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2012 - 2013 NCL 
ARC
5 
John Pendelbury 
head of school 
4 
Introduction 
When we embarked on restructuring our Part II offerings into an MArch...
11 
Graham Farmer 
concrete values 
10 
One of the most unfortunate additions to the vocabulary of architectural education...
12 13 
by its lack of a single identity or through its ability to resist being defined in any singular way. Pasmore once f...
14 
15 
Matthew Margettscharrettes 
The charrettes will be run by variety of tutors including successful design practition...
16 
A democratic and collaborative exploration into 
why people matter to architecture. 
We will investigate the interstit...
18 
The Charrette team will be given a large empty 
space to create a mixed media machine/ 
installation that triggers a s...
22 
The university has a world class reputation 
has a place of learning and research. Visiting 
the university campus, it...
30 
The Charrette will commence a year-long 
programme of activity in which the school will 
be working with Kielder Art &...
32 
The city lives and works in the eyes of 
cameras. It sleeps under the watchful gaze 
of closed-circuit television. You...
34 
35 
As we chart the relatively unknown waters of the new (or at least different) higher educational world in which we ...
36 
37 
Martin Beattie stage 1 
Stage one is a varied introduction to architecture, characterised by numerous workshops, v...
38 39 
Kati Blom 
exercise 
city 
drawing 
As part of induction week new students accom-panied 
by artists and design tuto...
44 45 
The first project is a simple one roomed single-storey 
beach hut. This is a place to make day vis-its 
to the beac...
46 47 
for 
place 
refuge 
The second project is a small summer cabin 
plus artists’ studio of 40 m². It is a place for on...
48 49 
Armelle Tarvideau 
urban 
delight 
Urban Delights is about Drawing, Cooking, Casting, Eating, Mapping, Film screeni...
50 51 
Preena Mistry John Harvey 
Sarah Topley 
Photography workshop 
Curry Group
52 53 
As part of induction week new students 
accompanied by artists and design tutors 
visit parts of the city with thei...
54 55 
Richard Dunn 
Ole Petter Steen 
Bernita Tao Wan Zhen
56 
57 
Simon Hacker 
Stage 2 Coordinatorstage 2 
Teaching in Stage 2 is something of a treat. 
It’s analogous to watching...
50 
51 
project 01 
placed 
displaced 
The project, envisaged as a primer for the 
subsequent ‘Simplicity, Economy, Home’ ...
52 
53 
William Whiteaway 
Richard Morrison 
Annabel MacLeod 
Katie-Rose Hay 
Shaobo Wu
54 
Bill Tavernor 
project 02 
Building on the previous project, ‘Simplicity, 
Economy, Home’ asks students to expand the ...
56 57 
Emilia Kalyvides 
Mariya Lapteva 
Gabriel Niculcea 
Mariya Lapteva
58 
The settlement of Tynemouth, characterised by 
its wide and largely intact medieval Front Street, 
provides the locati...
60 61 
Cynthia Wong 
Dominic Bareham 
Joseph Dent 
Sebastian Bowler 
Ningxin Ye 
Deimante Bazyte
62 
Simon Hacker section-alley 
The Section-Alley project was formulated in an 
attempt to challenge the dominance of plan...
64 
65 
Group 16 
Group 4 
Group 2 
Group 3 
Group 12 
Group 16
66 
67 
Daniel Malo 
Following the fast paced, high- energy, design charette across all stages and design programs at APL,...
68 69 
Barcelona 
Field Trip 
At the end of October 2012, stage 3 took part 
to a three day-field trip to Barcelona. Descr...
70 71 
Group photo 
talks and the environment of the 
‘Hangar’ set the tone and the 
context for the project. 
On the last...
73 
72 
‘Can Ricart’ is a 19th century industrial estate of textile factories located in a large urban site of the Pobleno...
74 
75 
Nedelina Atanasova 
Michael Pybus 
Nedelina Atanasova 
Oleg Sevelkov
Portia Malik 
76 77 
Portia Malik 
Ruta Austrina 
Alexander Hart 
Stavri Rousounidou 
Stavri Rousounidou
78 79 
play me, i’m 
yours 
The “Play Me” studio takes its inspiration from 
the ‘Play me, I’m Yours’ festival. This artis...
81 
<No intersecting link> 
80 
<No intersecting link> 
Adam Hampton-Matthews 
Nedelina Atanasova Ian Campbell 
Ewan Thoms...
82 83 
Playme_09-Alanah Honey.jpg 
Playme_01-David Tam.jpg 
Anna Cumberland 
Alanah Honey 
David Tam 
Fatima Afzal 
Muyan ...
84 
city of bridges 
If the morphology of the city of Newcastle is 
characterized by anything, it is surely that of the 
r...
86 
87 
Tahmineh Emami 
Tahmineh Emami 
Tahmineh Emami 
Shuo Yang 
Shuo Yang
88 89 
Alexander Hart 
Erandi Helamini Amarasinghe 
Alexander Hart 
Caspar Thorp
90 
91 
Rosalia Kateryna Samus 
Rosalia Kateryna Samus 
Malcolm Greer Pritchard 
Malcolm Greer Pritchard
92 93 
Gergana Popova 
Gergana Popova 
Gergana Popova 
Charles Lambert 
Emily Clay 
Thomas Day
95 
94 
Kati Blom and David McKenna 
This project is based on a hypothetical move of The Finnish Institute in London to Ne...
96 97 
Styliani Michael 
Stella Michael 
Stavri Rousounidou 
Stella Michael Stavri Rousounidou
98 99 
Ruta Austrina 
Ruta Austrina 
Daniel Celaya Miranda 
Daniel Celaya Miranda
100 101 
Mohammad Abdul Bari 
Mohammad Abdul Bari 
Rebecca Miller 
Rebecca Miller
102 103 
Joe Wilson 
Joe Wilson 
Matheus Simon dos Santos 
Stephen Ringrose
104 105 
Ella Cain 
Jack Scaffardi 
Katie Rowe 
Matt Jackson
106 107 
Matthew Wilcox 
Matthew Wilcox 
Rumen Dimov 
Rumen Dimov 
Rumen Dimov
108 
Graham Farmer, Adam Sharr 
Concrete is, simultaneously, the most solid and the most elusive of materials. A liquid wh...
110 111 
Anna Holsgrove 
Sarah Rozelaar 
Matthew Pratt 
Matthew Pratt 
Matthew Pratt
Jess Riddell 
112 113 
Claire Peerless 
Claire Peerless 
Myrto Barbaris 
Sophie Mclean
114 115 
Andrea Sze 
Nur Zaminudin 
Luke Lupton 
Luke Lupton 
Andrea Sze 
Nur Zaminudin
116 117 
Greta Varpucianskyte 
Greta Varpucianskyte 
Greta Varpucianskyte 
Nguyen Xuan Man 
Richard Spilsbury 
Nguyen Xuan...
118 119 
Tarek Abida 
Pheobe Burnett 
Kristina Kupstaite 
Ellen Creaser.jpg
Richard Everett 
120 121 
Richard Everett 
Anastasia Ananyeva 
Anna Melson 
Anna Melson 
Anastasia Ananyeva
122 
Matt Ozga-Lawn, James Craig 
testing 
ground 
This is a project about testing. 
Testing is central to the scientific ...
James Morton 
James Morton 
Rania Francis 
Natasha Carfrae 
Natasha Carfrae 
Natasha Carfrae
127 
Clare Thomas 
Edward Watkiss 
Oleg Sevelkov 
Marta Zembinskyte 
Marta Zembinskyte
128 
<No intersecting link> 
Michael Pybus 
Robert Evans 
Emma Hall
Hazem Halasa 
Hazem Halasa 
Agata Murasko 
Agata Murasko 
Agata Murasko
Alex Blanchard 
David Boyd 
Ibrahim Muasher 
James Humber
134 135 
James Humber 
James Humber 
Theodora Kyrtata 
Josh Smith Theodora Kyrtata
136 137 
Lam Nguyen 
Afterimage Hadrian Award 
Part I 
It was a great honour to receive the Hadrian 
Award. The award repr...
138 139 
time it was altered it was more 
exciting, something new revealed 
itself, and looking back I can see 
that every...
140 141 
Richard Breen 
A Cyclotel Created from Perspectives RIBA bronze 
medal 
runner Up 
The RIBA President’s Medal Stu...
142 143 
development of a building at this 
stage; the focus was purely on 
process, on finding a methodol-ogy 
on which t...
144 145 
Nick Bastow, Ewan Thomson, Sophie McLean ARCHIgrad 
summer 
school 
Set up by Northern Architecture and plus 
3 A...
147 
146 
Comments from the public consultation session included: 
“Wonderful ideas for this lovely church, so pleased it ...
149 
148 
Annabel Ward & Matt Lippiatt 
wider mbara project 
The Wider Mbarara Project is a student led construction initi...
151 
<No intersecting link> 
<No intersecting link> 
150 
Students coming into the MArch 
Programme at Newcastle 
take the...
New York at Buffalo), who also 
served as a panelist during a 
day of presentations by the four 
groups. 
In addition, Dr ...
tempelhof 1.JPG 
Museumsinsel 
Museumsinsel 
Kreuzberg 
154 
155 
Tempelhof 
Crossings 
Kreuzberg
AssimilationSEA FORTS / SEALMAY, 7 20132119 
156 157 
Daniel Dyer 
Katie Burgess 
Irina Korneychuk 
Olga Gogoleva 
Vitalij...
[PROMONADE] 
158 159 
Ugnius Katinas 
MA 1.jpg 
Peter Drysdale 
Joseph Charman 
Hugh Craft
site entriesmovementsite entriesmovement 
160 161 
Matthew Ruddy 
Paul Hegarty 
Paul Hegarty 
Adam Smith 
Annie Hart
163 
162 
Sam Austin 
memory 
detail, 
narrative, 
Design begins with a concept and ends in details, or so conventional wi...
164 165 
59 
roving travensed back to 
spinning room 
carded wool drawn across to extension to be gilled 
drawn and turned...
166 167 
Ronald Allen 
Olga Gogoleva 
Joseph Worral 
Annie Hart 
Adam Smith
168 169 
Gavin Welch 
Omer Alp 
Dana Mudawi 
Hugh Craft 
Will Whiter
170 171 
HUNTER STREET 
NORTHGATE STREET 
MALE TOILET FEMALE TOILET 
STORE ROOM 
CAFE 
BAR 
BAR 
KITCHEN 
PRODUCTION ROOM ...
