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Beloit Health System News Letter for 2013

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Read this Pdf for details about Beloit Health System News Letter for 2013. For more information visit http://beloithealthsystem.org or Call 608-364-5011

Read this Pdf for details about Beloit Health System News Letter for 2013. For more information visit http://beloithealthsystem.org or Call 608-364-5011

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  • 1. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013  Beloit  Health  System  Home      Give  Us  Feedback      NorthPointe  Health  and  Wellness  Campus      Riverside  Terrace In  This  Issue: What  Are  Our  Gadgets  Doing  to      Our  Bodies? Take  Good  Care  of  Your  Baby Stop  Shingles  Before  It  Starts 5  Exercise  Excuses  and  How  to      Overcome  Them The  Foundation  Thanks  Our  Community Calendar  of  Events th Thank  You  to  Our  27  Annual      Pro-­Am  Sponsors! Find  More…         Join  the  Conversation     What  Are  Our  Gadgets  Doing  to Our  Bodies? From  aching  necks  to  throbbing  thumbs,  Americans  are dealing  with  a  variety  of  ailments  that  may  result  from  our love  affair  with  electronic  gadgets.  "According  to  studies, frequent  computer  use  may  be  related  to  nerve,  muscle, tendon  and  ligament  damage,"  explains  Dr.  Kenneth  Klein, nonsurgical  orthopedist  at  Beloit  Health  System  and NorthPointe  Health  and  Wellness.  "The  fact  that  many  of  us are  continually  on  laptops,  tablets,  smartphones,  portable electronic  games  and  other  mobile  devices  has  only  added  to the  potential  strain." Some  Common  Conditions Overuse,  poor  posture  and  less-­than-­ideal  work  stations may  contribute  to  some  of  these  conditions. Wrist  and  hand  pain.  The  repetitive  motions  involved  with  typing  and  moving  a  mouse  may  result  in  tendinitis (inflamed  tendons)  or  bursitis  (inflammation  of  the  sacs  of  cushioning  fluid).  There  is  some  controversy  overwww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page1.html 1/3
  • 2. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 (inflamed  tendons)  or  bursitis  (inflammation  of  the  sacs  of  cushioning  fluid).  There  is  some  controversy  over whether  carpal  tunnel  syndrome  is  related  to  repetitive  stress,  but  it  may  be  possible.  Carpal  tunnel  syndrome  occurs when  thickened,  irritated  tendons  at  the  base  of  the  hand  press  on  a  nerve.  Symptoms  may  include  tingling,  numbness and  sharp  pains  through  the  wrist  and  up  the  arm. De  Quervains  tendinitis.  Possibly  caused  by  overuse  (think  constant  text-­messaging  or  game-­playing),  De Quervains  tendinitis  occurs  when  tendons  on  the  thumb  side  of  the  wrist  become  swollen  or  irritated.  Pain  at  the  base of  the  thumb  can  make  it  difficult  to  grasp  objects. Back,  shoulder  and  neck  pain.  Hours  of  hunching  over  a  computer  –  especially  if  stressed  or  under  a  deadline  – may  result  in  sore  and  strained  muscles. An  Ounce  of  Prevention Dr.  Klein  and  the  Physical  Medicine  department  have  a  few  tips  to  avoid  letting  your  gadgets  get  the  best  of  you. If  you  use  a  desktop  computer,  be  sure  your  workstation  is  properly  set  up  with  the  monitor  and  keyboard  adjusted for  your  height  and  optimal  viewing  distance.  Using  a  gel-­filled  or  padded  wrist  support  may  help  reduce  strain  on the  wrists  in  some  cases. If  you  plan  to  use  a  laptop  for  an  extended  period,  you  may  want  to  consider  plugging  in  an  external  keyboard  so  you can  adjust  the  monitor  to  a  more  comfortable  viewing  position.  