Enhancing Inclusion in National Service Programs, Iowa Nonprofit Summit

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powerpoint presentation from 11/16/11 training at the Iowa Nonprofit Summit

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  • Roxy
  • Roxy Who we are. Many of our services are free of charge.
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  • Roxy Ask people to share with each other there experiences of including people with disability . Positive /not so positive. The responses to the questions will help guide our presentation.
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  • Erin National Service Inclusion Project Serve Idaho: Managing Disability Inclusion, National Service and Volunteerism
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  • erin National Service Inclusion Project Serve Idaho: Managing Disability Inclusion, National Service and Volunteerism
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  • erin National Service Inclusion Project Serve Idaho: Managing Disability Inclusion, National Service and Volunteerism
  • Roxy The same disability can impact an individual differently so therefore it is important to not make generalizations. Do not let fear of making a mistake, fear of saying the wrong thing, or fear of the unknown make you hesitant to interact with an individual with a disability. If you make a mistake, acknowledge it and move on. If you are ever unsure of what to do, ask. For example: When someone is Deaf, do no speak with exaggerated slowness or with exaggerated facial expressions. When there are companions/interpreters present, always direct your comments to the person with the disability. Do not assume that because a person may not speak they are unable to understand or hear you. When helping a person who is blind, allow him/her to hold your arm. This way, he/she will be able to walk slightly behind you and get a sense of what to expect from the motion of your body. Ask if people want verbal cues as to what is ahead, approaching steps, curbs and barriers. Remember to relax.
  • Roxy Since individuals may use a service animal for a variety of reasons, the individual may not feel comfortable sharing his/her reason for using a service animal. It is important to not feed a service animal since they may be on a specific feeding, bathroom, and sleep schedule.
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  • Roxy Really explain Person first language. The importance of usage and with disability . Share experience with Basketball players
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  • Roxy Use as Vision statement.
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  • When we talk about “inclusion”, this is what we mean
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  • Erin National Service Inclusion Project Serve Idaho: Managing Disability Inclusion, National Service and Volunteerism
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  • Erin Use the post-its on your tables. We will ask each table to share two of their ideas.
  • Erin An inclusive service environment is more than ensuring an accessible building, providing a sign language interpreter or creating large print documents. Rather, an inclusive service environment welcomes all people, regardless of their disability. An inclusive service environment recognizes and uses individual skills and strengthens their abilities. Creating an environment that is inclusive and welcoming of all may include: offering members and volunteers the option to routinely meet with staff in private spaces. presenting information during meetings and trainings in alternative formats, such as large print and electronic format and using multiple learning styles to address the various ways individuals obtain new information. Individuals with disabilities are regarded as peers
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  • Erin Which of these statements is an inclusive statement? Inclusive means you seek to include everyone, accessible means that if someone wants to access your programs they can. This is a difference in attitude and often you can use your recruitment materials to make it clear that your projects are INCLUSIVE, not just accessible. National Service Inclusion Project Serve Idaho: Managing Disability Inclusion, National Service and Volunteerism
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  • Erin Strategy – design materials Do we provide materials in formats accessible to people with visual or cognitive disabilities? Do we have accessible, user-friendly web sites? Do we mail materials electronically prior to events? Do we provide Braille, electronic, large print, and illustrated materials? Do we read overheads and flipcharts when presenting? How will this improve the overall quality of the product? National Service Inclusion Project Serve Idaho: Managing Disability Inclusion, National Service and Volunteerism
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  • Erin What do you include on your position descriptions? What does a potential candidate need to know? Slide Bank Number 82 A thorough, comprehensive and universally designed position description includes these important, elements. Anyone answering a posting would benefit from knowing about all these aspects f the position.
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  • Erin On interviewing packet… Using the position description and what you know about the essential functions of this position work with your table to write at least three interview questions.
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  • Erin Slide Bank Number 84
  • Erin After reviewing these slides ask participants to evaluate the interview questions they developed for the interview.
  • Erin Slide Bank Number 87 The next two slides are from a study conducted at ICI for a PhD Dissertation. The responses above were collected from people with disabilities who chose to disclose (or not to disclose) and the impact on how this affected them. What are some other reasons as to why a person with a disability may chose not to disclose?
