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OER & Creative Commons
Education Services Australia
Melbourne
17 April 2014
Delia Browne
National Copyright Director
Na...
2
Some copyright
challenges
• The current licence schemes and free use exceptions 
are expensive, restrictive and complica...
3
OER - Definition
• Open Educational Resources (‘OER’) are a growing 
trend towards openness of teaching and learning 
ma...
4
OER: Fundamental Values
•OER share some fundamental 
values:
• Resources are free for any individual to use
• Are licens...
OER in a nutshell
 OER is about creating repositories of 
material which are free to:
Access
Use
Modify
Share
5
6
Creative
Commons
http://creativecommons.org// 
7
OER and Creative Commons
• Most OER resources use Creative Commons 
(CC) licences.
• This is because CC licences  are we...
OER: How it all works
 What is CC?
• CC creates a “some rights reserved”
model.
• The copyright owner retains copyright 
...
9
There are 4 primary licence elements which are mixed
to create a licence:
Attribution – attribute the author
Non-commerc...
10
Attribution – share alike
Attribution – non-commercial –
share alike
Attribution – non-commercial – 
no derivatives
Att...
Licence Type Licence Conditions
Attribution
Freely use, copy, adapt and distribute to
anyone provided the copyright owner ...
CC Licences
Licence Type Licence Conditions
Attribution Non Commercial
Freely use, copy, adapt and distribute for non-
com...
CC Licence Chooser
 http://creativecommons.org/choose/
 The licence chooser asks questions to
determine which licence be...
Attributing CC material
 The new CC licences have ‘common-sense attribution’.
 Best practice is that you label materials...
Where should I place the
attribution?
• For text resources (eg books, worksheets, PowerPoint slides etc),
include the attr...
Example: Image licensed under CC Attribution
licence
16
Eid Mubarak by Hamed Saber available at
http://www.flickr.com/phot...
Example: video
 You have created a video about the History
of X and can’t attribute all your sources in the
video itself....
Example: textbooks
 You have assembled a textbook
consisting of OER from various sources.
Here’s what a credits page at t...
Modifying a CC – licenced work
 Also, if you modify a CC-licensed work
indicate that you did so along with your
attributi...
Example
 You use another teacher’s lesson plan but
replace the classroom activity with your own.
Simply note that you cha...
Distinguishing between CC
material and Third Party Material
 Material owned by ESA and licenced under CC:
This work is li...
Distinguishing between CC
material and Third Party Material
 Third Party Material not licenced under CC:
 If you have pe...
How to find OER
 General Search
 Photo/image Search
 Video Search
 Audio/Music Search
 General Education Search
 Spe...
General search
 Creative Commons
 Google
 Open Tapestry
25
Google Advanced Search
 When searching the web for general
information, you can filter so that the search
results given a...
28
Google Advanced Search
Once you get into your advanced
settings, the usage rights filter is at
the very bottom.
29
Open tapestry:(http://www.opentapestry.com/items)
31
Photo/Image Search
 CC Search
 Wikimedia Commons
 Flickr
 Google Images
 Pixabay
 Europeana
 Open Clip Art Library
...
Searching Google for Openly
Licenced Images
 Advance search as describe above; or
 Google recently launched a simpler
wa...
Google Images
After you search
for an image, all
you have to do is
click “Search
tools” and select
the “Usage
Rights” that...
Video Search
 YouTube
 Vimeo
 Ted – Ideas Worth Spreading
 Al Jazeera
35
YouTube
There are a number of ways to find YouTube videos that
are licensed under CC:
• use the CC Search tool described ...
YouTube – filter for CC videos
 After you do a
search, click on
the filters option,
and under
‘Features’
selected
Creativ...
YouTube – filter for CC videos
38
Audio/Music Search
Jamendo
ccMixter
Free Music Archive
SoundCloud
39
General Education Search
 OER Commons
 The Orange Grove Digital Repository
 Connexions
 Curriki
 WikiEducator
 Saylo...
Video Tutorials Search
 Khan Academy
41
Open Textbook Search
 ck-12
 Wikibooks
42
Simulation and Animation
Search
 PhET
43
Current ESA projects
 Climate change
• Wikipedia
• Australia Government – Department of the Environm
• European Environme...
Smartcopying website
 For more specific, content-oriented OER and for an
ever-increasing list of OER, see the Smartcopyin...
