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Field trip unit plan Document Transcript

  • 1. Field  Trip  Unit  Plan    Christen  Mamenko  Unit:  Kingdoms  (Animal)  –  Block  5  Introduction      • Lesson  topic:  Echinoderms  and  Comparing  Invertebrates  • Length  of  Lesson:  45  min  lesson;  30  min  lab  • VA  Standards  of  Learning  (highlighted  standards  are  reached  by  the  lab  –  by  Block  7):     °  BIO  1.a,  1.d,  1.h  –  Students  will  plan  and  conduct  investigations  in  which  observations   of  living  organisms  are  recorded  in  the  lab  and  in  the  field;  graphing  and  arithmetic   calculations  are  used  as  tools  in  data  analysis;  chemicals  and  equipment  are  used  in  a   safe  manner   °  BIO  5.b-­‐c  –  Students  will  investigate  and  understand  life  functions  of  animals,  including   comparison  of  their  metabolic  activities  and  analyses  of  their  responses  to  the   environment   °  BIO  7.a  –  Students  will  investigate  and  understand  bases  for  modern  classification   systems,  including  structural  similarities  among  organisms   °  BIO  9.a-­‐e  –  Students  will  investigate  and  understand  dynamic  equilibria  within   populations,  and  ecosystems,  including  interactions  within  and  among  populations   including  carrying  capacities,  limiting  factors,  and  growth  curves;  nutrient  cycling  and   energy  flow  through  ecosystems;  succession  patterns  in  ecosystems;  analysis  of  the   flora,  fauna,  and  microorganisms  of  VA  ecosystems,  including  the  Chesapeake  Bay  and   its  tributaries      Cognitive  Objectives  for  All  Students    • Students  will  recognize  that  millions  of  different  organisms  that  live  on  Earth  today  share  many  structural  and  metabolic  features,  including  cellular  organization,  common  molecular  mechanisms  for  energy  transformation  and  utilization  and  maintenance  of  homeostasis,  common  genetic  code,  and  mechanisms  for  the  transmission  of  traits  from  one  generation  to  the  next  • Students  will  examine  the  diversity  that  is  evident  in  the  natural  world  and  compare  it  in  the  local  environment  • Students  will  demonstrate  prior  knowledge  by  prior  knowledge  by  completing  “entrance  ticket”  anticipatory  guide  • Students  will  participate  –  at  least  by  listening  –  in  whole  class  discussions  • Students  will  rate  themselves  on  their  understanding  of  the  content  by  completing  a  crossword  puzzle    Cognitive  Objectives  to  Challenge  Students:    
  • 2. • Students  will  participate  –  by  contribution  –  in  the  whole  class  discussions    Materials  and  Advanced  Preparation    • Miller  and  Levine’s  Biology  textbook  (Miller  &  Joseph,  2008):  Chapter  28.4  –  29    • PowerPoint  lecture  with  accompanying  fill-­‐in-­‐the-­‐blank  handout  • Crossword  Puzzle  • Temperature  probe  or  thermometer  • pH  probe  or  strips  • Dissolved  oxygen  probe  or  test  kit  • Conductivity  probe  or  hydrometer  • Turbidity  probe  or  Secchi  disk  • Flow-­‐rate  probe  or  flotation  measurement  device  • Observation  stations  for  Stonefly  larvae,  Dragonfly  larvae,  Midgefly  larvae,  Mayfly  larvae,  Damselfly  larvae,  Blackfly  larvae,  Caddisfly  larvae,  Alderfly  larvae,  Aquatic  worms,  Dobsonflies,  Cranefly  larvae,  Leeches,  Riffle  Beetles  (adult),  Riffle  Beetle  larvae,  Snails,  Water  Penny  larvae,  Clams  or  mussels,  Planaria,  Crayfish,  Scuds,  and  Sowbugs    Teaching  and  Learning  Sequence      • Introduction/Anticipatory  Set     °  Begin  with  an  oral  overview  of  what  was  taught  the  day  before,  answering  questions   as  needed   °  Have  the  students  fill  out  an  anticipatory  guide  (attached)  for  the  understanding  of   invertebrates     °  After  discussing  the  above,  ask  if  students  know  are  the  different  classifications  of   invertebrates?  What  makes  them  the  same?    What  makes  them  different?  • Lesson  Development  (refer  to  PowerPoint  Breakdown)   °  Overview  of  Echinoderms  (form/function,  feeding,  respiration/circulation,  excretion,   response/movement,  reproduction)   °  Discuss  the  different  classes  of  echinoderms  –  have  representative  drawings  in  journal   °  Discuss  the  ecology  of  echinoderms   °  Explain  molecular  paleontology  and  the  study  of  invertebrates   °  Compare  the  life  functions  of  invertebrates  in  journal  • Closure     °  Oral:  ask  students  the  different  types  of  echinoderms?    