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  • Erin Slide Bank Number 89 These are important points for all to be aware of, especially staff from the Human Resources department at your organization. Each bullet above describes one piece of the disclosure process. It is important that any forms that contain confidential information are kept separate from other personnel information in a locked drawer with access allowed only to necessary personnel. It is always up to the individual who discloses to decide how much information s/he would like to share about their disability.
  • Erin Slide Bank Number 86
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  • Roxy Asset-based management is a management style which matches members' strengths and abilities to the essential and marginal functions of a position. Based on members' skills and abilities, two or more members may share functions of a position which are areas of strength for those individuals.
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  • Erin he questions listed above can be used as a guideline for determining if a corrective action is needed and if the service organization has a policy in place. Treat poor performance on the part of the individual with a disability in the same way you would handle any other issue that arises at your organization. The majority of disabilities are invisible, and the individual may not even know s/he has a disability, even though she/he may be struggling. How does your organization handle issues that arise around performance? Do you have an organizational policy in place?
  • Erin Compare the tips the group has produced with these tips, cover any tips or points that need to be established before moving on.
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  • Enhancing Inclusion in National Service Programs, Iowa Nonprofit Summit

    1. 1. Enhancing Inclusion in Volunteer Programs 101 Ames, Iowa November-16-2011
    2. 2. www.serviceandinclusion.org Toll-free hotline: 888-491-0326 (voice/TTY)
    3. 3. National Partnerships
    4. 4. Housekeeping and Logistics <ul><li>Sign-in sheets </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluations </li></ul><ul><li>Restrooms </li></ul><ul><li>Fidgets </li></ul>
    5. 5. Please Introduce Yourself <ul><li>Please share with us: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What organization do you work for? What is your role in the organization? </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Share With Your Table </li></ul>What experience(s) have you had in the past with inclusion of people with disabilities?
    7. 7. <ul><li>What are your “burning questions” about the inclusion of people with disabilities? </li></ul>
    8. 8. “ People—diverse, passionate and committed—make America strong. Through national service and volunteering, Americans from all walks of life contribute to their communities and the nation.” - CNCS 2011 - 2015 Strategic Plan
    9. 9. Trivia! <ul><li>What is the world’s largest minority group? </li></ul><ul><li>People with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>The number of people with disabilities is increasing through population growth, medical advances and the increasing aging population </li></ul><ul><li>UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, “Some Facts about Persons with Disabilities”, http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/facts.shtml </li></ul>
    10. 10. Who are people with disabilities?
    11. 11. “ Disability” as Defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act & The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) <ul><li>A physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities </li></ul><ul><li>A history or record of such an impairment </li></ul><ul><li>Being regarded as having such an impairment, even when no limitations exist </li></ul><ul><li>Someone who has an association with someone with a disability </li></ul>
    12. 12. Major life activities include, but are not limited to: “ Major Life Activity” is Anything an Average Person Can Do with Little or No Difficulty
    13. 13. <ul><li>“ Substantially limits” </li></ul><ul><li>… unable to perform, or significantly limited in the ability to perform, an activity as compared with an average person. Factors to be considered are: </li></ul><ul><li>Its nature and severity </li></ul><ul><li>How long it will last or is expected to last, and </li></ul><ul><li>Its permanent or long-term impact, or expected impact </li></ul>
    14. 14. Exclusions from Coverage Defined by the Law <ul><li>Current drug use is not protected by the ADA </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary, non-chronic impairments that do not last for a long time and that have little or no long term impact </li></ul>
    15. 15. Disability Facts <ul><li>19.5 million people, or 9.9% of Americans have a disability. </li></ul><ul><li>Almost 380,000 Iowans have a disability. That’s 13.5% of your state’s population. </li></ul><ul><li>In the US, about 34.7% of people with disabilities are employed, compared to 71.9 % of people without a disability. </li></ul><ul><li>From the 2009 American Community Survey (Conducted by the US Census Bureau). See Center for Personal Assistance’s website for Iowa’s data: http://www.pascenter.org/state_based_stats/disability_stats/index.php?state=iowa </li></ul>
