SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 12
Download to read offline
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
1 
This survey was conducted by 
Ipsos on behalf of ING 
ING International Survey 
SEPTEMBER 2014 
Mobile Banking, Social Media and Financial Behaviour 
Learning young: Does getting pocket money teach savings habits for life?
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
2 
13 
1,000 
12,403 
About the ING International Survey 
The ING International Survey aims to gain a better understanding of how retail customers – and potential customers – of ING Bank around the globe spend, save, invest and feel about money. It is conducted several times a year, with past reports online at www.ezonomics.com/iis. This survey was conducted by Ipsos between 20 February and 14 March 2014 using internet-based polling and, in Poland, a portion of telephone- based polling. European consumer figures are an average, weighted to take country population into account. 
countries are compared in this report. 
About 1,000 respondents were surveyed in each, apart from Luxembourg, with 500. 
THE SURVEY 
is the total sample size of this report 
Netherlands 
Poland 
Czech Republic 
Austria 
Romania 
Turkey 
Italy 
France 
Spain 
Germany 
Belgium 
Luxembourg 
United Kingdom
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
3 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? 
Pocket money is often used as a tool to help children get a grip on money. Do children in Europe still receive pocket money from their parents and how are they getting pocket money these days? We asked almost 5,000 parents across Europe in the ING International Survey.
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
4 
Making money more real: Pocket money as a teaching tool around Europe, with life-long results? 
Respondents who received pocket money as a child are more likely to say they regularly add to their savings and to save for retirement. They are also less likely to regularly be overdrawn on their bank account. Of six money habits, people who received pocket money are more likely to show greater financial competence in four. But it is not possible to conclude from this whether pocket money is the cause of the greater financial competence or if there is simply a correlation. When asked how much pocket money they give to their children, Italian parents top the 2014 pocket money index. In contrast, the Czech Republic was the lowest ranked in our pocket money index – but exchange rates and lower average incomes are likely to be a factor here. The Dutch stand out as being less generous with pocket money than parents in neighbouring countries. In Austria, the rate spikes for children aged 15+, perhaps suggesting greater financial independence for Austrians in their late teens. The share who received pocket money as a child is similar to the share who give it to their children now, however, there are some interesting differences that have emerged over time. Paying into a bank account appears to be increasingly common, while working for pocket money (both inside and outside the home) is much less common. At the individual country level, pocket money appears to have become more popular in Italy (with a higher share giving it now than receiving pocket money as a child) and the reverse is apparent in the Netherlands (where much fewer parents give pocket money than received it as a child). As many might expect, the number one reason parents surveyed give their children pocket money is to teach how to be responsible with money. Teaching the value of money is the second most common response, followed by “so that they can buy the things that they need”. The vast majority of respondents who give pocket money have seen an improvement in their children’s understanding of the value of money. 
- Ian Bright, ING senior economist 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
5 
THE QUESTION 
Italy tops the “pocket money index” for 2014, Czech Republic last 
Italian parents top the 2014 pocket money index, being the most generous in a ranking of all age groups. Next are France, Spain and Austria. At the other end of the spectrum are Romania, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic, but exchange rates and lower average incomes are likely to be a factor in two of the countries here. There are some interesting standouts when looking at country medians. Austrians in the 15-plus age group do particularly well in the pocket money stakes. The going rate in the Netherlands is relatively low compared with that in the neighbours of the Dutch. It must be noted however, that the sample sizes in many of these answer categories are very small – so the results should be treated with caution. The all age ranking has been formed by ranking each country from highest to lowest pocket money in each age group. These rankings are then averaged to give the all age result. For Luxembourg, the sample size was too small for under 10s to give a statistically robust median, so it is excluded from the pocket money index. 
