Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

CNADocument_FINALDOC (1)

65 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

CNADocument_FINALDOC (1)

  1. 1. Community Needs Assessment Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo   DePauw University May 2016 Paige Bagby, Lizzy Gering, Amata Giramata, Peter Gorman  
  2. 2.   Table of Contents      EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ………………………………………………………………….. 5    Part I: Community Backdrop​ ……………………………………………………….....5  Part II: Community Health Analysis​ …………………………………………………..6  Part III: Community Diagnosis and Interventions​ ……………………………………6    PART 1: COMMUNITY BACKDROP ……………………………………………………...7    CHAPTER 1: Geographic Location, Population Characteristics & Distribution ……….8    Public Health Relevance​ …………………………………………………………….....8  Geographic Location and History​ ……………………………………………………..8  Population Characteristics and Distribution​ ………………………………………....10  History of the Population​ ……………………………………………………………..11  Gender/Age Distribution ​……………………………………………………………...12  Public Health Implications​ ……………………………………………………………13  References​ ……………………………………………………………………………..14    CHAPTER 2: Sociodemographic Characteristics …………………………………………..16    Public Health Relevance​ ……………………………………………………………....16  Household Characteristics​…………………………………………………………….17  Marital Status​ ………………………………………………………………………....18  Native and Language Spoken at Home ​……………………………………………….18  People in Poverty​ ……………………………………………………………………..18  Educational Attainment ​ ………………………………………………………………19  Food at Home ​ ………………………………………………………………………...19  Public Health Implications​ ……………………………………………………………20  Resources​ ……………………………………………………………………………...21      CHAPTER 3: Physical and Natural Environment …………………………………………22    Public Health Relevance​ ………………………………………………………………22  Physical Environment/Geography​ …………………………………………………….22  Weather and Climate ​ …………………………………….……………………………24  Land Details​ …………………………………………………………………………...27  1     
  3. 3.   Volcanism  ​………………………………..…………………………………………...28  Air Quality ​ ……………………………………………………………………...……29  Water Resources and Quality​ …………………………………………………………31  Public Health Implications​ …………………………………………………………...36  Resources​ ……………………………………………………………………………..36    CHAPTER 4: General Economics and Labor Force……………………………………….38    Public Health Relevance​………………………………………………………………38  Employment Rates & Labor Force​…………………………………………………….39  Employment & Major Industries​………………………………………………………41  Income & Economic Development​…………………………………………………….45  Public Health Implications​…………………………………………………………….46  References​……………………………………………………………………………...47    CHAPTER 5: Government and Politics……………………………………………………..49    Public Health Relevance​………………………………………………………………49  Pre­colonial and Colonial Governance​……………………………………………….49  The Congo Wars and Politics​…………………………………………………………53  21st Century Democratic Republic of Congo Politics​………………………………..54  Politics of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo​………………………………….55  Effects of 1994 Genocide Against Tutsi on Health​…………………………………....55  Public Health Implications​…………………………………………………………...56  References​…………………………………………………………………………..…57    PART 2: COMMUNITY HEALTH ANALYSIS…………………………………………...59    CHAPTER 6: Community Resources……………………………………………………...60    Public Health Relevance ​……………………………………………………………..60  Hospitals ​……………………………………………………………………………..60  Grocery Stores​………………………………………………………………………..61  Community Center​……………………………………………………………………61  Schools​………………………………………………………………………………..62  Religious Resources…​………………………………………………………………..62  Public Health Implications​…………………………………………………………...63    CHAPTER 7: Behavioral Health…………………………………………………………..64    Public Health Relevance​…………………………………………………………….64  Mental Health​……………………………………………………………………….64  Sexual Violence and Substance Abuse​………………………………………………65  2     
  4. 4.   Public Health Implications​………………………………………………………....65  References​…………………………………………………………………………..66    CHAPTER 8: Vital Statistics and Disease Burden……………………………………...67    Public Health Relevance ​…………………………………………………………67  Birth Rates ​………………………………………………………………………..67  Death Rate​………………………………………………………………………...68  Infant Mortality Rate​………………………………………………………………69  Maternal Mortality Rate​…………………………………………………………..70  Disease Burden​……………………………………………………………………71  Measles​……………………………………………………………………………71  Cholera​……………………………………………………………………………72  HIV/AIDS​………………………………………………………………………….72  Malaria​…………………………………………………………………………….75  Public Health Implications​………………………………………………………..75  References​…………………………………………………………………………76    CHAPTER 9: Healthcare System ……………………………………………………...77    Public Health Relevance​……………………………………………​………………77  General Overview​…………………………………………………………………..77  Healthcare Infrastructure ​………………………………………………………….78  Healthcare Facilities​………………………………………………………………..79  Healthcare Providers​……………………………………………………………….82  Women and Children Healthcare Services​…………………………………………85  Public Health Implications​…………………………………………………………86  References​………………………………………………………………………….87    CHAPTER 10: Not­for­Profit Assistance………………………………………………..89    Public Health Relevance ​…………………………………………………………89  Nutritional Assistance ​…………………………………………………………….89  Family and Children Services ​…………………………………………………….91  Public Health Implications ​…………………………………………………​…….93  References ​………………………………………………………………………...94    PART 3: COMMUNITY DIAGNOSIS AND INTERVENTIONS……………………96    CHAPTER 11: Community Diagnosis ……………………………………………………97    Priority Health Issues ​………………………………………………………………97  Selected Health Issue ​………………………………………………………………100  3     
  5. 5.   Magnitude of the Problem ​………………………………………………………….100  Severity of the Problem​……………………………………………………………..101  Feasibility of an Effective Intervention​……………………………………………..102  References ​…………………………………………………………………………..104    CHAPTER 12: Interventions ……………………………………………………………..105    References​…………………………………………………………………………..110                            4     
  6. 6.   Executive Summary       Part I: Community Backdrop    The city of Goma is part of the North Kivu province in the north­eastern Democratic  Republic of the Congo, a country in central Africa. Goma is located south to an active volcano,   Nyiragongo, and north of Lake Kivu. Goma is located west of Rwanda. After the  Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, many refugees entered Goma and this influenced the  health care system and the conflict structures. The influx of thousands of Rwandan refugees into  the North Kivu region continues to overwhelm the healthcare system and the overall population.  The country itself is rich in resources such as cobalt, copper, oil, diamonds, gold, silver, and  other mineral deposits. In 2002, Goma was destroyed by lava from the Nyiragongo volcano  which buried most of the town, including health facilities.   The population of Goma is approximately 1.1 million people. This number is a rough  count including internationally displaced persons, refugees, asylum seekers, and the native  populations. Seventy percent of the population is considered to be in poverty, and education rates  are as low as thirty percent.  A majority of the population suffers from food insecurity.   The Democratic Republic of Congo has incurred various wars such as the Congo crisis  and Congo wars that affected the populations severely. Goma particularly has continued to be  home to various rebel conflicts that cause social unrest among the citizens, influence the health  of the populations and affect the allocation of resources.    5     
