $54M $107M $70M $10M $25M $18M $4M $3M $14M $47M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 60 49 36 45 15 23 67 7 1 5 2 1 3 7 146 79 39 70 29 50 52 85 61 33 59 16 29 5 46 33 12 55 12 11 5 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU ECA 36 167 59.9% % AFR 59 EAP 44 SAR 42 SDN 37 279 ECA 16 5.7% EAP 30 10.80% AFR 21 16.0% LCR 46 HQ Based Count CO Based TotalTotal Regions Anchors and Other Ops LCR 14 5.0% 5 1.8%MNA MNA 15 112 279 SAR 22 7.9% 40.1% 100.0% GI GH GG GF GE GD GC UC GP1 27 135 65 9 10 24 9 Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Global Distribution Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 90 19 167
  • 10. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 10 Resilient, efficient, and transparent financial systems are essential to promoting a strong economy, ending extreme poverty, and building shared prosperity. By maintaining a healthy financial system, an economy can mobilize the capital it needs for investments in its develop- ment priorities – infrastructure, industry, and social services – and in its people. The following issues are of high importance: • For the 2.5 billion adults lacking access to a bank account, universal financial access through formal, regulated accounts offers them the ability to reduce their vulnerabilities to financial shocks and save for their future. • Millions of small enterprises need urgent ac- cess to credit, equity investment, and “angel financing” to expand their businesses and become more competitive. • Robust banking systems and capital markets are needed to ensure that capital flows effi- ciently toward its most productive uses, and that governments and firms can raise invest- ment capital. • Payment systems provide critical access to vital services and can reduce governments’ costs of delivering benefits and salaries. • Insurance helps prevent people from falling into poverty when they face catastrophic losses and insures them against unimaginable losses. • A transparent and well-governed global finan- cial system can better manage crises, main- tain cross-border cooperation, and curb illicit financial activities that can impede growth. The Finance & Markets Global Practice – an integrated World Bank Group practice– de- livers tailored development solutions with WBG financial, knowledge and convening services. The F&M GP implements compre- hensive solutions that integrate World Bank services (loans/credits, guarantees, and risk-management products) and IFC services (advisory services and investments in pri- vate-sector firms). For example: • In Colombia, programs are being devel- oped to fund infrastructure and housing needs, increase financial inclusion, and revamp financial oversight. In a joint IFC- Bank initiative, a Development Policy Loan is being prepared, as well as a Program- matic Approach to mobilize US$2 million in advisory services, including a “Deep Dive” for capital market development. • In the MENA region, a joint World Bank-IFC- CGAP MSME Facility is being implemented, providing timely support to countries such as Egypt and Jordan. • A G20-endorsed WBG initiative – the Finan- cial Inclusion Support Framework (FISF) – is being scaled up to help countries meet their financial inclusion targets. • Countries are receiving help to prevent vul- nerabilities and increase financial stability through Financial Sector Assessment Plans (delivered jointly with the IMF). Global Engagements • The Consultative Group to Assist the Poor is a global partnership to advance financial inclusion. • Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative supports in- ternational efforts to end safe havens for corrupt funds. FINANCE & MARKETS GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 11. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 11 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.245B 292 $0.563B 34 $2.240B 34 Supervision Supervision $8.032B 110 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $30M $23M $10M $500M $635M $540M $833M $77M $75M $70M $10M $2,328M $113M $3,397M $127M $1,502M $551M $15M $47M $26M $14M $5M $19M $8M $126M $16M $20M $12M $9M $10M $3M $114M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 110 67 84 85 63 38 313 5 3 1 25 71 34 35 27 37 10 78 29 6 26 5 13 12 19 8 3 7 2 3 2 9 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU IFC Staff by VPU 317 69.7% %AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR FPD IAL IAN IAP IBA IVP FPD SDN 31 30 27 13 13 14 7 11 29 33 35 1 205 1 LEG 5 339 116 ECA 29 6.4% EAP 52 11.40% AFR 20 4.4% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Total Total Regions IFC Anchors and Other... FACs LCR 7 1.5% 11 2.4%MNA 138 455 SAR 16 3.5% 30.3% 100.0% GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UA UC GPP GP 3 64 4 139 104 20 34 10 16 12 23 6 1 2 13 Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution 760 $184.52M Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 66 27 18 289 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based IFC HQ Appointed & Based IFC HQ Appointed & CO Based IFC CO Appointed & Based
  • 12. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 12 Sound governance and effective institu- tions are essential to achieve shared pros- perity and sustained reductions in pover- ty. A rapidly-growing body of analytic work demonstrates that there are clear linkages between good governance and the quality of health and education services, and that the poor often suffer disproportion- ately from lack of alternatives. Countries capable of controlling corruption are able to use their human and financial resources more efficiently, with fewer losses and distortions. They are able to attract higher levels of foreign and domestic investment and, on average, grow more rapidly. Recent years have brought some remark- able successes. In Minas Gerias, Brazil, for example, improvements in public man- agement resulted in a rise in elementary school reading levels from 65% to 89% between 2007 and 2012. In spite of these successes, clients still face significant challenges in building the systems and capacities required for effective delivery in diverse governance environments. In a recent survey, over half of 129 developing