    16. 16. Basic Disability Etiquette <ul><li>When offering assistance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask first </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clarify assistance desired </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preferences are different </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be comfortable with “no” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Always direct communication to the person with a disability, not to his or her companion, assistant or interpreter. </li></ul><ul><li>Treat adults as adults </li></ul><ul><li>Make a mistake? Apologize, correct, learn and move on </li></ul>
    17. 17. A service animal is typically a dog individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability regardless of whether they have been licensed or certified by a state or local government. Basic Disability Etiquette <ul><li>Do not touch or pet the service animal without permission </li></ul><ul><li>Do not try to distract the service animal as it may distract the animal from doing its job </li></ul><ul><li>Do not feed the service animal because it may disrupt his/her schedule </li></ul><ul><li>The person may not feel like discussing the assistance the Service Animal provides </li></ul>
    18. 18. Language <ul><ul><li>Why should you avoid saying… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ cripple”? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Derived from an old German term “kripple” which means “to be without power” which is completely untrue </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ handicapped”? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Comes from a history of people with disabilities having to beg “cap in hand” because they were not allowed to work </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ wheelchair bound”? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A wheelchair is a means for mobility and freedom, not something that restricts anyone </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Person First Language <ul><li>The key is to use “ person first ” language because people with disabilities are human first and have a disability second </li></ul><ul><li>For example… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ A volunteer with epilepsy” instead of an epileptic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The woman uses her wheelchair” instead of she is wheelchair bound </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ A boy with an intellectual disability ” instead of “a retarded child” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ A person without a disability” instead of a normal person. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Barrier Free World http://www.sterlingfrazer.com/BFW/BFWHome.html </li></ul>
    20. 20. Most often, it ’s best to call someone by name, not by a label.
    21. 21. Why is Inclusion important? <ul><ul><li>What do YOU think is the most important reason to be more inclusive of people with disabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share your reason with your group. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As a group, combine your reasons to create a 30 second (or less) “sound bite” to explain why disability inclusion is important to national service and volunteer programs. </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Laws that Support Inclusion <ul><li>Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Federally conducted programs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Federal contractors and grantees </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Federally assisted programs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Americans with Disabilities Act </li></ul><ul><li>Serve America Act </li></ul>
    23. 23. What’s Your Vision for Inclusion? <ul><li>What would successful inclusion look like in your program? </li></ul><ul><li>Take a moment to write a short vision statement and write it on your action planning poster. </li></ul>
    24. 24. “ If we are to achieve a richer culture… we must weave one in which each diverse human gift will find a fitting place” - Margaret Meade
    25. 25. Creating an Inclusive Environment
    26. 26. What is Access? <ul><li>There are five different types of Access programs should think about… </li></ul><ul><li>Architectural </li></ul><ul><li>Programmatic </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Alternate formats </li></ul>
    27. 27. Universal Design How can we make EVERYTHING accessible to EVERYONE??
    28. 28. Universal Design is the design of products and environments to be usable by all people , to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design - Center for Universal Design, North Carolina State University
    29. 29. For example…
    30. 30. Provide essential information in different modes
    31. 31. Flexible Use
    32. 32. How does this playground use Universal Design?