The  same  applies  to  extended  use  of  tablets. Practice  good  posture.  Dont  hunch  your  shoulders  or  cradle  a  phone  in  your  neck  while  working. Take  regular  breaks.  Get  up  and  stretch  or  walk  –  if  only  for  a  minute  or  two  –  at  least  once  every  hour,  and preferably  every  half  hour. Avoid  constant  texting.  If  you  have  a  long  message  to  deliver,  consider  using  your  phone  to  call  rather  than  text. A  Pound  of  Cure If  you  do  find  that  pain  in  your  hand,  wrist,  arm  or  back  and  shoulders  is  affecting  your  quality  of  life  or  ability  to  work, you  may  benefit  from  physical  or  occupational  therapy.  If  you  have  questions  about  pain  you  may  be  experiencing, please  call  Dr.  Klein  at  (815)  525-­4400. A  U.S.  Bureau  of  Labor  study  revealed  that  most  office  workers  sit  at  their  computers  7.5  hours  a day.  And  then  add  in  texting,  Facebook  and  tablets.  Now  that  can  have  an  effect  on  your  health! HealthWise  Homepage   Next  » Frequent  computer  use  may  be  related  to  nerve,  muscle,  tendon  and  ligament damage. Dr.  Kenneth  Klein,  Nonsurgical  Orthopedist  at  Beloit  Health  System  and  NorthPointe  Health  and Wellness The  Best  Is  Yet  to  Come!  •  A+  for  New  School  District  Clinic  •  Are  You  Taking  Care  of  Your  Colon?  •  Join Us  on  Facebook!  •  New  Physicians This  publication  does  not  constitute  professional  medical  advice.  Although  it  is  intended  to  be  accurate,  neither  the  publisher  nor  any  other party  assumes  liability  for  loss  or  damage  due  to  reliance  on  this  material.  If  you  have  a  medical  question,  consult  your  medical  professional. Images  may  be  from  one  or  more  of  these  sources:  ©Thinkstock,  ©iStock,  ©Fotolia.  ©  2012  Beloit  Health  System. Powered  by  BlueSpire  Strategic  Marketingwww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page1.html 2/3
  • 3. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013  Beloit  Health  System  Home      Give  Us  Feedback      NorthPointe  Health  and  Wellness  Campus      Riverside  Terrace In  This  Issue: What  Are  Our  Gadgets  Doing  to      Our  Bodies? Take  Good  Care  of  Your  Baby Stop  Shingles  Before  It  Starts 5  Exercise  Excuses  and  How  to      Overcome  Them The  Foundation  Thanks  Our  Community Calendar  of  Events th Thank  You  to  Our  27  Annual      Pro-­Am  Sponsors! Find  More…         Join  the  Conversation     Tips  for  a  Healthy  Pregnancy Take  Good  Care  of  Your  Baby Beloit  Health  Systems  obstetric  team  would  like  to  help you  have  a  healthy,  happy  baby.  Here  are  some  tips  to help  you  through  your  nine  months  of  preparation. From  day  one  of  your  pregnancy,  everything  you  do  and  eat directly  affects  your  child.  Taking  special  care  of  your  body before  and  during  pregnancy  can  help  you  and  your  baby develop  healthfully. Eating  for  One–Plus Eating  for  two  is  an  outdated  notion  that  can  lead  to unnecessary  weight  gain.  Gaining  too  much  weight  can  lead to  pregnancy  complications  such  as  diabetes,  high  blood pressure,  constipation  and  backaches,  as  well  as  a  more difficult  delivery.  While  its  important  to  eat  a  varied, balanced  diet,  the  National  Institutes  of  Health  recommends  eating  only  300  extra  calories  a  day.www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page2.html 1/3