and transition countries failed to imple- ment most of their policies. Governments recognize their essential role in resolving the complex and interconnected chal- lenges in sectors such as health, social protection, education and security. They also recognize the need to build states capable of weathering financial, natural, or other disasters. The Governance Global Practice brings together professionals in procurement, financial management, taxation, public management, regulatory policy, trans- parency, digital governance, law and development, anticorruption, and social accountability to develop innovative, integrated solutions to pernicious institu- tional problems. The practice utilizes a problem-driven, diagnostic approach, combining global comparative knowledge of reform successes and failures with keen understanding of the institutional challenges and opportunities of developing countries. Specifically, the GGP provides support in: • Sustainable Public Resource Management by im- proving analytic and policy capacity in public finance; strengthening the composition, management and re- porting of public expenditure; and augmenting budget and accounting systems and procurement processes to ensure sustainable funding for public programs. • Effective Service Delivery and Policy Implementa- tion through strengthening both core agencies and line departments. The GGP seeks to improve public sector performance and effectiveness by supporting reforms in public management, human resource man- agement, performance monitoring, regulatory reform, ICT solutions and innovative delivery approaches, and other areas. • Open and Accountable Governments by facili- tating collaboration to foster social accountability and citizen-centric development. This workstream includes government transparency and responsive- ness, strengthening key accountability institutions (including parliaments and the judiciary), using mobile technologies to monitor performance and en- abling citizens to participate effectively in government decision-making. Global Engagements • Global Initiative for Fiscal Transparency • PEFA - Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability • Anti-corruption Authorities Portal • Global Forum on Law, Justice and Development • Sharing in Governance of Extractive Industries • Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative • Public Expenditure Management Peer-Assisted Learn- ing network GOVERNANCE GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 13. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 13 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $2.962B $0.942B 54 $178.41M 655 $2.146B 104 Supervision Supervision Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $253M $110M $239M $28M $3M $154M $155M $773M $10M $309M $658M $8M $389M $1M $1,326M $2,889M $687M $1,697M $806M $2,190M $0M $130M $98M $224M $35M $547M $1,900M $28M $32M $29M $36M $9M $16M $17M $39M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 193 68 125 66 53 54 96 9 8 15 4 1 4 13 105 79 96 66 33 56 56 91 27 43 49 25 27 1 41 11 18 14 7 10 3 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 325 41.6% % ECA 46 5.9% EAP 112 14.3% AFR 116 14.9% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other Ops Total FACs LEG LCR 46 5.9% 45 5.8%MNA 456 781 SAR 73 9.3% 58.4% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR FPD PRM SDN WBI 171 129 103 113 66 105 1 36 5 35 781 17 263 $9.594B 491 GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based GPP GP 91 1 195 3229 70 36 31 6 18 Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 361 93 325
  • 14. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 14 High levels of child, maternal, and adult mor- tality – along with widespread malnutrition and persistently high fertility – remain primary constraints to development in too many coun- tries. The rapid emergence of chronic illness arising from changing life styles and popula- tion aging is placing unprecedented demands for more effective strategies to promote health and nutrition across the course of life. Fragmented and poorly functioning health care systems deny opportunities for health to the populations in greatest need; they also impoverish 100 million people annually due to payments made by those who fall ill. Access to quality affordable health, nutrition and population services is thus central to ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity. This high return on investment arising from mortality reduction in developing countries has been estimated to account for as much as 11% of economic growth. More- over, nearly 24% of the growth in full income between 2000 and 2011 - – which includes national income accounts and the value of additional life years – resulted from improved life expectancy. The Health, Nutrition & Population Global Practice aims to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage so that by 2030 no one will be tipped into, or kept in, poverty due to expenditure on health care, and the poorest 40% of the population will have access to essential health, nutrition, and population services.     The HNP GP will work with governments, the private sector and civil society, together with other development partners to:   1. Establish systems for fair, efficient, and sustainable financing of health. 2. Scale-up and strengthen person-centered, front-line and facility-based services. 3. Harness the potential of other sectors that contribute to HNP outcomes such as agriculture,transport, social protection, gender, education, and fiscal policy/taxa- tion. In working in these areas, the HNP GP will source the best evidence globally to support appropriate choice and effective implemen- tation of solutions according to context.     HEALTH, NUTRITION & POPULATION GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 15. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 15 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $1.200B 375 $1.855B 38 $101.93M 309 $3.673B 53 Supervision Supervision $9.106B 180 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $257M $189M $13M $407M $989M $1,124M $348M $676M $1,003M $300M $222M $0M $3,102M $808M $1,037M $1,833M $156M $2,158M $12M $488M $188M $11M $10M $11M $444M $48M $38M $9M $6M $6M $4M $7M $32M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 91 38 38 28 25 33 56 13 5 2 3 15 159 40 27 27 18 57 47 78 23 28 21 7 21 2 24 7 9 4 2 5 2 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 208 70.3% % 296 ECA 10 3.4% EAP 25 8.4% AFR 22 7.4% HQ Based Count CO Based TotalTotal Regions Anchors and Other Ops LCR 8 2.7% 6 2.0%MNA 88 296 SAR 14 4.7% 29.7% 100.0% GI GH GG GF GE GD GC UC GP3 36 127 67 15 9 29 10 Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR HDN WBI 80 37 29 28 13 28 67 14 Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 68 20 208