  7. 7.   Part II: Community Health Analysis  In order to for public health practitioners to construct proper healthcare systems and  provide effective services, it is important to understand the statistics in Goma, D.R.C regarding  the quality of life and disease burden. Overall, D.R.C has shown lowering death rates, birth rates,  infant mortality rates and maternal mortality rates. However, considering the population of the  country, these rates are significantly affecting large numbers of people. Some of the most  pressing disease issues in D.R.C. and particularly in Goma are Diarrheal diseases, malaria,  Trauma (mental health) and HIV/AIDS. Again, even though D.R.C has shown tremendous  decrease in the negative effects of some of the diseases, they are still affecting large populations.     Part III: Community Diagnosis and Intervention    Goma has a high prevalence of malaria, HIV/AIDS, diarrheal diseases, malnutrition and  mental health. D.R.C has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world and continues to  be affected highly with malaria. Even more mental health issues in Goma continue to increase.  Mental Health disorders stem from trauma of experiencing different wars and trauma from  surviving sexual violence. Due to the fact that mental health disorders are not viewed as health  issues culturally, people are discouraged to seek the necessary help. In effect, the disorders are  growing and affecting the communities further and influencing the increase of other diseases  such as HIV/AIDS, malnutrition and strokes as well as the high cases of sexual violence.      6     
  8. 8.   Part I: Community Backdrop                          7     
  9. 9.   Chapter 1: Geographic Location,  Population Characteristics &  Distribution     Public Health Relevance     The health and wellbeing of the population of Goma are heavily influenced by the  population’s location and history.  Specifically, its proximity to Rwanda and resulting influx of  refugees impacted the area’s overall public health.  This chapter identifies the location of Goma  as well as significant geographical features and historical events. Additionally, this section will  identify the population characteristics and distribution of Goma’s residents. In order to develop  public health interventions, it is important to asses the population and where they are living for  the most efficient planning, programming, or projection.  Geographic Location and History   The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is one of the largest countries in Africa  and is almost entirely landlocked (harambeeusa.org, 2016).  The country is divided into eleven  provinces (mapsofworld.com, 2012).  Goma is the capital of the North Kivu province on the  eastern border of the country.   8     
  10. 10.   The city of Goma itself has thirteen districts (JIPS.org, 2014) and sits between Lake Kivu  to the south and the active Nyiragongo Volcano to the north.  Lake Kivu serves as an important  resource but also poses a threat to the public health of Goma. This is because it holds huge  quantities of dissolved gas at pressure.  This gas could explode, causing the lake to erupt and  release catastrophic amounts of carbon dioxide into the air of the city.         9     
  11. 11.     Mount Nyiragongo erupted in January of 2002, destroying forty percent of Goma and  leaving 200,000 people homeless as the lava ran six and a half feet deep through the center of the  city all the way to the shore of the lake.  Some casualties occurred due to asphyxiation from the  carbon dioxide emissions from the eruption, but most people were able to evacuate with  adequate warning.  Mount Nyiragongo is still active and being monitored by scientists in Goma.  Goma lies on the eastern border of the country, right next to Rwanda.  The city center is  less than one mile away from the Rwandan border.  This proximity made Goma the center of the  refugee crisis caused by the Rwandan Genocide in the 1990s.  Between the 13th and 14th of July  in 1994, between ten­ and twelve thousand refugees crossed the border from Rwanda into Goma  every hour.  This massive influx of people created a humanitarian crisis including public health  problems due to a lack of adequate shelter, food, and water.  By the time one million refugees  had arrived in Goma, a cholera outbreak killed thousands of people in the camps.  Since Goma  was the host to Rwandan refugees, it became a target for Rwandan government forces.  During  the First and Second Congo wars, the Rwandan military attacked the camps in Goma, resulting  in thousands of more deaths.  Tensions and fighting between militias still persists, and in 2012  the M23 movement, a rebel military group, seized the city and tens of thousands of citizens fled.  Goma was then retaken by government forces.    Population Characteristics and Distribution  The total population of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is 67.5 million people. As  of 2012, the capital of the North Kivu Province, Goma, is home to about .73% of the population  10     
  12. 12.   of the country, with approximately 1.1 million people (World Bank). There are no accessible  statistics on the distribution of people throughout Goma. There remains little knowledge of the  population displacement because of the influx of refugees (IDPs) attracted to the fact that Goma  has regional security, which is more than most places. The inhabitants of Goma live wherever  sleeping is suitable but lack any kind of sanitation or plumbing system to remove waste from  homes. Many homes are shanty houses which are built over the sedimentary rock from the  volcanic eruption of Nyiragongo.     History of the Population  The current population of Goma, DRC is 1.1 million. In 1994, the Rwandan genocide  lead to a refugee crisis, and the population has been unstable ever since. Because of the relative  security in Goma, it became an ideal destination for refugees from Rwanda looking to escape  conflict.  In 2011, the population underwent a sharp increase from 400,000 to the current 1.1  million residents (FXB). Out of the current 1.1 million people living in Goma, 70 percent of  them live in poverty because of irregular income and lack of education (World Health  Organization).  The fluctuation of the population of Goma is also very rooted in the cultural beliefs and  political structures regarding borders. Like many African countries, D.R.C. has open border  policies for citizens in neighboring countries. The process of entering and leaving the country is  easy, affordable and accessible to many people. This is unlike the beliefs of western countries  when it comes to immigration laws and policies and the processes of immigration. The easy  11     
