Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Managing a multi generational workforce and employees with disabilities
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Managing a multi generational workforce and employees with disabilities

2,567
views

Published on

Multigenerational and disabled employees.

Multigenerational and disabled employees.

Published in: Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,567
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
63
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Experts say that for the first time in history, the workplace includes four often distinct generations, each with unique strengths, expectations, motivations, and work styles. The prospect of managing workgroups consisting of such a wide potential age range presents several challenges, but it also can yield significant opportunities.
  • Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and mature employees often work side by side, and creating an atmosphere where they can all work harmoniously can be a challenge for employers.Nearly 60 percent of HR managers at large companies say theyhave observed office conflicts that flow from generational differences,.It is important to remember that there is no one size fits all fix to age diversity in the workforce
  • accommodate generational differences in key areas. coach and motivateshow understanding of needs.building effective work teams and cohesive groups.Use these differences to enhance the work and build a better group mindset.
  • What Qualifies as a Disability?
  • Neither the statute nor the regulations lists all diseases or conditions that make up "physical or mental impairments," because it would be impossible to provide a comprehensive list, given the variety of possible impairments.
  • Neither the statute nor the regulations list all diseases or conditions that make up "physical or mental impairments," because it would be impossible to provide a comprehensive list, given the variety of possible impairments.Reasonable accommodation is any change or adjustment to a job or work environment that permits a qualified applicant or employee with a disability to participate in the job application process, to perform the essential functions of a job, or to enjoy benefits and privileges of employment equal to those enjoyed by employees without disabilities.
  • In fact, most disabled people do not need extra assistance or funding:Around one in five (19%) (19%) disabled people in the workforce needed some form of personal assistance, technical equipment or other workplace modifications to enable them to work in their current job. Modified or different duties, including flexible work hours, was the most common requirement indicated by 9% of these people. Alterations to the work area or building were required by 2% of people in the workforce.
  • Not on whether workers have disabilities rates
  • Manywith many costing nothing at all. Employers also report that accommodations paid for employees WITH disabilities typically cost only $320 more than what they would have paid for an employee WITHOUT a disability who was in the same position1. And available tax incentives make it even easier for businesses to cover accessibility costs.
  • an individual must first meet all requirements for a job and be able to perform its essential functions with or without reasonable accommodations.
  • Three conditions.unrelated to the disability orThe employee does not meet legitimate requirements for the job, such as performance or production standards, with or without a reasonable accommodation orBecause of the disability, he or she poses a direct threat to health or safety in the workplace.
  • Transcript

    • 1. By: Zach Bernard
      Managing multigenerational employees and employees with disabilities
    • 2. For the first time in history, the workplace includes four often distinct generations, each with unique strengths, expectations, motivations, and work styles.
      The prospect of managing workgroups consisting of such a wide potential age range presents several challenges, but it also can yield significant opportunities.
      What is a multigenerational workforce?
    • 3. A Generational Snapshot
      Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce
      Impact on the workforce
      Strategies for a multigenerational workforce
      Outline
    • 4. Silent Generation
      Silent Generation / Traditionalists (Born between 1920 - 1945).
      Great Depression and World War II
      Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 65 to 90.
      Baby Boomers
      The United State Census Bureau considers this to be someone born during the demographic birth boom between 1946 and 1964.
      Dramatic Social change and The Vietnam War
      Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 46 to 64.
      A Generational Snapshot….
    • 5. A Generational Snapshot….
      Generation X
      Born between 1965–1979. This generation is the children of both Traditionalists and Baby Boomers.
      Fall of the Berlin Wall and Desert Storm
      Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 31 to 45.
      Generation Y
      Gen Y / Millennial’s (Born between 1980-1999).
      September 11 and Barrack Obama
      Currently as of 2010 their ages range from 11 to 30.
    • 6. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce
    • 7. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce
    • 8. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce
    • 9. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce
    • 10. Understanding the Generational Characteristics in the Workforce
      “How are they motivated?”
    • 11. Impact on the Workforce
    • 12. Impact on the Workforce….“A Forecast for the Future”
      Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections
    • 13. “All employees no matter what generation want ……”
      To be respected and receive equitable and fair treatment
      Flexibility to balance work, family and personal needs and goals
      Provided opportunities for education, training, feedback and advancement
      Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce
    • 14. Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce
      The Five pathways to success
    • 15. Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce
      Retention strategies
    • 16. Strategies for a Multigenerational Workforce
      Retention strategies
    • 17. Managing Employees with Disabilities
      Outline
      What does the ADA consider a disability
      What accommodations must employers make for a disabled employee
      Myths and Facts employers need to know
      The Big three, “Reasons to hire disabled workers.”
      Disability toolkit for managers
    • 18. What Qualifies as a Disability?
      The ADA has a three-part definition of "disability.“
      Under the ADA, an individual with a disability is a person who:
      Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities;
      Has a record of such an impairment; or
      Is regarded as having such an impairment.
    • 19. A physical impairment is defined by the ADA as:
      "Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory (including speech organs), cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin, and endocrine."
      What Qualifies as a Disability?
    • 20. A mental impairment is defined by the ADA as:
      "any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities."
      What Qualifies as a Disability?
    • 21. What accommodations do employers have to make for disabled employees.
      Reasonable accommodation may include:
      • Providing or modifying equipment or devices
      • 22. Making the workplace readily accessible to and usable by people with disabilities.
      • 23. Adjusting or modifying examinations, training materials, or policies.
      • 24. modified work schedules
      • 25. Providing readers and interpreters
    • Myths and Facts
    • 26. Myths and Facts
      Job Accommodation Network (JAN), a service of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy
    • 27. Myths and Facts
    • 28. Myths and Facts
    • 29. The Big three, “Reasons to hire disabled workers.”
      (Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.)
    • 30. Disability toolkit for managers
      Disability toolkit for managers
      Understand the laws that protect disabled employees, under the ADA and EEOC.
      Show support.
      Be proactive in helping the disabled employees keep their benefits.
      Provide accommodations.
      Have a disaster preparedness plan for disabled employees.
    • 31. Conclusion
      ~ Diversity: the art of thinking independently together. ~
      -Steve Forbes