  • 16. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 16 The Macroeconomic and Fiscal Manage- ment Global Practice is the home of the World Bank Group’s family of country econ- omists and macroeconomics experts, pro- viding integrative development strategies, policy-based lending, macro data, global perspectives, real-time policy analysis, country risk assessments, and innovative projection tools. Growth is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for poverty to fall, while inflation is a sufficient, but not necessary, condi- tion for poverty to rise. That is why a solid macroeconomic framework is the bedrock for ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity—without it, the WBG’s strategic goals cannot be achieved. Fiscal policies and management are the mechanisms by which governments mar- shal resources to deliver services like heath, education, or infrastructure. It is at the core of the social contract between the state and the people, a contract without which modern societies could not function. As governments in developing economies began to access funding in the global financial market, or to receive rents from natural resource discoveries, the macro- economic challenges of turning those funds into well-being for all citizens have grown exponentially. Macroeconomic decisions to tax, borrow, and spend directly impact future genera- tions. Public investment and public debt are a way to transfer asset and liabilities to a country’s children. Solutions Based on Global Best-Practices • Integrative development strategies, including Systematic Country Diagnoses, Country Economic Memoranda, Policy Notes Collections, and Global Position Papers. • A country-by-country understanding of what drives economic growth, and a menu of policy options to accelerate it. • Comprehensive Public Expenditure Reviews that detect trade-offs among competing sectoral prior- ities. • Country performance, risk monitoring, and sur- veillance services that complement the work of the International Monetary Fund with a long-term, structural, and poverty focus. • Debt management services, including for global debt relief initiatives. Transformational Financing • Policy-based lending in support of multisectoral reform efforts. • Subnational financing: a tested battery of bud- get-support lending, policy, and coordination tools to address economic policy challenges at the state and municipal levels. • Funding and technical support for the construction of national accounts and other survey-based mea- surement tools. Cutting-Edge Knowledge and Analytical Tools • Practical advice on how to build consistent and sustainable macroeconomic frameworks that align fiscal, debt, monetary, exchange rate, financial, trade, labor, and sectoral policies. • Projection models to forecast the evolution of both major macroeconomic aggregates and poverty and equity indicators. • Standardized, country-specific and cross-country macroeconomic datasets. • Just-in-time policy advice in response to unex- pected external shocks, fiscal challenges, natural resource discoveries, and other macro-level events. • Analysis of tax and subsidy policies, public expendi- ture incidence, intergovernmental fiscal transfers, and monitoring and management of fiscal risks. MACROECONOMICS & FISCAL MANAGEMENT GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 17. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 17 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.100B 109 $0.531B 17 $75.37M 481 $10.205B 90 Supervision Supervision $9.715B Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $14M $33M $12M $472M $1,347M $525M $5,729M $1,580M $541M $480M $2M $1,531M $861M $4,051M $2,705M $501M $65M $1M $18M $19M $12M $12M $2M $16M $21M $22M $16M $10M $6M $7M $2M $11M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 153 69 71 47 29 26 86 5 3 2 7 33 20 10 8 8 8 22 62 11 14 20 3 4 4 36 13 22 7 4 4 4 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 175 51.8% % ECA 34 10.1% EAP 40 11.8% AFR 48 14.2% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other Ops LCR 11 3.3% 14 4.1%MNA 163 338 SAR 10 3.0% 48.2% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR CFP PRM WBI 91 47 65 45 26 23 1 39 1 118 338Total GPGI GH GG GF GE GD GC UC 1 45 123 87 33 9 25 15 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 113 46 175
  • 18. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 18 Despite progress in poverty reduction and human welfare in the last decade, extreme poverty and inequality persist at unaccept- ably high levels in many parts of the world. To eliminate extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity, clients will need to address several critical development challenges. First, the last miles of ending extreme poverty will be the hardest to achieve. Nearly 21% of the world lives on under $1.25 per day— around 1.2 billion people. In order to reach the World Bank Group’s target of just 3% extreme poverty by 2030, historical growth trends have to be improved, particularly for the poorest countries, and growth must bene- fit the least well-off. Second, past welfare gains have to be sus- tained in the face of challenges posed by slower global growth. This requires enhancing the microeconomic foundations of shared prosperity in developing countries, through a focus on employment and productivity com- plemented by effective social safety nets. Third, progress on shared prosperity necessi- tates equal access to opportunities. Many still lack the basic resources required to succeed in life. The benefits of globalization and technological progress must reach the most disadvantaged. In order to meet these challenges, it is essen- tial to use evidence to inform policy and hold governments accountable for results. The Poverty Global Practice delivers the following: • Advice and integrated knowledge to identi- fy key policies and multisectoral solutions that effectively reduce poverty and benefit the less well-off, and to help better under- stand the relationship between growth, poverty, and inequality. • Diagnostics to strengthen line of sight to twin goals, focus country dialogue, and shape World Bank Group advisory, financ- ing, and convening services. • Monitoring and evaluation of policies and programs to enhance the poverty impact of interventions and inform mid-stream correction. • Support for nationally-owned, transparent systems and methodologies for tracking poverty and other welfare outcomes. • Capacity-building in countries and within the WBG for analysis of distributional impacts of policies and programs, and monitoring of welfare. • Innovative data collection and measure- ment methods that can help fill crucial data gaps. • Global data portals and analytical ap- proaches to support the analysis of pov- erty, distribution, and micro-macro links consistently across countries. • Global leadership on poverty and shared prosperity, and global outreach to share ideas, knowledge, and lessons learned with client and partner countries. POVERTYGLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 19. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 19 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.069B 148 $0.304B 5 $81.10M 326 $0.362B 26 Supervision Supervision $0.713B 31 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $301M $3M $35M $3M $0M $23M $300M $1M $15M $1M $34M $660M $3M $0M $1M $29M $16M $11M $6M $4M $1M $3M $27M $18M $6M $10M $6M $3M $12M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 109 51 45 35 22 19 45 4 1 65 12 19 25 9 9 9 8 2 8 8 3 1 1 16 4 1 1 1 3 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 126 79.2% % 159 ECA 2 1.3% EAP 17 10.7% AFR 10 6.3% HQ Based Count CO Based TotalTotal Regions Anchors and Other Ops 33 159 SAR 3 1.9% 20.8% 100.0% GP Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR PRM 31 26 25 40 3 4 30 GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 17 39 51 20 2 15 1 13 Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 23 10 126
  • 20. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 20 1.2 billion people live in extreme poverty. Billions risk slipping into poverty due to shocks – both systemic (natural disasters, economic crises) and specific (such as job losses or ill- ness). Well-designed modern social protection systems are proven to be both effective and efficient at lowering current and future poverty, and to be flexible enough to buffer both system- ic and specific shocks.  Today, more than 150 million people have escaped extreme poverty thanks to social protection alone. Direct social transfers reduce immediate poverty and also help people exit poverty by building capabilities (incentivizing investments in education, health, and nutrition) and allowing investment in productive assets and activities. Inequality is also reduced by pen- sions, unemployment insurance, disability al- lowances, and the like, cushioning people from impoverishing shocks, and by allowing them better returns to work because of well-designed labor market policies.  WBG is the largest provider of development finance and solutions for social protection, working with high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries to develop country-tai- lored solutions for specific social protection challenges. These range from increasing the efficiency with which social resources are spent (where well-designed social safety net programs, reformed pension reforms, and integrated social protection systems are proven solutions), to improving employment outcomes through employability programs and associat- ed policy reforms, often most effective when targeted at the poor or the young. The Social Protection & Labor Global Prac- tice delivers operational approaches and evidence-based solutions to help individuals and families manage risk, cope with chronic/ transitional poverty, and access better liveli- hoods and jobs. These include: • Strategy, analysis, financing and design of programs delivering social safety nets/so- cial assistance in the form of cash transfers, public works programs, and fee waivers. • Advisory and analytical services on design and delivery of contributory transfers (in- cluding old-age pensions, unemployment insurance, disability and survivor benefits), and their fiscal sustainability (including budget support for transitions). • Analysis, design and delivery of labor mar- ket and youth employment programs (with a focus on supply side interventions and intermediation policies), as well as policy advice on labor market regulations and interventions. • Strategy, analysis, financing and design of integrated social protection delivery systems (e.g., payments, identification, registries, systems assessments) as un- derpinnings of effective social programs that can help cope with climatic shocks or underpin fiscal reforms. Global Engagements • The Social Protection Inter-Agency Coopera- tion Board (SPIAC-B) works to align and harmo- nize all multilateral and bilateral global partners’ work on social protection. • The Rapid Social Response (RSR) Program helps catalyze the building of social protection systems. • Coalition for Youth Employment Solutions aims to develop practical evidence of what works in youth employment. SOCIAL PROTECTION & LABOR GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 21. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 21 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $1.014B 228 $1.657B 27 $70.48M 279 $3.423B 46 Supervision Supervision $10.061B 138 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $1,314M $3M $4M $88M $114M $135M $873M $1M $526M $1,413M $310M $300M $4,202M $697M $1,003M $2,342M $627M $1,190M $861M $10M $17M $12M $77M $26M $12M $5M $12M $18M $5M $17M $6M $8M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 51 33 68 41 33 20 33 15 1 2 2 2 5 80 15 29 26 32 30 16 57 6 16 25 16 18 16 2 5 15 7 1 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 166 68.6% % 242 HQ Based Count CO Based TotalTotal Regions Anchors and Other Ops 76 242 31.4% 100.0% GP Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR HDN 54 21 45 43 23 20 24 9 12 13 9 7 9.9% 3.7% 5.0% 5.4% 3.7% 2.9% 36 GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 30 92 64 13 7 20 1 14 Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 61 15 166