  13. 13.   immigration processes of D.R.C allow for the population to fluctuate and are important in  providing refuge for other citizens.     Gender/Age Distribution   The distribution of DRC’s age structure highlights the key socioeconomic issues.  According to the World Fact Book, “Countries with young populations need to invest more in  schools, while countries with older populations need to invest more in the health sector” (The  World Fact Book).   The Democratic Republic of Congo’s population indicated that education should be the  key target because of the dramatic difference between old versus young age groups in the  country. However, only around thirty percent of the population receives a formal education  12     
  14. 14.   (FXB).  As shown in Figure 1.7 (above), the distribution of men and women is relatively equal,  which may indirectly result in the high heterosexual marital status.  ​Goma’s childhood death rate  is very high. 140 out of every 1,000 children die before they are one year old. Of those who  survive past the age of one, an additional 93 out of every 1,000 will die before the age of five  (FXB). The leading causes of infant mortality are high fever and Malaria (Babbo et al).    Public Health Implications  Geographic location and history are both important factors in the health and wellbeing of  individuals.  Goma’s volcano, toxic lake, shared border with Rwanda, and history of war and  conflict complicate its access to medical treatment facilities and programs.   It is important to  consider both the geographic location and important historical events of Goma when designing  and executing public health interventions.  It is normal for populations to fluctuate due to births  and deaths.  In Goma, however, the influx of International Displaced People, constant conflict,  and natural disasters make it extremely difficult to keep accurate population statistics for the city  or the country as a whole. The lack of statistics such as age or where people are living leads to  difficulty developing proper healthcare. In order to develop the most effective public health  interventions, it is vital to know how many people are living in a city and where. Not being able  to identify where people are living makes it impossible to know if they have transportation to  healthcare services or information, or where these programs should be implemented in the future.       13     
  15. 15.   References  Babbo Dominique, Martín, Karla Bil, Antonio Isidro Carrión, Corry Kik, Papy Salumu, Annick Lenglet,  and Jatinder Singh. "​Mortality Rates above Emergency Threshold in Population Affected by Conflict in  North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo, July 2012–April 2013.​" PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.  Public Library of Science.   Retrieved March 14, 2016 from: ​http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4169374/    FXB "Democratic Republic of the Congo ­ FXB English." FXB. N.p.,  Retreived on March 16, 2016 from: ​https://fxb.org/programs/democratic­republic­congo/    Gray, Richard. "Into Hell: Photos Capture Smouldering Lakes of Lava and Shifting Crust INSIDE the  Crater of Active Volcano Mount Nyiragongo." Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 27 May 2015.  Retreived on May 16, from:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article­3098946/Into­hell­Photos­capture­smouldering­lakes­lava ­shifting­crust­INSIDE­crater­active­volcano­Mount­Nyiragongo.html    Harambee USA Foundation."DRC: School Improvements."  N.p., 2016  Retreived on May 16, 2016 from:  http://harambeeusa.org/projects/current­projects/democtratic­republic­of­the­congo­school­impr​ovements    JIPS. Goma DRC. East Hiroshima: Daisō Sangyō, n.d. Joint Profiling Services. 2015.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from:  http://www.jips.org/system/cms/attachments/1026/original_P_G­Goma­web.pdf    Nyiragongo Volcano Eruption Destroyed The City Of Goma, Congo...." Getty Images. N.p.  Retrieved May 16. 2016 from:   http://www.gettyimages.com.au/detail/news­photo/nyiragongo­volcano­eruption­destroyed­the­city­of­go ma­news­photo/162732425    "Political Map of Democratic Republic of the Congo." Maps of World. N.p., n.d.   Retreived on May 16, 2016 from:  http://www.mapsofworld.com/democratic­republic­of­congo/democratic­republic­of­congo­political­map. html    REUTERS. "Rwanda Launches Power Plant That Uses Methane Gas." ​The East African​. N.p., 17 May  2016. Web. 17 May 2016.  <http://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/business/Rwanda­launches­power­plant­that­uses­methane­gas­/­/2560/ 3207650/­/item/0/­/uxdf3l/­/index.html>    The World Bank. (2016) “​Congo, Dem. Rep.​” Retrieved March 14, 2016 from:  http://data.worldbank.org/country/congo­dem­rep    14     
  16. 16.   World Health Organization. "DRC WHO." English. N.p., Nov. 2012.   Retrived March 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.who.int/hac/Donor_alert_DRC_27Nov2012.pdf                                          15     
  17. 17.   Chapter 2: Sociodemographic  Characteristics    Public Health Relevance  In order to supplement existing infrastructure and create healthcare interventions, it is  important to understand a community's needs. These statistics generally identify what is most  pressing in the target audience. Knowing who lives in a household could be an indicator of  where people are living and contributing to paying for expenses such as rent or healthcare. Being  able to address what a household consists of could identify where the population’s children are  living and who is taking care of them. Close household ties are shown to positively affect the  health care of an individual, especially if there are older relatives to act as an influence. A higher  rate of participation in healthcare is also seen amongst people who are married or living with a  steady partner than with those who are single or in an unstable relationship (UN). Identifying  poverty rates is a proxy for addressing who has the ability to afford an adequate food supply and  education. These aspects factor into the everyday quality of life for each individual.     Household Characteristics  The people of Goma live in a variety of environments throughout the thirteen districts.  These locations include but are not limited to urban sites, IDP camps, military bases, and rural  villages (Slegh, 2012).  16     
  18. 18.   Due to the influx of IDPs, household compositions are very irregular. A housing  arrangement may consist of refugees hosted with a nuclear family, extended families, solely  refugees, and any combination or variation of these groups. Regardless of who lives in a house,  the actual structure of the house does not significantly differ between groups of people. Homes  are located anywhere in the city, which could include over the sedimentary rock from the  volcanic eruption of Nyiragongo in 2002. Property ownership is relatively low because of the  lack of tangible housing leases and agreements. On average, only ten percent of IDPs own  property in comparison to fifty­one percent of Goma’s original residents (Joint IDP Profiling  Services).    Marital Status   The Joint IDP Profiling Service (JIPS) conducted research in Goma in 2013 and 2014 in  which they surveyed four diverse locations in Goma. This research was able to provide a glimpse  into the city of Goma where demographics are not always available.   17     