  • 4. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 However,  you  will  need  to  add  more  nutrients  to  your  diet  to  help  your  baby  grow.  You  may  be  able  to  glean  some  of these  extra  vitamins  and  minerals  from  food,  while  others  may  require  a  supplement. Folic  acid  helps  prevent  neural  tube  defects  such  as  spina  bifida  and  is  essential  to  the  formation  of  red  blood  cells. Pregnancy  doubles  the  need  for  folic  acid,  which  is  found  in  kidney  beans,  leafy  green  vegetables,  peas  and  liver.  Your doctor  may  recommend  a  supplement  to  ensure  you  consume  the  proper  amount  before  and  during  pregnancy. Iron  helps  form  red  blood  cells,  and  pregnancy  calls  for  higher  than  normal  doses.  Iron  deficiency  can  lead  to  exhaustion and  anemia. Calcium  helps  build  a  baby’s  bones,  so  its  important  for  pregnant  and  breastfeeding  women  to  consume  1,000  to  1,300 mg  a  day.  For  lactose-­intolerant  women  or  those  who  struggle  to  eat  enough  dairy  products,  your  doctor  may  suggest  a supplement. Some  foods  can  add  to  your  discomfort  and  may  actually  harm  you  and  your  baby.  Caffeine  can  cause  irritability, insomnia,  nervousness  and  dehydration  in  the  mother,  and  low  birth  weight  in  the  baby.  Alcohol  consumption  can  lead to  fetal  alcohol  syndrome,  a  leading  cause  of  birth  defects  and  mental  retardation.  You  may  also  want  to  steer  clear  of raw  fish  high  in  mercury  and  soft  cheeses. Get  Fit  For  Two Exercising  for  30  minutes  on  most  days  during  pregnancy  offers  a  range  of  benefits,  including  improving  your  mood, building  muscle,  managing  weight,  reducing  backaches  and  so  much  more. You  may  find  that  nonweight-­bearing  exercises,  such  as  swimming  and  biking,  are  the  most  comfortable  during pregnancy.  Walking  and  low-­impact  aerobics  can  also  provide  a  safe  and  healthy  option.  Talk  to  your  doctor  about continuing  any  higher-­impact  pre-­pregnancy  activities. As  your  pregnancy  progresses,  avoid  exercises  that  require  you  to  lie  flat  on  your  back  or  stand  for  long  periods  of  time. Beware  of  getting  overheated  and  drink  plenty  of  fluids.  And  avoid  activities  that  put  you  at  risk  for  injury,  such  as downhill  skiing  and  contact  sports. Get  the  Care  You  Need Seeing  your  healthcare  provider  regularly  helps  ensure  that  you  and  your  baby  grow  strong.  Even  if  youre  only  thinking about  trying  to  conceive,  discuss  with  your  doctor  what  you  can  do  to  ensure  a  healthy  pregnancy. Please  call  Beloit  Clinic  at  (608)  364-­2220  or  NorthPointe  Clinic  at  (815)  525-­4500  to  make  an appointment  with  a  member  of  our  obstetric  team.www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page2.html 2/3
  • 5. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 «  Previous   HealthWise  Homepage   Next  » The  Best  Is  Yet  to  Come!  •  A+  for  New  School  District  Clinic  •  Are  You  Taking  Care  of  Your  Colon?  •  Join Us  on  Facebook!  •  New  Physicians This  publication  does  not  constitute  professional  medical  advice.  Although  it  is  intended  to  be  accurate,  neither  the  publisher  nor  any  other party  assumes  liability  for  loss  or  damage  due  to  reliance  on  this  material.  If  you  have  a  medical  question,  consult  your  medical  professional. Images  may  be  from  one  or  more  of  these  sources:  ©Thinkstock,  ©iStock,  ©Fotolia.  ©  2012  Beloit  Health  System. Powered  by  BlueSpire  Strategic  Marketingwww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page2.html 3/3
