Senior Communicator Briefing.1

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  • This morning you will receive a set of briefs intended to highlight the importance of this program,
  • Greetings
    Purpose: To give you the background of MCIP and to provide you a report on results of Pacific Endeavor 2009
    Let me start by saying that I think this is important work we are doing, and I am confident that by the end of this presentation you will agree
    Gentlemen, on behalf of MCIP, thanks for sending such a superb group of individuals to work together with us on this worthwhile endeavor. The assembled group of professionals have worked long and hard of procedure the impressive results I will tell you about.
    ,
  • I will talk about the program’s vision goals and objectives
  • But first let me tell you the Why and the where? For the Pacific Command this is a serious concern. Since 1996 PACOM has participated in over 20 disaster relief operations in 12 Countries.
    The loss of lives from these disasters is mind numbing
    If you take just the 4 on the slide we are talking close to ½ million people who loss their lives
    Effective communications is essential relief operation. Knowing what systems will work together or won’t, knowing what is interoperable is critical to effective communications. The MCIP aims to work together as a community of nations to help speed up the planning process and answer the question “Can We Communicate” before committing forces to the next disaster and to help save some of these lives.
    This is not a lofty goal or pie in the sky. This is a necessity. We have got to get it right to reduce this senseless loss of lives.
  • That something is expressed in our vison goals and objective
  • These are the nations that have participated in MCIP this far, and
    These are the 15 nations represented in PE 09
  • Over the course of two weeks the men and women assembled here your nations have been working long hours, conducting assessments of equipment, validating developed SOP and getting to know each other, getting to learn from each other, they will more about their work in a few minutes,
    At this time though I want to tell you what your corporate board has conceptualized for the year 2010, and 11.
  • Over the course of two weeks the men and women assembled here your nations have been working long hours, conducting assessments of equipment, validating developed SOP and getting to know each other, getting to learn from each other, they will more about their work in a few minutes,
    At this time though I want to tell you what your corporate board has conceptualized for the year 2010, and 11.
  • As I mentioned before let me begin by giving you the program background,
  • The basic scenario for our MIO experiments, currently also expanding into Port Security tasks, involves a Coast Guard operation to search a suspect ship for contraband material and suspect persons. The scenario entails detecting a moving vessel emitting signs of ionizing radiation. Coast Guard officers assisted by NPS students and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers (role playing Coast Guard and Navy officers) board the vessel, take in-depth readings with portable radiation-detection instruments, and identify biometrics of the suspect vessel crew. They use self-forming wireless networking with unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) , unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), radiation detection sensors, and biometrics identification tools. The sensor readings are quickly electronically relayed to scientific experts at remote sites as well as to biometrics identification centers. Results of data analysis are transmitted back to the boarding vessel to be used by first responders who are continuing their search on the intercepted vessel.
  • Operation Enduring Freedom – Pacific (OEF-P) - ongoing
    Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) – ongoing
    Talisman Saber/Cobb Ring
    TS 07:
    On-site interoperability support for communications systems, equipment, and networks
    Assessment of the Common collaboration tool test
    CB 08:
    Conducted a limited technical assessment of the Common collaboration tool initiative
    RIMPAC 08
    Combined Interoperability Program (CIP) multi-national system-to-system and/or a family of systems assessment to determine Link 11/16 system-specific interoperability of coalition TDL systems
    Balikatan 07
    On-site interoperability support for communications systems, equipment, and networks
    Validated a full direct RP-US tactical voice switch interface
    Cobra Gold 07
    On-site interoperability support for communications systems, equipment, and networks
    Established and assess a Thai/US tactical voice switch
    Valiant Shield 06
    Assess exercise participants’ ability to digitally exchange information using Link 16 architecture’s to support tactics, techniques and procedures (TTP’s) for maritime interaction
    Indonesia Tsunami Relief 04
    Deployed 2 soldiers to provide interoperability support for communications systems, equipment, and networks
    Ulchi Focus Lens 04
    Assessment of the adequacy of the supporting networks and equipment to provide a COP
    Assessment of the production and management of overlays that support the COP
  • COMBINED ENDEAVOR
    Builds professional relationship.
    Supports Development of common standards.
    Increases multinational communications interoperability among NATO, Partnership for Peace, and U,S, , Militaries
    Develops and proves standards and policy
    Provides operational test range for communications systems integration
    PACIFIC ENDEAVOR / MCIP
    2005 was the last MCIP where we conducted Interoperability assessment due limited funding.
    PE/MCIP: 2006-2007: No interoperability exercises – JITC participated in the following conferences.
    2006; There were three events held in 2006:
    Concept Planning Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (January 06);
    Senior Communicator's Conference in Hawaii (September 06),
    PACOM/JITC Strategy Meeting at PACOM HQs in Hawaii (December 06).
    2007; There were two events held in 2007:
    MCIP Work Shop in Singapore (April 2007)
    Concept of Employment meeting held in conjunction with a Senior Communicator's Conference in Ulaan Baator, Mongolia (August 2007).
    2008; One event:
    Table Top Exercise, counties participated in scenario play to train for Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief situations
  • COMBINED ENDEAVOR
    Builds professional relationship.
    Supports Development of common standards.
    Increases multinational communications interoperability among NATO, Partnership for Peace, and U,S, , Militaries
    Develops and proves standards and policy
    Provides operational test range for communications systems integration
    PACIFIC ENDEAVOR / MCIP
    2005 was the last MCIP where we conducted Interoperability assessment due limited funding.
    PE/MCIP: 2006-2007: No interoperability exercises – JITC participated in the following conferences.