  19. 19.   In Figure 2.1 (above), the graph indicates that more than forty five percent of men and  women are legally married, followed by fifteen percent living with a partner. In Goma, women  are more likely to be widowed or separated than men and very little of the population is single,  never married, or have no stable partner (Slegh, 2012). Marriage may be more widely practiced  because of the economic stability it offers and the lack of housing throughout Goma.    Native and Languages Spoken at Home   There are more than 200 languages spoken in the DRC. The official languages of Goma  are French and Swahili. Citizens of the DRC are expected to know both because they are both  universally spoken throughout the government, schools, and general population. In addition to  French and Swahili, Kituba, Lingala, and Tshiluba are often spoken among various ethnic groups  (Knapp Sawyer, 2013).    People in Poverty   With the influx of refugees, jobs are scarce and inconsistent, causing seventy percent of  the population to live under the poverty line. Some examples of everyday jobs in Goma include  vending, loading vehicles, and cleaning compounds. Irregular income causes the majority of  households to struggle to obtain proper nutrition and adequate food. The importance of feeding a  family is superior to educating one (FXB).        18     
  20. 20.   Educational Attainment   With jobs being inconsistent, it remains difficult for families to pay for students to attend  school when they are still struggling with providing three meals a day (JIPS). The average rate of  education is thirty percent as of 2012 (Slegh, 2012). Of those educated, the percent of men  receiving an education is relatively higher at 58.5 percent leaving women at only 41.5 percent.  Like the homes in Goma, the schools are run down and structurally unstable. In Goma, all  education costs must be paid for by families out­of­pocket. At the primary level, education can  cost between two and five dollars per year. At the secondary level, yearly costs range closer to  ten dollars (FXB). If families cannot pay for education, the cycle of low education and high  poverty rates continues. Again, food will always take precedence over education due to the  importance of nutrition in order to survive.     Food at Home  The food that goes into one’s body affects their ability to perform and function on all  scales such as simple everyday tasks or exerting energy. As previously mentioned, food is  inconsistent because of the unstable work force and lack of education in Goma. The fear of the  incapability of feeding a family is shown below in Figure 2.2.   19     
  21. 21.     Figure 2.2 (above) shows that the most significant concern for food insecurity are IDPs.  Although all groups of people have trouble feeding their families, 59% of IDPs have frequent  trouble feeding their families (Fig 2.2­ mostly and often in combination) in comparison to the  37% of residents with food insecurity.     Public Health Implications  With seventy percent of the population living in poverty, education rates are very low and  many people are failing to meet adequate nutrition. These two factors are lowering the quality of  life for these individuals. Education will continue to be a secondary concern after food because  one must eat in order to survive. Because displaced people are the most vulnerable to food  insecurity, there is a greater need for a nutritional assistance program in refugee camps and host  families, specifically IDPs. One option could be a program that facilitates teaching IDPs to grow  20     
  22. 22.   their own food and harvest it. This would create sustainability, adequate food, and lower the  percent of households having trouble satisfying its needs.   References  Babbo Dominique, Martín, Karla Bil, Antonio Isidro Carrión, Corry Kik, Papy Salumu, Annick Lenglet,  and Jatinder Singh. "​Mortality Rates above Emergency Threshold in Population Affected by Conflict in  North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo, July 2012–April 2013.​" PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.  Public Library of Science.   Retrieved March 14, 2016 from: ​http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4169374/    FXB "Democratic Republic of the Congo ­ FXB English." FXB. N.p.,  Retreived on March 16, 2016 from: ​https://fxb.org/programs/democratic­republic­congo/    Knapp Sawyer, Kem. "In Far­Away Congo, a Girl's Life Focuses on School and Family." Pulitzer Center.  N.p., 26 Oct. 2013.   Retrieved March 17th, 2016 from:  http://pulitzercenter.org/reporting/africa­congo­education­youth­children­Goma­school­public­health    Slegh, Henny. "Eastern DRC." Gender Relations, Sexual Violence and the Effects (n.d.): n. pag. Save the  Children. June 2012.   Retrieved March 14, 2016 from:  http://resourcecentre.savethechildren.se/sites/default/files/documents/6945.pdf    "The World Fact Book." Central Intelligence Agency. Central Intelligence Agency, 2014.   Retrieved March 16, 2016 from:  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the­world­factbook/fields/2010.html    World Health Organization. "DRC WHO." English. N.p., Nov. 2012.   Retrived March 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.who.int/hac/Donor_alert_DRC_27Nov2012.pdf      21     
  23. 23.   Chapter 3: Physical and Natural  Environment     Public Health Relevance   Understanding the physical and natural environment of a community is vital to  completing a community needs assessment. Public health experts, architects, and others in the  livable communities field are examining the ways in which the built environment can affect  health. Encouraging physical activity, reducing air pollution, and preserving the natural  environment are important for public health (AIA 2015). This chapter will provide details about  the physical and natural environments of Goma from geography, weather, and climate to land  details, air quality, and water resources, while discussing the associated public health  implications. Physical Environment/Geography   The Democratic Republic of Congo is located in central Africa. The Democratic  Republic of Congo is bordered by the Central African Republic and Sudan to the north, Uganda,  Rwanda, Burundi, and Tanzania to the east, Zambia and Angola to the south, and the Republic of  the Congo to the west. Goma is a city in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. It is located  on the northern shore of Lake Kivu, next to the Rwandan city of Gisenyi. The city centre of  Goma is approximately 0.6 miles (1 km) from the Rwandan border, and approximately 2.2 miles  (3.5 km) from the centre of Gisenyi (King and Cole 2008).  22     
  24. 24.   Goma is the capital of North Kivu province, ethnically and geographically similar to  South Kivu. Goma has many landmarks which include Mount Nyiragongo, Virunga National  Park, Lake Kivu, Kisantu Catholic Cathedral, Zongo Falls, the Congo River and the Goma  International Airport (King and Cole 2008). Goma has five lakeside wharfs, which are level  quayside areas to which a ship may be moored to load and unload. As Figure 3.1 shows, the city  of Goma lies only thirteen to eighteen kilometers due south of the crater of the active  Nyiragongo Volcano. The vast, low­lying central area of Goma is a basin­shaped plateau sloping  toward the west and covered by tropical rainforest. This area is surrounded by mountainous  terraces in the west, plateaus merging into savannas in the south and southwest, and dense  grasslands extending beyond the Congo River in the north (King and Cole 2008).     There are major environmental issues in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and  especially in the city of Goma. The mining of minerals, water pollution, deforestation, wildlife  poaching and soil erosion all cause environmental damage, eventually leading to public health  23     