Median amount of pocket money given a week by age, converted into euros 
Under 5 
5-to-10 years 
10-to-15 years 
15-plus 
All age ranking 
European consumer 
2.00 
4.75 
9.50 
20.00 
Italy 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
30.00 
1 
France 
2.00 
5.00 
10.00 
20.00 
2 
Spain 
1.00 
5.00 
10.00 
20.00 
3 
Austria 
2.25 
3.50 
9.75 
35.25 
4 
Belgium 
2.00 
2.25 
10.00 
20.00 
5= 
Germany 
1.00 
4.00 
10.00 
20.00 
5= 
United Kingdom 
2.50 
6.00 
6.00 
12.00 
7 
Turkey 
1.50 
3.25 
6.50 
16.00 
8 
Poland 
2.25 
2.25 
4.75 
11.75 
9 
Romania 
2.25 
2.25 
3.00 
11.00 
10 
Netherlands 
0.50 
1.50 
5.00 
12.50 
11 
Czech Republic 
0.75 
1.75 
4.00 
10.75 
12 
Luxembourg 
n/a 
n/a 
10.00 
50.00 
n/a 
Sample size: 671 (Under 5), 918 (5-to-10 years), 1,107 (10-to-15 years), 1,223 (15-plus)
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
6 
THE QUESTION 
Positive signs: Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? 
Respondents who received pocket money as a child are more likely to regularly add to their savings and to save for retirement. They are also less likely to regularly be overdrawn on their bank account and likely to say they can easily control their spending. Of six money habits, people who received pocket money are more likely to show greater financial competence in four. In addition, people with well organised personal finances and a financial buffer in place arguably may have more freedom to “buy on impulse”, so the higher likelihood to do this among people who received pocket money is not inherently negative. Some academic research disputes whether pocket money has an impact on the way people save and spend later in life. The results to this survey add to the debate but it is not possible to conclude from the results whether pocket money is the cause of the greater financial competence or if there is simply a correlation because of other factors. Current income, parents’ income during childhood and other influences from family background may be relevant. 
Sample size: 12,403 
Did receive pocket money 
Did not receive pocket money 
Difference 
I regularly add to my savings 
55% 
45% 
+10 
I am saving for retirement 
40% 
31% 
+9 
I am regularly overdrawn 
22% 
25% 
-3 
I easily control my spending 
74% 
72% 
+2 
I keep a household budget 
66% 
71% 
-5 
I regularly buy on impulse 
34% 
22% 
+12
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
7 
THE QUESTION 
Direct payment to bank more common; fewer working for their cash 
The most common way of giving children pocket money is from parents on a regular basis, with a smaller share saying they do it “when needed”. This is similar to answers respondents gave to how they received pocket money themselves. While only 8% of parents who give pocket money stipulate that they do so by directly depositing it into a bank account, this is more than double the share of respondents who received it in this way. Paying into a bank account appears to be increasingly common. However, the reverse is true for the share of children who earn their pocket money. Just 8% of parents who give pocket money say the pocket money is contingent on doing chores in the family home and an additional 4% on working outside the home. But the share who received pocket money in this way when they were children themselves was 12% working inside the home and 15% outside it. These days, giving pocket money for good performance at school or in school exams is another commonly cited reason. 
Did you receive pocket money when you were growing up?/Do you allow your children to get pocket money? 
4% 
8% 
8% 
21% 
33% 
35% 
15% 
3% 
12% 
20% 
29% 
38% 
Yes - earned by doing 
a job outside the 
home 
Yes - directly into a 
bank account 
Yes - earned by doing 
chores at home 
I do not allow / did 
not recive pocket 
money 
Yes - when needed 
Yes - on a regular 
basis 
Give pocket money 
Received pocket money 
Sample size: 4,695 give pocket money, 12,403 received pocket money
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