  • 6. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013  Beloit  Health  System  Home      Give  Us  Feedback      NorthPointe  Health  and  Wellness  Campus      Riverside  Terrace In  This  Issue: What  Are  Our  Gadgets  Doing  to      Our  Bodies? Take  Good  Care  of  Your  Baby Stop  Shingles  Before  It  Starts 5  Exercise  Excuses  and  How  to      Overcome  Them The  Foundation  Thanks  Our  Community Calendar  of  Events th Thank  You  to  Our  27  Annual      Pro-­Am  Sponsors! Find  More…         Join  the  Conversation     Get  a  Shingles  Shot Stop  Shingles  Before  It  Starts Have  you  gotten  your  shingles  vaccination?  Shingles,  or herpes  zoster,  is  caused  by  the  same  virus  as  chickenpox, and  results  in  painful,  blistering  rashes  on  your  skin. "Shingles  can  affect  anyone  who  has  had  chickenpox,  but the  risk  increases  with  age,"  explains  Dr.  Christel  Tecarro, family  practice  physician  at  Beloit  Clinic.  "If  you  are  over age  60,  ask  your  doctor  about  getting  vaccinated." To  further  protect  yourself  and  your  loved  ones  against shingles,  here  are  some  questions  and  answers  about  the virus  that  everyone  should  know. What  Causes  Shingles  and  Can  It  Spread? "The  chickenpox  virus  never  completely  leaves  your  body," she  says.  "Instead,  it  lies  dormant  in  your  system,  hiding  in  certain  nerve  cells.  Shingles  occurs  when  this  virus  suddenly becomes  active  again."www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page3.html 1/2
  • 7. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 Shingles  itself  isnt  contagious.  But  the  virus  can  be  passed  on  through  direct  contact  with  the  shingles  sores  by  anyone who  isnt  immune  to  chickenpox,  causing  them  to  develop  chickenpox. What  Are  the  Symptoms  of  Shingles? Shingles  may  first  appear  as  a  tingling  or  burning  sensation  followed  by  red  blotches  on  the  skin.  These  blotches typically  appear  on  your  torso  crossing  from  your  abdomen  to  your  spine,  but  they  can  also  appear  on  your  face. Wherever  they  appear,  these  blotches  quickly  become  painful  or  itchy  and  develop  blisters.  While  this  rash  is  the  most common  symptom,  it  isnt  the  only  one.  Other  symptoms  of  shingles  include  abdominal  pain,  chills,  fever,  headache, hearing  loss  and  problems  with  taste  or  vision. How  Is  Shingles  Treated? "Shingles  is  treated  with  an  antiviral  drug  that  reduces  the  pain  and  risk  of  complications,  and  shortens  the  length  of  the outbreak.  The  prescription  typically  comes  in  pill  form  and  works  best  when  started  within  24  hours  of  detection,  before blistering  occurs,"  Dr.  Tecarro  states. A  shingles  outbreak  may  take  a  few  weeks  to  clear  up.  In  the  meantime  cool  compresses,  long  baths  and  lotions  can  help soothe  the  pain  and  itching,  or  your  doctor  may  recommend  medications  that  can  help.  Bed  rest  is  also  recommended  if you  have  a  fever. What  Are  Possible  Complications  of  Shingles? People  over  age  60  have  the  highest  risk  for  complications  from  shingles.  These  complications  include  nerve  damage  in areas  of  initial  outbreak  –  leading  to  long-­lasting  pain  –  as  well  as  reinfection,  blindness,  deafness  or  bacterial  infections. Get  Vaccinated! Shingles  is  preventable.  By  taking  the  time  now  to  get  vaccinated,  you  can  reduce  your  risk  and  save  yourself  from  a  lot of  pain  later  on. For  more  information  on  shingles,  make  an  appointment  with  Dr.  