  25. 25.   concerns. The influx of refugees are responsible for significant deforestation, soil erosion, and  wildlife poaching. In addition, the roads in Goma are in poor repair, and many roads are heavily  damaged from recent volcanic lava flow disasters.  The natural hazards that are present to the  people of Goma are periodic droughts in the south and flooding from the Congo River. Due to  human conflict, Goma’s physical and natural environments are suffering (King and Cole 2008).    Weather and Climate  Goma’s central location on the north bank of Lake Kivu and the northeastern part of the  country dictates much of its weather and climate. The Democratic Republic of Congo lies on the  equator, with one­third of the country to the north and two­thirds to the south. The climate is hot  and humid in the river basin and cool and dry in the southern highlands (Climate­Data.org 2012).   Goma has a tropical savanna climate or tropical wet and dry climate which corresponds to the  Koppen­Geiger climate classification of “Aw” (Snow, 2013).   24     
  26. 26.   Tropical savanna climate or tropical wet and dry climate is a type of climate that  corresponds to the categories “Aw” and “As.” Figure 3.2 shows the different Koppen­Geiger  climate map. The Democratic Republic of Congo is in the lightest shade of blue signifying that  Goma is within the classification of “Aw,” meaning they are a tropical savanna climate or  tropical wet and dry climate.  Goma’s regular weather and climate are full of constant average temperatures, while on  average, Goma gets about five hours of sunshine per day, and twelve hours of daylight per day.  Precipitation is quite evenly spread out over the year with a slightly drier period from June until  August. When compared with winter, the summers have much more rainfall. The average annual  temperature in Goma is 68​°F (19.8 °C) (Snow, 2013). On average, the warmest month of the  year is January or February, with average temperatures between 68­72°F. October also sees the  maximum average precipitation in this area, with an average of 5.63 inches. The average coolest  month of the year is June or July, with average temperatures between 59­66°F (Snow, 2013).  Figure 3.3 below sh​ows the average high and low temperatures and ​Figure 3.4​ shows the average  rainfall for the city of Goma; both figures are the monthly averages throughout the years 2000 to  2012.             25     
  27. 27.                         As Figure 3.5 outlines above, the variation in the precipitation between the driest and  wettest months is 5.67 inches. The variation in annual temperature is around 33.8​°F. In addition,  26     
  28. 28.   the maximum UV Index is around 10­11+ and the heat and humidity are, on average, low to  none throughout the year (Sliwski, 2013). Data on average high temperature, daily mean  temperature, average low temperature, average precipitation, average rainy day, and mean daily  sunshine hours appear below.      Land Details  The Democratic Republic of Congo is widely considered to be the richest country  in the world regarding natural resources.  Its untapped deposits of raw minerals are estimated to  be worth in excess of US $24 trillion (Tupy, 2015). The geology of Democratic Republic of  Congo consists of many natural and mineral resources. Goma specifically has many natural  resources in and around their inner city. Cobalt, copper, niobium, tantalum, petroleum, industrial  and gem diamonds, gold, silver, zinc, manganese, tin, uranium, coal, hydropower, and timber are  all found throughout Goma and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Congo no doubt boasts  some of the richest mineral deposits in the world, as the Congo has over 70% of the world’s  coltan, a third of its cobalt, more than 30% of its diamond reserves, and a tenth of its copper  27     
  29. 29.   (Tupy 2015). Goma in particular is well known for housing the largest resource of tin, as  Congo’s lucrative tin mining industry is centered in the North Kivu province. Congo’s  government is unable to exert much control over tin mining activity; as a result, armed groups  fight over tin ore mines. Much of the area’s tin is then smuggled out of Goma to other countries.  The Democratic Republic of Congo’s mineral wealth and natural resources continues to fuel  long­simmering conflicts across the country, especially in Goma.   Volcanism      Two of Africa’s most active volcanoes are located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Nyamuragira is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. Nyiragongo was the scene of a  natural disaster in 2002 when over 400,000 people were displaced by an eruption (Seach 2015).  Nyiragongo, at an elevation of approximately 11,385 feet, has been experiencing ongoing  activity, posing a major threat to the city of Goma, home to over a million people. The volcano  produces unusually fast­moving lava, having the world’s fastest flowing lava, known to travel up  to, on average, 62 miles per hour (Seach 2015). Nyiragongo has been deemed a “Decade  Volcano” by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior,  worthy of study due to its explosive history and close proximity to the Goma population.  Nyiragongo’s neighbor is the Nyamuragira, another active volcano which last erupted in 2010,  and seen as Africa’s most active volcano. Visoke is another historically active volcano, that is  located on the border between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda. Figure 3.6 below  shows the lava flow from Mount Nyiragongo toward the city of Goma, and throughout the rest of  the providence. During Mount Nyiragongo’s eruptions, the lava flows move toward and through  the city of Goma to the shores of Lake Kivu. In 2002, the lava flow destroyed 13% of the city  28     
  30. 30.   and approximately 12,000 to 15,000 homes, displacing hundreds of thousands of people, and the  lava flow entered Lake Kivu and posed a threat of releasing the ​CO​2​ and CH​4 ​stored within the  lake. To this day, constant activity, seismic tremors and smaller eruptions continue to threaten  Goma’s population (Cottrell et. al. 2015).                             Air Quality   The most significant environmental problem in Goma is the substantial increase in urban  population, in which Goma’s urban centers are hampered by air pollution from vehicle and  29     
