A Short Primer on Spit Tobacco Roger Dier, BS UW-Center for Tobacco Research & Education Northeast Region
What is SPIT TOBACCO? <ul><li>Loose leaf chewing tobacco </li></ul><ul><li>Plug chewing tobacco </li></ul><ul><li>Dry snuf...
Facts About Spit Tobacco <ul><li>Use is rising among young people </li></ul><ul><li>2005 Wisconsin Youth Tobacco Survey </...
Spit Tobacco - More safe?
Hooking New Spit Users <ul><li>“ Macho” man image  </li></ul><ul><li>Outdoors--fishing, hunting  </li></ul><ul><li>Rodeos ...
Hooking New Spit Users <ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul>
How They Hook ‘em <ul><li>Techniques that appeal to the “individual,”  “risk taker,” “macho man,” and “rugged” </li></ul><...
Brand Building
Brand Building
Brand Building
How They Hook ‘em <ul><li>“ New users of smokeless tobacco . . . are most likely to begin with products that are milder ta...
Spit Tobacco Pharmacology <ul><li>4.8 mg nicotine/gm of moist snuff x 30 gm/can =  144 mg </li></ul><ul><li>144 mg nicotin...
pH Manipulation by Industry <ul><li>Wall Street Journal, October 1994 </li></ul><ul><li>“ US Tobacco routinely adds chemic...
pH Manipulation by Industry <ul><li>“ It (Copenhagen) was brought up to a pH of 7.8 by adding more sodium bicarbonate and ...
Chemicals   in Spit Tobacco <ul><li>Cadmium (car batteries) </li></ul><ul><li>Polonium 210 (nuclear waste) </li></ul><ul><...
Chemicals in Spit Tobacco <ul><li>Nickel </li></ul><ul><li>Nicotine </li></ul><ul><li>Pesticides </li></ul><ul><li>Acetald...
Health Consequences of Nicotine Exposure <ul><li>Increased heart rate </li></ul><ul><li>Stroke </li></ul><ul><li>High bloo...
Oral Health Effects of Spit Tobacco Usage <ul><li>Stained teeth </li></ul><ul><li>Periodontal disease </li></ul><ul><li>Ro...
Oral Cancer
Gum Disease
Not A Safe Alternative
Not A Safe Alternative
Not A Safe Alternative
Keratosis
When Are Users Hooked?  When they … <ul><li>have switched to a stronger brand </li></ul><ul><li>can’t go more than a few h...
The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 1: </li></ul><ul><li>Decide to Quit: </li></ul><ul><li>Make a List of...
The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery   <ul><li>Step 2:   </li></ul>Set a Quit Date -  Two weeks away
The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery   <ul><li>Step 3: </li></ul>See a Health  Care Provider Pharmacotherapy Options St...
The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery   <ul><li>Step 4: </li></ul>Call the Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line
The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery   <ul><li>Step 5: </li></ul>Build a Support  Team
The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery   <ul><li>Step 6: </li></ul>Your Quit Day
 
 
 