    2006; There were three events held in 2006:
    Concept Planning Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (January 06);
    Senior Communicator's Conference in Hawaii (September 06),
    PACOM/JITC Strategy Meeting at PACOM HQs in Hawaii (December 06).
    2007; There were two events held in 2007:
    MCIP Work Shop in Singapore (April 2007)
    Concept of Employment meeting held in conjunction with a Senior Communicator's Conference in Ulaan Baator, Mongolia (August 2007).
    2008; One event:
    Table Top Exercise, counties participated in scenario play to train for Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief situations
  • These are examples from the COCOM that resulted in the goodness that came from the Endeavors.
    They all have one thing in common - all involved either personnel or equipment that participated in an Endeavor. With the knowledge gained from the Endeavor's and or the use of the Interoperability Guide, it contributed to achieve success in real missions and exercises.
    "Ghana Navy Maneuvers with United States Off Navy West African Coast". This was a success story in that several members of the Ghanaian Navy that participated in Africa Endeavor used their skills acquired from the multinational technical interoperability testing and human interoperability with the U.S. participants and other participants during their maneuvers with the U.S.
    Operational Successes
    Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) / NATO Response Force (NRF)
    Polish MND used CE IO Guide to establish communications with higher echelons
    Armenia, Georgia and Moldova used CE Lessons Learned for radio networking
    USAF in Talil, Iraq, tapped CE IO Guide to overcome interoperability issue with Italy
    Georgian Crisis
    CE Staff provided critical on-site assistance to partner nation during Russian Invasion
    Lebanon NEO
    France, Italy and Russia used CE IO Guide to prepare Comm Plan for NEO
    UN NEO off Liberia
    Ireland used CE Lessons Learned to plan/execute NEO
    Deployment preparation
    UK, Lithuania and SEEBRIG preparation for ISAF
    Tsunami Relief efforts
    Swiss helicopter crews used Lesson Learned to overcome comms challenges with ground controllers
    EU Mission, Eagle Base Tuzla
    EU mission used CE venue to prepare for three years prior to deployment
    UASF Over Flight
    Turkey and Armenia used CE relationships to coordinate Turkey over flight approval
    Sweden, Denmark and Canada
    Use CE IO Guide to train in their signals schools
  • Philippines GM-300 UHF Radio not deployed to PE 2009 (2 test strings not tested, 4 participants affected)
    Indonesia Motorola GM-338 UHF Radio Inoperable (3 string not tested, 6 participants affected)
  • New Zealand – Interface Unserviceable (1 test string not tested, 2 participants affected)
    Philippines – Switch damaged in transit beyond repair (6 test strings not tested, 12 participations affected)
    Thailand – Switch not shipped (5 test strings not tested, 10 participants affected)
  • Senior Communicator Briefing.1

    1. 1. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) UNCLASSIFIED Pacific Endeavor 09 (PE 09) Senior Communicator Briefing Big Island, Hawaii10 - 21 Aug 2009
    2. 2. 2 Overview - Morning  Welcome/Introductions/Accomplishments – Col Fox  MCIP/PE 09 Background & FY10/11 Focus – Mr. Layne  Spectrum – Mr. Marcial  HADR Considerations – Mr. Lanthier and Mr. Zita  OSD Perspective – TBD  Discussion
    3. 3. 3 PE 09 Exercise Factoids • Meals to 150 people/3 times per day – plus snacks! • Work Hours: 0700 – 2000 (and then some!) • Daily Camp Gatherings – Country Briefs • Team Building Events/Work – Had Fun! – Opportunity to See Big Island
    4. 4. 4 PE 09 Exercise Factoids … continued: • DJC2 – 24/7 Ops; Connected 17 Facilities; 7000 Feet of Cable Providing Internet/Phones; 2000 Gallons of Fuel • Weather…Understanding Hawaii Can Be Cold…. • Farthest & Coldest Participant – Maldives! – Sea Level to Mauna Kea (13,796Ft/35 Degrees F) – Nepal & Mongolia…That Ain’t Cold or High!
    5. 5. 5 The PE 09 “TEAM” – Thanks! • PTA – Provide Facilities/Support • American Forces Network; Air Force Capabilities Center; Air Force Television – Public Affairs & Video • Joint Interoperability Testing Center – Testing the Equipment • Air National Guard – Support • MARFORPAC – Support & DV Day Activities • DJC2/JCSE – Communications Connectivity • Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Officers Club – Meals • Technology Partners – CISCO • Exercise Facilitators – Made us Think! • MCIP Nations, Corporate Board and Working Groups • Big Island Hospitality MAHALO and ALOHA
    6. 6. 6 PE 09 – MULTINATIONAL TEAM Improved Comm Interoperability = Effective HADR Ops
    7. 7. 7 PE 09 Accomplishments  Strategic Engagements – 15 Countries & 165 Personnel  Interoperability Testing – JITC executed 409 tests  Exercise Scenario Stressed Planning Tools and Collaboration  Spectrum Training  Corporate Board – Established FY 10 Direction  Strategic Communications – Briefed Congressional Staffers Focus: Improve HADR Interoperability
    8. 8. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) MCIP Overview Mr. Ricardo Layne
    9. 9. Provide information regarding the US Pacific Command-sponsored Multinational Communications Interoperability Program Vision, Goals, and Objectives
    10. 10. Australia Bangladesh Brunei Canada Fiji India Indonesia Japan Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Nepal New Zealand Philippines Republic of Korea Singapore Sri Lanka Thailand Tonga Tuvalu United States Vietnam 22 Member Nations- 15 Here
    11. 11. The Way Ahead • Include International Humanitarian Community and Disaster Management Agencies • Validate Tactics Techniques and Procedures (TTPs) in Field Environment • Expand Collaboration On-Line Use • Build Relationships with Partner Nations / Organizations • Technology Demonstrations During Future Events
    12. 12. FY 2010 Focus • Scenario Driven Exercise at Singapore Changi C2 Center – Simulate aspects of disaster that impact communication, information sharing, and coordination – Evaluate and employ info sharing and collaboration tools – Utilize JITC-validated architecture – Demonstrate remote data connectivity – Document results / lessons learned – Develop architecture to support HADR scenario for PE 11 • Identify, Document and Ratify Standards – Spectrum, Info Assurance and CIS 16
    13. 13. FY 2010 Focus cont. • Conduct Targeted Technology Demonstrations – Identify Emerging Technologies Able to Support Combined HADR Operations that: • Improve collaboration • Enhance information sharing • Improve existing architecture interoperability • Coordinate with International Humanitarian Community (IHC) and Disaster Management Agencies to: – Involve Selected Organizations – Understand Intricacies in Information Sharing – Develop Solutions and TTPs to Improve Interoperability 17
    14. 14. FY 2010 Focus cont. • Validate and Update Communications Annex to Multinational Forces Standard Operating Procedures (MNF SOP) • Build on Accomplishments and Test Core Services at PE 11 • Improve the Multinational Communications Interoperability Guide (MCIG) • Develop and Execute a Strategic Communications Plan – Tell consistent story • Produce Executive Report 18
    15. 15. FY 10 Working Groups • Technology and IHC Selection • Exercise Network • Communications and Information Systems (CIS) – TWGs: Transmission, Core Services, Telephone Switch • Exercise Scenario Development – Partner with Center for Excellence, USPACOM J7 and Singapore • Logistics 19
    16. 16. Working Group Chair & Co Chair CIS Network Logistics Scenario IHC Tech Chair New Zealand Singapore United States Bangladesh Malaysia Co Chair Nepal Maldives Singapore Philippines Australia
    17. 17. 21 PE 09 – MULTINATIONAL TEAM Improved Comm Interoperability = Effective HADR Ops
    18. 18. 22 PE 09 Accomplishments  Strategic Engagements – 15 Countries & 165 Personnel  Interoperability Testing – JITC executed 409 tests  Exercise Scenario Stressed Planning Tools and Collaboration  Spectrum Training  Corporate Board – Established FY 10 Direction  Strategic Communications – Briefed Congressional Staffers Focus: Improve HADR Interoperability
    19. 19. FY 2010 Focus • Scenario Driven Exercise at Singapore Changi C2 Center – Simulate aspects of disaster that impact communication, information sharing, and coordination – Evaluate and employ info sharing and collaboration tools – Utilize JITC-validated architecture – Demonstrate remote data connectivity – Document results / lessons learned – Develop architecture to support HADR scenario for PE 11 • Identify, Document and Ratify Standards – Spectrum, Info Assurance and CIS 23
    20. 20. FY 2010 Focus cont. • Conduct Targeted Technology Demonstrations – Identify Emerging Technologies Able to Support Combined HADR Operations that: • Improve collaboration • Enhance information sharing • Improve existing architecture interoperability • Coordinate with International Humanitarian Community (IHC) and Disaster Management Agencies to: – Involve Selected Organizations – Understand Intricacies in Information Sharing – Develop Solutions and TTPs to Improve Interoperability 24
    21. 21. FY 2010 Focus cont. • Validate and Update Communications Annex to Multinational Forces Standard Operating Procedures (MNF SOP) • Build on Accomplishments and Test Core Services at PE 11 • Improve the Multinational Communications Interoperability Guide (MCIG) • Develop and Execute a Strategic Communications Plan – Tell consistent story • Produce Executive Report 25
    22. 22. FY 10 Working Groups • Technology and IHC Selection • Exercise Network • Communications and Information Systems (CIS) – TWGs: Transmission, Core Services, Telephone Switch • Exercise Scenario Development – Partner with Center for Excellence, USPACOM J7 and Singapore • Logistics 26
    23. 23. FY 10 Conference Locations IPC MPC FPC PE Location New Zealand or Maldives Thailand Indonesia Singapore Timeframe Feb/Mar May/Jun Jul/Aug Aug/Sep
    24. 24. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) Spectrum Training Mr. Bob Marcial
    25. 25. Spectrum Management • Scope: AOR-Wide Participants – 18 Spectrum Managers – 11 Nations & US Representation • Focus: Training and Exercise Participation – 12 Step Spectrum Management Process – Developed Spectrum Management Appendix for PE 09 – Exercised Spectrum Instructions in Scenario • Accomplishments: Better Prepared for HADR Ops – Multinational Spectrum Awareness – Improved Partnership
    26. 26. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) International Humanitarian Communities and Disaster Management Interaction Mr. Pat Lanthier and Mr. Ken Zita
    27. 27. Strategic Issues for MCIP Outreach to the International Humanitarian Community (IHC) Ken Zita Network Dynamics Associates LLC, USA 20 August 2009 – MCIP / Pohukaloa Training Facility
    28. 28. Key MCIP Planning Issues for IHC Outreach • What is the optimal planning process to formalize MCIP priorities, plans and initiatives for outreach to the IHC communities? • What actions are required to define, structure, and deploy new collaboration programs for information sharing? • How can the military adopt best practices for HADR from civil society? • Which new Internet, social networking, data sharing and related technologies are most appropriate to facilitate MCIP’s role in HADR? • How can MCIP goals and objectives be best communicated to the diverse range of actors outside of the military? Information sharing and collaboration for HADR is now an established priority for PACOM and MCIP
    29. 29. The Need for Collaboration • MCIP is at a complex inflection point: – Shift from military => IHC – Shift from voice interoperability => data interoperability • Today there is a wide gap in approach between military and non- military HADR procedures and data reporting and sharing requirements – HADR operational mandates, technology solutions and perceptions of priorities vary widely between military and civilian actors – Coordination between constituencies is often ad-hoc and limited in scope – Communications landscape is prone to legacy obstacles • All participants require better common operational pictures and the facility to self-organize through data sharing Expanded collaboration with the IHC community is essential for successful HADR operations
    30. 30. Key IHC Concerns Working with the Military • One-way flow of information • Mistrust over military operational mandate, especially in conflict zones – Is the military partisan or a neutral broker in HADR? – Countries with foreign military forces remain problematic • Continuity of mission – Operational cooperation dependent on individual personalities – Institutional ties and trust relationships often do not survive rotation • IHC attitudes are evolving – Chief Executive political attention – UN-ISDR (Hyogo Framework) – OCHA “International Humanitarian Partnership” (IHP) – NGO increasing willingness to engage MCIP needs to understand IHC issues and perspectives in order to coordinate HADR operations more effectively
    31. 31. MCIP/Pacific Endeavor Opportunity • Institutionalize communications from ad hoc interactions with IHC to collaborative alliances • Exercise joint working groups, TTX and public conferences to build trust relationships • Identify new technologies and metadata sharing frameworks • Tell a consistent story to achieve unity of mission • Save lives Identify mutual perspectives, issues and operational approaches to “communications interoperability”
    32. 32. 1. Develop Overall Strategy for MCIP Outreach • MCIP mission and vision is excellent, but: – Additional strategy is required to address “communications interoperability” and data sharing issues – What data can/should/should not be shared? – Need to prepare gap analysis of MCIP “today” vs. “to be” states and metrics for measuring success Prepare an integrated, iterative strategy to define/refine MCIP initiatives with the IHC
    33. 33. 2. Strategic Communications / PR • The 95/5 rule • Define StratCom program – MCIP board messaging needs and issues analysis – Message development among MCIP national interest groups and IHC • Develop programs – Web portal and online communities – Conferences and Workshops – White papers – Media Technical interoperability alone will not realize MCIP strategic goals; effective public relations is essential to achieving unity of mission and Shared expectations
    34. 34. 3. New Technology and Best Practices • Review HADR best practices adopted by large NGOs, IOs and national DMC/EOC • Develop strategic scenarios for data sharing and collaboration • Identify IHC/private sector innovations • Develop case studies, briefings and recommendations: – Social networks – Data syndication, Meta-data – Video – Real-time situational awareness, etc. Many early-stage architectures and approaches are competing for acceptance but there are no de facto standards for HADR communications / collaboration.
    35. 35. Key Take-aways 1. Two strategic shifts are taking place simultaneously • Voice interoperability => data interoperability • Military collaboration => collaboration with IHC 1. Social networking and Internet technologies are transforming the context in which MCIP operates • Political and IHC experiences shape expectations of the military • New solutions appear at the speed of the market 1. Perceptions matter • PR is strategic
    36. 36. Maritime Interdiction Ops (MIO) - SF Bay + Global • Livermore Info Net Collaborative (LINC) • U.S. Naval Post Graduate School (NPS) • Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) • Use LINC-like wireless IP to communicate on-board • nuclear material signatures • Cuts process time from hours to minutes
    37. 37. New element: Ship to Shore MIMO OFDM Link: 100 Mbps as far as 10 nm MIO : Networks & Partners
    38. 38. Adding Unmanned Systems to MIO Network: Drive-by Search by USV Sea Fox; USV and UAV Relay to the Fast Boat USV provided radiation detection in small-boat drive-by with real- time expert reachback; adds network-controlled USV
    39. 39. MIO Scenario & Global Partners Intel: Nuclear device shipped from Persian Gulf onto 2 possible ships Singapore Navy Austrian Border Patrol . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . US Navy Stilleto US Marines Biometric Fusion Center USCG LLNL reachback Swedish Navy Naval Postgraduate School
    40. 40. Fire to Firestorm in 3 Hours: Comms & SOP Impacts
    41. 41. U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security E2OC lead to eCLIC, etc. • E2OC : Extensible Emergency Operations Center >>> Lead to eCLIC, LINC & SeCLIC • $M DHS ITEP: Info Tech Evaluation Program • Multiple Data Transport Paths – WiFi, WiMax, Satellites (OASIS, Other), Cellular, CalREN (California Research & Education Network) • Common Operating Picture (COP), a “Picture of the Disaster Area”…see info from many sources
    42. 42. eCLIC, LINC, SeCLIC • eCLIC = emergency Communications Leadership & Innovation Center: “Point and Click” Wireless Broad Band Internet Protocol Networks + Common Operating Picture (COP) + Collaborators • LINC = Livermore Info Net Collaborative: survivable wireless Broadband IP network “collaboratory” that leverages technology, deployed assets, COP and collaboration • SeCLIC = Stanford Linear Accelerator – LINC + COP, tunnel video via WiFi mesh “breadcrumbs”
    43. 43. COP Example
    44. 44. Law Enforcement EOC Waveland Police Station Relief Distribution Center Hancock Medical Center Bay St Louis Fire & Police Station Relief Distribution Center 223rd ENG BATT DET Tachyon Satellite 802.16 Wireless 802.11 Wireless NPS DET 1 NETWORK NPS KATRINA Network (HFNs)
    45. 45. eCLIC / LINC / SeCLIC “Success Triad” Holistic…Not just Technology
    46. 46. MCIP Take-Aways • Good Disaster Response REQUIRES Good Communications & Planning Continuity • This is the BEST TIME EVER for really good wireless technology (Broadband IP) • Apply the eCLIC “SUCCESS TRIAD”: Hard Infrastructure, Soft Infrastructure, Leadership • MCIP is uniquely positioned to provide continuity & spread the “Success Triad” with partners in the highest disaster risk area in the world
    47. 47. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) Office of the Secretary of Defense Perspective
    48. 48. 52 Discussion
    49. 49. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) End of Morning Session
    50. 50. 54 Overview - Afternoon  PE 09 Exercise Results – Mr. Crawford  Interoperability Testing Results – JITC  DJC2 Overview – LT Street  Technology Demo – CISCO  Move to Theater for Closing Ceremony
    51. 51. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) Exercise Overview Mr. Richard Crawford
    52. 52. Multinational Communication Interoperability Program (MCIP) “Pacific Endeavor 09” This brief is classified: UNCLASSIFIED MCIP TTX DV Brief 20 August 2009 “Nations Working Together In The Pursuit Of Solutions”
    53. 53. 57 TTX Training Goal & Objectives Goal: To help MCIP evolve as a fully functional multinational group of nations that can deploy and join together after a major disaster; with deployable communication equipment and systems that will work collectively to ensure nations’ military resources are efficiently and effectively used when supporting HA/DR operations in the Asia/Pacific Region Objectives: - Test that the MCIP/MCIG tools support multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations - Test MCIP nations’ ability to de-conflict the communication frequency spectrum and build a multinational network - Enhance MCIP nations’ capacity to work together
    54. 54. 58 MCIP COMEX/TTX Hawaii TTX 09 NATIONSTTX 09 NATIONSMCIPMCIP Mongolia Philippines Malaysia Indonesia Sri Lanka Bangladesh Thailand Australia Nepal Singapore New Zealand Republic of Korea Japan Maldives United States Multinational Coordination Center Interoperability
    55. 55. “Pacific Endeavor 09” This brief is classified: UNCLASSIFIED SCENARIOSCENARIO 59
    56. 56. 60 60 ROM Islands Nia Indian Ocean Tarasa Poka North Islands Population 52,000 Central Islands Population 305,500 Ahu Mau Little Kai Great Kai South Islands Population 132,500 7.909 N, 92.139 E ROM 1460 DJC2 MNCC MN REGION C Brigade C MN REGION A Brigade A MN REGION B Brigade B
    57. 57. 61 TTX Diagram Singapore C2 Center MN REGION C MNCC DJC2 MN REGION B Nations MN REGION A Nations A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 B3 C2 C3C1 MNCC Rear Republic of Moku (ROM) HA/DR Multinational Support MNCC FWD Coordination Cmd & Cont How to coordinate HA/DRHow to coordinate HA/DR effort with each nation ?effort with each nation ? Each Nation hasEach Nation has C2 of its forcesC2 of its forces Nations
    58. 58. “Pacific Endeavor 09” This brief is classified: UNCLASSIFIED Nations’ Break-Out Groups 62
    59. 59. 63 MCIP TTX 09 BGD “A” Partner Nations’ Assignments The following countries are assigned to the North Island’s Brigade “A”: Island of NIA – Australia - Port 1 x Hq Force Support/ 1 x LPA/ 1 x C130/ 1 x Level 2 Medical Facility 1 x Aeromedical Health Support (Level 2)/ 1 x Aviation Support 1 x CH47D & Fixed Wing 1 x Engineer & Logistics Squadron/ 1 x Signal Support – Bangladesh – Airfield 1 x Air Contingent for MOVCON – Japan Observer – Maldives - Port 1 x LSD/Security Unit – Philippines – Port & Airfield 1 x Infantry Company - Republic of Moku – Port & Airfield 1 x Infantry Company & Small Boat & Aviation Units 8 ROMIslands Nia Indian Ocean Tarasa Poka North Islands Population 52,000 Central Islands Population 305,500 Ahu Mau Little Kai GreatKai South Islands Population 132,500 7.909 N, 92.139 E ROM
    60. 60. 64 MCIP TTX 09 BGD “B” Partner Nations’ Assignments The following countries are assigned to the Central Island’s Brigade “B”: Islands of TARASA, POKA, AHU, MAU – Indonesia – Poka – Airfield 1 x Infantry Platoon – Malaysia – Ahu – Port 1 x Infantry Company – Mongolia – Tarasa – Airfield 1 x Platoon with Medical & Transportation Teams – New Zealand – Tarasa & Ahu – Port & Airfield 1 X HMNZS CANTERBURY MRV (Multi Role Vessel) 1 x C130H 1 x 10 Member Medical Team 1 x Pl Infantry – Republic of Moku Tarasa, Ahu, Mau, Poka 2 Infantry Companies & Small Boat & Aviation Units divided between islands – United States Tarasa & & Poka – Port & Airfield 2 x Infantry Companies/ Amphibious LHD//Hospital Ship/Composite Squadron/ HUMRO-OCP 8 ROMIslands Nia Indian Ocean Tarasa Poka North Islands Population 52,000 Central Islands Population 305,500 Ahu Mau LittleKai GreatKai South Islands Population 132,500 7.909 N, 92.139 E ROM
    61. 61. 8 ROMIslands Nia Indian Ocean Tarasa Poka North Islands Population 52,000 Central Islands Population 305,500 Ahu Mau Little Kai GreatKai South Islands Population 132,500 7.909 N, 92.139 E ROM 65 MCIP TTX 09 BGD “C” Partner Nations’ Assignments The following countries are assigned to the South Island’s Brigade “C”: Islands of LITTLE KAI, GREAT KAI Nepal – Little Kai – Port 1 x Movement Control Team – Republic of Korea Little Kai – Airfield 1 x Engineer Bn, 1 x Med Company, 1 x C-130 – Republic of Moku – Port & Airfield 1 x Infantry Company & Small Boat & Aviation Units divided between Great & Little Kai – Singapore – Great Kai – Airfield & Port 1 x Landing Ship Tank/ 1 x C130/ 2 x Super Pume Helicopters/ 1 x Medical Team – Sri Lanka – Little Kai – Airfield 1 x Infantry Platoon – Thailand – Great Kai – Port 2 x Motorized Infantry Companies (+) 1 x Medical Team 1 x Engineering Platoon (+)
    62. 62. 66 ROM Islands NiaIndian Ocean Tarasa Poka North Islands Central Islands Ahu Mau Little Kai Great Kai South Islands 7.909 N, 92.139 E ROM HELO LZ Small Airport Airfield A Port A Port B AIRFIELDS & PORTS Large Airfield Small Airfield Large Port Small Port Helo LZ Port C Port D Airfield B Small Airfield Port E Small Port Airfield D Small Airfield Small Port Airfield C 15
    63. 63. MCIP TTX 09 Country Assignments The following countries are assigned to the North Island (Brigade “A”) NIA Australia - Port Maldives - Port Bangladesh – Airfield Philippines – Port & Airfield Japan - (Observers) Republic of Moku – Port & Airfield The following countries are assigned to the Central islands (Brigade “B”) TARASA, POKA, AHU, MAU Indonesia – Poka – Airfield New Zealand – Tarasa & Mau – Port & Airfield Malaysia – Ahu – Port Republic of Moku – Tarasa, Ahu, Mau, Poka – Port and Airfield Mongolia – Tarasa – Airfield United States Tarasa & & Poka – Port & Airfield The following countries are assigned to the South Islands (Brigade “C”) LITTLE KAI, GREAT KAI Nepal – Little Kai – Port Singapore – Great Kai – Airfield & Port Republic of Korea – Little Kai - Airfield Sri Lanka – Little Kai - Airfield Republic of Moku – Great & Little Kai Port & Airfield Thailand – Great Kai – Port & Airfield 67
    64. 64. 68 OPERATIONAL TASKS For each Master Scenario Event, use the MCIP/MCIG Tools to develop: 1. Nations Internal Requirements (frequencies & equip) 2. Nations Tab A: Radio Network Diagram 3. Nations Tab B: Guard Chart 4. Brigade Equipment Interoperability Requirements & MCIG Compatibility Gaps 5. De-conflict Frequency Assignments 6. Publish Brigade CEOI with Tab A & Tab B CEOI: Communication-Electronic Operating Instructions
    65. 65. 69 TTX Observations 1. Continuity of MCIP membership 2. Nation’s equipment and resources to facilitate the use of website/collaboration tools 3. Updating and maintaining the MCIG data base to ensure interoperability 4. Train the Trainer Program 5. Continue to conduct HA/DR TTX/COMEX events with military and others 6. Operational involvement in TTX 2010/2011