172 173 
John Beattle 
Competition 2012 
Second Prize RIBA 
Forgotten 
Spaces 
During 2012 the RIBA ran a design competiti...
174 175 
<No intersecting link> 
have met local needs, the redun-dant 
steel frame can become 
another opportunity for the...
176 
177Materiality (Armelle Tardiveau) Studio 2 – ArchAid (Martyn Dade Robertson) 
Studio 3 – Quotidian Contraptions (Mat...
178 
The Thinking Through Making Week (TTMW) 
was a new initiative for this academic year. The 
intensive week was designe...
180 181 
<No intersecting link> 
<No intersecting link> 
<No intersecting link> 
IMG_0823.JPG
NCL ARC 2013 Yearbook
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NCL ARC 2013 Yearbook

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NCL ARC 2013 Yearbook

  1. 1. 2012 - 2013 NCL ARC
  2. 2. 5 John Pendelbury head of school 4 Introduction When we embarked on restructuring our Part II offerings into an MArch course, our goal was to provide students a supportive environment to pursue their own self-initiated research and design agendas by combining a broad latitude for exploration with opportunities for frequent and personalized feedback. To this end, we consolidated the coverage of almost all RIBA criteria within design studios where matters such as arts, history, urban context, cultural heritage, technology, materials and construction, sustainability would be seen as integral parts of the design process rather than streamed in parallel modules. We structured the first two semesters as two mini-thesis projects where the students propose their own briefs within a well-defined thematic framework. Throughout the year, a range of lectures, study visits, readings, specially designed exercises, presentations, exhibitions, and symposia complement the learning process. The first of these thematic projects emphasizes the urban fabric and students investigate the socio-spatial dynamics of cities, the relationships between buildings and the spaces between them, and urban transformation processes (such as gentrification, ghettoization, regeneration etc). The second semester zooms down to the scale of the individual building, with a sharp focus on the significance of detail design, appreciation of technology and understanding of the spatial narratives embedded in every structure. These projects also offer students the chance to think about the design process as a method of developing critical responses to the pressing issues they have identified— that is, a thesis—from the outset. This year our Master of Architecture Programme (Part II) will see its first students graduate. We could not have asked for better partners in the process—our first cohort of students have thrown themselves into the challenges with passion, worked with us as we dealt with the kinks of a new system, engaged us in discussions and made the school a buzzing hub of activity. Their work has been varied and engaging, they have, in addition to a range of interesting design projects, participated in linked research projects and produced dissertations that have enriched the school’s
  3. 3. 11 Graham Farmer concrete values 10 One of the most unfortunate additions to the vocabulary of architectural education in recent years has been the term; unique selling point or USP. A recent RIBA visiting board to the school insisted that we establish and articulate (in a limited number of words) what the school stands for and what differentiates it from the growing number of architecture courses in the UK. This necessity to have a distinctive ‘offer’ also mirrors a wider concern within Higher Education for the marketing and marketability of courses and connects to an institutional context in which even the slightest annual fluctuations in application numbers, survey ratings or league table position can either verify or bring into question the value of your ‘product’. Fortunately, when viewed through these particular lenses the architecture programmes at Newcastle continue to go from strength to strength. We have seen significant increases in student satisfaction ratings and our application numbers have risen again this year - bucking the national trend. Recently published league tables cement our place within the top 5 of Architecture Schools and we are now the highest ranked school for graduate employment in the UK. Add to that the impressive and continued success of our students in local, national and international design competitions and we have much to celebrate. However, it is also important to acknowledge that such recognition can be fleeting and if you focus too much on it you risk neglecting the deeper character and attributes that really do make the school unique and which provide the strong foundation for our continued success. These enduring qualities cannot be captured in a sentence or two and to understand them you certainly have to delve further into the background and culture of the school. Over the course of the past two years I have become much more conscious of the history of the school and in particular the important role it has played in the trajectory of modern architecture in the UK, both regionally and nationally. Architectural education at Newcastle dates back almost 100 years and developed out of Fine Art in the 1920s and expanding rapidly through the 1930s to establish itself as an academic discipline
  4. 4. 12 13 by its lack of a single identity or through its ability to resist being defined in any singular way. Pasmore once famously described the pavilion as a ‘free and anonymous’ monument, and by this he meant that it belonged to everyone and anyone who used it and they would in turn bring their own particular function, use or meaning. It could be argued that the very generosity of this gesture - of not wishing to narrowly define or impose a predefined meaning onto the structure is the aspect of the work that will both continue to provoke, but that will also sustain it into the future. Perhaps this is a lesson for every school of architecture. in its own right. From its earliest foundations the pedagogical outlook of the School has always extended beyond a narrow focus on design and formal concerns to encompass an ethical outlook and a wider social concern for the conditions in which people live. The city and region with its particular social, industrial and landscape context has always been fundamental to the work of the school and this remains the case to this day. I recently had the opportunity to work on several research and teaching projects connected with Victor Pasmore’s Apollo pavilion, an iconic piece of brutalist public art located in the new town of Peterlee. In many ways the history of the pavilion mirrors that of the school and it encompasses a rich and fascinating story that includes (amongst many others), Peterlee’s first master planner; Berthold Lubetkin and numerous graduates of the school including Gordon Ryder, who went on to work with Lubetkin and later founded the practice Ryder and Yates. Ryder himself lodged with Peter Smithson as a student at the university and went on to teach Alison Gill, who later became Smithson’s wife. Together they coined the term brutalism in 1953, and set in motion an important but often misunderstood contribution to architecture that is still recognised internationally. A year later in 1954, Victor Pasmore joined the university as Master of Painting and together with Richard Hamilton contributed to fundamentally reshaping arts-based education in the UK through the establishment of Basic Design training that itself was rooted in the philosophy of the Bauhaus. During this period Newcastle University was at the very centre of pedagogical innovation in the Arts and Architecture, a legacy that still remains. The pavilion itself is an innovative structure that blurs the boundaries between art and architecture and was the result of Pasmore’s involvement as a landscape consultant at Peterlee during the 1960s. Completed in 1970 the concrete pavilion has always been controversial, and has been under threat of demolition for much of its life. For a period it was vandalised, poorly maintained and became the setting for serious anti-social behaviour. However, it is recently restored and in December 2011 it was granted Grade II* listing, effectively securing its longterm future. The impetus for creating a positive future for the pavilion was generated locally and can be largely attributed to the successful campaign work carried out by local groups including the Apollo Pavilion Community Association who had the vision to recognise and celebrate the wider importance of the pavilion beyond the immediate and all too visible problems of its dirty and spalling concrete forms. Crucially, they understood the intangible values embodied in the pavilion both as a culmination of an ambitious collaboration between artist and architect and as a monument embodying progressive values, as part of the post-war period in which architects strove to create better living environments for all. In a contemporary world fascinated by product and branding, perhaps the pavilion has much to teach those who seek to market Higher Education. It could be argued that the positive future of the pavilion has been secured
  5. 5. 14 15 Matthew Margettscharrettes The charrettes will be run by variety of tutors including successful design practitioners from all over the U.K. Each charrette will be made up of students from the BA, MArch, MAUD and DigiArch. Most charrettes will have approx. 40 students. Students will be assigned groups automatically The week will end with an exhibition and celebratory drinks. All work will be collated for a published book and form a chapter in the year book 5 days 450 students 9 charrettes
  6. 6. 16 A democratic and collaborative exploration into why people matter to architecture. We will investigate the interstitial, examine the undergarment of the city and listen to the walls and doorways. Places reek with the living in them and the traces of spent lives. We will find a tool or device for listening to the stories that soak the air like a history mist. Once the device has been established the team, like early Victorian detectives, will hunt out and retell these stories; unfold a network, a lattice, a pattern, a connected and collective understanding of the city. The job then will be to establish a game, a route or a telling, a performance, a construct or a poetry. Product It might be an Almanac, a collection, a mapping or a bibliography. It will be rich and enduring as an oral legacy and an invitation to enjoy seeing and listening to the city today. Key themes: collaboration, the interstitial, narrative. The History of Space squeezing blood out of the stone: Tim Bailey (xsite architecture) 17
  7. 7. 18 The Charrette team will be given a large empty space to create a mixed media machine/ installation that triggers a series of inventive chain reactions to perform a simple outcome or task. This charrette aims to encourage all the aspects of the design process that are crucial to a successful project in a fun, stimulating, and inclusive way. The Charrette team would be split into 10 groups and each group given an allocated area within a studio in which to create chain reactions which would then form part of the large ‘machine’ installation. Careful consideration will have to be given to the connecting elements between each group. This will be an intensive, stimulating and rewarding project (if the machine works!) Social is also to be included within the programme. Product: Machine/ installation Key themes: machines, problem solving, mixed media animate space Daniel Kerr (MawsonKerr Architects) 19
  8. 8. 22 The university has a world class reputation has a place of learning and research. Visiting the university campus, it is difficult to see, appreciate or even believe the wealth of amazing discoveries, inventions and learned academic activity. You are asked to conceive and develop a piece of full scale work that will be viewed and experienced as a monument/ folly to one or more of the discoveries, inventions or significant developments made at the university during it’s history. It will be a temporary addition to the built environment, it may be usable, have more than one function, encourage certain activities or be intended to be merely viewed. Product: Full scale interventions Key themes: uncelebrated, forgotten, lost….ideas, discoveries and inventions. temporary monument Colin Ross 23
  9. 9. 30 The Charrette will commence a year-long programme of activity in which the school will be working with Kielder Art & Architecture on a design and construction project that will aim to increase public engagement, participation, and understanding of contemporary architectural practice. ‘Testing Ground’ will allow a wide range of mutually beneficial opportunities to be explored, including connections between education and research, thinking and making, and public outreach and engagement. These interconnected aspects of the project have the potential to lead to significant and influential architectural outcomes that will be demonstrated through the ‘live’ construction of a pavilion and related programme of events at Kielder during 2013. The design challenge of the Testing Ground Charette is to generate a range of initial ideas that will respond to the existing built structures of Kielder as well as its landscape qualities and ecological context. Students will work in mixed-stage groups to propose an appropriate architectural, tectonic and material response to the Kielder context and to generate a resource base of design, construction and material ideas that can be taken forward to subsequent phases of the project. Product: Design proposals Key themes: education, engagement, construction testing ground Graham Farmer (Director of Architecture) 31