Tecarro  at  (608)  364-­2240,  or talk  to  your  doctor  to  see  if  the  vaccine  is  right  for  you. «  Previous   HealthWise  Homepage   Next  » Shingles  can  affect  anyone  who  has  had  chickenpox,  but  the  risk  increases  with age. Dr.  Christel  Tecarro,  Family  Practice  Physician  at  Beloit  Clinic The  Best  Is  Yet  to  Come!  •  A+  for  New  School  District  Clinic  •  Are  You  Taking  Care  of  Your  Colon?  •  Join Us  on  Facebook!  •  New  Physicians This  publication  does  not  constitute  professional  medical  advice.  Although  it  is  intended  to  be  accurate,  neither  the  publisher  nor  any  other party  assumes  liability  for  loss  or  damage  due  to  reliance  on  this  material.  If  you  have  a  medical  question,  consult  your  medical  professional. Images  may  be  from  one  or  more  of  these  sources:  ©Thinkstock,  ©iStock,  ©Fotolia.  ©  2012  Beloit  Health  System. Powered  by  BlueSpire  Strategic  Marketingwww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page3.html 2/2
  • 8. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013  Beloit  Health  System  Home      Give  Us  Feedback      NorthPointe  Health  and  Wellness  Campus      Riverside  Terrace In  This  Issue: What  Are  Our  Gadgets  Doing  to      Our  Bodies? Take  Good  Care  of  Your  Baby Stop  Shingles  Before  It  Starts 5  Exercise  Excuses  and  How  to      Overcome  Them The  Foundation  Thanks  Our  Community Calendar  of  Events th Thank  You  to  Our  27  Annual      Pro-­Am  Sponsors! Find  More…         Join  the  Conversation     5  Exercise  Excuses  and  How  to Overcome  Them Weve  all  heard  of  the  benefits  that  come  from  exercising regularly.  People  who  are  physically  active  are  healthier, feel  happier  and  have  more  energy.  But  when  it  comes  to getting  out  there  and  exercising,  many  of  us  have  a  long  list of  excuses  for  why  we  shouldnt.  Dr.  Robert  Lisek  shares five  of  the  most  common  excuses  and  ways  to  beat  them. Have  you  heard  or  said  these? 1.   Im  too  busy.  The  U.S.  Surgeon  General  recommends at  least  150  minutes  of  aerobic  activity  a  week.  This may  seem  like  a  lot,  but  its  not  much  more  than  20 minutes  a  day.  Start  looking  at  your  schedule  to  see where  you  can  fit  this  initial  20  minutes.  Maybe  you can  jog  in  place  while  watching  TV.  Better  yet,  try turning  off  the  TV  and  using  that  time  for  exercising. 2.   Im  too  tired.  Physical  activity  is  often  associated  with  exhaustion.  However,  being  physically  active  actually releases  endorphins  into  your  body,  leaving  you  feeling  energized.  Instead  of  focusing  on  how  tired  you  feel  beforewww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page4.html 1/3
  • 9. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 releases  endorphins  into  your  body,  leaving  you  feeling  energized.  Instead  of  focusing  on  how  tired  you  feel  before you  exercise,  focus  instead  on  the  energized  feeling  you  will  get  after  your  workout. 3.   Its  too  hot/cold.  Have  a  backup  plan  ready  for  those  days  when  the  weather  isnt  cooperating.  Perhaps  broaden your  exercise  regimen  to  include  indoor  activities  like  Pilates  or  yoga.  Try  a  DVD  that  you  can  watch  and  follow along  at  home. 4.   I  hate  going  to  the  gym.  You  dont  have  to  go  to  a  gym  to  get  exercise.  Find  an  activity  you  love  and  do  it.  For example,  if  you  love  music,  why  not  join  a  dance  or  cycle  class  set  to  music?  