Exercises
 Finding CC material
 Getting CC Savvy – P2PU:
https://p2pu.org/he/groups/get-cc-savvy/
46
Creative Commons Licences and how to find OER
Creative Commons Licences and how to find OER
Creative Commons Licences and how to find OER
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Creative Commons Licences and how to find OER

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Creative Commons Licences and how to find OER

  1. 1.    OER & Creative Commons Education Services Australia Melbourne 17 April 2014 Delia Browne National Copyright Director National Copyright Unit www.smartcopying.edu.au
  2. 2. 2 Some copyright challenges • The current licence schemes and free use exceptions  are expensive, restrictive and complicated: • Teachers are burdened with complex copying limits.  • Teachers cannot modify, share or remix material except in  very limited circumstances.  • The material can only be made available to parents and  the community in limited circumstances.  • The school community pays over $80 million in licensing  fees to copyright collecting societies every year for the  use of copyright materials in schools.
  3. 3. 3 OER - Definition • Open Educational Resources (‘OER’) are a growing  trend towards openness of teaching and learning  materials. • OER are teaching and learning materials that are freely  available online for everyone to use, whether you are a  teacher, student or self learner. • OER include: worksheets, curriculum materials, lectures,  homework assignments, quizzes, class activities,  pedagogical materials, games and many more  resources from around the world. See: www.oercommons.org
  4. 4. 4 OER: Fundamental Values •OER share some fundamental  values: • Resources are free for any individual to use • Are licensed for unrestricted distribution • Possibility of adaptation, translation, re-mix, and improvement.
  5. 5. OER in a nutshell  OER is about creating repositories of  material which are free to: Access Use Modify Share 5
  6. 6. 6 Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org// 
  7. 7. 7 OER and Creative Commons • Most OER resources use Creative Commons  (CC) licences. • This is because CC licences  are well known  blanket licences that are free and easy to use. • A creator needs only to do one thing - select  the type of licence they want from the CC  website!
  8. 8. OER: How it all works  What is CC? • CC creates a “some rights reserved” model. • The copyright owner retains copyright  ownership in their work while inviting  certain uses of their work by the public. • CC licences create choice and options for  the copyright owner. 8
  9. 9. 9 There are 4 primary licence elements which are mixed to create a licence: Attribution – attribute the author Non-commercial – no commercial use No Derivative Works – no remixing ShareAlike – remix only if you let others remix See the CC information pack at: http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go/pid/956 CC Primary Licence Elements
  10. 10. 10 Attribution – share alike Attribution – non-commercial – share alike Attribution – non-commercial –  no derivatives Attribution Attribution - non-commercial Attribution - no derivatives Six Standard CC Licences
  11. 11. Licence Type Licence Conditions Attribution Freely use, copy, adapt and distribute to anyone provided the copyright owner is attributed. Attribution No Derivatives Freely use, copy and distribute to anyone but only in original form. The copyright owner must be attributed. Attribution Share Alike Freely use, copy, adapt and distribute provided the new work is licensed under the same terms as the original work. The copyright owner must be attributed. 11 CC Licences
  12. 12. CC Licences Licence Type Licence Conditions Attribution Non Commercial Freely use, copy, adapt and distribute for non- commercial purposes. The copyright owner must be attributed. Attribution Non Commercial No Derivatives Freely use, copy and distribute verbatim copies of the original work for non-commercial purposes. The copyright owner must be attributed. Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike Freely use, copy, adapt and distribute for non- commercial purposes provided the new work is licensed under the same terms as the original work. The copyright owner must be attributed. 12
  13. 13. CC Licence Chooser  http://creativecommons.org/choose/  The licence chooser asks questions to determine which licence best suits your needs, and it then produces: • The correct licence; • The hyperlink to the correct licence summary information; • The HTML code to insert into websites to generate the licence, information and links. 13
  14. 14. Attributing CC material  The new CC licences have ‘common-sense attribution’.  Best practice is that you label materials with: • Title • Author/copyright owner, • Source – Link to work • Licence – Name + Link  It is important to always check whether the creator has specified a particular attribution.  Open Attribute (http://openattribute.com) is a tool to assist users of CC material to properly attribute. Once downloaded, it will attribution information for CC licensed content which users can copy and paste into their own work containing CC material. For further information on attributing CC material, see: http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go/pid/956 14
  15. 15. Where should I place the attribution? • For text resources (eg books, worksheets, PowerPoint slides etc), include the attribution details next to CC work or as the footer along the bottom of the page on which the CC work appears. • For video works, include the attribution information near the work as it appears on screen during the video. • For sound recordings (eg podcasts), mention the name of the artist during the recording (like a radio announcement) and provide full attribution details in text near the podcast where it is being stored (eg blog, school intranet, learning management system etc). For further information on attributing CC material, see: http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go/pid/956 15
  16. 16. Example: Image licensed under CC Attribution licence 16 Eid Mubarak by Hamed Saber available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/44124425616@N01/1552383685 . This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.