8 
THE QUESTION 
Generation shift? Dutch least likely to give pocket money 
The vast majority of people in Europe received pocket money when they were growing up – with 80% saying they did. It ranges from highs amongst respondents from Turkey, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, to lows in France and Poland. A similar share of people in Europe say they give pocket money as those who received it when they were young. However, there are some differences between responses in some countries. Italians, for example, are much more likely to give their children pocket money than they were to receive it themselves. Meanwhile, the Dutch are least likely to give pocket money but the second most likely to have received it when they were growing up. 
Did you receive pocket money when you were growing up?/Do you allow your children to get pocket money? 
Percent who indicated their answer was “yes” (Did not answer “no”) 
79% 
67% 
68% 
69% 
71% 
72% 
73% 
74% 
77% 
81% 
82% 
86% 
92% 
95% 
80% 
89% 
71% 
66% 
79% 
65% 
83% 
80% 
85% 
71% 
83% 
88% 
85% 
93% 
European consumer 
Netherlands 
Czech Republic 
Poland 
Spain 
France 
Belgium 
Austria 
Germany 
Italy 
Luxembourg 
United Kingdom 
Romania 
Turkey 
Give pocket money 
Received pocket money 
Sample size: 4,695 give pocket money, 12,403 received pocket money
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
9 
THE QUESTION 
Teaching responsibility the top goal of giving pocket money 
As many would expect, the number one reason parents surveyed give their children pocket money is to teach how to be responsible with money. Teaching the value of money is the second most common response, followed by “so that they can buy the things that they need” in third. Very few give pocket money without any specific reason, suggesting it is a tool rather than simply handing over money without a bigger purpose. 
Why do you give your children pocket money? 
Percent who answered in the below categories 
4% 
14% 
17% 
25% 
28% 
36% 
37% 
38% 
48% 
54% 
No specific reason 
It is normal to do this in my culture 
To help them prepare for living 
away from home 
To encourage independence 
To encourage them to learn the 
basics of financial planning 
To help them manage money 
To encourage them to budget 
So that they can buy the things they 
need 
To teach the value of money 
To teach how to be responsible with 
money 
Sample size: 3,635
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
10 
THE QUESTION 
“My child knows the value of a euro now” 
The vast majority of respondents who give pocket money have seen an improvement in their children’s understanding of the value of money. Likewise, many have seen improved basic budgeting and money management skills. This is in line with the top goals of parents when they give pocket money to children – teaching responsibility and the value of money. 
Since giving my child(ren) pocket money I have seen an improvement in their… 
Percent who “strongly agree” or “agree” 
70% 
73% 
79% 
83% 
becoming more self-sufficient once 
they leave home 
money management skills 
basic budgeting skills 
realising the value of money 
Sample size: 3,635
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
11 
Contact list 
Name Phone number Email 
Senior Economist Ian Bright +44 20 7767 6656 ian.bright@uk.ing.com 
Editor Martha McKenzie-Minifie +44 20 7767 6564 martha.mckenzie-minifie@uk.ing.com 
ING Sustainability Maarten de Jongh +31 20 5637911 maarten.de.jongh@ing.com 
Marketing Manager Kariem Hamed +31 6 300 71 661 kariem.hamed@ing.nl 
Ipsos Nieko Sluis +31 20 607 0707 nieko.sluis@ipsos.com 
CONTACT LIST
ING International Survey 
Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 
12 
The opinions expressed in this publication are based on information 
gathered by ING and on sources that ING deems reliable. This data 
has been processed with care in our analyses. Neither ING nor 
employees of the bank can be held liable for any inaccuracies in this 
publication. No rights can be derived from the information given. 
ING accepts no liability whatsoever for the content of the publication 
or for information offered on or via the sites. Authors rights and data 
protection rights apply to this publication. Nothing in this publication 
may be reproduced, distributed or published without explicit 
mention of ING as the source of this information. The user of this 
information is obliged to abide by ING’s instructions relating to the 
use of this information. Dutch law applies. 
Disclaimer 
DISCLAIMER