  • 22. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 22 More than 1.5 billion people – especially women and young people – are jobless or underemployed. Within 15 years, 600 million new jobs must be created to keep up with the surging global population. The private sector must create 90% of those new jobs, and it will be important in mobilizing capital for critical in- vestments. A vibrant private sector is the most important engine of economic growth, and thus is a key driver of poverty reduction. Strengthening a country’s position in trade and competitiveness is critical to helping it achieve sustained poverty reduction and boost shared prosperity. By increasing trade, countries are able to sustain high levels of growth, strong private investment and vibrant productivity growth. With globalization intensifying interna- tional competition, countries must adopt poli- cies that reduce trade frictions and transaction costs, and they must facilitate investment and the absorption of technology. Countries aiming to attract investment and spur business growth should look at the regulatory barriers, monopolistic/anti-com- petitive practices and bureaucratic procedures impeding their business climate. Productivity is the single most important factor in explain- ing income differences among nations. Firm productivity is determined by the efficiency of input and output markets, competition, tech- nology and innovation, and legal and regulato- ry constraints. The joint Trade & Competitiveness Global Practice – combining World Bank, IFC and MIGA – provides policy advice and lending support to help client countries increase trade and investment, improve productivity and competitiveness at the national and industry levels, and create an inclusive, com- petitive private sector. The T&C GP works with governments to identify policies that promote growth, while helping identify and remove impediments to the smooth functioning of markets (such as gaps in coordination, undersupply of public goods, non-competitive market structures, and regulatory constraints). A contributor to shaping innovative development solutions, the T&C GP provides: • Policy advice on trade policy and integra- tion, trade facilitation and logistics. • Industry-specific competitiveness diagnos- tics (e.g., agribusiness, manufacturing and tourism) and spatial growth solutions (e.g. growth poles and resource corridors). • Innovation and entrepreneurship diag- nostics; customized approaches to foster gender and youth entrepreneurship; and learning labs to test new technology-en- abled ventures. • Policy advice to improve the business environment at the country and industry levels, through strong legal and regulatory environments, investment policy frame- works, business taxation systems, and policies that unlock constraints to market competition. • Cross-cutting trade and competitiveness diagnostics and cross-thematic assess- ments of constraints to private-sector-led growth, bringing together skills from within the T&C GP and other practices. TRADE & COMPETITIVENESS GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 23. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 23 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services IFC Advisory Services IFC Advisory Services $0.217B 228 $0.378B 22 $144.90M $147 M 469 129 $2.673B 76 Supervision Supervision $5.298B 81 Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Know’ld & AS Expenses ($M) Num. of Know’ld & AS Activities Region Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $23M $10M $21M $23M $13M $22M $267M 3 1 3 2 1 1 11 $834M $212M $1,100M $272M $180M $71M $3M 27 8 18 9 6 2 6 $1,442M $261M $119M $1,513M $39M $1,924M 39 10 9 8 5 10 $54M $32M $28M $11M $21M $57M $14M 78 20 35 27 20 21 27 $39M $11M $2M $7M $19M $9M $49M 133 36 70 41 36 27 126 10 5 2 3 5 6 2 Pipeline Pipeline Trust Funds Trust Funds Supervision vvvv Knowledge Services Knowledge Services IFC Advisory Services* IFC Advisory Services Grants Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU GPP GP Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 51 1 3192 172 8 42 8 21 8 12 IFC Staff by VPU 251 47.9% %AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR FPD IAL IAN IAP FPD HDN PRM WBC WBI 72 10 38 17 19 12 46 61 65 59 97 1 25 1 1 293 231 ECA 63 12.0% EAP 43 8.2% AFR 73 13.9% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Total Total Regions IFC Anchors and Other Ops LCR 17 3.2% 34 6.5%MNA 273 524 SAR 34 6.5% 52.1% 100.0% Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. * IFC regional breakdown will be provided soon Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 155 38 56 22 213 Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services IFC Advisory Services HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based IFC HQ Appointed & Based IFC HQ Appointed & CO Based IFC CO Appointed & Based