  31. 31.   volcano emissions. The high altitude of the volcanic crater means that the volcano acts like a  huge stack, so that plume emissions get carried away from ground level around the volcano. A  concern about air quality in Goma, particularly in dry weather, is the effect of the dust generated  by traffic driving on roads created after the eruption by bulldozers levelling the rough surface of  the lava flows. Measurements of PM10 concentrations at the roadside (using a DustTrak  analyser) showed rapid rises and falls with vehicle movements, but the effect on the ambient air  was small and lasted only briefly. The background air quality in Goma, as measured in the WHO  office garden, was good (< 50 µg /m3). This was helped by the fresh winds blowing from Lake  Kivu and occasional rainfall, which dampens down dust (Baxter 2002). The Pollution Index of  the Democratic Republic of Congo is 108.05 and the Pollution Exp Scale is 198.17 (Baxter  2002). The Pollution Index is an estimation of the overall pollution in the city. The biggest  weight is given to air pollution, then to water pollution and accessibility ­ two main pollution  factors. Pollution Exp Scale is using an exponential scale to show very high numbers for very  polluted cities, and very low numbers for unpolluted cities. Figures 3.7 ­ 3.8 below represents the  pollution, and the purity and cleanliness in Goma. As shown, the air pollution is very high,  among many other pollution aspects throughout the city. The overall air quality in Goma is low  due to many environmental volcanic ash emissions, vehicle emissions and other pollutants and  allergens present.          30     
  32. 32.             Water Resources and Quality    As a result of ongoing volcanic activity, people are continually affected by hazards such  as acid rain, endemic fluorosis, diarrhea, and other diseases caused by polluted drinking water.  Lava ash and gas emissions from volcanic eruptions make water resources scarce and water  quality very poor. Contaminated food and drinking water in Goma are exacerbated by many  geological features. Lake Kivu is the main, if not only, supply of drinking water, but the  31     
  33. 33.   sanitation system of the area presents a constant source of potential contamination of the lake  with cholera and shigella organisms which are not rapidly destroyed by the freshwater (Baxter  2002). The eruptions of Nyiragongo’s lava flows into the Lake and other natural water resources  which contributes to the poor quality of water.    REGIDESO, the Goma water company, found rising fluoride levels between  approximately 4.8 ppm to 7.5 ppm. At the lava front the level was approximately 17 ppm. To put  this in perspective, normal tap water is supposed to have anywhere from 0.7 ppm to 1.0 ppm.  Thus, the water quality in Goma poses many threats to the population (Partow 2011).     Figure 3.9 shows the water network that was put in place by the REGIDESO throughout  the city of Goma, in which some of the main water network pumps and locations were destroyed  by lava. The water network across the city continues to be damaged by lava flows. Both of the  main supply pumping stations for the city continue to be out of action because the power  supplies are disrupted by the eruption.     32     
  34. 34.   Over half of Africa’s surface waters flow through the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Possessing an estimated 52% of Africa’s surface water reserves (rivers, lakes, and wetlands), the  Democratic Republic of Congo is the most water­rich country in Africa (Partow 2011).  Furthermore, the DRC accounts for an estimated 23% of Africa’s internal renewable water  resources. The vast majority of the population depends on springs located in dense forests,  highlighting the importance of the forest ecosystem for services to local community water  supplies. Despite the abundance of surface waters, the majority of the DRC’s population is  dependent on groundwater and springs as sources of safe drinking water. Groundwater is  estimated to comprise almost 47% of the DRC’s internal renewable water resources (Partow  2011).    The United Nations Environment Programme continues to assess the overall  Environmental Assessment of the Democratic Republic of Congo. There are many key drinking  water challenges by sub­sectors of urban versus rural areas. Despite its immense freshwater  resources, the overriding challenge for the DRC water sector is to improve its rapidly growing  population’s low access to safe drinking water. Based on the most recent estimates (2010), only  around 26% of the DRC’s population of 67.8 million – equivalent to 17.6 million people – have  access to safe drinking water, well below the approximately 60% average for Sub Saharan  Africa. This means that almost 51 million people do not have access to potable water in the  country of DRC today (Baxter 2012). In regards to emergency health measures, this includes the  provision of chlorinated water along evacuation routes and in refuge areas, and adequate medical  cover for the treatment of cholera and other diseases.   33     
  35. 35.   Figure 3.10 shows the evolution and prospects for safe drinking water coverage in the  DRC. Until recently, the deteriorated state of the country’s water infrastructure and rapidly  growing population (estimated at 3%) meant that water coverage was on a negative and declining  trend as shown in Figures 3.11 of rural areas versus urban areas. Urban centers have a larger  percentage of population with safe drinking water access, whereas rural centers have a  significantly lower percentage of the population with safe drinking water.            34     
  36. 36.                     Goma’s dilapidated and badly damaged water system simply cannot provide enough  water for the city’s inhabitants and increasing population. A lot of small­scale projects in the  community (NGOs or government programs) and community­based water supply systems have  been trying to bridge the gap between urban and rural access to safe, clean, drinking water, but it  is not enough. The most endangered water source areas include springs, wellheads, river intake  zones, lakes and reservoir segments. The water sector is on the brink of undergoing fundamental  reforms driven by numerous factors. High­level political commitment and donor support have  reinvigorated the sector, but poor construction and maintenance in Goma prevent water resources  and qualities from improving over time.         35     
  37. 37.   Public Health Implications  When developing public health programs and interventions in Goma, Democratic  Republic of Congo, the unique physical and natural environment characteristics of the area are a  vital part to be considered. It is critical that public health officials have a complete understanding  of the impact that the Nyiragongo Volcano has on the overall population’s health from air and  water quality to temperatures and climate patterns. The effect that the environmental factors play  adds to the uncertainty of future public health interventions. From physical and natural factors  that pose numerous challenges, public health officials can use these to their advantage for many  intervention opportunities. The DRC’s abundant water resources are a major asset for public  health officials and for national development that can solve many future health related problems.  Additionally, land use and the need for continuous water and air quality are vital to the health of  the Goma community. To establish and improve the overall health of Goma and the Democratic  Republic of Congo, prompt and appropriate actions and intervention management needs to be  carefully thought out when engaging in relief efforts in the rapidly changing physical and natural  environments of the city.    Resources   ​"​About The AIAPrograms & Initiatives.​" AIA RSS. 5 Aug. 2015.  Retrieved on May 17, 2016 from: ​http://www.aia.org/about/initiatives/AIAS075431    Baxter, Peter. "​Human Health and Vulnerability in the Nyiragongo Volcano Crisis."​ World Health  Organization. 1 Jan. 2002.   Retreived on May 16, 2016 from: ​http://apps.who.int/disasters/repo/7828.pdf     "​Climate: Goma.​" Climate Graph, Temperature Graph, Climate Table. 3 July 2012.   Retrieved on May 17, 2016 from: ​http://en.climate­data.org/location/1074/    36     