More Related Content

Similar to Learning young: Does getting pocket money teach savings habits for life?

Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"
Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"
Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"Ipsos France
 
Consumer Attitudes Survey 2014 Report
Consumer Attitudes Survey 2014 ReportConsumer Attitudes Survey 2014 Report
Consumer Attitudes Survey 2014 ReportAviva plc
 
Ing international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_version
Ing international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_versionIng international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_version
Ing international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_versionPaperjam_redaction
 
Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications
Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy ImplicationsFinancial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications
Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy ImplicationsEuropeanBankingFederation
 
Strong demand across Europe for financial education in schools
Strong demand across Europe for financial education in schoolsStrong demand across Europe for financial education in schools
Strong demand across Europe for financial education in schoolsIpsos UK
 
Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit
Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit
Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit Laja Shoniran
 
Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015
Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015
Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015Ipsos France
 
Observatoire de la consommation 2016
Observatoire de la consommation 2016 Observatoire de la consommation 2016
Observatoire de la consommation 2016 Violette De Lattre
 
Breakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young people
Breakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young peopleBreakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young people
Breakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young peopleWijzer in geldzaken
 
Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...
Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...
Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...CharityComms
 
Financial literacy (is good for sex)
Financial literacy (is good for sex)Financial literacy (is good for sex)
Financial literacy (is good for sex)Henry Tapper
 
Margins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big data
Margins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big dataMargins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big data
Margins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big dataIpsos UK
 
Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...
Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...
Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...CharityComms
 
ILC-UK - The Value of Financial Advice
ILC-UK - The Value of Financial AdviceILC-UK - The Value of Financial Advice
ILC-UK - The Value of Financial AdviceILC- UK
 
Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...
Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...
Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...Wisr
 
Bank to the Future
Bank to the FutureBank to the Future
Bank to the FutureGood Rebels
 

Similar to Learning young: Does getting pocket money teach savings habits for life? (19)

Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"
Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"
Baromètre "Les Européens et les dépenses de Noël"
 
Consumer Attitudes Survey 2014 Report
Consumer Attitudes Survey 2014 ReportConsumer Attitudes Survey 2014 Report
Consumer Attitudes Survey 2014 Report
 
Ing international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_version
Ing international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_versionIng international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_version
Ing international survey_homes_and_mortgages_final_luxembourg_web_version
 
Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications
Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy ImplicationsFinancial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications
Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications
 
Future of Ireland 3
Future of Ireland 3Future of Ireland 3
Future of Ireland 3
 
Strong demand across Europe for financial education in schools
Strong demand across Europe for financial education in schoolsStrong demand across Europe for financial education in schools
Strong demand across Europe for financial education in schools
 
Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit
Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit
Savings Survey - Imact of Teach Children To Save Summit
 
Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015
Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015
Ipsos views | Briefing: Europe 2015
 
Observatoire de la consommation 2016
Observatoire de la consommation 2016 Observatoire de la consommation 2016
Observatoire de la consommation 2016
 
Breakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young people
Breakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young peopleBreakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young people
Breakout: Promoting responsible use of credit among young people
 
Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...
Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...
Attitudes and Action: How do young people understand and engage with voluntee...
 
LUSARDI Annamaria - 2014 Symposium to Advance Financial Literacy
LUSARDI Annamaria - 2014 Symposium to Advance Financial LiteracyLUSARDI Annamaria - 2014 Symposium to Advance Financial Literacy
LUSARDI Annamaria - 2014 Symposium to Advance Financial Literacy
 
Financial literacy (is good for sex)
Financial literacy (is good for sex)Financial literacy (is good for sex)
Financial literacy (is good for sex)
 
Margins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big data
Margins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big dataMargins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big data
Margins of Error: public understanding of statistics in an era of big data
 
Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...
Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...
Engagement: challenges, trends and new ways of thinking. Engagement conferenc...
 
ILC-UK - The Value of Financial Advice
ILC-UK - The Value of Financial AdviceILC-UK - The Value of Financial Advice
ILC-UK - The Value of Financial Advice
 
Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...
Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...
Tempe Research Institution Summit [Resource] - Ashland University: Millennial...
 