  • 24. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 24 Virtual and physical connectivity is a critical factor of competitiveness and economic growth. However, a third of the world’s population lacks access to an all-weather road, and two-thirds of people in developing countries are more than one hour away from a large city. 60% of the world’s population lack inter- net access, and even where broadband service is available, many of the poorest cannot afford it. More and better invest- ment in transport and ICT is needed to end extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity. By facilitating the movement of people, goods and information, Transport and ICT enable economic and social develop- ment, food security, and access to jobs, health, and education services. Trans- port is also at the heart of the Climate Change solution, as one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases and energy users. Clients seek solutions to connect globally and respond to growing mobility needs of expanding populations, while keeping other effects, such as car fatalities, congestion, pollution, GHG emissions, and digital divide, under control. As a multilateral, multisectoral institution, the WBG is uniquely positioned to support large-scale transformational projects and deliver innovative cross-cutting solutions for connectivity. The WBG is the largest provider of development finance for transport globally, with an active port- folio of $47 billion; 74% of Bank projects include an ICT-related component. The Transport & ICT Global Practice provides clients with infrastructure and policies to improve connectivity and competitiveness, link people to markets and social ser- vices to stimulate economic growth, increase climate resilience and reduce carbon footprint. These aims are achieved through: Financing Infrastructure • Transport assets and corridors – rural and inter-urban roads and highways, railways, ports, waterways, avia- tion, logistics and trade facilitation. • Urban transport – inclusive and “clean” transport modes (public transport, walking/biking). • Telecom/broadband infrastructure and disruptive technologies (mobile internet, “internet of things”, cloud, 3D printing). • IT systems, applications and services to catalyze greater impact in other sectors (digital IDs, cloud computing, Open Data/Analytics, cyber security, and citizen engagement tools). Policy Advice • Private participation in infrastructure financing. • Road asset management; railways, ports, air transport and urban transport institutional management; sector reform; interurban connectivity; rural access, institu- tions and governance to manage infrastructure and the rolling stock; and road safety. • IT/telecommunications policy, regulation and support to IT-based industries. Global Public Goods • Network of experts (government CIOs network, sus- tainable urban transport, citizen feedback using ICTs). • Leading advocacy on issues, such as open data, inclu- sive green transport, and road safety . Global Engagements • Global Road Safety Facility ($41 million since 2006) • Africa Transport Policy Program ($17 million over 2014-16) • Multi Donor Trust Fund on Sustainable Logistics ($2.5 million since 1013) • Korea Trust Fund on ICT4D ($15 million) TRANSPORT & ICT GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 25. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 25 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.829B $0.231B 11 $93.21M 411 $11.384B 107 Supervision Supervision Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $133M $60M $8M $29M $1,202M $3,202M $2,135M $1,339M $994M $2,512M $0M $9,758M $7,927M $7,249M $6,897M $1,784M $8,573M $1M $347M $188M $13M $25M $7M $242M $7M $27M $15M $7M $8M $5M $4M $28M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 82 52 37 49 30 27 134 2 4 1 4 66 86 21 32 18 33 32 95 79 36 51 16 40 3 20 33 14 12 13 2 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU IFC Staff by VPU 190 66.2% % ECA 16 5.6% EAP 22 7.7% AFR 19 6.6% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other... FACs IFC Total Total LCR 10 3.5% 7 2.4%MNA 97 287 SAR 18 6.3% 33.8% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR SDN LEG FPD 49 35 37 43 17 34 70 1 1 286 1 320 288 GPGI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 38 116 67 10 8 25 3 17 $42.190B HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based IFC HQ Appointed & Based Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 74 23 189 1
  • 26. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 26 In developing a vision for the new Urban, Rural & Social Development Global Practice, key statistics highlight priority development challenges to focus on together with other practices and CCSAs: • Ending extreme poverty: 75% of the world’s poor live in rural areas. At the same time, 1 billion people live in slums today and poverty is urbanizing. 1.5 billion people live in countries affected by repeated cycles of violence. In the past decade, the number of people affected by natural disasters tripled to 2 billion. • Boosting shared prosperity: Past rural development efforts have not been enough to address the rural poor’s vulnerability and marginalization. Although 80% of GDP is generated in urban areas, social exclusion and inequality are rapidly growing in cities. Since 1980, low-income countries have accounted for only 9% of the disaster events but 48% of fatalities. Increasing the resil- ience of cities, villages, and communities is critical because the burden of disasters, conflict, crime, and violence falls dispropor- tionately on the poor and the bottom 40% of the population. • Sustainability: 1 billion people are expected to move to cities by 2030. The growth path of cities, human settlements, and rural areas has local and global implications for sustain- ability and climate change. Ensuring that the marginalized and vulnerable segments of society have a say in defining their develop- ment path is indispensable. As the Urban, Rural & Social Development Global Practice is established, it will work to define service lines and platforms of engagement with other GPs, CCSAs, and global partnerships (such as Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, Global Partnership on Output-Based Data, and others) around the objective of helping clients build inclu- sive, resilient, sustainable, and prosperous territo- ries, cities, villages, and communities. Some of the service lines to be reviewed and refined include: • Social sustainability and safeguards; beneficiary and citizen engagement. • Local and decentralized institutions, municipal finance and accountability. • Disaster risk management, urban and social resilience. • Community-driven development. • Integrated solutions for urban and rural infra- structure and local services. • Land tenure policy and administration, urban planning and land use management, geo-spatial planning tools, housing, informal settlements upgrade. • Social inclusion, with an emphasis on marginal- ized groups, gender, and youth. • Violence and conflict prevention and operational response. • Sustainable dimensions of urban and rural devel- opment. • National and regional territorial policy and local development. • Tourism and cultural heritage. More importantly, the URSD GP will work with other GPs and CCSAs through platforms of engage- ment in: (i) social inclusion and sustainability; (ii) mainstreaming resilience in all dimensions devel- opment; (iii) territorial and rural development; and (iv) urban planning, services and institutions. The URSD GP will refine with other groups joint multi- sectoral services in these platforms of support. URBAN, RURAL & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT GLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 27. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 27 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $1.133B $0.902B 43 $275.55M 649 $8.961B 142 Supervision Supervision $21.816B Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $73M $119M $16M $22M $65M $9M $598M $1,384M $2,432M $1,277M $823M $681M $2,362M $2M $3,270M $8,741M $2,607M $1,880M $795M $4,521M $2M $150M $435M $39M $117M $146M $141M $105M $76M $78M $13M $16M $10M $46M $37M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 118 121 88 77 40 73 132 7 7 4 5 3 2 15 129 234 47 109 61 154 111 73 121 52 61 34 53 3 22 41 21 26 8 22 2 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 348 64.2% % ECA 16 3.0% EAP 83 15.3% AFR 36 6.6% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other Ops LCR 12 2.2% 13 2.4%MNA 194 542 SAR 25 4.6% 35.8% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR SDN WBI 84 104 62 87 36 72 87 10 397 542Total HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based 845 GPP GP GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC 1 50 4194 164 7 36 21 33 2 24 Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 142 51 348
  • 28. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 28 Access to services: • Sustainable access to water supply and sanitation, irrigation, energy, and many other economic, social and environmental services are vital for poverty reduction and economic growth. Around 2.5 billion people lack access to improved sanitation and 768 million lack ac- cess to improved water supply. One in 3 of the poorest 40% do not have access to improved drinking water and 4 in 5 do not have access to improved sanitation. • Access to water services, along with better and more equitable management of water resourc- es, will benefit the poor through improved health, greater access to electricity, higher school attendance, more jobs and increased food security. It will also make them less vul- nerable to natural disasters. Sustainable management of water resources: • In addition to this basic access challenge, many clients face growing water related chal- lenges: • Coastal cities could see $1 trillion in dam- ages due to floods by 2050. • By 2050, developing countries will need to double food production with less water allocated for irrigation. • Energy demand will increase 35% by 2035, increasing water use by 15%. • Degradation of water quality due to poor water management is reducing the amount of freshwater, degrading land, impacting ecosystems and affecting the health of millions of poor. • Growing populations and economies, de- clining water quality and increased climate variability are putting water resources under unprecedented pressure, and clients need help to develop multisectoral solutions to allocate and manage water sustainably. Value Proposition: Ensure water is a reliable foundation for poverty reduction and shared prosperity through the delivery of public water “goods” coupled with private initiatives to add value to water services throughout the water cycle. This will be provided by helping clients: • Increase their understanding of the role of water in poverty reduction, equitable growth, and sustainabil- ity. • Better align supply and demand (including intersec- toral water allocations). • Identify appropriate options for development of water laws, regulations, institutions, metrics and infrastruc- ture. • Develop stakeholder consensus for reform across socio-economic, sectoral and geographic boundaries. • Attract technical and financial partners to support transformational investments in hardware and insti- tutions. Services: Water supply and sanitation services for households and businesses; irrigation services to intensify agricultural production and to raise rural incomes; drought resilience and flood management for climate change adaptation and managing uncertainty; and conservation of quality freshwater resources and ecosystems. Products: Knowledge; technical assistance (institu- tional /legal/regulatory support); financial and eco- nomic analysis (assessment of trade-offs, investment plan options); and implementation, supervision and evaluation of investments. Global Engagements • The Water and Sanitation Program: Improved access to WSS services and knowledge creation ( $235m). • The Water Partnership Program: Improved WSS, water resource management, climate resilience, and green growth ($49m). • Cooperation in International Waters (CIWA): Large- scale trans-boundary investments in Africa ($71m). • The South Asia Water Initiative (SAWI): Regional cooperation in the Himalayan Rivers ($9m). WATERGLOBAL PRACTICE
  • 29. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 29 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.723B $0.628B 36 $319.23M $5.967B 85 Supervision Supervision Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH $185M $24M $80M $3M $33M $8M $295M $773M $1,173M $1,479M $602M $340M $1,521M $2M $4,880M $3,043M $2,016M $2,692M $1,669M $6,789M $1M $268M $59M $80M $21M $74M $98M $123M $95M $69M $5M $33M $21M $50M $47M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR OTH 185 124 25 97 30 122 119 5 3 12 1 5 2 8 112 66 41 50 35 77 58 59 36 31 36 29 41 1 27 13 20 7 5 12 1 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU 147 43.9% % ECA 5 1.5% EAP 44 13.1% AFR 58 17.3% HQ Based Count CO Based Total Regions Anchors and Other Ops Total FACs LEG LCR 33 9.9% 8 2.4%MNA 188 335 SAR 38 11.3% 56.1% 100.0% Staff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution AFR EAP ECA LCR MNA SAR SDN WBI 44 28 22 32 21 29 157 1 335 1 233 $21.090B 439 GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB GA UC HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based CO Appointed & Based GPP GP 2 36 5 37 36 88 43 6 12 8 12 24 3 9 9 1 1 702 Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Distribution of Staff by Location Staff by Location and Appointment Type Trust Fund Contributions ($B) 138 48 147