Or  if  you  enjoy  reading,  why  not  get some  audio  books  and  listen  while  you  take  a  walk? 5.   I  can  never  follow  through.  Changing  habits  can  be  difficult.  Set  small  attainable  goals.  Dont  try  to  run  for  an hour  on  your  first  go,  build  up  to  it.  By  breaking  up  your  exercise  goals  into  small  manageable  pieces  you  may succeed. Dont  dread  exercise,  it  can  be  fun!  Try  teaming  up  with  an  exercise  buddy  so  you  can  keep  each  other  on  track  and motivated.  Its  harder  to  make  excuses  when  someone  is  counting  on  you  to  be  there  for  a  walk,  bike  ride  or  trip  to  the gym. NorthPointe  Wellness,  at  5605  E.  Rockton  Road  in  Roscoe,  has  a  daily  schedule  of  fun  activities  for  members  or  those who  want  to  try  a  day  pass  for  $15.  They  also  have  the  fitness  experts  to  get  you  motivated  and  moving.  No  excuses! Call  (815)  525-­4900  to  find  out  more.     Winter  Crisp Cranberries  and  apples  are  baked  with  oats  and  whole wheat  flour  for  a  wholesome  treat. Number  of  servings:  6 Ingredients ½  cup  sugar 3  tablespoons  whole  wheat  flour 1  teaspoon  lemon  peel  (grated) 5  cups  apple  (unpeeled,  sliced) 1  cup  cranberries  (fresh) ⅔  cups  rolled  oats ⅓  cup  brown  sugar  (packed) ¼  cup  whole  wheat  flour 2  tablespoons  cinnamon 3  tablespoons  margarine  (melted) Directions Filling: 1.   Combine  sugar,  flour  and  lemon  peel  in  a  medium  bowl  and  mix  well. 2.   Stir  in  apples  and  cranberries. 3.   Spoon  into  a  6-­cup  baking  dish. Topping:www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page4.html 2/3
  • 10. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 Topping: 1.   Combine  oats,  brown  sugar,  flour  and  cinnamon  in  a  small  bowl. 2.   Stir  in  melted  margarine. 3.   Sprinkle  topping  over  filling. 4.   Bake  at  375°F  for  40  minutes  or  until  filling  is  bubbly  and  top  is  brown. 5.   Serve  warm  or  at  room  temperature. Per  serving:  320  calories,  7  g  fat,  0  mg  cholesterol,  60  mg  sodium,  62  g  carbohydrates,  6  g  fiber,  39  g  sugar,  4  g  protein Recipe  courtesy  of  the  U.S.  Department  of  Agriculture,  recipefinder.nal.usda.gov. «  Previous   HealthWise  Homepage   Next  » The  Best  Is  Yet  to  Come!  •  A+  for  New  School  District  Clinic  •  Are  You  Taking  Care  of  Your  Colon?  •  Join Us  on  Facebook!  •  New  Physicians This  publication  does  not  constitute  professional  medical  advice.  Although  it  is  intended  to  be  accurate,  neither  the  publisher  nor  any  other party  assumes  liability  for  loss  or  damage  due  to  reliance  on  this  material.  If  you  have  a  medical  question,  consult  your  medical  professional. Images  may  be  from  one  or  more  of  these  sources:  ©Thinkstock,  ©iStock,  ©Fotolia.  ©  2012  Beloit  Health  System. Powered  by  BlueSpire  Strategic  Marketingwww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page4.html 3/3
  • 11. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013  Beloit  Health  System  Home      Give  Us  Feedback      NorthPointe  Health  and  Wellness  Campus      Riverside  Terrace In  This  Issue: What  Are  Our  Gadgets  Doing  to      Our  Bodies? Take  Good  Care  of  Your  Baby Stop  Shingles  Before  It  Starts 5  Exercise  Excuses  and  How  to      Overcome  Them The  Foundation  Thanks  Our  Community Calendar  of  Events th Thank  You  to  Our  27  Annual      Pro-­Am  Sponsors! Find  More…         Join  the  Conversation     The  Foundation  Thanks  Our  Community Beloit  Health  System  Foundation  had  a  busy  fall!  