    33. 33. Activity <ul><li>Find at least one example of Universal Design in this training. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(More than one example will earn you bonus points!) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Think of at least two changes you could make to this training in order to make it more universally accessible. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(More than two examples will earn you extra double bonus points!) </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. <ul><li>Individuals with disabilities are full participants in program and service activities </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations for individuals with disabilities are the same as for everyone </li></ul><ul><li>All participants are asked about their experiences and satisfaction; their input is carefully assessed </li></ul><ul><li>Access is considered in the design of every aspect of the program. </li></ul><ul><li>An inclusive service program recognizes and maximizes individual skills while strengthening everyone’s abilities. </li></ul>Indicators of a Welcoming Service Program
    35. 35. Taking Action… <ul><li>What is one way your program can use universal design to improve your accessibility? </li></ul><ul><li>Take a moment to write an action step on your action planning poster. </li></ul>
    36. 36. “ To be free is not only to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others” – Nelson Mandela
    37. 37. Inclusive Outreach and Recruitment
    38. 38. Recruiting a diverse pool of volunteers <ul><li>Think about what you say in your recruiting materials </li></ul><ul><li>Think about the images you use in your recruiting materials </li></ul><ul><li>Think about what formats you use to recruit your volunteers </li></ul>Images Words Formats
    39. 39. What you say <ul><li>“ Qualified individuals with disabilities and those from diverse backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply. We provide reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals and conduct all activities in fully accessible settings.” </li></ul>“ We are an equal opportunity program or organization.” Words
    40. 40. The images you use <ul><li>Include pictures of people with disabilities in your recruitment materials </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate to students with disabilities that they will be valued members of your team </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate to others that your organization values the contribution of all volunteers. </li></ul></ul></ul>Images
    41. 41. The formats you use <ul><li>Ensure that your materials can be accessed by individuals with a varied array of abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic files can be printed larger, emailed to interested students, read by screen reader programs, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Have your videos captioned (or caption them yourself in YouTube!) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>click here to learn more about captioning on youtube! </li></ul></ul>Formats
    42. 42. What is a “ Qualified Individual with a Disability ”? <ul><li>Someone who can perform the essential functions of the position with or without accommodations </li></ul><ul><li>Someone who meets the qualifications/certifications that the program has in place </li></ul><ul><li>Remember, someone may be able to perform an essential function in an unexpected way </li></ul>
    43. 43. Inclusive Service Descriptions <ul><li>In your group, think of two ways you could change this service description to make it more accessible to candidates with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Where might you go to recruit qualified individuals with disabilities for this position? </li></ul><ul><li>What information do you think might be missing from this service description? </li></ul>
    44. 44. Elements of an Inclusive Service Description <ul><li>Service position title </li></ul><ul><li>Full or part time </li></ul><ul><li>Supervisor/title </li></ul><ul><li>Service position summary </li></ul><ul><li>Essential functions </li></ul><ul><li>Marginal functions </li></ul><ul><li>Working relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge, skills and abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Academic qualifications </li></ul><ul><li>Service conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Physical, emotional, intellectual demands </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment used </li></ul>
    45. 45. Inclusive Service Descriptions <ul><li>What is Essential? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Position exists to perform a specific function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited number of others who can do the function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Function is specialized; person selected because of expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What is Marginal? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tasks are preferential or secondary to essential functions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be traded or done by another volunteer </li></ul></ul>
    46. 46. Where can you recruit interested people with disabilities? <ul><li>Disability organizations </li></ul><ul><li>College and University Offices for Students with Disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>US Department of Veteran ’s Affairs </li></ul><ul><li>State and local Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies </li></ul>
    47. 47. Inclusive Interviewing <ul><li>Meet Carrie and Warren… </li></ul>
    48. 48. <ul><li>If you were Carrie what questions would you ask in your interview with Warren? </li></ul>
    49. 56. <ul><ul><li>If you agree , hold up a GREEN card </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you disagree , hold up a RED card </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ Carrie asked appropriate questions” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Warren is a good candidate for this position” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I want to know more about Warren’s disability” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Warren should not have mentioned his disability during the interview” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The interview went well” </li></ul>
    50. 57. Interview Questions that are OK <ul><li>Are you able to perform the essential functions of this position, with or without reasonable accommodations? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you describe how you would perform the following job functions (followed by a list of service duties)? </li></ul><ul><li>Ask: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How would you? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What would you do if? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How long would it take to? </li></ul></ul>
