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Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
Evidence-based medicine
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Evidence-based medicine

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  • 1. بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم
  • 2. Evidence-Based Medicine
  • 3.
    • EBM is the integration of clinical expertise, patient values, and the best evidence into the decision making process for patient care. Clinical expertise refers to the clinician's cumulated experience, education and clinical skills. The patient brings to the encounter his or her own personal and unique concerns, expectations, and values. The best evidence is usually found in clinically relevant research that has been conducted using sound methodology. (Sackett D, 2002)
  • 4. The Steps in the EBM Process 6. Evaluate your performance with this patient Self-evaluation 5. Return to the patient -- integrate that evidence with clinical expertise, patient preferences and apply it to practice The patient 4. Appraise that evidence for its validity (closeness to the truth) and applicability (usefulness in clinical practice) The evaluation 3. Select the appropriate resource(s) and conduct a search The resource 2. Construct a well built clinical question derived from the case  The question 1. Start with the patient -- a clinical problem or question arises out of the care of the patient The patient
  • 5. Two types of evidence - based medicine have been proposed
    • Evidence - based guidelines ( EBG ): is the practice of evidence - based medicine at the organizational or institutional level . This includes the production of guidelines, policy, and regulations . This approach has also been called evidence based ealthcare
    • Evidence - based individual decision making ( EBID ): making is evidence - based medicine as practiced by the individual health care provider . There is concern that current evidence - based medicine focuses excessively on EBID .
  • 6. Medical guideline
    • Modern clinical guidelines briefly identify, summarize and evaluate the best evidence and most current data about prevention , diagnosis , prognosis , therapy including dosage of medications , risk / benefit and cost - effectiveness . Then they define the most important questions related to clinical practice and identify all possible decision options and their outcomes . Some guidelines contain decision or computation algorithms to be followed . Thus, they integrate the identified decision points and respective courses of action to the clinical judgment and experience of practitioners . Many guidelines place the treatment alternatives into classes to help providers in deciding which treatment to use .
  • 7. Qualification of evidence
    • Evidence-based medicine categorizes different types of clinical evidence and ranks them according to the strength of their freedom from the various biases that beset medical research.
    • Systems to stratify evidence by quality have been developed, such as this one by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for ranking evidence I,II.III and the UK National Health Service uses a similar system with categories labeled A, B, C, and D.
  • 8. The U . S . Preventive Services Task Force for ranking evidence about the effectiveness of treatments or screening :
    • Level I : Evidence obtained from at least one properly designed randomized controlled trial .
    • Level II-1 : Evidence obtained from well - designed controlled trials without randomization .
    • Level II-2 : Evidence obtained from well - designed cohort or case - control analytic studies, preferably from more than one center or research group .
    • Level II-3 : Evidence obtained from multiple time series with or without the intervention . Dramatic results in uncontrolled trials might also be regarded as this type of evidence .
    • Level III : Opinions of respected authorities, based on clinical experience, descriptive studies, or reports of expert committees
    • The above Levels are only appropriate for treatment or interventions
  • 9.
    • Different types of research are required for assessing diagnostic accuracy or natural history and prognosis, and hence different " levels " are required . For example, the Oxford Centre for Evidence - based Medicine suggests levels of evidence ( LOE ) according to the study designs and critical appraisal of prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and harm studies :
  • 10.
    • Level A : Consistent Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial , cohort study , all or none , clinical decision rule validated in different populations .
    • Level B : Consistent Retrospective Cohort, Exploratory Cohort, Ecological Study, Outcomes Research , case - control study ; or extrapolations from level A studies .
    • Level C : Case - series study or extrapolations from level B studies .
    • Level D : Expert opinion without explicit critical appraisal, or based on physiology , bench research or first principles .
  • 11. Categories of recommendations
    • In guidelines and other publications, recommendation for a clinical service is classified by the balance of risk versus benefit of the service and the level of evidence on which this information is based.
    • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force uses the following :
  • 12.
    • Level A : Good scientific evidence suggests that the benefits of the clinical service substantially outweighs the potential risks . Clinicians should discuss the service with eligible patients .
    • Level B : At least fair scientific evidence suggests that the benefits of the clinical service outweighs the potential risks . Clinicians should discuss the service with eligible patients .
    • Level C : At least fair scientific evidence suggests that there are benefits provided by the clinical service, but the balance between benefits and risks are too close for making general recommendations . Clinicians need not offer it unless there are individual considerations .
  • 13.
    • Level D : At least fair scientific evidence suggests that the risks of the clinical service outweighs potential benefits . Clinicians should not routinely offer the service to asymptomatic patients .
    • Level I : Scientific evidence is lacking, of poor quality, or conflicting, such that the risk versus benefit balance cannot be assessed . Clinicians should help patients understand the uncertainty surrounding the clinical service .
  • 14. Quality of clinical trial publications
    • Evidence - based medicine attempts to objectively evaluate the quality of clinical research by critically assessing techniques reported by researchers in their publications .
  • 15.
    • Trial design considerations . High - quality studies have clearly - defined eligibility criteria, and have minimal missing data .
    • Generalizability considerations . Studies may only be applicable to narrowly - defined patient populations, and may not be generalizable to clinical practice .
    • Followup . Sufficient time for defined outcomes to occur can influence the study outcomes and the statistical power of a study to detect differences between a treatment and control arm .
    • Power . A mathematical calculation can determine if the number of patients is sufficient to detect a difference between treatment arms . A negative study may reflect a lack of benefit, or simply a lack of sufficient quantities of patients to detect a difference .
  • 16. Practice of Evidence - based Medicine
    • The practice of EBM is through asking a good clinical question by which is an answerable question that will limit your findings . A good clinical question contains 4 parts or the PICO question; i . e .
    • Population, patient and problem
    • Intervention, prognostic factor, or exposure
    • Comparison
    • Outcome
  • 17. http :// www . cebm . net / index . aspx?o = 1001 For more details refer to this site:
  • 18. واخر دعوانا ان الحمد لله رب العالمين

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