Bank to the Future
Bank to the FutureBank to the Future
Bank to the Future
 
UK Charitable Giving 2010
UK Charitable Giving 2010UK Charitable Giving 2010
UK Charitable Giving 2010
 

More from removed_f06d903cf11319d8a9c7afb4ce2a9fb6 (6)

Household wealth in Europe (infographic)
Household wealth in Europe (infographic)Household wealth in Europe (infographic)
Household wealth in Europe (infographic)
 
Economics in 3D
Economics in 3DEconomics in 3D
Economics in 3D
 
3Q14 ING Group Results
3Q14 ING Group Results3Q14 ING Group Results
3Q14 ING Group Results
 
First Quarter 2014 Results ING
First Quarter 2014 Results INGFirst Quarter 2014 Results ING
First Quarter 2014 Results ING
 
The German technology industry. Opportunities in a more open supply chain. #HM14
The German technology industry. Opportunities in a more open supply chain. #HM14The German technology industry. Opportunities in a more open supply chain. #HM14
The German technology industry. Opportunities in a more open supply chain. #HM14
 
Towards Ambition 2015. Goldman Sachs Conference 2013
Towards Ambition 2015. Goldman Sachs Conference 2013Towards Ambition 2015. Goldman Sachs Conference 2013
Towards Ambition 2015. Goldman Sachs Conference 2013
 

Learning young: Does getting pocket money teach savings habits for life?