  10. 10. 32 The city lives and works in the eyes of cameras. It sleeps under the watchful gaze of closed-circuit television. You live in a city of surveillance. It’s time to turn the cameras back on themselves and turn eyes back to you. You live in the city. You live here. How does twenty-four hours pass in this urban environment? What stories, what acts, what loves and hates, what crimes, fears, excitements and boredoms are played out around one rotation of the earth on its axis? You’ll find out. You’ll record: a series of stories composed of life in the city. An opera of opportunities, disappointments, meetings, chance encounters. Eat.Shop.Drink.Dance.Drive.Write.Think.Draw. Sleep.Love.Smile.Cry.Laugh.Walk.Run.Record. We’ll take precedent from the ground-breaking 24hrs Berlin, produced for German television channel Arte, and we’ll grow the idea from there. You’ll live your lives, and you’ll record the events of your twenty-four hours in this city new, city old, city lived and city yet to be experienced. Product: Recordings Key themes: time, record, film 24 hours newcastle Ed Wainwright (Publish Architecture) 33
  11. 11. 34 35 As we chart the relatively unknown waters of the new (or at least different) higher educational world in which we find ourselves, the good ship BA Architecture appears to have enjoyed a year of stability - the number of new students joining the programme has increased slightly, the performance of students throughout the programme remains high, our students have enjoyed success in a number of high-profile awards and competitions, and the number of graduates gaining placements in both work and educational contexts has been encouraging. It would be tempting to suggest that the continuity of our “outputs” simply reflects the continuity and stability of the “inputs”; of staff, tutors, project themes, module content and the like. Whilst this is undoubtedly true to an extent - and this is the ideal point to express my thanks to everyone involved in making the BA so successful - there are many areas and avenues within Architecture and within our programme where risk and uncertainty, far from simply existing, must always be encouraged. Regardless of the extent of the change that the on-going BA Review ultimately brings about, I hope that the BA Architecture Programme will keep one eye firmly fixed on the prize of stability and continuity, but in doing so, never shrink back from testing, innovating, and from a healthy dose of risk-taking and uncertainty – all of which, I trust, are in evidence on the following pages. Simon Hacker Degree Programme DirectorBA degree Looking up Dog Leap Stairs - Photograph by Chris Perriman
  12. 12. 36 37 Martin Beattie stage 1 Stage one is a varied introduction to architecture, characterised by numerous workshops, visits and hands-on activities and students respond to it with great energy. In the first week of term students begin by taking part in a number of intense design charettes with all students from across the School. Their first designs were for small spaces of refuge and shelter in rural settings, where scale, function, materiality and the construction of space were explored primarily through modelmaking. Additional hands-on projects developed structural understanding and measured drawing skills and made use of buildings – historic and contemporary - in Newcastle and its surroundings, with visits to Holy Island, Escomb and to Durham. Theory, history and technology are taught through lectures, seminars and group work and are also integrated into the design teaching. In semester two students move to the city to embark upon a longer design project that demands more complex three dimensional manipulation and emphasises the experience and qualities of space. Artist-led workshops allow the testing of alternative ways of exploring form, drawing and space - and introduce a process-driven approach to design. A final semester two project for a piece of set design primes students in the use of digital tools, before students bring together the great range of work they have undertaken for the portfolio. Drawing on the Dog Leap Steps
  13. 13. 38 39 Kati Blom exercise city drawing As part of induction week new students accom-panied by artists and design tutors visit parts of the city with their sketchbooks to experiment with the use of various drawing media including pen-cils, pastels, charcoal and graphite. After wandering and drawing in different loca-tions, students finally find a destination in town -churches, markets, galleries, old city walls- and start to draw using A1 paper and a drawing board. The idea is to get a taste of the way ar-chitects look at the environment, but also to get students to do something they have never done before; use A1 paper on a drawing board and sketch with charcoal or graphite. It is meant to be a pleasant and memorable occasion and gives them opportunity to familiarise themselves with the city and each other, as well as the way the first year is run in collaboration with artists. This city sketching exercise is part of a profes-sional studies module, which introduces them to different visual media. Later on during the autumn semester students visited Lindisfarne island and castle making a presentation using analogical media. Ruta Bertaunskyte Yee Ching Chew
  14. 14. 44 45 The first project is a simple one roomed single-storey beach hut. This is a place to make day vis-its to the beach, a room of one’s own with a view of the sea. Students were asked to pose creative and conceptual ways of living, which were re-flected in their beach hut designs. The beach hut is a place for daydreams and this project hope-fully captures some of the dreams that first year students may have had about architecture. The site is on the North East coast of England, next to a long strip of golden sand which runs north-south. The hut’s internal dimensions are 2.5 x 3 metres, and it forms part of a row. Natural-ly, it will have a floor, walls, and roof to give shel-ter from the elements, a door to get into the hut, and openings in the walls and/or roof, to let light in and see out. Students were asked to develop their schemes largely in model form. The final re-view was student led, with students choosing the best schemes for a final selected exhibition. shelter for daydreams Martin Beattie project 01 Ban Xzaoxu Robert Douglas Philippa Skingsley
  15. 15. 46 47 for place refuge The second project is a small summer cabin plus artists’ studio of 40 m². It is a place for one person to stay for short intervals throughout the year. Basic provision is made for sleeping, cook-ing, relaxing, studying, and creating art. There is no electricity and vehicular access to the building is not possible. The experience is one of living simply in nature and in isolation and it might be a chance to question conventional modes of living. The site is located on the southern edge of a promontory of land, forested with Scots Pine, called the Belling, in Kielder Forest. It is a site where the sound of wind in the trees and water lapping on the beach are prominent. Sunlight, wind, proximity to shelter, trees, ground condi-tions, topography, paths, aspect, outlook and surveillance were crucial aspects which students were asked to consider. However we were also looking for a more conceptual and poetic re-sponse to both site and programme. Students were asked to develop their schemes through sketchbooks, models and weekly theory read-ings. Martin Beattie project 02 BryonyM Saitmthceowx Wreglesworth Matthew Wreglesworth
  16. 16. 48 49 Armelle Tarvideau urban delight Urban Delights is about Drawing, Cooking, Casting, Eating, Mapping, Film screening, Modelling, Photographing (01_Photography workshop) and Drawing again. The Urban Delights project aims to engage students with 1:1 scale by first designing and delivering a feast in which both food and cast dishes (02_Curry group cast), vessels or food stand are staged for palatal and visual enjoyment and where the spatial and lighting environment related to each food group is carefully considered. The food groups included Tapas, Wrap, Couscous, Noodles, Bakery, Pastry, Sushi and Curry (03_Noodles group feast). The second part of the project focused on the urban fabric of the Quay Side area of Newcastle. Students mapped food related spaces and venues (from pubs to fashionable cafés/ restaurants and temporary food kitchens) and recorded unexpected (04_Unexpected urban space) and potential urban spaces for the now well established EAT Festival of Newcastle Gateshead to take place at the end of summer. They also drew inspiration from various films where food was at the core of the plot (05_Film scene). The final part of the project is dedicated to the design of a cookery school located on a topographically challenging site adjacent to Black Gate. Particularly emphasis is drawn to the sequences of spaces, the cooking and eating spaces are often drawn from the feast experience, whether nesting, stacking or spreading across the site (06_ Model). Guest lecturers: Tim Townshend, Jane Midgley, Simon Hacker, Simon Preston and Carol Bell (Eat Festival). Artists supporting drawing, casting and photography: Andrea Toth, Charlotte Powell, Keri Townsend, Tracey Tofield, Damien Wootten and Tara Stewart. Design tutors: Katie Lloyd Thomas, Di Leitch, Bill Tavernor, Tony Watson, Sophia Banou, Ed Wainright, Montse Ferres and Louise Squires, James Longfield Stage 6 students support: John Beattie, Janice Chen, Suzanne Croft, Nikoletta Karastathi, Imogen Lees, Matt Lippiatt, April Murray, Stuart Taylor and Annabel Ward. project 03 Noodles Group Feast
  17. 17. 50 51 Preena Mistry John Harvey Sarah Topley Photography workshop Curry Group
  18. 18. 52 53 As part of induction week new students accompanied by artists and design tutors visit parts of the city with their sketchbooks to experiment with the use of various drawing media including pencils, pastels, charcoal and graphite. After wandering and drawing in different locations, students finally find a destination in town -churches, markets, galleries, old city walls- and start to draw using A1 paper and a drawing board. The idea is to get a taste of the way architects look at the environment, but also to get students to do something they have never done before; use A1 paper on a drawing board and sketch with charcoal or graphite. It is meant to be a pleasant and memorable occasion and gives them opportunity to familiarise themselves with the city and each other, as well as the way the first year is run in collaboration with artists. This city sketching exercise is part of a professional studies module, which introduces them to different visual media. Martyn Dade-Robertson digital comunication project 04 Alexander Minney
  19. 19. 54 55 Richard Dunn Ole Petter Steen Bernita Tao Wan Zhen
  20. 20. 56 57 Simon Hacker Stage 2 Coordinatorstage 2 Teaching in Stage 2 is something of a treat. It’s analogous to watching trees come into leaf – admittedly for much of the time you don’t notice anything that spectacular, but then there are rare days when, if you look closely enough, you can witness individual students and their designs growing in front of your eyes. Of course, some students become frustrated with what they consider to be a lack of architectural growth and development, but at this time of year, when they revisit their entire year’s work and curate it for their portfolios, for most, the cumulative change and development that has taken place across the year is undeniable. Of course (hopefully) the analogy falls down when we consider the role of those who lecture and teach. A tree will tend to leaf regardless of the care and attention lavished on it, and whilst some students will inevitably progress with relatively little direct input from the staff, for some the right lecture or tutorial can certainly contribute to the tree coming into leaf a little quicker. Perhaps, ultimately, even to it growing a little stronger. So, thanks to all the teaching staff (keep tending), and thanks to all the trees (keep growing). I hope you enjoy the following, very edited, collection of leaves… Darren Harmon
  21. 21. 50 51 project 01 placed displaced The project, envisaged as a primer for the subsequent ‘Simplicity, Economy, Home’ project later in the Semester, focuses on the spatial and volumetric planning and design of small row house. Students are asked to generate, test and declare a range of possible alterna-tives within a given, fixed volume. The very tight physical parameters of the project brief prevents students from resorting to the lazy solution of simply making the design a little bigger – rather, in order to ‘place’ one requirement of the brief, it necessitates ‘displacing’ another. The primary focus of the project is on the understanding of the principles of ergonom-ics, although the project also asks students to consider the varying degrees of privacy required in a home and the thresholds that might define these, together with an appreciation of natural daylight and sunlight within small scale spaces. The overall aim of the project is to familiarise students with the creation of good, liveable homes within relatively modest means. Project Tutors: James Craig, Simon Hacker, Dan Kerr, Di Leitch, Astrid Lund, Tony Watson, Jenny Webb, Kate Wilson Simon Hacker Ningxin Ye
  22. 22. 52 53 William Whiteaway Richard Morrison Annabel MacLeod Katie-Rose Hay Shaobo Wu