Some  of  our  events  included  sponsoring  fundraisers  such  as  the  Pro-­ Am,  hosting  educational  seminars  and  providing  a  forum  for  professional  women.  All  of  these  help  us  connect  with  you and  help  provide  funding  for  quality  patient  services!  We  wanted  to  share  some  of  our  recent  highlights  with  you  in  this photo  journal.  Numbers  correspond  to  photos  below. 27th  Annual  Pro-­Am 1A The  27th  annual  Pro-­Am  featured  twotime  national  long  drive  champion  Jamie  Sadlowski.  He  “wowed” attendees  with  his  420-­yard  drives  and  trick  shots.  Forrest,  Sue  (2012  Pro-­Am  Chair)  and  Joe  Knueppel welcome  Jamie  (second  from  left). 1B Ann  Sitrick,  Foundation  Executive  Director,  and  Bill  Sullivan  get  ready  for  the  Culver’s  Putt  for  Ca$h  event.  In addition  to  the  golf  tournament,  more  than  200  guests  attended  the  evening  dinner  to  help  raise  funds  for  vital patient  technology. 1C Dave  Cullen  and  Jeff  Johnson  were  two  of  the  120  golfers  who  played  in  the  Pro-­Am  that  raised  more  than $100,000  for  Cancer  Care  at  Beloit  Health  System.www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page5.html 1/5
  • 12. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 Kids  with  Quilts 2 A  group  of  Beloit  youngsters  were  inspired  by  a  “friends  for  change”  TV  commercial.  It  gave  them  the  idea  to cut  and  knot  these  seven  brightly  colored  blankets  and  donate  them  to  hospitalized  children. Marion  Fry  Memorial 3 The  family  of  Marion  Fry,  who  worked  in  Beloit  Health  Systems  Family  Care  Center  for  more  than  30  years, recently  donated  a  beautiful  Amish  Rocker  to  the  Family  Care  Center  in  her  memory.  The  chair  is  now  being enjoyed  by  moms  and  newborns  and  has  a  place  of  honor  in  the  birthing  center  nursery. Community  Against  Cancers  2nd  Annual  Co-­Ed  Softball  Tournament 4 Eleven  softball  teams  participated  in  the  Community  Against  Cancers  2nd  annual  co-­ed  softball  tournament  in September.  The  event  raised  $7,000  for  two  organizations  that  benefit  Stateline  area  breast  cancer  patients.  From left  are  Josette  Fillbach,  Tracy  Hannah,  Ann  Sitrick,  Karie  Larson  and  Jerry  Garbe. Dinner  with  the  Docs 5 Lisa  and  Bill  Groeper  enjoyed  an  evening  with  Dr.  Kenneth  Klein  (center),  at  the  Foundation  "Dinner  with  the Docs"  in  September.  Attending  physicians  thank  the  community  for  their  continued  support  at  this  event. Womens  Forum  Celebrates  Health,  Finance  and  Community  Spirit 6A The  Womens  Forum  is  an  opportunity  for  women  to  gather  and  educate  themselves  on  health,  finance  and community  spirit.  Bonnie  Wetter,  BMO  Harris  Bank;;  Diane  Hendricks,  ABC  Supply;;  and  Dr.  Lisa  Reinicke, podiatrist;;  each  shared  their  wisdom  with  guests. 6B Women’s  Forum  guests,  including  Shauna  El-­Amin,  Pam  Lathrop,  Joan  Waite  and  Sherry  Pasetka,  were  among the  more  than  40  participants  who  enjoyed  the  fall  Womens  Forum  co-­sponsored  by  the  Foundation  and  BMO Harris  Bank.www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page5.html 2/5
  • 13. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013www.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page5.html 3/5
  • 14. 12/18/12 Beloit -‐‑HealthWise -‐‑ Winter/Spring 2013 «  Previous   HealthWise  Homepage   Next  » The  Best  Is  Yet  to  Come!  •  A+  for  New  School  District  Clinic  •  Are  You  Taking  Care  of  Your  Colon?  •  Join Us  on  Facebook!  •  New  Physicianswww.myhealthnewsletter.com/beloit/WinterSpring2013/page5.html 4/5