    66. 66. MCIP TTX 09 BDE Inputs to DV Brief
    67. 67. 8 ROMIslands Nia Indian Ocean Tarasa Poka North Islands Population 52,000 Central Islands Population 305,500 Ahu Mau Little Kai GreatKai South Islands Population 132,500 7.909 N, 92.139 E ROM MCIP TTX 09 BGD “C” Partner Nations’ Assignments The following countries are assigned to the South Island’s Brigade “C”: Islands of LITTLE KAI and GREAT KAI – Nepal – Little Kai – Port 1 x Movement Control Team – Republic of Korea – Little Kai – Airfield 1 x Engineer Bn, 1 x Med Company, 1 x C-130 – Republic of Moku – Ports & Airfields (LK & GK) 1 x Infantry Company, Small Boats & Aviation Units divided between Great & Little Kai – Singapore – Great Kai – Airfield & Port 1 x Landing Ship Tank, 1 x C130, 2 x Super Puma Helicopters & 1 x Medical Team – Sri Lanka – Little Kai – Airfield 1 x Infantry Platoon – Thailand – Great Kai – Port 2 x Motorized Infantry Companies (+) 1 x Medical Team 1 x Engineer Platoon (+)
    68. 68. DEPLOYMENT OF MNF (LK & GK) LK GK2 Air Field GK2 Port LK GK1 GK1 MED LST MED NAVAL MED I (-) NAVAL NAVAL ROM ROM ROM ROM ROM ROM ROM ROM ROM ROM
    69. 69. SL KR TH NP SG RM SL N/A KR N/A N/A N/A N/A TH N/A N/A NP N/A SG N/A RM N/A HF COMPATIBILITY CHART (BASED ON MCIG DATA) VHF
    70. 70. MNCC XX MNCC COMMAND NET MNCC HQ BDE A HQ BDE B HQ BDE C HQ NIS - DF Freq - (HF) K16072.5 (UHF) M372.875 (SATCOM) M7850 / M8590 MNCC COMD-HF/UHF/SATCOM
    71. 71. C X BHQ SL TH SG COMD-VHF & HF BRIGADE C HQ CONTROL NETS KRRM NP BHQ SL TH SG ADMIN-HF KRRM NP BHQ SL TH SG INTEL-VHF & HF KRRM NP HF NIS - RR Freq - K11481.0 VHF NIS - RC Freq - M42.250 HF NIS - IH Freq - K9912.5 VHF NIS - IV Freq - M41.775 NIS - RL Freq - K13475.5
    72. 72. BRIGADE C HQ AIR/MARITIME NETS C X GK 2 BHQ BHQ GK 2 MARITIME - HFAIR - HF LK LKGK 1 GK 1 NIS - AF Freq - K17380.5 NIS - NM Freq - K20024.0
    73. 73. BDE C HQ ROM ROMHF HF HF & VHF CONTINGENT RADIO DIAGRAM – THAILAND MOT INF COY ENGR PL MED TM MOT INF COY HF HF Home Country HF / SAT Phone HF & VHF NIS - TH Freq - K7706.2
    74. 74. RADIO GUARD CHART Legend X = Guard W = When Directed A = As Required M = Monitor C = Net Control S = Asst Net Control R = Retrans 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Sat link 0001 Non- Combata nt Evacuatio n Net CTF Log Combined Forces Link-up Net Comd Net 1 Comd Net 2 Intel Net 1 Intel Net 2 Admin Net Air Net Maritime Net Circuit SOP JTF 6 JTF 91 Emission Designator 7M57G1D 6K00A3E 27K0F3 E 3K00J1E 3K00H3 E 25K0F2 D 3K00H3 E 25K0F2 D 3K00H3 E 3K00H3 E 3K00H3 E Transmission Type SHF UHF UHF HF HF VHF HF VHF HF HF HF Restoration Priority 1A 1A 1B 3A 1 1 3 3 4 2 2 Crypto Equipment MNCC C C C C BDE C HQ A X X X C C C C C C C NP MVT CTRL TM X X X X X M SG MARITIME X SG MED TM X X A A X M SG AIR X SL INF PLT X X X X X M TH INF COYS X X X M TH MED TM X A X M TH ENGR PL X X X KR ENGR BN X X KR MED COY X A M KR AIR X RM INF X X X X X M M RM AIR X
    75. 75. BRIG C VHF LEAD NATION BRIG B VHF LEAD NATION LEAD NATION BRIG A VHF CMD NET VHF Priority 1 PRC-152 (US)PRC-152 (US) 36.075 MHz36.075 MHz RT-F2OORT-F2OO (AUS)(AUS) 36.075 MHz36.075 MHz PRC-1077 (LKA)PRC-1077 (LKA) 36.075 MHz36.075 MHz
    76. 76. MDV GM338 BRIG C VHF- 38.500 LKA PRC 1077 SNG PRC 840 KOR PRC 999K NPL PRC 1077 IDN BRIG B VHF- 34.225 US PRC 152 NZL PRC 117 MNG VX-3200 MYS TRC 9200 PHL RF-5800V BLD PRC 1077 AUS RT-F200 BRIG A VHF-36.625 COMMS NET VHF Priority 1A IPICS THA
    77. 77. MDV BRIG C HF-10990.0 LKA PRC 1099 SNG PRC 138 KOR NPL PRC 1099 IDN MICOM 2ES BRIG B HF-7970.0 US PRC 150 NZL PRC 150 MNG RF-5800H MYS TRC 3500 PHL BLD BARRETT 950 AUS RT-F100 BRIG A HF-10445.0 ADMIN NET HF Priority 1B IPICS THA VRC 6100
    78. 78. MDV XTS 3000 429.3 Base Radio UHF NZ PRC 117 Base Radio 41.45 MHz VHF MNG RF 5800H MP Base Radio 38.2 MHz VHF MDV XTS 3000 429.3 UHF BRIG C IP Phone LOG NET PHL 5800H MP Base Radio 9908.0 KHz HF NZL PRC 150 9908.0 KHz HF IPICS AUS RT-F200 41.45 MHz VHF MNG RF 5800V HH 38.2 MHz VHF Wireless IP Phone
    79. 79. BDE C Lessons Learned • Importance of modern collaboration tools for effective functioning of HQs and updating the situational awareness at various levels. • Importance of continuous updating of MCIG which ultimately facilitates operational planning. • Achieving much needed interoperability with the use of modern collaboration equipment, e.g. IPICS. • Importance of having inputs from operational community for more realistic end results. • Functional complexities encountered when working in a Multinational environment. • Importance of identifying commonly agreed/accepted frequency slots/bandwidths within respective frequency bands (HF,VHF,UHF,SHF etc) among MCIP Nations.
    80. 80. BDE A Lessons Learned • Achieved interoperability with existing equipment and built improved relations among personnel • Able to improve MCIP and MCIG - database of equipment and SOPs. • Confirmed the value of tools for planning before deployment of troops for HA/DR event. • Exposure to modern technologies and ideas. • Value achieved on working for a humanitarian cause.
    81. 81. BDE B Lessons Learned • Collaboration and Communication tools were effective • MCIG database contains good information • Improve MCIP / MCIG website user interface • Physically displace Brigades (different islands, cities) • Spectrum personnel involved on Day 1 • Integrate Web 2.0 sites such as Twitter, Facebook, etc
    82. 82. QUESTIONS 86
    83. 83. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) Interoperability Testing Overview JITC
    84. 84. JITC PACOMJITC PACOM Support OverviewSupport Overview
    85. 85. A Combat Support AgencyA Combat Support Agency Mission: JITC conducts DoD-wide Systems of Systems joint interoperability test, certification, operational testing, and analysis to enhance combat effectiveness and support investment decisions in Warfighting, National Intelligence, and Business mission areas Vision: Creation of the integrated, DoD- wide, mission area focused test and evaluation capability which enables the rapid deployment of interoperable and operationally effective Information Technology (IT) and National Security Systems (NSS) Mission & VisionMission & Vision
    86. 86. A Combat Support AgencyA Combat Support Agency Experience and Expertise in Joint OperationsExperience and Expertise in Joint Operations Contingency & Exercise Support 90
    87. 87. A Combat Support AgencyA Combat Support Agency 91 JITC CCIB / IMB Support: • Australia/New Zealand CCIB - Link 11/16 testing • Philippines CCIB - Out-briefed BALIKATAN results • ROK - Link 11/16 testing • Singapore CCIB – Link 11/16 testing • Thailand CCIB - Link 11 testing • Japan IMB - Link 11/16 testing CCIB – Command and Control Interoperability Board IMB – Interoperability Management Board JITC Support OverviewJITC Support Overview
    88. 88. A Combat Support Agency Endeavor ExercisesEndeavor Exercises 92 • COMBINED ENDEAVOR – USEUCOM (1995-2009) – IP, Transmission, Single-Channel Radio, and Spectrum Management CE 2008: Main Operating Site in Germany, Forward Operating Site in Croatia; 43 Nations and Two Multi-National Organizations; 1,310 documented tests including Core Services, Data Transport Services, Video Teleconferencing, Telephony, Voice over Internet Protocol • PACIFIC ENDEAVOR – USPACOM (2005-2009) – 2005: Bellows Air Force Base, Oahu, Hawaii; 15 Nations; 206 documented tests including Telephone Switch and Single-Channel Radio – 2008: Table Top Exercise (TTX), New Zealand
    89. 89. A Combat Support Agency Endeavor ExercisesEndeavor Exercises 93 • AFRICA ENDEAVOR – USEUCOM (2006-2008) and USAFRICOM (2009) – AE 2008: Nigeria Air Force base, Abuja, Nigeria; 21 African Nations, Two Strategic Partner Nations, Two Multi-National Organizations; 143 documented tests including Single-Channel Radio and Data Transport Services; HF Long Haul Operational Network; Information Sharing with ECOWAS Regional Information Exchange System
    90. 90. A Combat Support Agency EndeavorEndeavor Program SuccessProgram Success StoriesStories 94 • Pacific Endeavor: • Cobra Gold: Thailand Cobra – U.S. DGM Tri-Tac, Tactical Switch Interface • Balikatan: Philippine Red Com HGX to U.S. Redcom IGX Switch Interface • Combined Endeavor: • Armenian, Moldovan radio networking in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) • United States Air Force and Italian network integration Tallil Air Base, Iraq, OIF • Interoperability Guide/Combined Endeavor Cadre key to integrating Polish Multi-National Division (MND) in OIF • Continuous work with multiple NATO Standardization Agreements (on- going)
    91. 91. PACIFIC ENDEAVOR 2009 JITC TEST STATUS 20 AUGUST 2009
    92. 92. Overall Interoperability Testing Technical Working Group Tests Completed Switch 36 Data 59 Transmission 314 Total 409
    93. 93. Country Scheduled Completed Not Tested % Complete Australia 22 22 100% Bangladesh 20 20 100% Indonesia 21 17 4 81% Malaysia 25 25 100% Maldives 11 9 2 82% Mongolia 25 25 100% Nepal 30 30 100% New Zealand 33 32 1 97% Philippines 26 24 2 92% Singapore 28 27 1 96% S. Korea 11 11 100% Sri Lanka 24 24 100% Thailand 15 15 100% USA 33 33 100% Total 324 314 10 97% Transmission Test Results
    94. 94. Country Scheduled Completed Not Tested % Complete Bangladesh 7 7 100% Indonesia 8 8 100% S. Korea 7 7 100% Malaysia 8 8 100% Mongolia 7 7 100% Philippines 7 7 100% Thailand 7 7 100% USA 8 8 100% Total 59 59 100% Data Test Results
    95. 95. Country Scheduled Completed Not Tested % Complete Indonesia 9 7 2 78% S. Korea 8 7 1 88% Malaysia 6 4 2 67% Mongolia 8 6 2 75% New Zealand 1 1 0% Philippines 6 6 0% Sri Lanka 10 8 2 80% Thailand 6 6 0% USA 6 4 2 67% Total 60 36 24 60% Switch Test Results 12 opportunity tests conducted; 3 Indonesia, 3 S. Korea, 2 Mongolia, 4 Sri Lanka
    96. 96. Combined Endeavor Program EVOLUTION: • 1995 – 1997: Rudimentary Testing • 1998 - 2002: Network Operations • 2003 - 2007: Network Security • 2008 - 2009: Network Policy and Services COMBINED ENDEAVOR 2009 FOCUS: • Increasing Operational Focus • Everything over Internet Protocol (EOIP) , Bundled Services (voice, video, data, etc.) • 24 NATO and 15 Partnership for Peace Nations with NATO and SEEBRIG • Three locations: Main Site – Bosnia; Remote Sites – Denmark and Netherlands • 12 test days; 1032 Interoperability Tests; network core services, data transport services, video teleconferencing, single-channel radio, switch, Voice over IP
    97. 97. JITC Recommendations PACIFIC ENDEAVOR 2009 • Rudimentary Testing (Single-Channel Radio Voice, and Data Link; Data Network Transport; and Telephone Switch) FUTURE PACIFIC ENDEAVORS • Test LAN and Core Services – Increase Operational Focus • Everything over Internet Protocol (EOIP) , Bundled Services (voice, video, data) • Suggested Testing Areas: network core services, data transport services, video teleconferencing, Voice over IP, single-channel radio
    98. 98. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) Deployable Joint Command and Control (DJC2) LT. Vince Street
    99. 99. Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) Technology Demonstration IPICS – A CISCO Solution
    100. 100. 104 Multinational Communications Interoperability Program (MCIP) PE 09 Questions

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