  23. 23. 54 Bill Tavernor project 02 Building on the previous project, ‘Simplicity, Economy, Home’ asks students to expand the realm of the private beyond the single cellular home to include aspects of shared and col-lective living. A small Foyer scheme, to house eight vulnerable youngsters forms the core of the brief, with a workshop and training provision alongside. Besides immediately requiring the students to translate themselves into the particular and often ‘different’ needs of others, of their clients, the project necessitates them analysing and choos-ing between two very different sites. Throughout the project the boundaries between what is rightfully private and the public realm are exam-ined, determined and re-assessed. This takes place within two over-arching requirements of the brief; one highly pragmatic – to employ a simple, affordable constructional solution; and the second almost impossibly idealistic – to provide something that many of the clients will never have had, a home. Project Tutors: James Craig, Simon Hacker, Dan Kerr, Di Leitch, Astrid Lund, Bill Tavernor, Tony Watson, Jenny Webb home simplicity economy 55 Gabriel Niculcea
  24. 24. 56 57 Emilia Kalyvides Mariya Lapteva Gabriel Niculcea Mariya Lapteva
  25. 25. 58 The settlement of Tynemouth, characterised by its wide and largely intact medieval Front Street, provides the location for the major Semester 2 project. Students choose one of three medium-scale public building typologies – a Moot (small Town) Hall, an Outward Bound Centre or a Literary Co-op – and mix and match these with four suggested sites. Whilst the emphasis inevi-tably changes from that of the private and the personal, to that of the public and the collective, students encounter many of the same themes introduced in the earlier projects. Associated lectures and tutorials concentrate initially on what makes public space ‘public’, and what the implications for architects and designers are in this regard. They go on develop thoughts around urban movement and routes - how buildings and spaces announce them-selves and the role they play in the townscape - and then develop this to consider the way in which individual buildings can be structured in similar ways. In addition, there is a conversa-tion throughout the project concerning various environmental and technological issues – with a view to integrating elements of the on-going technology lecture module and assessment with the project. Project Tutors: Simon Hacker, Dan Kerr, Di Leitch, Astrid Lund, Bill Tavernor, Tony Watson, Jenny Webb, Kate Wilson civic centred Simon Hacker project 03 59 Mariya Lapteva
  26. 26. 60 61 Cynthia Wong Dominic Bareham Joseph Dent Sebastian Bowler Ningxin Ye Deimante Bazyte
  27. 27. 62 Simon Hacker section-alley The Section-Alley project was formulated in an attempt to challenge the dominance of plan drawing and thinking amongst architectural scholars and practitioners. The blunt but highly effective teaching approach is to simply ban plan drawings for the duration of the project. Newcastle’s medieval quayside Chares, or alleys, provide the physical context for the project. Each has it’s own qualities and unique characteristics, but all share the same essential quality – that of being interesting and complex sectionally – their form borne out of the essen-tial function of linking the low-level quayside to the high-level city centre. Working in groups, students choose and then survey a Chare and produce drawn, modelled and video-based presentations. Employing lightweight and demountable timber construc-tion techniques, they are then asked to design one or more performance-based interventions within their chosen Chare, to help facilitate “Musical Chares” - a hypothetical annual busk-ing festival. Finally, each group was tasked with publicising and promoting their Chares and interventions prior to a final exhibition of the project work. The project combines collaborative working methods with an insistence on the production of exhibition-standard material throughout its duration. Project Tutors: Dan Kerr, Di Leitch, Astrid Lund, Tony Watson, Jenny Webb, Kate Wilson project 04 Group 2 Group 3 63
  28. 28. 64 65 Group 16 Group 4 Group 2 Group 3 Group 12 Group 16
  29. 29. 66 67 Daniel Malo Following the fast paced, high- energy, design charette across all stages and design programs at APL, students first engaged in a short competition project focusing on the relationships between architecture and ecology. The design of a small structure, located in one of Newcastle’s wildlife corridors, was intended to provide a haven for biodiversity. The project was carried out in collaboration with the Natural History Society of Northumbria with the support of TRADA and the winning schemes will be built for the 2013 British Science Festival hosted in Newcastle. The second part of the first semester concentrated on the strategic master plan of an abandoned textile estate in Barcelona and the addition of a programmatic provision to one of the buildings addressing reuse and refurbishment at the micro scale. The module culminated with a choice of five studios offering a wide variety of graduation projects. Win-win ecologies project, a haven for biodiversity in Heaton Park, by Emma Irene Hall, Wing Laam Sze and Fatima Tayyeb Afzalstage 3
  30. 30. 68 69 Barcelona Field Trip At the end of October 2012, stage 3 took part to a three day-field trip to Barcelona. Described as the City of Marvels by Catalan writer Eduardo Mendoza, Barcelona has reinvented itself over the years. Mendoza’s highly atmospheric novel takes us through the development of the city be-tween the World Fairs hosted in 1888 and 1929, two key moments in history that generated large scale urban transformations. This ambition of constant improvement of the built environment has never ceased and has intensified over the years. From the design of public spaces in the 1980s, to the metropolitan plans for the Olympic development in the 1990s through to the re-gional scale strategic plans of the 2000s, Barce-lona’s history of urban renewal demonstrates an exemplary determination to become one of the best European cities in terms of quality of public space and urban life. The project was supported by James Craig, Montse Ferrés, David McKenna, Tim Mosedale, Matt Ozga-Lawn and Michael Simpson. Acknowledgements: This field trip would not have been possible without the invaluable input and effort of Montse Ferrés who identified the site and provided links with the local authorities and professionals. Our thanks go to Marc Aureli Santos (architect in charge of ‘fabriques de creacio’) and Rosina Vinyes (architect and urban designer). Daniel Mallo and Colin Ross Turo-de-la-Rovira Santa-Caterina-Market
  31. 31. 70 71 Group photo talks and the environment of the ‘Hangar’ set the tone and the context for the project. On the last day of our visit, we embarked on a wider perspec-tive of the city. A coach drove us to the edges of the city, marked by the mountain, the Besós and Llobregat rivers and the sea. The abandoned military bunker at the top of the Turó de la Rovira Park provided a memorable view across the city and the geographic context in which it is located. The coach allowed us to hop from the works of wHerzog & de Meuron (Forum building), Josep Lluis Sert (Miró Founda-tion) to the unavoidable Mies van der Rohe’s pavilion for the 1929 World Fair, the ideal setting for a farewell to the City of Marvels. Our field trip started with a day walk through the historic core of Barcelona crossing from the Raval and Gothic districts to the newly revived and creative Born area. This short walk enabled a journey through history rang-ing from the medieval times (Pi square) to the period of growth and prosperity of the 12th- 14th century (church of Santa Maria del Mar), which was followed by a slow process of decadence and densification that can still be perceived through the labyrinth of narrow streets. It was only in the 19th century when the city walls were eventually demolished that Barcelona radically changed its image thanks to the city extension designed by Ildefonso Cerdà in 1859. We were taken through squares, markets, museums and religious landmarks. Two distinct markets punctuated our walk: la ‘Bo-queria’, the holy place for both locals and world known chefs, awakened all the senses needed to enjoy the city while ‘Santa Ca-terina’ provided a breath taking architectural experience with its levitating wavy roof designed by the late Catalan architect Enric Miralles. After a long day and little energy left, we walked down the streets of the Born area to reach the beach and the incred-ibly calm Mediterranean sea. For some, it was hard to resist its magnetic attraction. Even though the early autumn evening was not particularly hot; it was simply impossible not to take shoes and shirts off. The following day unfolded under the auspices of heavy rain and public transport strike, which set a challenge for the visit to the project site in the neighbourhood of Poblenou. Nonetheless all the students made it and, in contrast to the first day, we discovered a part of the city without tourists or historic landmarks, but a built environment of abandoned industrial factories intertwined with residential areas and newly built regeneration schemes. The site, known as ‘Can Ricart’, has a long history dating back to the heydays of the textile industry in the 19th century and has been abandoned in recent years. This derelict environment has attract-ed meanwhile uses, in particular artists’ initiatives that flourished thanks to the low-rents associ-ated with the dilapidated condi-tion of ex-industrial buildings. The ‘Hangar’ studio, adjacent to our site, is one of such initiatives, which is now supported by the city council. The ‘Hangar’ was our base for the day where Marc Aureli Santos talked to us about the reuse of industry heritage in Barcelona and Rosina Vinyes on the wide master plan vision for the neighbourhood. Both the La Oliva abandoned factory Can Ricart site visit Mies van der Rohe Barcelona pavilion
  32. 32. 73 72 ‘Can Ricart’ is a 19th century industrial estate of textile factories located in a large urban site of the Poblenou neighbourhood, Barcelona. The site offers the opportunity to rethink abandoned industrial buildings and to create synergies with the emerging productive, cultural industry of Poblenou. Following a field trip to Barcelona, students focused first on site strategies and landscape design; the project then zoomed into the micro scale with a detailed proposal for the refurbishment or extension of one of the buildings developed in conjunction with the Architectural Technology module. of synergies can ricart: factory Daniel Mallo Rania Francis Agata Murasko Agata Murasko
  33. 33. 74 75 Nedelina Atanasova Michael Pybus Nedelina Atanasova Oleg Sevelkov
  34. 34. Portia Malik 76 77 Portia Malik Ruta Austrina Alexander Hart Stavri Rousounidou Stavri Rousounidou
  35. 35. 78 79 play me, i’m yours The “Play Me” studio takes its inspiration from the ‘Play me, I’m Yours’ festival. This artistic pro-ject by British artist Luke Jerram started in 2008 and has been touring across 30 cities in the world. A series of pianos located in the city are available for any member of the public to play and enjoy (see http://www.streetpianos.com). The studio echoes the vision and values behind this city festival with the activation of urban spaces through improvisation and participation. The project was set with the assumption that the “Play me, I’m yours” festival would come to Grainger Town, the historic core of Newcastle upon Tyne, whose dense urban morphology and vibrant city life offers a wealth of urban spaces that can provide venues for both public and intimate performances. Three main themes have driven the narrative of the studio: interstices, atmosphere and envelope. In Phase 1, the project explored the realm of Grainger Town: students were asked to produce a ‘townscript’, a descriptive and interpretative drawing that mapped perceptions, geometrical patterns as well as traces of every day life. As well as including 5 locations for the pianos, this drawing became a palimpsest of interstitial spaces including the quietest, the most intimate and unexpected urban spaces and revealed the hidden and the historical layers of Grainger Town. The 5 chosen locations informed the de-sign of a prototype for a stool to accompany the pianos, both enabling the festival and activating the spaces identified. Learning from Phase 1, Phase 2 of the project invited students to embrace the design of a music hub, drawing from the atmospheres recorded on their ‘townscript’. This facility encompasses a series of rehearsal rooms, all of different size, volume, character, atmosphere and acoustic quality intended as a community resource as well as cater for local musicians and bands in need of rehearsal space. The hub also acts as a base for the festival and future, similar initiatives and is complemented with a music library and a provision to financially support it, such as café, music lessons, second hand instruments shop, repair workshop, etc. Phase 3 of the project engaged with a material study focusing on the concept of structure-envelope providing an opportunity for the structure to define column-less volumes. Students were asked to investigate and celebrate the space in-between these volumes and to consider these interstices in terms of their programmatic potential, for instance, the ‘Play me’ pianos could be safely stored until the next call for an improvised tune… Daniel Mallo and Michael Simpson Seray Sutcuoglu
  36. 36. 81 <No intersecting link> 80 <No intersecting link> Adam Hampton-Matthews Nedelina Atanasova Ian Campbell Ewan Thomson
  37. 37. 82 83 Playme_09-Alanah Honey.jpg Playme_01-David Tam.jpg Anna Cumberland Alanah Honey David Tam Fatima Afzal Muyan Liu