  • 1. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 1 This survey was conducted by Ipsos on behalf of ING ING International Survey SEPTEMBER 2014 Mobile Banking, Social Media and Financial Behaviour Learning young: Does getting pocket money teach savings habits for life?
  • 2. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 2 13 1,000 12,403 About the ING International Survey The ING International Survey aims to gain a better understanding of how retail customers – and potential customers – of ING Bank around the globe spend, save, invest and feel about money. It is conducted several times a year, with past reports online at www.ezonomics.com/iis. This survey was conducted by Ipsos between 20 February and 14 March 2014 using internet-based polling and, in Poland, a portion of telephone- based polling. European consumer figures are an average, weighted to take country population into account. countries are compared in this report. About 1,000 respondents were surveyed in each, apart from Luxembourg, with 500. THE SURVEY is the total sample size of this report Netherlands Poland Czech Republic Austria Romania Turkey Italy France Spain Germany Belgium Luxembourg United Kingdom
  • 3. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 3 Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? Pocket money is often used as a tool to help children get a grip on money. Do children in Europe still receive pocket money from their parents and how are they getting pocket money these days? We asked almost 5,000 parents across Europe in the ING International Survey.
  • 4. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 4 Making money more real: Pocket money as a teaching tool around Europe, with life-long results? Respondents who received pocket money as a child are more likely to say they regularly add to their savings and to save for retirement. They are also less likely to regularly be overdrawn on their bank account. Of six money habits, people who received pocket money are more likely to show greater financial competence in four. But it is not possible to conclude from this whether pocket money is the cause of the greater financial competence or if there is simply a correlation. When asked how much pocket money they give to their children, Italian parents top the 2014 pocket money index. In contrast, the Czech Republic was the lowest ranked in our pocket money index – but exchange rates and lower average incomes are likely to be a factor here. The Dutch stand out as being less generous with pocket money than parents in neighbouring countries. In Austria, the rate spikes for children aged 15+, perhaps suggesting greater financial independence for Austrians in their late teens. The share who received pocket money as a child is similar to the share who give it to their children now, however, there are some interesting differences that have emerged over time. Paying into a bank account appears to be increasingly common, while working for pocket money (both inside and outside the home) is much less common. At the individual country level, pocket money appears to have become more popular in Italy (with a higher share giving it now than receiving pocket money as a child) and the reverse is apparent in the Netherlands (where much fewer parents give pocket money than received it as a child). As many might expect, the number one reason parents surveyed give their children pocket money is to teach how to be responsible with money. Teaching the value of money is the second most common response, followed by “so that they can buy the things that they need”. The vast majority of respondents who give pocket money have seen an improvement in their children’s understanding of the value of money. - Ian Bright, ING senior economist EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  • 5. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 5 THE QUESTION Italy tops the “pocket money index” for 2014, Czech Republic last Italian parents top the 2014 pocket money index, being the most generous in a ranking of all age groups. Next are France, Spain and Austria. At the other end of the spectrum are Romania, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic, but exchange rates and lower average incomes are likely to be a factor in two of the countries here. There are some interesting standouts when looking at country medians. Austrians in the 15-plus age group do particularly well in the pocket money stakes. The going rate in the Netherlands is relatively low compared with that in the neighbours of the Dutch. It must be noted however, that the sample sizes in many of these answer categories are very small – so the results should be treated with caution. The all age ranking has been formed by ranking each country from highest to lowest pocket money in each age group. These rankings are then averaged to give the all age result. For Luxembourg, the sample size was too small for under 10s to give a statistically robust median, so it is excluded from the pocket money index. Median amount of pocket money given a week by age, converted into euros Under 5 5-to-10 years 10-to-15 years 15-plus All age ranking European consumer 2.00 4.75 9.50 20.00 Italy 5.00 5.00 10.00 30.00 1 France 2.00 5.00 10.00 20.00 2 Spain 1.00 5.00 10.00 20.00 3 Austria 2.25 3.50 9.75 35.25 4 Belgium 2.00 2.25 10.00 20.00 5= Germany 1.00 4.00 10.00 20.00 5= United Kingdom 2.50 6.00 6.00 12.00 7 Turkey 1.50 3.25 6.50 16.00 8 Poland 2.25 2.25 4.75 11.75 9 Romania 2.25 2.25 3.00 11.00 10 Netherlands 0.50 1.50 5.00 12.50 11 Czech Republic 0.75 1.75 4.00 10.75 12 Luxembourg n/a n/a 10.00 50.00 n/a Sample size: 671 (Under 5), 918 (5-to-10 years), 1,107 (10-to-15 years), 1,223 (15-plus)
  • 6. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 6 THE QUESTION Positive signs: Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? Respondents who received pocket money as a child are more likely to regularly add to their savings and to save for retirement. They are also less likely to regularly be overdrawn on their bank account and likely to say they can easily control their spending. Of six money habits, people who received pocket money are more likely to show greater financial competence in four. In addition, people with well organised personal finances and a financial buffer in place arguably may have more freedom to “buy on impulse”, so the higher likelihood to do this among people who received pocket money is not inherently negative. Some academic research disputes whether pocket money has an impact on the way people save and spend later in life. The results to this survey add to the debate but it is not possible to conclude from the results whether pocket money is the cause of the greater financial competence or if there is simply a correlation because of other factors. Current income, parents’ income during childhood and other influences from family background may be relevant. Sample size: 12,403 Did receive pocket money Did not receive pocket money Difference I regularly add to my savings 55% 45% +10 I am saving for retirement 40% 31% +9 I am regularly overdrawn 22% 25% -3 I easily control my spending 74% 72% +2 I keep a household budget 66% 71% -5 I regularly buy on impulse 34% 22% +12