  17. 17. Example: video  You have created a video about the History of X and can’t attribute all your sources in the video itself. Now you can simply include a link to a page that lists all the credits. 17
  18. 18. Example: textbooks  You have assembled a textbook consisting of OER from various sources. Here’s what a credits page at the end of that textbook might look like. 18
  19. 19. Modifying a CC – licenced work  Also, if you modify a CC-licensed work indicate that you did so along with your attribution. This makes it easier for downstream users (including you) to know it has changed from the original. 20
  20. 20. Example  You use another teacher’s lesson plan but replace the classroom activity with your own. Simply note that you changed it so others will know the difference.  Sample Attribution: • American History Lesson by John Doe used under a CC BY license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Activity in Section E changed from original. 21
  21. 21. Distinguishing between CC material and Third Party Material  Material owned by ESA and licenced under CC: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Best practice to indicate somewhere (usually in your Copyright Statement or T&Cs) how you want to be attributed. Third Party Material licenced under CC: previous slides. 22
  22. 22. Distinguishing between CC material and Third Party Material  Third Party Material not licenced under CC:  If you have permission from the copyright owner to reproduce the material you should check with them how they would like to be attributed.  If you publish material owned by someone else, you should always clearly indicate the source of the material in the footer of each page.  When you incorporate works, such as illustrations, photographs or charts which are owned by someone else, into a resource, you should include the copyright information next to the actual work.  Example attribution of Third Party Material: “Reproduced and made available for [whatever rights are given – eg educational purposes] with the permission of [insert copyright owner/attribution information].” 23
  23. 23. How to find OER  General Search  Photo/image Search  Video Search  Audio/Music Search  General Education Search  Specific Education Search  Recorded Lectures & Video Tutorials Search  Open Textbook Search  Simulation and Animation Search 24
  24. 24. General search  Creative Commons  Google  Open Tapestry 25
  25. 25. Google Advanced Search  When searching the web for general information, you can filter so that the search results given are only free, openly licenced materials.  To apply the filter you must first go into your advanced search settings, which are found in the settings tab on the right hand side of your search result. 27
  26. 26. 28
  27. 27. Google Advanced Search Once you get into your advanced settings, the usage rights filter is at the very bottom. 29
  28. 28. Open tapestry:(http://www.opentapestry.com/items) 31
  29. 29. Photo/Image Search  CC Search  Wikimedia Commons  Flickr  Google Images  Pixabay  Europeana  Open Clip Art Library  Encyclopedia of Life  Public Library of Scien  CC finder 32
  30. 30. Searching Google for Openly Licenced Images  Advance search as describe above; or  Google recently launched a simpler way to filter Google images by reuse rights (ie, openly licenced resources). 33
  31. 31. Google Images After you search for an image, all you have to do is click “Search tools” and select the “Usage Rights” that reflect your use. All four usage rights allow for educational use. 34
  32. 32. Video Search  YouTube  Vimeo  Ted – Ideas Worth Spreading  Al Jazeera 35
  33. 33. YouTube There are a number of ways to find YouTube videos that are licensed under CC: • use the CC Search tool described above. • http://www.youtube.com/creativecommons lets you see the most viewed and most reused CC licensed videos. • in your search you can include the term “creativecommons”, and the videos returned will be CC licensed. • or you can filter for Creative Commons licenced videos after you search. 36
  34. 34. YouTube – filter for CC videos  After you do a search, click on the filters option, and under ‘Features’ selected Creative Commons. 37
  35. 35. YouTube – filter for CC videos 38
  36. 36. Audio/Music Search Jamendo ccMixter Free Music Archive SoundCloud 39
  37. 37. General Education Search  OER Commons  The Orange Grove Digital Repository  Connexions  Curriki  WikiEducator  Saylor Academy  Wikiversity  LiveBinder by Karen Fasim  Open Education Europa 40
  38. 38. Video Tutorials Search  Khan Academy 41
  39. 39. Open Textbook Search  ck-12  Wikibooks 42
  40. 40. Simulation and Animation Search  PhET 43
  41. 41. Current ESA projects  Climate change • Wikipedia • Australia Government – Department of the Environm • European Environment Agency • The Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Networ • The Science Education Resource Centre • The Global Words project 44
  42. 42. Smartcopying website  For more specific, content-oriented OER and for an ever-increasing list of OER, see the Smartcopying website: http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/open-education/open-educ 45
  43. 43. Exercises  Finding CC material  Getting CC Savvy – P2PU: https://p2pu.org/he/groups/get-cc-savvy/ 46

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