  38. 38. 84 city of bridges If the morphology of the city of Newcastle is characterized by anything, it is surely that of the remarkable density of extraordinary bridges that span the Tyne. Normally bridges are singular “pinch points” in a city, but something else seems to be at work in Newcastle – an almost irrational compulsion to span the river and to make a “city of bridges”. The aim of this studio is to develop and push this logic to an extreme condition by designing 12 new inhabited bridges to be situated in the zone between the Swing Bridge (to the west) and the new Millen-nium bridge (to the east). The studio was set up in such a way that, although each student could work independently, all the bridges could be brought together at the end to form a collec-tive urban project, a “city of bridges”. Through studies of the existing context of the river and its architectural relations with the city, and of cinematic media, we developed proposals for a new architecture that connects the two sides of the river but that also introduces new program-matic elements to it. Each student was asked to elaborate a design for an inhabited bridge that contains a variety of functional elements. However, these were to be anchored around a key programmatic condition: a cinematic screening facility together with adjunct func-tions. The cinematic focus of the project was not arbitrarily given, for there is something uncan-nily filmic about bridges. Internally they are to do with passage, movement and framing, and as massive infrastructural elements they give rhythm to the cityscape, partitioning it in mobile and contingent ways. Taken together, the work of the studio produced a “city of bridges” that was at the same time a “cine-città”. In the initial stage of the project, students were asked to use video to construct short films of a visual and acoustic architec-tural passage, using montage and other filmic techniques. The films were then transformed into notational drawings as a way of opening an architectural speculation regarding the constitu-tion of the bridge itself. The aim of the notational drawing was to graphically spatialise, in a single drawing, the film, and as such to work as a kind of architectural translation of it. The cinematic construct and notational drawing then led on directly on to the major project. Aikaterini Antonopoulou & Mark Dorrian
  39. 39. 86 87 Tahmineh Emami Tahmineh Emami Tahmineh Emami Shuo Yang Shuo Yang
  40. 40. 88 89 Alexander Hart Erandi Helamini Amarasinghe Alexander Hart Caspar Thorp
  41. 41. 90 91 Rosalia Kateryna Samus Rosalia Kateryna Samus Malcolm Greer Pritchard Malcolm Greer Pritchard
  42. 42. 92 93 Gergana Popova Gergana Popova Gergana Popova Charles Lambert Emily Clay Thomas Day
  43. 43. 95 94 Kati Blom and David McKenna This project is based on a hypothetical move of The Finnish Institute in London to Newcastle. The mission of the Institute is to act as a catalyst to promote collaboration between cultural agents in Finland and their counterparts in UK or Ireland. Students were initially asked to familiarise themselves with a local practitioner who could work with the Institute to inform what a permanent base for the organisation might be. The Incubator The starting point was a period of research into the local cultural climate. Each developed a small scale proposal for a possible local collaborator who might give some insight into the activities of the Institute. Interview techniques were used in the early stage of project to gain information and get inspired. This phase, the “Incubator”, could be thought of as a stage set that locates a specific activity of the agent at a site somewhere in the city centre. There were no environmental constrains and ideally the Incubator would augment the existing fabric of a found site with a strategically placed intervention without the need for any major construction. The incubator became a prototype from which would develop, firstly, a more detailed brief in response to the particular interests of the collaborator and secondly, a focus for the design by establishing the spatial and tectonic strategies that would be explored in the architectural proposal for the institute. The Institute In the second phase, each student chose a site according to their emerging brief. The choice was between three possible city centre locations. The most popular was Broadchare which replaced a missing tooth in the urban fabric of the quayside, connecting the river and street front newcastlethe finnish institute in with the back courts and historic chares. The Black Gate site tested the students ability to resolve the programme within a small footprint and to understand the complex sectional relationship between the steeply sloping road, the castle and viaduct. The third site was in Gateshead; the former Brett Oils Ltd Refinery at Pipewell Gate which required negotiation between the height of the adjacent High Level Bridge and the horizontal expanse of the disused refinery and the Tyne. The educational emphasis was partly on brief making as a method to promote abstract cultural or social aims and in parallel to develop and refine an architectural language. Most revisited the incubator to establish clearly defined areas exploration in the design of the Institute. During the tutorials, specific emphasis was afforded to the translation of the individual briefs into a coherent spatial and diagrammatic strategy with a focus on model making and refinement of an architectural proposal. Generic fields of interest varied between sustainability, research fields like synthetic biology, visual arts like photography, textile design, and glass design, and performance arts like poetry, dance, and theatre. Collaborative organisations included the Textile Hub, Institute of Aging and Health, Northern Stage, Homelessness and Arts, Newton’s Ladder, Institute of Social Renewal, and Sentient Cities. Richard Glover
  44. 44. 96 97 Styliani Michael Stella Michael Stavri Rousounidou Stella Michael Stavri Rousounidou
  45. 45. 98 99 Ruta Austrina Ruta Austrina Daniel Celaya Miranda Daniel Celaya Miranda
  46. 46. 100 101 Mohammad Abdul Bari Mohammad Abdul Bari Rebecca Miller Rebecca Miller
  47. 47. 102 103 Joe Wilson Joe Wilson Matheus Simon dos Santos Stephen Ringrose
  48. 48. 104 105 Ella Cain Jack Scaffardi Katie Rowe Matt Jackson
  49. 49. 106 107 Matthew Wilcox Matthew Wilcox Rumen Dimov Rumen Dimov Rumen Dimov
  50. 50. 108 Graham Farmer, Adam Sharr Concrete is, simultaneously, the most solid and the most elusive of materials. A liquid which becomes solid, concrete is usually given its shape by the formwork into which it’s poured, regularly displaying the impress of the shuttering material. Yet it also has its own material properties which determine how it flows, sets and how it acts when dry. Seemingly self-reliant, it is really only liberated in association with other materials. This studio explores concrete; its material properties, its cultural consequences and its contemporary meanings. Students are expected to evolve a design position through a combination of direct experience, inquisitive intuition, critical imagination and material experimentation. The studio worked with the former site of the Bank of England building in Newcastle. Designed by Fitzroy Robinson and built in concrete in 1971 (although faced in Portland Stone) it was partly demolished in 2012, although the vaults, constructed of thick concrete walls remain as a buried remnant of the site’s former use. The site addresses Newcastle’s most heroic modernist space – the roundabout at the foot of Pilgrim Street – oversailed by a footbridge and by Swan House (now known as 55 Degrees North) and undercut by the Central Motorway. It sits directly on the north-south axis of the Tyne Bridge and forms a gateway to the city for those travelling by car or rail, who view it at speed. The site is also a key point on the proposed urban link between city and Quayside (The ‘Geordie Ramblas’) which could potentially solve the current disconnection between them. The project encouraged students to adopt a position on the threatened ‘Brutalist’ heritage of the city. The Bank is the latest in a sequence of demolitions of concrete buildings of that period. This part of the city was developed as part of T. Dan Smith’s ambitious vision of Newcastle as the ‘Brasilia of the North’. It was a vision of slab and point blocks, representing a new future after the privations of the wartime past and symbolizing a new Newcastle imagined for the computer age. This placed cars below and people above on new high-level ‘pedways’. A truncated ‘pedway’ adjoins the site, as do various subways and the tunnel housing the Central Motorway. Students were asked to find their own programme around that could promote and support social innovation. The wide diversity of projects produced each propose interesting ideas for an urban, programmatic and material focal point for social change within the city. ideagora the concrete 109 James Houston
  51. 51. 110 111 Anna Holsgrove Sarah Rozelaar Matthew Pratt Matthew Pratt Matthew Pratt
  52. 52. Jess Riddell 112 113 Claire Peerless Claire Peerless Myrto Barbaris Sophie Mclean
  53. 53. 114 115 Andrea Sze Nur Zaminudin Luke Lupton Luke Lupton Andrea Sze Nur Zaminudin
  54. 54. 116 117 Greta Varpucianskyte Greta Varpucianskyte Greta Varpucianskyte Nguyen Xuan Man Richard Spilsbury Nguyen Xuan Man Richard Spilsbury
  55. 55. 118 119 Tarek Abida Pheobe Burnett Kristina Kupstaite Ellen Creaser.jpg
  56. 56. Richard Everett 120 121 Richard Everett Anastasia Ananyeva Anna Melson Anna Melson Anastasia Ananyeva
  57. 57. 122 Matt Ozga-Lawn, James Craig testing ground This is a project about testing. Testing is central to the scientific method. Its role, in the form of experiments of near-limitless variety, is to demonstrate the relationship between two events: a cause, and an effect. This project invited students to produce a design for a new building that was derived through this process, from initial tests of the body and its relationship to its surroundings, to the iterative development of test institutes and their corresponding test sites. The institute was to be situated on the site of the former Steetley Magnesite Works in Hartlepool. The works was among the largest of its kind in the world, and together with other, massive- scale industrial landscapes in the region, constituted a significant part of the late 20th century industrial history of the North East. This legacy is now largely erased or in ruins as factories close their doors and jobs and expertise disappear, and we are left to interpret their remains. Often, we read the post-industrial landscapes they leave behind alongside representations that hold them in perpetuity, such as the famous opening scene of Ridley Scott’s 1982 science fiction film Blade Runner, in which nearby Wilton industrial works is merged with Los Angeles to create a dense, nightmarish urban environment. Films such as this immortalise the industrial structures of the 20th century through their reinterpretation as something else, taking their characteristics and utilizing them to generate something new, and this was the ambition of the studio. The project challenged students to find a new use for the unique terrain in Hartlepool that lives up to its generative qualities. To do this, students were encouraged to act as both testers and explorers. The first site of exploration was the body, and altering its relationship with the world. Through these tests, students arrived at starting points for specific and individual treatments of the site, onto which their tests and apparatuses were translated at a large scale and programmed accordingly. Through studies of the body, its surroundings, and the apparatuses, drawings and techniques arrived at through the development of the project, proposals were arrived at for a series of unique testing grounds and institutes in Hartlepool. These included a cloud generating and colouring institute, an institute for the experience of falling, and a nightclub utilising resonant sounds generated by the landscape, to name a few of the diverse and extraordinary projects depicted here. Rebecca Dillon-Robinson
  58. 58. James Morton James Morton Rania Francis Natasha Carfrae Natasha Carfrae Natasha Carfrae
  59. 59. 127 Clare Thomas Edward Watkiss Oleg Sevelkov Marta Zembinskyte Marta Zembinskyte
  60. 60. 128 <No intersecting link> Michael Pybus Robert Evans Emma Hall
  61. 61. Hazem Halasa Hazem Halasa Agata Murasko Agata Murasko Agata Murasko
  62. 62. Alex Blanchard David Boyd Ibrahim Muasher James Humber
  63. 63. 134 135 James Humber James Humber Theodora Kyrtata Josh Smith Theodora Kyrtata
  64. 64. 136 137 Lam Nguyen Afterimage Hadrian Award Part I It was a great honour to receive the Hadrian Award. The award represents a recognition of achievement that has been built up over two years of my education at Newcastle. I’d like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the many contributions others have made to my success. First of all is my greatest appreciation to my parents’ support for my study in the UK. Having the chance to study in the UK has opened up a lot of opportunities that have brought me closer to a deep and personal understanding of de-signing and making. Among those, the chance to meet and work under the advice and tuition of Matt Ozga-Lawn and Aikaterini Antonopolou in my graduation project was a great opportu-nity for me, and their inspiration opened up a new horizon in the way I approach design that I have continued to develop through my Masters studies, which began with another collaboration with Matt. Finally I’d like to show my apprecia-tion to the department’s support staff and the facilities they operate – the 24h access and the workshop in particular – with special thanks to Sean Mallen and Bill Softley for their help with many models. All these figures and their support play a very important part in my achievement of winning the Hadrian Award and it wouldn’t have been possible without them. I was really honoured to be selected as the student to bring the Hadrian Award 2012 to the School. It was the third award granted to the Architecture Department since 2010 and it is proof of the high standard in quality in architec-tural education that Newcastle staff have been providing.
  65. 65. 138 139 time it was altered it was more exciting, something new revealed itself, and looking back I can see that every step was connected coherently from beginning to end. I used different patterns where different urban grids met, overlaying them, rotating them, aligning them, finding the geometrical similarity between them, connecting them and rotating and aligning them again… little bit by little bit, the fragmented details of the layered urban condition, the layered car park and layer of structure exposed when the excavator demolished the building became involved in my sequences of transformation. What came up in the end was exciting for both my tutors and me. My proposal was in some ways a more imposing structure than even the previous Brutalist structure. But unlike the car park, my building is a living, breathing, growing vertical neighbourhood. The scheme divided opinion and sparked discussion at the Hadrian jury panel – is it too brutal, impersonal, even cold? ‘Either way, it does what all good projects should – it asks questions, challenges and engages you…’ – the panellists. The Hadrian Award 2012 was an achievement in my study and its impact will echo into my future career, but more than that, what I have learned through this exceptional experience really opens up a new horizon on the way I see design, the way I approach it and process it. I want to express my sincere thankfulness to my tutors and Matt Ozga-Lawn in particular, for this priceless experience at the School. My project, named ‘Afterimage’, addresses the recently demolished iconic Trinity Square car park in Gateshead, commonly known as the ‘Get Carter Car Park’. The studio was also named Afterimage, led by Matt and Katerina, with a brief written by Professor Mark Dorrian, who writes in the studio brief: ‘Through studies of the volumetrics and morphology of the previous building, and its architectural relations with the city, we will develop proposals for a new architecture that works through a kind of oscillation or reflection between past and present’. The term Afterimage, in science, refers to the phenomena of a visual image that persists after the visual stimulus causing it has ceased to act. In the first stage of the project, we were asked to express our personal remembrance of the car park; this expression would be presented through a range of visual media as a kind of ghost image. The result among the studio was full of fun and sparkling imagination. I expressed my fascination in the layering structural relationship between the concrete, monumental car park and the surrounding industrial collaged cityscape of Gateshead. Sited within 500m from the river bank, near the top of a deep slope, the building is surrounded by infrastructural connections where railway bridges overlap road bridges, where one urban grid meets another, and historical buildings, church sites and low rise council housing come together. These layers of infrastructure and architecture set up the particular urban character of Gateshead which fascinated me. It seemed that the car park held everything together, and I wanted to provide something to the urban condition to recreate this purpose. I produced an analytic model of the city where information was separated into different layers piled up on top of each other, geography, transport and infrastructure, building facilities, and so on. This layering proved very influential to my final design. In the second phase of the project we were encouraged to use the ‘afterimage of the car park’ that we had produced and transform it into a new form of architecture that carries a significant relationship to the original building. This way of designing was really new and challenging for me, and so it raised questions for the way I operated in my design process. The aim moved from being about designing something ‘new’ after doing research to gain understanding about a subject and applying it to the site, to transforming the initial subject, the initial forms and ideas, literally, right from the beginning of the design process through many iterative developments, many times over so that an understanding of the subject is gained gradually and incrementally, and these steps are repeated until we reach a point of satisfaction. This design method created a lot of challenges, confusions, uncertainty and sometimes lack of confidence in me at the time. I remember asking Matt about this way of design later on in my Masters studies: ‘are you not scared of designing without knowing where it leads to?’ and he answered, ‘that’s the exciting thing about design’. Although a new methodology for me, transforming my analytic ‘afterimage’ model into a new structure was in some ways a straightforward task. The transformation wasn’t done once but many times, and every
  66. 66. 140 141 Richard Breen A Cyclotel Created from Perspectives RIBA bronze medal runner Up The RIBA President’s Medal Student Award is a truly iconic and highly respected award and cel-ebration of student work, recognised throughout the world. Taking entrants from around the Com-monwealth, the award is highly accredited and receives a hugely diverse range of work. It was a great honour for my project to be nominated by the school as one of two projects chosen to represent the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape at the awards. The process quickly spiralled far beyond my expec-tations; from being nominated to short-listed from 110 entries to 14 to it being announced that I was to collect a Bronze Medal Commen-dation from 66 Portland Place on 5th December 2012. A truly overwhelming achievement, not only for myself but for the School, my tutors: Matt- Ozga-Lawn, Aikaterini Antonopoulou and James Craig, and my fellow Afterimage studio participants. Receiving the award at the RIBA Headquarters in London was an indelible hon-our. Discussing my work with and collecting my award from the RIBA President Angela Brady, while my project was presented and critiqued to a room of 300 people was a truly special experi-ence. The evening provided a great opportunity to discuss the nominated projects with their authors, bringing together students from New-castle, Sheffield, Leeds Met, University College London and the Architectural Association. It was a wonderful evening of conversation, celebration and the promise of a bright architectural future! As an award winner my work will be exhibited around the world in the Awards Tour, from Aus-tralia to Chile to Bulgaria – a testament to the universal communicative qualities of architecture
  67. 67. 142 143 development of a building at this stage; the focus was purely on process, on finding a methodol-ogy on which to base our archi-tectural intervention in the vast Gateshead site. It was amazing to see the array of widely differ-ent approaches to the project discussed an early Crit. It was so exciting to be involved in such a uniquedesign pedagogy but it presented us with a shock when seeing our early work alongside the work of other studios as the approach I was taking was so different to many of my contem-poraries in the School. I personally became interested in how the car park’s existence survives in the subjective memories of people, and more tangibly in photography and film. I was interested in exploring how photography and its qualities of framing, composition, lighting, focus and colour, can attribute to people’s continuing memory of the car park. The photography as well as great exposure for the School. The project I chose, entitled Afterimage, run by Matt and Kat and based on a brief by Professor Mark Dorrian, provided a far too intriguing and interest-ing challenge to ignore when it was presented to the year. Their presentation stood out for many reasons, chiefly in its experimen-tal nature and its dedication to challenge the boundaries of the design process, architectural output and idea generation. The choice, though very daunting at the time, was an obvious one – this was the project for me. Afterimage presented a very different challenge to the other offered projects as well as all the previous projects I had engaged with during my time at the School. The idea of taking on a project in which the rules of architectural design were to be tested to the limits as the last project of my Part I degree was very exciting. The project tasked us with exploring the physical, emotional and psychological void left in Gateshead by the demolition of the brutalist and monumental ‘Get Carter’ Car Park designed by Owen Luder, with the aim of developing a new architecture that acted as an afterimage or ghost of the old structure. The brief for a Cyclotel (a hotel for cy-clists), became the architectural and contextual vehicle to explore our independent interpretation of the car park and its impact, morphology, construction, destruction and function. While it provided a loose guide as to what the Cyclotel should accom-modate, the brief was thoroughly open to interpretation. The beginning of the project was dedicated to idea generation, theoretical exploration and physi-cal experimentation. Little, if any time was afforded to the actual The architecture I was creating was almost at the mercy of my process and the experimenta-tion I had embarked upon. The Cyclotel brief was accommo-dated and the design developed, but the result was one that I could not have foreseen at the beginning of the project. I believe therefore, that the quality and merit of the project existed in the results being honest to my thorough and sometimes uncom-promising design process. Gaining recognition at the RIBA President’s Medal Awards provided a massive boost to my confidence and was a wonderful acknowledgement of my hard work and dedication during mt time at the School as well as a brilliant signifier of my devel-opment from an uncertain art stu-of Sally Ann Norman presented a locally uncharacteristic ap-preciation of the architecture. By focusing on her capturing of the car park’s dramatic forms, lines, verticality and shadows I selected four appropriate images to digitally manipulate under a set of fairly arbitrary rules, to test and distil the qualities of the car park, in an attempt to forge a new perception. Each manipulation was then produced as an acetate layer, allowing -with the use of an old-fashioned overhead projec-tor - the physical creation and manipulation of new imagery on a large and dynamic scale. Through assigning architectural qualities to each layer, a potential formal, spatial and architectural language began to emerge when projected back onto site. dent to a devoted architectural designer. As well as boosting my CV, my Commendation provides a great talking point with prospective employers and a presentation of my project be-came my first ever professional CPD, given at xsite Architecture LLP in January 2013. I firmly believe that the project brief, my tutors and my peer group provided the perfect platform and atmosphere for me pursue a design process and ex-ploration that ultimately resulted in mine and the School’s suc-cess during the Bronze Medal Awards. Therefore I would like to extend my sincere gratitude to everyone involved.
  68. 68. 144 145 Nick Bastow, Ewan Thomson, Sophie McLean ARCHIgrad summer school Set up by Northern Architecture and plus 3 Architects, the six week summer school was hosted by FaulknerBrowns Architects in Killingworth, Newcastle. The summer school team included Nick Bastow (who is currently on placement at FaulknerBrowns), Ewan Thomson and Sophie McLean, who are both graduating their part 1 this year. Our project was to propose design ideas to regenerate a Grade II brick neo-gothic church in Blyth, for our Client, Headway Arts. Headway arts which is a charity, offers unique resources, specialising in participatory arts across multiple art forms. They offer people that may tradition-ally be regarded as “hard to reach” the chance to take part in highly inclusive projects. We were given our own work space in Faulkner- Browns’ office as well as access to their print room and model workshop. In addition to this, we were mentored twice weekly by a Partner Architect. This provided us with valuable experi-ence in areas we hadn’t encountered at uni-versity, such as working with a real client, legal issues and liaising with a conservation officer.
  69. 69. 147 146 Comments from the public consultation session included: “Wonderful ideas for this lovely church, so pleased it is being used so well.” “Great to see the building regenerated with such a bold and exciting vision” “Congratulations - local craft group would like to use the space to display” “The extension is very fitting” “Fantastic potential - feels like there’s a very positive vibe already” “Welcoming, a place people can come to, a hub, beautiful” Finally we would like to thank FaulknerBrowns and ArchiGRAD for their time and support during this six week programme. We learnt many new skills during this time and it was a fantastic opportunity. point. From this, a new sensory connection and theatrical format between the performers and the audience would be established. Our proposal and feasibility work was then displayed and discussed at a public exhibition inside the church. We gave a verbal presentation to accompany the 1:50 model, plans, visualisations and a 1:1 partial model of our theatrical curtain, which we projected onto. This enabled members of the local community and the Conservation Officers we had been working with, the chance to view our work and leave their feedback. We were left very positive comments, praising the sensitive, rational and creative way we had dealt with the church. Frances Castle, Chief Executive of Headway Arts commented: “It has been an excellent project for Headway Arts to be involved in and the ideas and designs produced will be a valuable resource for the company.” From our site analysis we discovered that Blyth was undergoing a major regeneration and that we had an opportunity to make the church an integral part of this, returning the building to its historical position as a social hub for the town. Access by visitors was a key concern due to the nature of the clients’ work. To address this, we proposed a new, accessible entrance and a clearer circulation route to make the building instantly understandable. We incorporated sustainable ideas, using a vertical louvre system that not only regulated the heat gain but visually complemented and connected linear elements of the church, such as the tower and spire, back into the new atrium space. We also spent time designing a digital theatre and production space that offered the client a permeable 360° cinematic projection screen. This screen would act as an ever changeable scenery set, offering the ability to pass through at any
  70. 70. 149 148 Annabel Ward & Matt Lippiatt wider mbara project The Wider Mbarara Project is a student led construction initiative working in south west Uganda. Founded in 2004, the project relies on 12 volunteers raising £12000, designing a building and travelling to Uganda to assist local labourers with the construction. 2009 – 2013: House of Love Orphanage, Uganda. The House of Love provides a home for the most deprived orphans in the Kichwamba area. On land donated by a local family, WMP has created a central living building, eating area, learning centre and dormitory block as part of a 5 year plan to expand the capacity of the orphanage. This year sees the construction of a second dormitory and completion of this master plan. As a celebration of completing this project we are holding an exhibition to show the achievements of our current students, and to involve new students in 2014 and beyond. Join us on: Tuesday 15th October at 6pm, in crit 2 of the Architecture Building. The project is organised annually by students in APL and CEG. The students undertake design work, through a dialogue with local people. The money students raise through fund-raising pays for materials and local labour. This is an excellent opportunity for students to gain hands on construction skills, while living within the local community. Students have the opportunity to travel within East Africa, and experience a variety of cultures, people and places while making a positive contribution. To find out more visit: w: http://www.widermbararaproject.btck.co.uk e: wmp.annabel@hotmail.co.uk
  71. 71. 151 <No intersecting link> <No intersecting link> 150 Students coming into the MArch Programme at Newcastle take the ARC8053 Studio, a yearlong module. As a graduate design studio, ARC 8053 integrates research, seminars, and workshops. The goal is to get students to think critically about the wider context within which they will be practicing architecture, to develop their own critical responses in relation to the social, cultural, political and economic factors that shape the built environment, and to hone their craft at different spatial scales. With two projects that focus on the urban and individual building scale over the course of two semesters, the students prepare for the demands of the individual thesis project in their last year. stage 5 Zeynep Kezer
  72. 72. New York at Buffalo), who also served as a panelist during a day of presentations by the four groups. In addition, Dr Thomas organized a series of movie nights over several weeks with films shot in Berlin revealing facets of experiences and memories pertaining to the variegated populations that inhabit the city. The selection, which included, among others Goodbye Lenin, Run Lola Run, Lola and Bilidikit, and Wings of Desire, also opened up opportunities for extended conversations, since, in many cases, the project sites were featured in the films shown. Students proposed an astounding variety of interventions in response to the issues they identified in each site, which made for very interesting discussions. Guest reviewers at the final review (December 13-14) included Graham Farmer, Adam Sharr, James Craig, and Tim Bailey (Excite Architects). 152 Matthew Margetts & Jo McCafferty project 01 Zeynep Kezer berlin: the urban fabric The first semester design studio in the New-castle MArch programme is about the urban fabric. This year, we visited Berlin again, but with a larger group and had four sites and four projects to choose from: Crossings : Nord/Süd (tutor: Dr Ed Wainwright) North and South Berlin are now connected directly by tunnels and over ground rail lines. They have been separated by politics, culture and economics, and continue to have dra-matically differing, yet interrelated conditions. Today, the patched and repaired infrastructure of the city is subject to significant economic challenges and political pressures, and Berlin is still considered a near-bankrupt city-state in Germany. Physical divisions between the west and east have been largely repaired, but social, cultural and economic divides still prevail across the German capital and these crossing points have significant challenges facing their spatial situation. In this studio, students were sked to analyse and determine what these chal-lenges are, through a close contextual reading of the sites, and to propose a method of urban-infrastructural change to address a question they determined in their investigations. The goal was to produce an emergent spatial-led strategy to address a range of issues ranging from a proposal to address unemployment, to a method to encourage re-housing, presented through a variety of means from manifestoes to drawings to models. Fields of Flight : Tempelhof (tutor: Dr Sam Austin) This project used the now abandoned site of Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport—once regarded as a symbol of the city’s modernity and Nazi Germany’s technological achievements— to explore what happens to the sites left behind and ‘liberated’ by the processes of modernization and the expansion of global capitalism, what happens to their outdated infrastructures and to the places, activities and networks that have formed around them, and what issues are raised by their sudden ‘return’ to the locality? Students were asked to consider Tempelhof in context: as part of ever-changing interrelations, systems and flows that constitute the city and extend beyond it, relations that are infrastructural, political, socio-cultural, environmental, historical and economic. After critically investigating the questions posed by the site’s past separation and its proposed reintegration into the urban fabric, the students were asked to develop develop urban strategies and interventions that respond to the issues, rhythms,relations and distinctions you identify. Cultural Encounters / Spatial Fluidities: Kreuzberg (tutor: Dr Zeynep Kezer) This project focused on Berlin’s Kreuzberg district, which was marginalized during the Cold War due to its physical proximity to the and became a predominantly immigrant district with low rents that was also favored by young artists, activists and squatters. With the removal of the wall Kreuzberg is once again near the city’s centre, and has become a desirable residential area that is undergoing gentrification. The social and physical transformation of the area and the tensions between its diverse inhabitants set the scene for student proposed interventions this semester. This year, the site selected within Kreuzberg was larger and included areas adjacent to the wall to the North and the banks of the canal to the South. This allowed students to pursue a broader range of projects from waterfront development to memorials. Curating Museum Island (tutor: Matt Ozga-Lawn) Berlin’s Museumsinsel has become, since the Reunification, the site of a contentious construction and ‘reconstruction’ projects through the city authorities have sought to replicate the city’s pre-1939 urban structure and rebuild neo-classical landmarks. The process has progressively erased traces of GDR modernism in order to restore a sense of continuity with the pre-war city, editing the recent past out, in favour of a selective image of an older past, thereby unapologetically promoting one distinctive set of values over others. In this project, the students were asked to re-imagine the Museumsinsel, making new proposals about its future, interpreting its past and considering its unusual and symbolic role as an epicentre of what might be described as the ‘museumification’ of the European historic city centre. Although very different in scale and character, all four project choices required students to consider very carefully questions of memory/history, urban transformation (especially ghettoization and gentrification), urban infrastructure, rights to the city, public good and public space, land use and rents. These issues were continually discussed frequently, throughout the semester, during both the stages of investigation and of proposal development After a week of intensive preparatory readings and lectures by Prof Sharr, Patrick Devlin (Pollard Thomas Edwards Architects, London), Professor Peter Blundell Jones (Sheffield University) and Dr Katie Lloyd Thomas, we embarked on our trip to Berlin (October 15-19). The first half of the semester was dedicated to intense research on each one of the sites, followed, on November 8, by a symposium in which students focusing on the three sites made multi-media presentations featuring their findings and outlining their proposals for intervention. The symposium also featured a guest lecture by Professor Despina Stratigakos (State University of
  73. 73. tempelhof 1.JPG Museumsinsel Museumsinsel Kreuzberg 154 155 Tempelhof Crossings Kreuzberg
  74. 74. AssimilationSEA FORTS / SEALMAY, 7 20132119 156 157 Daniel Dyer Katie Burgess Irina Korneychuk Olga Gogoleva Vitalija Salygina Dana Mudawi