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Spit Tobacco

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Spit Tobacco

  1. 1. A Short Primer on Spit Tobacco Roger Dier, BS UW-Center for Tobacco Research & Education Northeast Region
  2. 2. What is SPIT TOBACCO? <ul><li>Loose leaf chewing tobacco </li></ul><ul><li>Plug chewing tobacco </li></ul><ul><li>Dry snuff </li></ul><ul><li>Moist snuff </li></ul><ul><li>Fine cut tobacco </li></ul>
  3. 3. Facts About Spit Tobacco <ul><li>Use is rising among young people </li></ul><ul><li>2005 Wisconsin Youth Tobacco Survey </li></ul><ul><li>14.4% high school males </li></ul><ul><li>2% high school females </li></ul><ul><li>Rural use higher than urban/suburban use </li></ul><ul><li>Smokeless (spit) tobacco is marketed to young people through sports and athletic events </li></ul><ul><li>Spit tobacco causes nicotine addiction, periodontal disease, oral cancer </li></ul><ul><li>Users can successfully quit </li></ul>
  4. 4. Spit Tobacco - More safe?
  5. 5. Hooking New Spit Users <ul><li>“ Macho” man image </li></ul><ul><li>Outdoors--fishing, hunting </li></ul><ul><li>Rodeos </li></ul><ul><li>Car Racing </li></ul><ul><li>Use it when you can’t smoke </li></ul>
  6. 6. Hooking New Spit Users <ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul>
  7. 7. How They Hook ‘em <ul><li>Techniques that appeal to the “individual,” “risk taker,” “macho man,” and “rugged” </li></ul><ul><li>Offer “free” gifts – Coupons </li></ul><ul><li>“ Educate” youth on how to use the product </li></ul><ul><li>(Big League Chew … bubble gum marketed in tobacco pouch) </li></ul><ul><li>Advertise spit tobacco as a safe alternative to smoking </li></ul><ul><li>Hats, Tee-Shirts and Branding </li></ul>
  8. 8. Brand Building
  9. 9. Brand Building
  10. 10. Brand Building
  11. 11. How They Hook ‘em <ul><li>“ New users of smokeless tobacco . . . are most likely to begin with products that are milder tasting, more flavored and/or easier to control in the mouth. (Cherry-flavored Skoal) </li></ul><ul><li>After a period of time, there is a natural progression of product switching to brands that are more full-bodied, less flavored, have more concentrated ‘tobacco taste’ than the entry brand.” </li></ul><ul><li>(UST document, “The Graduation Theory”) </li></ul>
  12. 12. Spit Tobacco Pharmacology <ul><li>4.8 mg nicotine/gm of moist snuff x 30 gm/can = 144 mg </li></ul><ul><li>144 mg nicotine/(1.8 mg nicotine/cigarette) = 80 cigarettes </li></ul><ul><li>80 cigarettes/(20 cigarettes/pack) = 4 packs </li></ul><ul><li>1 can snuff = 4 packs of cigarettes </li></ul>=
  13. 13. pH Manipulation by Industry <ul><li>Wall Street Journal, October 1994 </li></ul><ul><li>“ US Tobacco routinely adds chemicals to its snuff deliver the free nicotine faster and to make the product stronger.” </li></ul><ul><li>-Larry Story, former UST chemist </li></ul><ul><li>“ The fermentation process involves adding chemicals and, at the end, you add some more chemicals which increase pH too ... Without increasing the pH, you couldn’t get nicotine release.” </li></ul><ul><li>-James C. Taft, former UST chemist </li></ul><ul><li>Connolly, G.N. (1995). “The marketing of nicotine addiction by one oral snuff manufacturer.” Tob Control 4:73-79 </li></ul>
  14. 14. pH Manipulation by Industry <ul><li>“ It (Copenhagen) was brought up to a pH of 7.8 by adding more sodium bicarbonate and ammonium carbonate.” </li></ul><ul><li>- Larry Story, former UST chemist </li></ul>Connolly, G.N. (1995). “The marketing of nicotine addiction by one oral snuff manufacturer.” Tob Control 4:73-79
  15. 15. Chemicals in Spit Tobacco <ul><li>Cadmium (car batteries) </li></ul><ul><li>Polonium 210 (nuclear waste) </li></ul><ul><li>Lead (decreased IQ in children nervous system damage) </li></ul><ul><li>Formaldehyde (embalming fluid) </li></ul><ul><li>Arsenic (rat poison) </li></ul><ul><li>Cyanide (used in the gas chamber) </li></ul><ul><li>Nitrosamines (potent cancer- causing agents) </li></ul>
  16. 16. Chemicals in Spit Tobacco <ul><li>Nickel </li></ul><ul><li>Nicotine </li></ul><ul><li>Pesticides </li></ul><ul><li>Acetaldehyde </li></ul><ul><li>Benzopyrene (cancer-causing) </li></ul><ul><li>Hydrazine </li></ul><ul><li>Uranium 235 and 238 </li></ul><ul><li>28 carcinogens </li></ul>
  17. 17. Health Consequences of Nicotine Exposure <ul><li>Increased heart rate </li></ul><ul><li>Stroke </li></ul><ul><li>High blood pressure </li></ul><ul><li>Delayed wound healing </li></ul><ul><li>Peptic ulcer disease </li></ul><ul><li>Low birth weight babies and other reproductive disorders </li></ul>
  18. 18. Oral Health Effects of Spit Tobacco Usage <ul><li>Stained teeth </li></ul><ul><li>Periodontal disease </li></ul><ul><li>Rough patches in the mouth (leukoplakia) </li></ul><ul><li>Bad breath (halitosis) </li></ul><ul><li>Receding gum line </li></ul><ul><li>Oral cancer </li></ul><ul><li>Exposure to 28 carcinogens </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic slides are next </li></ul>
  19. 19. Oral Cancer
  20. 20. Gum Disease
  21. 21. Not A Safe Alternative
  22. 22. Not A Safe Alternative
  23. 23. Not A Safe Alternative
  24. 24. Keratosis
  25. 25. When Are Users Hooked? When they … <ul><li>have switched to a stronger brand </li></ul><ul><li>can’t go more than a few hours without it </li></ul><ul><li>have strong cravings when they try to quit </li></ul><ul><li>reach for a dip first thing in the morning </li></ul><ul><li>budget </li></ul>
  26. 26. The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 1: </li></ul><ul><li>Decide to Quit: </li></ul><ul><li>Make a List of </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons Why </li></ul>
  27. 27. The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 2: </li></ul>Set a Quit Date - Two weeks away
  28. 28. The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 3: </li></ul>See a Health Care Provider Pharmacotherapy Options State of Oral Health
  29. 29. The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 4: </li></ul>Call the Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line
  30. 30. The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 5: </li></ul>Build a Support Team
  31. 31. The Cessation Process Steps to Recovery <ul><li>Step 6: </li></ul>Your Quit Day

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