  38. 38.   Cottrell Liz, Sally Sennert, and Ben Andrews. "​Global Volcanism Program | Visoke.​" Global Volcanism  Program | Visoke. 23 Oct. 2015.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from: ​http://volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=223050    King, Angela, and Brad Cole. "​Democratic Republic of the Congo Map ­ Democratic Republic of the  Congo Satellite Image.​" Geoscience News and Information. 2 Feb. 2008.   Retrieved on May 17, 2016 from:  http://geology.com/world/democratic­republic­of­the­congo­satellite­image.shtml    Partow, Hassan. "Water Issues in the Democratic Republic of the Congo." United Nations Environment  Programme. 17 Feb. 2011.  Retrived on May 17, 2016: ​http://postconflict.unep.ch/publications/UNEP_DRC_water.pdf    Seach, John. "Volcano Live." Visoke Volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo / Rwanda. 8 Dec. 2015.   Retrieved on May 17, 2016 from: ​http://www.volcanolive.com/visoke.html    Sliwski, John. "​Goma Climate Info | What’s the Weather like in Goma, the Democratic Republic of the  Congo.​" 18 Aug. 2014.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from:  http://www.whatstheweatherlike.org/democratic­republic­of­the­congo/goma.htm    Snow, Jillian. "​Goma Monthly Climate Average, Democratic Republic of Congo​." World Weather Online.  4 Jan. 2013.   Retrieved on May 17, 2016 from:  http://us.worldweatheronline.com/goma­weather­averages/nord­kivu/cd.aspx    Tupy, Marian. "​Rule of Law and the Future of the Congo ­ Harvard International Review.​" Harvard  International Review. 25 Nov. 2015.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016: ​http://hir.harvard.edu/rule­law­future­congo/          37     
  39. 39.     Chapter 4 : General Economic &  Labor Force    Public Health Relevance  Health problems result from a complex interplay of a number of forces. An individual’s  health­related behaviors, surrounding physical environments, and health care (both access and  quality), all contribute significantly to how long and how well we live. However, none of these  factors are as important to population health as the social and economic environments in which  we live, learn, work, and play (Bernstein, 2009). The economy shapes the complex interactions  among employment, health coverage and costs, and financial access to care and health outcomes.  The effects of economic stress can play a dominant role in health care and population health. A  person’s health is a product of their education, financial resources, and social status. Economic  factors affect the use of health services and health outcomes, so the interactions among access,  health­related behavior, and use of health services can be difficult to define (Bernstein, 2009).   Included in this section is a description of Goma’s economic and labor conditions. This  discussion includes the city’s employment statistics, labor force, income, cost of living, expected  job growth, and expected economic development.           38     
  40. 40.   Employment Rates & Labor Force  The unemployment rate in the Democratic Republic of Congo and other countries is  defined as the number of unemployed people as percent of the labor force. The labor force  includes the people who are either employed or unemployed, i.e. who don’t have a job but are  actively looking for one. The labor force does not include people who are not looking for work,  children, and the retired (Trading Economics, 2016). As Figure 4.1 shows, the unemployment  rate as of the latest data (2013), is 46.1%.    Due to weak institutional framework, informal urbanization and high contested  economic, social and political urban areas, an international humanitarian presence has become a  significant factor in reinforcing economic patterns. The result of informal jobs and years of  mismanagement, corruption and war, the economy of Goma continues to suffer. Unemployment  rates in the Congo decreased to 46.10% in 2013 from 49.10% in 2012. Unemployment rates in  Congo averaged 52.07% from 1999 until 2013, reaching an all time high of 66.90% in 2000 and  a record low of 45.40% in 2004 (Trading Economics, 2016).    39     
  41. 41.   In 2014, the Democratic Republic of Congo made a moderate advancement in efforts to  eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Government took steps to implement a UN­backed  action plan to end the recruitment and use of child soldiers, however, children in the Congo  continue to engage in child labor, including domestic work in the worst forms, such as forced  mining of gold and other minerals. As shown in Figures 4.2, 73.0% of employment throughout  the Democratic Republic of Congo is agriculture and fishing, while education and health are  4.2%. The employment opportunities in the Congo do not give much room for stability and  employment security.                   40     
  42. 42.   The GDP is $68.691 billion, as of 2015 and the GDP growth of the Democratic Republic  of Congo is 9% in 2015, continuing to increase each year. As Figure 4.3 shows the GDP by  Economic Activity Branch, agriculture is tied with manufacturing at approximately 27% of the  GDP. Unemployment is high among men and women throughout Goma because of informal  with work being the most common source of income. This includes agriculture­based activities  and informal selling. The effects of poverty and unemployment most definitely affect the people  of Goma and the overall health of the population.  Employment and Major Industries   Integrating into the urban landscape, the humanitarian sector has contributed to various  processes of transformation in Goma. While create new opportunities, their presence has  reinforced patterns of conflict and competition over the urban political and socioeconomic space  (Buscher and Vlassenroot, 2013). The growth of the humanitarian presence in Goma has led to a  high demand for housing, shopping malls, private cars and other amenities. Due to the influx of  humanitarian agencies, total urbanization has created jobs for locals in Goma. Although waves of  conflict over the past two decades had led to the presence of some 500 aid agencies, around 100  of them are international; the rest depend largely on foreign funding. In 2012, the United Nations  and its partners appealed for $718 million to meet humanitarian needs in the Congo, much of it  for programs in the east (IRIN, 2013). The growing rates of average economic growth is driven  by robust extractive industries and related investments despite the global economic slowdown  and the decline in the demand and price for minerals exported by the DRC. Public investments  have also helped spur growth (World Bank, 2016).   41     