Environmental  effects?     Comparison  questions  about  the  life  functions  of  invertebrates?       °  Break  students  down  into  two  groups  begin  the  Freshwater  Field  Study  lab  (Virginia   Department  of  Education,  2010)   °  Review  all  safety  procedures  and  emphasize  that  they  must  wear  warm,  waterproof   clothes  when  working  in  the  stream;  bring  spare  socks,  shoes,  and  clothing   °  While  working  their  groups,  have  students  complete  the  crossword  puzzle   °  Have  students  in  group  1  review  how  to  use  the  equipment  in  their  journals   °  Have  students  in  group  2  review  the  different  organisms  they  may  see  in  their  journals  
  • 3. °  Assign  students  to  review  their  journals  for  homework;  bring  in  change  of  clothes;   bring  in  journal  and  pencil;  bring  a  bagged  lunch    Homework      • Assign  students  to  review  their  journals  for  homework;  bring  in  change  of  clothes;  bring  in  journal  and  pencil;  bring  a  bagged  lunch    Assessment      • Formative  –  Asking  the  students  questions  during  the  lesson  (refer  to  PowerPoint  Breakdown)    to  re-­‐enforce  the  segment  being  taught;  anticipatory  guide;  exit-­‐ticket  crossword  puzzle;  group  work  in  lab    • Summative  –  After  completion  of  the  lab,  students  will  be  evaluated  on  their  data  sheet  and  journals,  which  incorporate  the  lesson      References      Miller,  K.,  &  Joseph,  L.  (2008).  Biology.  Pearson  Prentice  Hall.  Virginia  Department  of  Education.  (2010).  Science:  Biology:  Scope  and  Sequence.  Retrieved   August  31,  2010,  from  Virginia  Department  of  Education:   http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/sol/scope_sequence/science_scope_sequence/sco peseq_science_biology.pdf    Appended  Materials      • Instructional  Content  and  Strategies  Organizer    • Curriculum  Framework  Document      • Anticipatory  Guide  • Crossword  Puzzle  • Fill-­‐in-­‐the-­‐Blank  Handout  • Lab    
  • 4.   Instructional  Content  and  Strategies  Organizer   Instructional  Content   • Introduction:  Begin  with  an  oral  overview  of  what  was  taught  the  day  before,  answering   questions  as  needed   • Introduction:  Have  the  students  fill  out  an  anticipatory  guide  (attached)  to  gauge  prior   knowledge  of  invertebrates   • Lesson:  Millions  of  different  organisms  that  live  on  Earth  today  share  many  structural   and  metabolic  features  (Refer  to  PowerPoint  Breakdown)   o Cellular  organization   o Common  molecular  mechanisms  for  energy  transformation  and   utilization/maintenance  of  homeostasis   o Common  genetic  code   o Mechanisms  for  the  transmission  of  traits  from  one  generation  to  the  next   • Lab  Work:  The  diversity  that  is  evident  in  the  natural  world  can  be  studied  in  the  local   environment  in  the  context  of  variations  on  a  common  theme  (Refer  to  Lab  Handout)   • Lab  Work:  Define  abiotic  factors  and  explain  how  they  affect  the  biodiversity  of  a   freshwater  ecosystem(Refer  to  Lab  Handout)   • Lab  Work:  Learn  new  equipment  as  laid  out  in  lab  (Refer  to  Lab  Handout)   • Lab  Work:  Learn  specific  organisms  as  laid  out  in  lab  (Refer  to  Lab  Handout)   Instructional  Modifications  to   Major  Instructional  Strategies   Instructional  Modifications  to   ASSIST  Students   CHALLENGE  Students   • Meet  IEP   • Oral  review   • Using  critical  thinking   Requirements   • Anticipatory  guide   skills  to  ascertain  the   • Extend  lesson  as   • Visually-­‐stimulating   critical  differences   needed  to  make  sure   lesson   between  invertebrates   all  students   • Begin  lab   • Field  Study  Lab:   understand  lesson   working  with  new   • Additional  information   equipment     on  website  for   • Assisting  other  group   instruction   mates   • Students  with  reading   disabilities:  if  they  do   not  understand  the   text  they  read,  the   visual/auditory  lesson   should  enhance   comprehension;  group   work   • Auditory  learners:   learn  by  discussions  in   the  class;  group  work    
  • 5. • Visual  learners:  learn   by  the  PowerPoint   lesson  that  includes   pictures,  charts,  and   graphs;  group  work   • Students  with  ADHD:   work  hands-­‐on  during   the  lab          
  • 6.  
  • 7.  Anticipatory  Guide  Based  on  last  night’s  reading  of  comparing  invertebrates,  place  a  √  (checkmark)  next  to  the  statements  that  you  think  are  true: