Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
PRUFESSIUNAL

INTELLIGENCE

THE 21 PRINCIPLES [IF HUIII Tfl SUCCEEI] AT WORK

 

6 PAULA JAEU 9
PRUFESSIUNAL INTELLIGENCE

THE 21 PRINCIPLES [IF H[]III TI] SUCCEEU AT WORK

 

PAULA JAGU
Introduction

Paula Jago has spent 20 years working in the Creative Industry,  with a
successful career running businesses...
.'. °‘ . U".4>. °°! ’! "

9.

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

18.
19.
20.
21.

Principles

Understand how your Employer m...
Understand how your Employer
makes money

(5) I

This may sound obvious,  but do you really know how the Business you
work...
Be part of the solution, 
not the problem

vi‘; 

The way you approach your time at work is critical to your short term
we...
Read between the lines,  and listen
with all senses

‘£7

Corporate communications can be difficult to digest — you may find...
Play the Long Game

It's very easy to focus your own careerjourney on the person who is in the
role directly senior to you...
Write concisely and never reply in
anger or via other platforms

fit

The written word is indelible.  it may also deliver t...
Don't get caught up in other
people's battles

049

if a colleague is mid-battle,  it's easy to get swept into the firing l...
Making no decision is worse than
making the wrong one

 

Active decision-making is one of the core behaviours of successf...
If it's a ‘big’ conversation,  have it
face-to-face,  and straight away

9)

As you move through the ranks at work,  the e...
Never challenge or undermine
someone in front of others

i 8

Effective partnering of Emotional intelligence with good Dec...
Like everyone,  but don't expect to
be liked by everyone

 

We have a basic human need to feel liked and appreciated,  an...
Learn how to take a telling off

 

For the majority of us,  getting told off is one of the most difficult events to
experi...
Manage your online reputation

@

if it's written online,  it's there forever. 

The digital age has been upon us for seve...
Treat your role as a podium, 
not a destination

5!’

if you can adopt this mantra,  the sky is the limit in terms of care...
Always have a plan,  even if you
end up not following it

I

This may sound like a cliche,  but you'd be surprised how pow...
Unless you are expressly told ‘No’, 
assume it's a ‘Yes’

Q)

Everyone suffers now and then from the procrastination of ot...
Seek out/ employ people who are
better than you

The application of this theory changes as you yourself become more
senior...
Don't put your boss in an awkward
position over your personal life

 

How many people do you know who have great jobs. .....
Consultation is the shortcut
to adoption

    

This is one of the basic components of ‘Change Management’ techniques, 
bu...
In chaos lies opportunity

AVAVA

‘V

Aside from acute chaos,  which is caused inevitably by a standalone fail
event and r...
Take and make every opportunity
to Present

5%

Being able to present well is critical to progression to the C-Suite.  it'...
Expectation Management is the
secret of life

A

This is the biggest piece of advice in the book,  so I've saved it for la...
An expert in SME Business Operations,  Paula Jago has spent 20 years
working in the Creative Technology industry,  forging...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

How to Succeed at Work - Professional Intelligence

6,046 views

Published on

Professional Intelligence - the 21 Principles of How to Succeed at Work will tell you everything you need to know to win in the workplace.

A quick reference collection of directives that have been produced based on my 25 years of managing high performance people and successful business leadership.

The principles leverage the core attributes of EI/EQ, CQ and SQ (Emotional Intelligence, Change Quotient and Social Quotient) into easily actionable behaviours and approaches.

Published in: Career
  • Hello! Get Your Professional Job-Winning Resume Here - Check our website! https://vk.cc/818RFv
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

How to Succeed at Work - Professional Intelligence

  1. 1. PRUFESSIUNAL INTELLIGENCE THE 21 PRINCIPLES [IF HUIII Tfl SUCCEEI] AT WORK 6 PAULA JAEU 9
  2. 2. PRUFESSIUNAL INTELLIGENCE THE 21 PRINCIPLES [IF H[]III TI] SUCCEEU AT WORK PAULA JAGU
  3. 3. Introduction Paula Jago has spent 20 years working in the Creative Industry, with a successful career running businesses of varying proposition, and managing talented people of varying disciplines. As an expert in SME Business Operations; her first love is the People who work for those Operations. Paula calls her approach ‘Professional Intelligence’. This book contains the 21 Principles of being Successful at Work; a summarised digest of mentoring directives and workplace behavioural insight that you can keep to hand should you feel in need of guidance at any time. They are pragmatic yet proven, and each and every one has the potential to positively affect your career, and also the success of the Company you work for (the two go hand in hand after al| !). Employing the Principles of Professional Intelligence will change your approach to work forever.
  4. 4. .'. °‘ . U".4>. °°! ’! " 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Principles Understand how your Employer makes money Be part of the solution not the problem Read between the lines, and listen with all senses Play the Long Game Write concisely and never reply in anger, or via other platforms Don't get caught up in other people's battles Making no decision is worse than making the wrong one If it's a big conversation, have it face to face, and straight away Never challenge or undermine anyone in front of others Like everyone, but don't expect to be liked by everyone Learn to take a telling off Manage your online reputation Treat your role as a podium, not a destination Always have a plan, even if you end up not following it Unless you are expressly told ‘No’, assume it's a ‘Yes’ Seek out/ employ people who are better than you Don't put your boss in an awkward position over your personal life Consultation is the shortcut to adoption In chaos lies opportunity Take every opportunity to present Expectation Management is the secret of life
  5. 5. Understand how your Employer makes money (5) I This may sound obvious, but do you really know how the Business you work for makes its money? Irrespective of your job function or seniority, one of the keys to empowering yourself to progress your career is a true understanding of what the business delivers, and where the profit margins are made and lost. If you are employed by a business, however large, it means you have an identified part to play in the generation of the Company's profit — find out what it is — ask the question, and seek out the people who can show you the numbers. Then translate that back to your role — what are the key functions of your job that directly influence the ability of the Business to make money? Then focus on them and do them well — I can guarantee it will be noticed, and often by the person you least expect. Know where the money is.
  6. 6. Be part of the solution, not the problem vi‘; The way you approach your time at work is critical to your short term wellbeing as well as your long term career success. So many factors can have a negative impact on your day to day experience at work, including lack of infrastructure, weak management, inadequate processes and office politics. You may feel that you are not being managed well, or that the way the business is set up prevents you from doing yourjob to its full effect. Over time, this will build up and you may find yourself becoming increasingly frustrated, resulting in you pushing back against people senior to you, or against the business as a function. Both of these responses are quite natural, but they are not the path to career success; you are effectively becoming part of the ’problem’. If you are suffering, in all likelihood so are the people around you, including the person you report to, and the person they report to. The key is to make yourself part of the solution —this could be part of your managers solution, part of your team's solution or part the business’ solution — in most cases they are all linked, and in all cases, your so| ution—| ead approach will be appreciated and, importantly; recognised. Bring solutions.
  7. 7. Read between the lines, and listen with all senses ‘£7 Corporate communications can be difficult to digest — you may find yourself listening to, or reading a communication from the Business you work for that immediately frustrates you as it doesn't reflect or address the issue as you know it. That's because the issue as you know it probably sits between the lines, and the Business is unable to address it more specifically as it would make itself vulnerable to legislation or misinterpretation. This is equally true of communications that happen day—to—day in the working environment. As people move through the ranks, they have to address wider, more variable audiences, and therefore become more corporate in the way they speak and communicate in order to protect themselves from the increasing variables of interpretation. The key is to read between the lines — extract the information that is relevant to you, and draw further insight from the way the information is delivered — if it's delivered verbally, watch the body language ofthe person speaking, and if the forum invites questions, don't challenge the person in front of others — ask for clarification offline. Listen carefully.
  8. 8. Play the Long Game It's very easy to focus your own careerjourney on the person who is in the role directly senior to yours. Whilst this is important in the short to mid—term, especially if the person above you is inspirational and high performing, it can also cause unexpected disruption to your own career — that person is not necessarily a given in your World — they will have their own career plan and, if they are talented and great in their role, you can assume they won't be in that specific role in the long term — they will be promoted or move to a more senior role elsewhere. Be very careful about taking a sideways move just because you interpret that the person directly above you is so good that they will never leave — quite often the opposite is true, so be patient and learn as much as you can from them in the meantime. Also make it clear to them in your appraisal that you ‘technically’ want their job — a good manager should not take this as a threat, but will take this ambitious statement as a positive thing and will help you to get there. The other more obvious application of the ‘Long Game’ is to remember that you have a long working life and it's a surprisingly small World. Someone more junior than you may one day be more senior, and vice versa, and todays colleague or supplier may be tomorrows Client, so be sure to treat all relationships with grace. Think ahead.
  9. 9. Write concisely and never reply in anger or via other platforms fit The written word is indelible. it may also deliver the first impression that someone has of you. Make an effort with everything you write, on whatever platform — presentation decks, emails, instant chat. Try and take the ‘less is more’ approach with workplace communications — edit your writing and ensure the content, purpose and audience of the article is considered and politically correct. Be very careful with BCC — apart from the obvious implications should it get rep| y—al| ’d by the person you have BCC‘d it to, never write anything that may come back to haunt you should it be put in the wrong persons hands. importantly — never scribe a work—based article whilst angry, upset or partially informed. it can be cathartic to draft it, but then save it and sleep on it before you decide whether to send it in written form. These responses are often better delivered verbally. However tempting, never respond to a work place situation via public platforms like Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter or a blog. Write well.
  10. 10. Don't get caught up in other people's battles 049 if a colleague is mid-battle, it's easy to get swept into the firing line. it may be on moral grounds, personal interest orjust the fact that you are friends with them and want to support their ‘cause’. Whatever the situation, you can be sure that it is being observed by senior stakeholders. Employee battles, ofany nature, nearly always cause damage to the business, so it will be on the radar of senior colleagues who will monitor it until such a time that they will step in to prevent damage to the Company. Your position at that time will be vulnerable and there is rarely a case whereby it will be seen in a positive light from a career progression point of view. Of course, the exception to this is when you adopt the peacemaker approach, which is a tricky activity as you divide loyalties between your colleague and the Company you work for — it takes confidence, pragmatism and leadership to act in this role — qualities that those observing senior stakeholders will recognise and take note of. Be diplomatic.
  11. 11. Making no decision is worse than making the wrong one Active decision-making is one of the core behaviours of successful people. It's also quite rare. Having the confidence to make big decisions demands a combination of knowledge of subject matter, experience, consultation and risk analysis. Big decisions trip many a senior person up — they get torn between the risk analysis and the potential benefits afforded by the decision, and none are trickier than when it puts the interests of the Company's human capital up against the interests of the business capital. The reality is if no decision is made, both will suffer. This is the case for most workplace decisions, so start practising early. Gather as much information as possible, consult the people with relevant input, ensure you understand the risks, and then take ownership of making the decision. if you have consulted the right people, the contingency will automatically be in place to manage the fallout if it turns out to be the wrong decision — just make sure you respond quickly and change approach before too much damage is done — and ask for help! On balance, the ‘wrong decision’ is far less damaging than ‘no decision’. And remember, if it turns out that was the wrong decision — you'll have learnt something! Be decisive.
  12. 12. If it's a ‘big’ conversation, have it face-to-face, and straight away 9) As you move through the ranks at work, the event of having to manage ‘big’ conversations becomes a more regular one. They are more frequent if you manage a team of people, but also crop up when managing any nature of relationship; client, supplier, legislative etc. in the event of a big conversation being necessary, which is generally related to either personal behaviour or commercial activity, try to ensure that you have it face—to—face and as immediately after the event as possible. Don't save it up for weeks so that you can deliver it for the first time in a defined feedback forum such as someone‘s appraisal or development review. Most importantly, don't deliver the feedback, or parts of it, to the recipient within an open forum, or in ‘public’ i. e. on the floor in the office or in a team meeting. Do it face to face and in private. Needless to say, if you feel the ‘big’ Conversation needs to be delivered upwards, organisationally speaking, think very carefully about the impact this will have on the person/ people you are delivering it to in terms of your own career progression, but equally, the same rules apply— do it in private, face—to—face. Also deploy the ‘being part of the solution’ approach, as broached in Principle 2. Be brave.
  13. 13. Never challenge or undermine someone in front of others i 8 Effective partnering of Emotional intelligence with good Decision-making is another key behaviour of successful people — it is a shortcut to team management and will be identified as a valuable skill in any organisation. in general office conditions, be very self—aware when it comes to challenging your colleagues, and never undermine them in front of others — regardless of their behaviour, or of the subject matter. This is especially relevant if there are also external stakeholders such as Clients present. There is nothing positive to be gained from undermining someone — it is weak behaviour that can be perceived as arrogant and thoughtless — 2 qualities that are not conducive to being picked out as a future star of the Company or indeed a good Manager of people. Be respectful.
  14. 14. Like everyone, but don't expect to be liked by everyone We have a basic human need to feel liked and appreciated, and it's important to be aware of your personal level of requirement in this matter. You will spend your working life occasionally meeting people you don't like, for one reason or another, and it's useful to be able to park these feelings at home before leaving for the office. The ability to consistently appear to like people, regardless of your most inner feelings is one of the more useful smoke and mirrors behaviours that you can deploy to further your career. If you are seen as pragmatic and diplomatic when challenged by a difficult or unlikeable personality, senior stakeholders will pick you out as a key relationship builder and maintainer — a problem solver. Equally, as you climb the career ladder and take on more challenging decisions and governance activities, you will experience the inevitable; the feeling that certain people don't like you. The way to reconcile this in your mind is to always approach things on behalf of the Business — if you are able to do this with integrity, then you will not suffer from the confidence—damaging feelings that come with the occasional experience of recognising that someone dislikes you as a result of your activity in your role. Have confidence. 10
  15. 15. Learn how to take a telling off For the majority of us, getting told off is one of the most difficult events to experience in the workplace. it's embarrassing, humiliating and, sadly, is often mismanaged by the person delivering the feedback. There are many elements to consider here. Assuming the telling off is deserved (and you'll know this deep down, however much your initial instinct may tell you to defend yourself), you need to find a way to accept the feedback and move on without feeling like it's a terminal event, and, importantly, without it damaging your confidence. Be aware that the person who has had to deliver that feedback to you, whether it's your Manager or other senior stakeholder, will probably be having a hard time too — it's nearly as difficult delivering negative feedback as it is receiving it — most Managers would have had a period of anguish whilst they decide how to handle the situation. Ensure that it's notjust a telling off, but that you have taken away lea rnings from the event — make sure the person delivering the feedback is also delivering the insight into how it should have been done correctly and offers all support necessary to prevent a reoccurrence of the situation. Take it on the chin. 11
  16. 16. Manage your online reputation @ if it's written online, it's there forever. The digital age has been upon us for several years now, so there's really no excuse when it comes to managing your online profile. Consider yourself a ‘brand’ — your reputation can be damaged by the slightest faux pas, and actually destroyed by the more significant ones. We are in the age of people losing their jobs due to inappropriate activity online, either whilst in the office or at home. This comes back to playing the Long Game. ifyou tweet, blog, comment on forums or update your status on social networks, stop for a second and think about what your Manager would think if they read it, and how it would be perceived. Then think about how the owner of your Company would perceive it in respect of your future career aspirations. Look beyond today; think of your online presence as your own ‘brand’ and act accordingly online. Also remember that your brand could potentially be damaged by the inappropriate behaviour of someone with the same name as you — learn the basics ofSEO (Search Engine Optimisation) to help neutralise such effects. Be smart online. 12
  17. 17. Treat your role as a podium, not a destination 5!’ if you can adopt this mantra, the sky is the limit in terms of career progression. There is not a role in existence that belongs at a ‘destination’ (whereby you consider yourself to have ‘arrived’, with no tangible onward activity required), although the majority of people treat it as such. Seniority in its very essence is about driven, incremental practise of business—related activity — increased authority, autonomy, budget size, decision—making powers and the ability to make a difference; these are all ‘podium’ activities — you are there because you have the experience and merit to be handed these powers — the Business expects you to stand up, practise them, deploy them, and use them to full effect; with the end result of the business making more money. ifyou treat your newly acquired place as a team leader/ management team member/ board member as a destination, you won't be there for long. Whereas treat it as a podium, and the awards will follow. Stand up and make a difference. 13
  18. 18. Always have a plan, even if you end up not following it I This may sound like a cliche, but you'd be surprised how powerful it is, and how often it's neglected. When it comes to activity at work, always have a plan — it provides focus, mitigates risk, ensures the right people are involved at the right time, and also helps to provide early metrics that can be used to measure future successes and failures. Success is rarely achieved alone, and the very process of building a plan, even if it's scribbled in the back of a drinks mat, helps to rationalise the idea and identify potential opportunities and problems early on — before the investment of time and money starts. The mere event of sharing and publishing your plan, by whatever means, in the workplace also stamps your name in the ‘Ownership’ box — another opportunity for you to raise your head above the crowd when it comes to career development. Plan it. 14
  19. 19. Unless you are expressly told ‘No’, assume it's a ‘Yes’ Q) Everyone suffers now and then from the procrastination of others. For example; you have a good idea, do the due diligence on it, combine it with your experience of the subject matter and submit it for consideration by your manager or senior stakeholder. You then hear nothing in response. So you resubmit it and the reply comes back as a non—committa| fuzzy II response that says neither “Yes” nor “No . There are myriad reasons for this — they may not fully understand the idea (but don't want to admit it), or they may have other things on their mind and haven't had time to apply to making a decision. However, if there was a significant reason for you not to do it, you can generally rely on the fact that you would have received an explicit “No” very quickly after your first approach. Be brave; if you've had a good idea, want to try it and haven't been expressly told “No”, assume it's a “Yes" and go for it. Let the procrastinator know in advance that you're going to give it a go (allowing enough time for them to get with the program and deliver the explicit ”No” as a late arrival). Be tenacious. 15
  20. 20. Seek out/ employ people who are better than you The application of this theory changes as you yourself become more senior. From the first day of your working life, seek out the people who know more than you, have more experience than you, and who know people you don't. People tend to be generous with their time and knowledge if they know that your interest is genuine. Always ask if you don't know something — don't consider it a weakness, regardless of your role or positioning. Carve out a team of people who act as your mentors and as you become more senior yourself, pay it back with acquiring a set of mentees. On the flip side, don't be a protectionist yourself — be generous with your proven experience, time and knowledge. As you reach hiring manager status, employ people who are smarter than you, or who have deeper knowledge or experience in a given discipline than you — they will be your platform for the C—suite, after all. Be genuine and generous. 16
  21. 21. Don't put your boss in an awkward position over your personal life How many people do you know who have great jobs. ... and an absolutely chaotic private life? Many, I bet. in fact, you may even be one of them. Try not to let the two Worlds collide in your workplace. The art of managing people takes lots of experience and many Managers are still learning to employ the tools of professional man—management in the workplace. The introduction of elements from people's private lives to the workplace can cause problems for even seasoned Managers, and if you do not manage the distinction between your two Worlds appropriately, it can therefore potentially damage your professional equity. if you have a private issue that is affecting your ability to perform at work, tell your Manager discretely and, where possible take the solution with you to that conversation — ambiently reassure them that it will not require them to compromise their position as your Manager, but equally appeal to their emotional intelligence to ensure you receive the support that you require to navigate the situation. Stay private. 17
  22. 22. Consultation is the shortcut to adoption This is one of the basic components of ‘Change Management’ techniques, but it's a really useful approach for many workplace situations. When you are planning to roll out a new process, template, workflow, policy or ‘way of working’, it will be a much smoother exercise if you take the time to identify and consult all of the key stakeholders who will be affected by the change. if you let people have their say early on, and ensure to address their input along the way, they will automatically become part of the adoption framework. if you leave them out, and then try and roll it out to them, they are more likely to become blockers. This does not mean that you try and please everyone by taking their ‘consultation’ as ‘direction’ and attempt to apply it to your output just to keep them happy — remember that you own the activity, and make sure that you go through a process of validation of the input — delivering the rationale in respect oftheir feedback in advance of the roll out. it is rare that one person can stand in the middle of the room and impart change — it has to be done using the positive involvement of the key stakeholders as a col| ective. ... then you have a much stronger chance of success. Involve early. 18
  23. 23. In chaos lies opportunity AVAVA ‘V Aside from acute chaos, which is caused inevitably by a standalone fail event and requires disaster recovery activities to mitigate, the most common cause of chronic chaos in the workplace is lack of ownership. This lack of ownership can be the result of a variety of elements: poor business architecture, lack of infrastructure, inadequate or incompetent management, an inappropriate organisational structure, incorrect processes, inadequate systems. ..the list can go on and on. Chronic chaos presents a formidable opportunity to the discerning career builder. identify the glaring spaces that are un—owned — it will normally be a point of absent or underserviced governance, process, or management, then grab it and make it yours. Build your portfolio of ownership and you will by default redefine your role and it can only be in the upwards direction. This draws off the ‘be part of the solution’ approach, but it's more specific to chaotic working environments. The natural response to such workplaces is to get drawn into the chaos; this results in stress, seemingly unmanageable workloads and eventual exhaustion. Instead, keep your head whilst everyone else is losing theirs; see the wood for the trees and use it to your advantage by taking control where there is none — it can only result in positive progression. Take ownership. 19
  24. 24. Take and make every opportunity to Present 5% Being able to present well is critical to progression to the C-Suite. it's a skill that for most can take years to perfect and even the seemingly most seasoned presenters generally suffer from anxiety leading up to a presenting engagement. There are lots of techniques that need to come together to present well — far too many for a little book like this, but get in early in your career — take every opportunity to present to other people — start with a small number of familiar faces and build up to team, department, company level before setting foot in the outside speaking domain and giving a keynote. Two important tips — write your own presentation, and tell a story. If you write it, you won't forget it, and the art of Storytelling underpins every great Leader. Present, Present, Present! 20
  25. 25. Expectation Management is the secret of life A This is the biggest piece of advice in the book, so I've saved it for last. Expectation Management is accessible and applicable to every person, in every job, in every sector, at every level of seniority. it's scalable, easy to deploy and has far reaching effects on everyday life — at work, and also at home. Make yourself easy to live with by being clear about your expectations and by respecting other people's needs. Apply this to every activity, but for example; if you ask for something to be done, be exact about what you expect and when you want it done by. if you are going out, be clear about when you'll be back. if you expect a response, ask for it. If you request a piece of hardware, be clear about the spec. And remember it also works in reverse: if you promise something, deliver it. 21
  26. 26. An expert in SME Business Operations, Paula Jago has spent 20 years working in the Creative Technology industry, forging a successful career running businesses of varying proposition, and managing talented people of a range of disciplines. In an approach she calls ‘Professional Intelligence’, this first book in the series focuses on the 21 Principles of How to Succeed at Work. it is a summarized digest of mentoring directives and workplace behavioral insight drawn from her extensive experience, and proven time and again in the working environment. The Professional Intelligence Series’ objective is to put a mentor in every pocket — if you are a Business Leader, give this book to your team — it will transform the culture of your Company and foster a happy, high—performing, successful team of people.

×