    51. 58. Interview Questions that are NOT OK <ul><li>Do you have a disability? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you have any physical or mental impairments which might limit you in performing this job? </li></ul><ul><li>Have you ever collected workers ’ compensation? </li></ul><ul><li>What medical conditions do you have? </li></ul><ul><li>What information can you tell me about your disability? </li></ul>
    52. 59. Reasons for not Disclosing <ul><li>Culture of program environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Gossipy” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Excessively competitive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Racially insensitive </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fear of potential reactions </li></ul><ul><li>Refusal by others to share equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Not relevant </li></ul><ul><li>Stigma associated with disability </li></ul><ul><li>Need to disclose to other people outside of service program first </li></ul><ul><li>*Information collected by research project at ICI </li></ul>
    53. 60. Impact for not Disclosing <ul><li>Social isolation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Did not get close to people for fear of personal questions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feel compelled to misrepresent </li></ul><ul><li>Report less support than people who did disclose </li></ul><ul><li>Stress of keeping the secret </li></ul><ul><li>Unable to request accommodations </li></ul><ul><li>*Information collected by research project at ICI </li></ul>
    54. 61. Things to Remember about Disclosure <ul><li>It is up to each individual to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide if they wish to disclose their disability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide how much information they wish to disclose about their disability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide who has access to information about their disability </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If an individual discloses a disability, that information must be maintained confidentially and cannot be disclosed to others </li></ul><ul><ul><li>May share information regarding disabilities if member provides approval in writing or alternative verifiable method </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HR personnel and supervisors are trained/informed in the confidentiality of medical, disability and accommodation-related information </li></ul></ul>
    55. 62. More Hints on Interviewing... <ul><li>Offer the availability of accommodations prior to the interview </li></ul><ul><li>If someone discloses a disability, offer the availability of and process for acquiring accommodations </li></ul><ul><li>Do not ask for details about a requested accommodation during the interview </li></ul><ul><li>Not everyone with a disability needs an accommodation </li></ul><ul><li>Ask ( and document ) the same questions of everyone </li></ul><ul><li>Ask how the person would accomplish concrete tasks </li></ul>
    56. 63. Taking Action… <ul><li>What is one way your program can make your outreach, recruitment and selection efforts more inclusive? </li></ul><ul><li>Take a moment to write an action step on your action planning poster. </li></ul>
    57. 64. Member and Volunteer Management
    58. 65. Asset-Based Management <ul><li>Match each participants ’ strengths to the essential functions of a position. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage team members to share their strengths. </li></ul><ul><li>Help each individual maximize their potential </li></ul>
    59. 66. What is an accommodation? <ul><li>Modification or adjustment to the application process </li></ul><ul><li>Modification or adjustment to the work environment that enable an individual with a disability to perform essential functions </li></ul><ul><li>Modification or adjustments that enable the member/volunteer to enjoy equal benefits and privileges of service </li></ul>
    60. 67. Who needs to provide accommodations? <ul><li>Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act applies to: </li></ul><ul><li>Federally conducted programs </li></ul><ul><li>Federal contractors and grantees </li></ul><ul><li>Federally assisted programs </li></ul><ul><li>The Americans with Disabilities Act applies to many other programs. </li></ul>
    61. 68. What do you think?
    62. 69. Disability vs. Poor Performance <ul><li>Are specific tasks not being properly performed? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the issues present beyond typical tolerance for performance variations? </li></ul><ul><li>How are performance issues typically handled? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the person aware of performance issue? </li></ul>
    63. 70. Tips for Managers <ul><li>Clear communication is key! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate policies to all program staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate clearly defined expectations to all volunteers and members in more than one way </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Establish an inclusive service environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work to create a culture that is accepting of differences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respect each individual ’s right choose what personal information they disclose. </li></ul></ul>
    64. 71. Taking Action… <ul><li>What is one way your program can make your member management more inclusive? </li></ul><ul><li>Take a moment to write an action step on your action planning poster. </li></ul>
    65. 72. Applying Inclusion <ul><li>Case studies </li></ul><ul><li>Work with your tables on scenarios. </li></ul><ul><li>We will share our finding with the large group </li></ul>
    66. 73. Wrap-up <ul><li>Overview of what we learned </li></ul><ul><li>Action planning – complete any new ideas, resources, action steps for your program </li></ul><ul><li>Questions and Answers </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluations </li></ul><ul><li>Applause for your hard work </li></ul>
    67. 74. “ Friend” us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Visit our website! Information on our electronic resources is available in your folder!
    68. 75. Click to edit Master title style Contact Information: National Service Inclusion Project 888.491.0326 [V/TTY] [email_address] www.SERVICEandINCLUSION.org

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