  75. 75. [PROMONADE] 158 159 Ugnius Katinas MA 1.jpg Peter Drysdale Joseph Charman Hugh Craft
  76. 76. site entriesmovementsite entriesmovement 160 161 Matthew Ruddy Paul Hegarty Paul Hegarty Adam Smith Annie Hart
  77. 77. 163 162 Sam Austin memory detail, narrative, Design begins with a concept and ends in details, or so conventional wisdom and contract documents might have us believe. This studio challenges the tendency to see architectural ideas as separate from the materials, processes and technologies of construction. Inspired by Marco Frascari’s notion of the ‘tell-the-tale detail’, the project explores how details can embody the story of the whole. Studio participants chose an existing building – of any style, age, location or use – and proposed an addition to it. First, they drew and modelled their building in detail as a way to encapsulate their interpretation of it. Then, focussing on the ‘tell-the-tale detail’ where new meets old, they developed a programme, devised strategies and designed the addition. An accompanying series of lectures and seminars, including contributions from Rob Thomas (Cardiff University), Ade Scholefield (Architype) and Claudia Dutson (RCA), encouraged exploration of technical and environmental issues as integral to the emerging narrative of the project. The resulting proposals are thought-provoking, playful and diverse: Sunderland Civic Centre is transformed into Culinary Institute, Shivering Sands sea fort becomes an outpost for isolation training, a mill boiler house near Darlington is recast as Industrial Ideas Store, a Cambridge block is refigured to open the University to the city… project 02 Joseph Charman Lam Nguyen
  78. 78. 164 165 59 roving travensed back to spinning room carded wool drawn across to extension to be gilled drawn and turned into roving lift spinning room roving dropoff staff kitchen polycarbonate panel 35mm marlon st sevenwall polycarbonate panel polycarbonate panel polycarbonate encloses cuts made through existing building existing windows originals have already been scrapped therefore replace with double glased, timber frame windows shower room shower room design studio electrical access point mechanical services 24mm birch ply flooring existing stonework 540mm masonry wall with 110mm stone facing clipping frame steel frame: 200mm circular hollow section clips out existing wrought iron frame to create atrium opening bracing 10mm steel cables prevent steel frame twisting steel frame steel frame: 200mm circular hollow section PLAN DETAIL PERSPECTIVE 1:50 Tell the Tale Details Sarah Harrison Daniel Dyer Katie Burgess Matthew Ruddy
  79. 79. 166 167 Ronald Allen Olga Gogoleva Joseph Worral Annie Hart Adam Smith
  80. 80. 168 169 Gavin Welch Omer Alp Dana Mudawi Hugh Craft Will Whiter
  81. 81. 170 171 HUNTER STREET NORTHGATE STREET MALE TOILET FEMALE TOILET STORE ROOM CAFE BAR BAR KITCHEN PRODUCTION ROOM RESTAURANT RESTAURANT OUTDOOR SEATING AREA Scale 1:100 at A1 Ground Floor Plan NORTH site model massing model massing model massing model Vitalija Salygina Paul Hegarty Marina Osmjana Ugnius Katinas Peter Drysdale
  82. 82. 172 173 John Beattle Competition 2012 Second Prize RIBA Forgotten Spaces During 2012 the RIBA ran a design competition called ‘Forgotten Spaces’. Open to entrants from across the country, the competition asked students, architects, planners, artists, engineers and landscape designers to nominate an existing site in the North East area and propose an idea for its improvement. A ‘forgotten space’ could be small or large a grassy verge, a wasteland, an unused car park, a derelict building, an empty unit, an underpass or a flyover. The proposal could be simple or complex, a commercial or public facility, a piece of public art or a new build-ing. The main requirement is that it responds to the surrounding area and serves a function for the local community. The North East is a sprawling region full of poten-tial for development. Despite successive waves of economic booms, there still remain pockets of obscure left over land and neglected plots that could with imagination and new thinking accom-modate a host of functions and respond to local needs. The competition placed an emphasis on local engagement and active participation in the de-velopment of our urban realm under the assump-tion that in the coming years we are likely to see an expanded role for neighbourhood and com-munity groups in what gets built and where. For-gotten Spaces 2012 was an opportunity for test-ing ideas and is a chance to put locally inspired proposals ‘out there’.
  83. 83. 174 175 <No intersecting link> have met local needs, the redun-dant steel frame can become another opportunity for the occu-pation of a more sustainable, risk free development. Proposal The scheme proposes a new adaptable architectural system that can inhabit a redundant steel frame. In doing so it aims to question the type of generic masterplanning present in ar-eas of potential regeneration. The design therefore seeks a way of thinking about development that will only respond to current mar-ket demand and the needs of the local area. A new type of architec-tural system will emerge allowing adaptability, less restrictions, ef-ficient extensions and no vacant spaces. The system will inhabit the redundant frame and will con-stantly change to meet market New City Industries: Sunderland Context Back in 2006 council plans were in place for the regeneration of the Sunniside area of Sunderland. Developers were attracted to in-vest and work began in 2007 on the first of many intended sites. The site in question was acquired by an Irish developer where work was underway to construct a 6 storey development, compris-ing of 62 apartments and retail units at ground floor level. During the construction phase financial problems caused by the reces-sion brought work on site to a stand still. To this day the site has remained a forgotten space where a redundant steel frame still stands as a monument to the boom and bust culture of pre-recession development. In recent years steps have been made to progress the origi-nal masterplan resulting in the completion of a small number of new developments. On the whole these schemes have car-ried big risks for developers and now many remain vacant. The real issue for this area is the as-sumption that generic mixed-use buildings are the answer to suc-cessful regeneration. It is exactly this kind of real estate develop-ment practice that I want to ques-tion through my forgotten space. Some of the more neglected buildings originally marked for demolition have seen a gradual increase in the occupation of cre-ative industries. This type of sus-tainable development has meant the area is slowly showing signs of life without the need for generic masterplanning. In a similar way to how these neglected buildings demand and satisfy multiple uses for both buying and renting. The system is based around the con-cept of flexible individual units constructed cost-effectively off-site. It has been designed to al-low units to cater for any use type. Also various options will be avail-able to suit the client’s require-ments chosen from a standard kit of parts. If the client requires additional floor space in the fu-ture, new units can be connected vertically or horizontally across the frame. This is all made pos-sible through an interchangeable panelling system that tackles the problem of adaptability that is in-herent in other modular construc-tion. Also, if the client decides to move out of the frame the unit can be recycled and used elsewhere independently or as an extension. Once units start to occupy the frame the collective community will start to make decisions on how the future of the scheme will develop. This co-operative ap-proach will take away decisions from developers and allow the community to develop inclusively. This method of development chal-lenges the original masterplan of the area and seeks to nurture a more sustained growth inline with the needs of the local area.
  84. 84. 176 177Materiality (Armelle Tardiveau) Studio 2 – ArchAid (Martyn Dade Robertson) Studio 3 – Quotidian Contraptions (Matthew Margetts and Jo McCafferty) Studio 4 – Under the Skin (Colin Ross) Studio 5 – Strange Places (Adam Sharr) The studios were designed to offer the students a wide range of themes to consider – from Studios centred around strange or historic contexts, through people and process to advanced technology and experimental materiality. In all cases the studios explored issues that also had a wider contemporary social, economic and cultural relevance. As a thesis, students were still expected to identify and develop their own particular individual line of architectural enquiry. In many cases this evolved gradually throughout the year, but always with a continuous narrative. The line of enquiry was encouraged to be specific, but linked to the collective themes identified by the studio. Prevalent themes explored this year have been liminal thresholds, post- industrial employment, economic insecurity, temporary materiality and uncertain futures. Also new to 2012 / 2013 was the introduction of the ‘Technical Specialism’ as an integral part of the thesis project, and the ‘Academic Portfolio’. Students were encouraged to explore from the outset a specific line of technical enquiry that could inform the architectural development of their project. Supported by leading regional and national engineers the technical development of the project was recorded in the ‘Technical Report’. The Academic Portfolio is a separate critically reflective document which collects all the design output from the two March years into one edited portfolio, carefully mapped by the student against the RIBA / ARB criteria. Matthew Margettsstage 6 Stage 6 this year has been taught through 5 themed studios. Students still undertook a year long thesis with a self generated brief, however this brief was informed by, and related to, a thematic framework established by the studio. There were a series of collective reviews programmed through the year, but between these shared points the studios were encouraged to function autonomously, organising their own field trips, technical support and guest reviewers / tutors. All studios participated in a 5 week long ‘primer’ exercise at the start of semester 1 which was used to develop and test wider themes on smaller scale projects. The primer output was not expected to be a ‘building’ but in all cases had an architectural relevance. Many students’ thesis project briefs emerged directly from the primer project, though this was by no means an expectation. The five studios were: Studio 1 – Atlas – Exploring
  85. 85. 178 The Thinking Through Making Week (TTMW) was a new initiative for this academic year. The intensive week was designed to provide Stage 6 students with an introduction to a range of ‘making’ techniques which could be used to develop new ways of thinking about their thesis projects. A series of interactive workshops were developed with practicing artists and makers throughout the week to explore notions of space through a variety of media and working at a variety of scales. Each day was themed around a particular process – assemblage, film, casting, rubbing and stitching. Tim Morrison (http://www.yorkopenstudios. co.uk/artist/Timothy-Morrison) launched the week with his ‘Assemblage’ workshop – challenging the students to create miniature worlds from brown cardboard. These worlds were then used as the basis for stop motion animations in a workshop run by Newcastle graduate Matt Lawes –(http://www. matthewlawes.co.uk). Christian Spencer-Davies from London based A-Models (http://www.amodels.co.uk) ran a workshop introducing the students to advanced model making techniques. Wednesday centred around a workshop run by Newcastle based artist Effie Burns - http://www. effieburnsglass.co.uk, exploring small scale casting techniques. Thursdays ‘rubbing’ theme involved block printing workshops from current Stage 5 student Kevin Liu and life drawing classes from Charlotte Powell. The week culminated in a day long workshop run jointly by Lesley Campbell – Course Leader Fashion Design at Sheffield Hallam and Rachel Currie (Plus 3 Architecture) which introduced the students to dress pattern making techniques and explored how these might be spatialised. The History of Space thinking through making week Tim Bailey (xsite architecture) 179 <No intersecting link>
  86. 86. 180 181 <No intersecting link> <No intersecting link> <No intersecting link> IMG_0823.JPG

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