  • 30. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 30 Unless measures are taken to reduce risks, climate change is likely to undermine poverty goals and exacerbate inequality for decades to come: • No country or business is exempt from the threat of climate change. • No country has fully internalized the costs of climate change inaction. The science indicates that global temperature rise will bring widespread food shortages, ex- treme flooding, droughts, and violent storms. Every region will feel the impact, and those least able to adapt - the poor and vulnerable - will be hit hardest. In the poorest countries, climate change will increase the cost of devel- opment by 25 to 30%. Impacts are expected to be regressive and differential, affecting most significantly the urban poor and highly vulnerable countries in Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia, where the number of exposed poor may reach 325 million by 2030 ( Shepard et al 2013). Across all regions, the growing movement into urban areas will lead to ever-higher numbers of people who are vulnerable and living in slums. 72% of Africa’s urban population already lives in low-lying informal settlements. They will be increasingly exposed to heat waves, flooding, mudslides, and disease. The economic costs of extreme weather events are stunning. Weather-related losses and damage have risen from an annual aver- age of about $50 billion in the 1980s to close to $200 billion over the last decade. Clients recognize that the sooner they factor climate costs into economic planning, the sooner they can manage risks and seize development opportunities. The Climate Change Cross-cutting Solutions Area’s first priority is to ensure that solutions are fit-for- purpose and that the CCSA is able to deliver the best evidence of climate impact on the poorest, the most valuable tools for all those working on climate action, and the best assessment of climate risk and opportunity for clients. The key question will be how the Climate Change CCSA can make the Global Practices, the regions, and external clients successful in what they do by: • Seeking to embed climate risk, opportunity, and resilience into country strategies and internal processes, learning, and knowledge. • Developing climate indicators across the World Bank Group and working to harmonize them with partners. • Delivering innovative products that enable cli- ents to better assess and manage climate risk. • Catalyzing climate action working where it matters most. • Focusing on climate smart agriculture, livable low-carbon cities, renewable energy, energy efficiency, and working with partners to advance carbon pricing and harmful subsidy reform. • Working the balance sheet, innovative treasury operations, and in the markets, to mobilize finance for low carbon growth and resilient investments. • Supporting international climate negotiations and processes with data, evidence and invest- ment strategies to ensure success. Recognizing that climate finance must come from both the public and private sectors, the Climate Change CCSA is committed to making sure every action is vital to helping the WBG achieve its key goals. Alliances will be a critical part of success, as the CC CCSA recognizes that the goals cannot be achieved working alone. CLIMATE CHANGE GROUP
  • 31. Active portfolio* Staff snapshot* *Data sourced from OPCS dashboard on 5/2/2014. Does not include IFC portfolio data except where noted. *Data sourced from HR People Soft mapping on 4/13/2014. 31 Activity Count by Region Map Global (OTH) Pipeline Supervision Grants Knowledge Services Lending Portfolio Commitments ($B) Number of Lending Projects $40B $20B $0B 400 300 200 100 0 $4B $2B $0B 1000 500 0 $4B $2B $0B 100 50 0 $400... $200... $0M 800 600 400 200 0 Pipeline Pipeline Grants Grants Trust Funds Trust Funds Knowledge Services Knowledge Services $0.445B 82 $19.33M$0.002B 4 Supervision Supervision Includes the following IBRD/IDA Lending product lines only: CN, DR, GE, GM, GU, HT, IF, MT, PE, RE, RN, SFand SN Includes all Grant Commitments and Trust Contributions mapped to this GP. Not all Grants mapped to this GP originate from this set of Trust Funds. Value of Grants are outflows, Trust Fund Contributions are inflows. Includes DA, EW, GL, GP, IE, KP, PA, PT, RF, TA, and TE Product Lines only. Trust Fund Contributions ($B) Number of Trust Fund Value of Grants ($B) Number of Grants Knowledge Expenses ($B) Number of Knowledge Activities Region AFR EAP LCR OTH $5,130M$2M $2M $31M $83M $184M $148M $1M $1M $0M $17M Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Regional Distribution of Portfolio ($B) Region AFR EAP LCR OTH 2 1 1 6582 19 31 39 8224 Pipeline Trust Funds Supervision Knowledge Services Grants Activity Count by Region WB Staff by VPU IFC Staff by VPU % 226 99.6%HQ Based Count CO Based (EAP) Total Anchors and Other Ops Total Total IFC IVP 1 0.4% 227 100.0% Distribution of Staff by LocationStaff by Grade 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Global Distribution Staff by Location and Appointment Type CCG SDN 180 4 184 43 43 2 $0.002B 171 GI GH GG GF GE GD GC GB UC HQ Appointed & Based HQ Appointed & CO Based IFC HQ Appointed & Based GPP GP 2 24 52 77 27 6 8 1 18 1 1 5 69 $5.130B 43 1 183
  • 32. What do we deliver to our clients? Why is this important to our clients? 32 For more information, contact Ana Elisa Luna (alunabarros@worldbank.org) or visit our Spark site (type ‘Globalpractices’ in your intranet browser) The one pagers included in this document provide an initial snapshot of the content of the 14 Global Practices and the Climate Change CCSA. These documents will continue to evolve as we move into the practices on July 1, 2014. Note GLOBAL PRACTICES AND CLIMATE CHANGE CROSS CUTTING SOLUTIONS AREA ONE-PAGERS