Wild West or gulag: models for policing cyberspace Dr Ian Brown FRSA FBCS CITP Department of Computer Science, UCL
The Internet as a wild frontier <ul><li>&quot;Just as the strength of the Internet is chaos, so the strength of our libert...
The Internet as gulag <ul><li>“ Total Information Awareness may be the closest thing to a true Big Brother program that ha...
Human rights in 21 st  century <ul><li>“ This is as much an issue of modernity as liberty. We are trying to fight 21st cen...
European Convention for the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms <ul><li>Reaffirming their profound belief ...
Privacy ever-more fundamental in the information age <ul><li>The right to make mistakes - to learn, to grow, to fall in lo...
Efficacy of data mining <ul><li>~5000 Americans surveilled over 4 years; led to <10 warrants per year </li></ul><ul><li>“ ...
Schengen, Hague, Prum and privacy <ul><li>“ Direct automated access, in particular, will increase the risk of transferring...
Data retention <ul><li>EU passed Data Retention Directive last year </li></ul><ul><li>Comms data to be retained for severa...
Wild West model is still more likely <ul><li>Internet will continue to give 1st amendment global effect, esp. for non-main...
Conclusions <ul><li>No magic technological solution to terrorism: surveillance tech will remain imperfect, propoganda cann...
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Wild West or gulag: models for policing cyberspace

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  • Wild West or gulag: models for policing cyberspace

    1. 1. Wild West or gulag: models for policing cyberspace Dr Ian Brown FRSA FBCS CITP Department of Computer Science, UCL
    2. 2. The Internet as a wild frontier <ul><li>&quot;Just as the strength of the Internet is chaos, so the strength of our liberty depends upon the chaos and cacophony of the unfettered speech the First Amendment protects.” - Judge Stewart Dalzell, 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.” - John Gilmore, 1994 </li></ul>Source: Wikipedia; 1887
    3. 3. The Internet as gulag <ul><li>“ Total Information Awareness may be the closest thing to a true Big Brother program that has ever been seriously contemplated in the United States.” - ACLU </li></ul><ul><li>Stasi produced 180 km of files, 360,000 photographs, 99,600 audio cassettes </li></ul>
    4. 4. Human rights in 21 st century <ul><li>“ This is as much an issue of modernity as liberty. We are trying to fight 21st century crime by 19th century means. It hasn't worked. It won't work.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I think these civil liberties arguments are a bit outdated.” </li></ul>
    5. 5. European Convention for the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms <ul><li>Reaffirming their profound belief in those fundamental freedoms which are the foundation of justice and peace in the world: </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence. </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and to freedom of association with others. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Privacy ever-more fundamental in the information age <ul><li>The right to make mistakes - to learn, to grow, to fall in love </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthens individuals and families as bulwarks against overbearing state power </li></ul><ul><li>A fundamental psychological need for some control over how we are seen by the world </li></ul>
    7. 7. Efficacy of data mining <ul><li>~5000 Americans surveilled over 4 years; led to <10 warrants per year </li></ul><ul><li>“ Techniques that look at people's behavior to predict terrorist intent are so far from reaching the level of accuracy that's necessary that I see them as nothing but civil liberty infringement engines.&quot; –Jeff Jonas, Chief Scientist, IBM Entity Analytics </li></ul><ul><li>Base rate problem </li></ul>
    8. 8. Schengen, Hague, Prum and privacy <ul><li>“ Direct automated access, in particular, will increase the risk of transferring illegitimate, inaccurate or out-of-date information, and the data controller will not be able to verify the legitimacy of a transmission or the accuracy of the data in each individual case. ” -Lord Avebury </li></ul><ul><li>” National delegations tend to come from law enforcement areas which, up to now, largely prefer to ignore data protection”. -EU Data Protection Superviser </li></ul>
    9. 9. Data retention <ul><li>EU passed Data Retention Directive last year </li></ul><ul><li>Comms data to be retained for several years </li></ul><ul><li>EU Data Protection Supervisor: proposals were disproportionate, unnecessary and hence illegal </li></ul><ul><li>How long will law take to catch up with technology (c.f. wiretapping)? </li></ul>
    10. 10. Wild West model is still more likely <ul><li>Internet will continue to give 1st amendment global effect, esp. for non-mainstream users </li></ul><ul><li>“ Total surveillance” is ineffective in countering terrorism, and likely to be recognised as such by courts </li></ul><ul><li>Free speech and privacy are more, not less important in the information age </li></ul>
    11. 11. Conclusions <ul><li>No magic technological solution to terrorism: surveillance tech will remain imperfect, propoganda cannot be banished from the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Mass surveillance and censorship (the gulag) will destroy the freedom we espouse </li></ul><ul><li>Key opportunity of Internet is a huge boost to soft power - how can we use this to stop communities acquiescing in terrorism? </li></ul>

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