  • 7. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 7 THE QUESTION Direct payment to bank more common; fewer working for their cash The most common way of giving children pocket money is from parents on a regular basis, with a smaller share saying they do it “when needed”. This is similar to answers respondents gave to how they received pocket money themselves. While only 8% of parents who give pocket money stipulate that they do so by directly depositing it into a bank account, this is more than double the share of respondents who received it in this way. Paying into a bank account appears to be increasingly common. However, the reverse is true for the share of children who earn their pocket money. Just 8% of parents who give pocket money say the pocket money is contingent on doing chores in the family home and an additional 4% on working outside the home. But the share who received pocket money in this way when they were children themselves was 12% working inside the home and 15% outside it. These days, giving pocket money for good performance at school or in school exams is another commonly cited reason. Did you receive pocket money when you were growing up?/Do you allow your children to get pocket money? 4% 8% 8% 21% 33% 35% 15% 3% 12% 20% 29% 38% Yes - earned by doing a job outside the home Yes - directly into a bank account Yes - earned by doing chores at home I do not allow / did not recive pocket money Yes - when needed Yes - on a regular basis Give pocket money Received pocket money Sample size: 4,695 give pocket money, 12,403 received pocket money
  • 8. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 8 THE QUESTION Generation shift? Dutch least likely to give pocket money The vast majority of people in Europe received pocket money when they were growing up – with 80% saying they did. It ranges from highs amongst respondents from Turkey, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, to lows in France and Poland. A similar share of people in Europe say they give pocket money as those who received it when they were young. However, there are some differences between responses in some countries. Italians, for example, are much more likely to give their children pocket money than they were to receive it themselves. Meanwhile, the Dutch are least likely to give pocket money but the second most likely to have received it when they were growing up. Did you receive pocket money when you were growing up?/Do you allow your children to get pocket money? Percent who indicated their answer was “yes” (Did not answer “no”) 79% 67% 68% 69% 71% 72% 73% 74% 77% 81% 82% 86% 92% 95% 80% 89% 71% 66% 79% 65% 83% 80% 85% 71% 83% 88% 85% 93% European consumer Netherlands Czech Republic Poland Spain France Belgium Austria Germany Italy Luxembourg United Kingdom Romania Turkey Give pocket money Received pocket money Sample size: 4,695 give pocket money, 12,403 received pocket money
  • 9. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 9 THE QUESTION Teaching responsibility the top goal of giving pocket money As many would expect, the number one reason parents surveyed give their children pocket money is to teach how to be responsible with money. Teaching the value of money is the second most common response, followed by “so that they can buy the things that they need” in third. Very few give pocket money without any specific reason, suggesting it is a tool rather than simply handing over money without a bigger purpose. Why do you give your children pocket money? Percent who answered in the below categories 4% 14% 17% 25% 28% 36% 37% 38% 48% 54% No specific reason It is normal to do this in my culture To help them prepare for living away from home To encourage independence To encourage them to learn the basics of financial planning To help them manage money To encourage them to budget So that they can buy the things they need To teach the value of money To teach how to be responsible with money Sample size: 3,635
  • 10. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 10 THE QUESTION “My child knows the value of a euro now” The vast majority of respondents who give pocket money have seen an improvement in their children’s understanding of the value of money. Likewise, many have seen improved basic budgeting and money management skills. This is in line with the top goals of parents when they give pocket money to children – teaching responsibility and the value of money. Since giving my child(ren) pocket money I have seen an improvement in their… Percent who “strongly agree” or “agree” 70% 73% 79% 83% becoming more self-sufficient once they leave home money management skills basic budgeting skills realising the value of money Sample size: 3,635
  • 11. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 11 Contact list Name Phone number Email Senior Economist Ian Bright +44 20 7767 6656 ian.bright@uk.ing.com Editor Martha McKenzie-Minifie +44 20 7767 6564 martha.mckenzie-minifie@uk.ing.com ING Sustainability Maarten de Jongh +31 20 5637911 maarten.de.jongh@ing.com Marketing Manager Kariem Hamed +31 6 300 71 661 kariem.hamed@ing.nl Ipsos Nieko Sluis +31 20 607 0707 nieko.sluis@ipsos.com CONTACT LIST
  • 12. ING International Survey Does pocket money teach savings habits for life? (September 2014) 12 The opinions expressed in this publication are based on information gathered by ING and on sources that ING deems reliable. This data has been processed with care in our analyses. Neither ING nor employees of the bank can be held liable for any inaccuracies in this publication. No rights can be derived from the information given. ING accepts no liability whatsoever for the content of the publication or for information offered on or via the sites. Authors rights and data protection rights apply to this publication. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced, distributed or published without explicit mention of ING as the source of this information. The user of this information is obliged to abide by ING’s instructions relating to the use of this information. Dutch law applies. Disclaimer DISCLAIMER