  43. 43.   There are numerous main primary products throughout the Democratic Republic of  Congo that influences the employment and major industries in Goma: bananas, cobalt, coffee,  cotton, ground nuts, maize, cassava, cocoa, copper, diamonds, gold, plantains, palm oil and  kernels, rubber, sugarcane, and tea. In addition to the main primary products that influence  employment in the DRC and Goma, there are major industries and companies that do as well.  The major industries that are in the Democratic Republic of Congo that directly impacts the local  economy in Goma include: Agriculture, Clothing, Foodstuffs, Forestry, Mining, Oil Refining,  and Textiles (Clarke, 2011).   In Table 4.4, it shows the major industries and the companies that employ people in the  Democratic Republic of Congo. There are numerous industries that employ people in the Congo,  but these large companies employ people in major cities such as Kinshasa, the capital and largest  city of the Democratic Republic of Congo; not rural communities that are in need of the  employment.                    42     
  44. 44.       INDUSTRY  EMPLOYERS / COMPANIES   Agriculture  Feronia Inc.  Airlines  Air Kasai, Air Tropiques, Compagnie Africaine d’Aviation, Congo  Express, FlyCongo, Malift Air, Wimbi Dira Airways, Free Airlines,  Korongo Airlines  Banks  Central Bank of the Congo, Commercial Bank of Congo, RawBank, Trust  Merchant Bank  Energy  Cohydro, Societe nationale d’electricite  Forestry  Sodefor  Media  Groupe L’Avenir  Mining  Camrose Resources, Mwana Africa, Societe Generale de Belgique  Transportation  Congo Railway, Office National des Transports  Telecommunications  Radio Television Groupe Avenir, Supercell (mobile network), Orange RDC  Textiles  TEXAF  Utilities   Regideso      Lastly, it is notable that the Democratic Republic of Congo has many main trading  partners that continues to influence employment, economic development and major industries.  The Democratic Republic of Congo’s main trading partners are Belgium, Luxembourg, France,  the United States of America, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Japan, and the United  Kingdom (Clarke, 2011). As Figure 4.5 shows the diagrammatic map of the transport system in  the Democratic Republic of Congo, waterways, railways, paved highways, most gravel  43     
  45. 45.   highways, and main tracks were influential on trading partners with other countries. Ground  transport has always been difficult especially in Goma since it is quite a large city, with not  enough resources.   Furthermore, the DRC has thousands of kilometers of navigable waterways, and  traditionally water transport has been dominant means of moving around approximately  two­thirds of the country (Clarke, 2011). Many of the routes listed in Figure 4.5 are in poor  condition and can only operate at only a fraction of their original capacity. The First and Second  Congo Wars caused great destruction of transport infrastructure from which the country has not  yet recovered. A major infrastructure program was implemented in 2007, as China agreed to lend  the Democratic Republic of Congo $5 billion for two major transport infrastructure projects to  link a major mineral­rich railway to an ocean port, and then a road to the river port, improving its  links to the transport network of Southern Africa in Zambia (Duncan, 2007). Overall, the terrain  and climate of the Congo Basin present serious barriers to road and rail construction, and the  distances are enormous across the vast country.                 44     
  46. 46.                             Income and Economic Development  The monthly average incoming in Luxembourg is more than 18 times the annual average  salary in the Democratic Republic of Congo. That is how huge the gap is between the richest and  the poorest. The number one country with the lowest household average salary according to The  World Bank, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s average household average salary is $422  (Said, 2013). This is with the correct amount of data, since more than half of the population is  45     
  47. 47.   not formally employed, so the average data is not an accurate “average.” The result of informal  jobs and years of mismanagement has caused the average annual salary in Goma to continue to  suffer.  Despite its rich resources, the Democratic Republic of the Congo has battled violence,  poverty, and systematic corruption after gaining its independence from Belgium in 1960.  Congo’s economy is growing at a relatively rapid clip of 6% to 7% a year as it recovers from  years of internal conflict over the nation’s substantial resources ­ including tin, ore, and  diamonds. Congo occupies the final spot on the IMF’s list of per capita gross domestic  production, with a total production of just $231 per person. Much of the nation’s economic  activity takes place in the informal sector, and is not counted in official GDP estimates. In  addition, prospects for local economic development are limited due to restricted marketability as  a consequence of the poor infrastructure and because of lack of access to credit as well as lack of  mastery of skills and access to tools (Said, 2013). After an economic slump in 2009 that brought  the growth rate down to 2.8% due to the global financial crisis, the DRC posted an annual  average economic growth rate of 7.7% during the 2010­2014 period, well above the average in  Sub­Saharan Africa. (World Bank, 2016).     Public Health Implications  While the unemployment rate is at 46.1%, the recent job growth has been positive, as the  Congo’s economy continues to grow at a relatively rapid rate of 6% to 7% per year as it recovers  from years of internal conflict over the nation’s substantial resources (well above the average in  Sub­Saharan Africa). In order for the Democratic Republic of Congo, specifically Goma’s  46     
  48. 48.   economy to build, expand, and grow, the people must continue to have a vision for economic  vitality. Even though it can be hard to have a vision of economic growth, the economy must  provide entry points and opportunities for diverse types of workers to participate in. In addition,  working with leaders, officials, NGO’s and other humanitarian agencies can facilitate  opportunities for increasing collaboration between Goma, its cities, rural communities, and  health organizations to support economic strategies that promote economic growth of the entire  country.   Something to note is that statistic and data indicate that the most of the economic growth  that occurs throughout the country comes from major employers and industries that employ  people in major cities. With this in mind, there are no larger employers and companies in smaller  cities and rural communities such as Goma to promote local businesses in order to ensure their  long­term growth across the entire country. In the end, this will help not only the economic and  business sector within the country, but the overall health and wellbeing of the citizens of Goma  as well.    References    Bernstein, Jill. "Impact of the Economy on Health Care." ​Academy Health​. 1 Aug. 2009.   Retfrieved on May 15, 2017 from: ​https://www.academyhealth.org/files/HCFO/findings0809.pdf    Buscher, Karen, and Koen Vlassenroot. "​The Humanitarian Industry and Urban Change in Goma.​"  OpenDemocracy. 21 Mar. 2013.   Retreived on May 16, 2016 from:  https://www.opendemocracy.net/opensecurity/karen­b%C3%BCscher­koen­vlassenroot/humanitarian­ind ustry­and­urban­change­in­goma    Clarke, Latimer. "​Democratic Republic of the Congo ­ Atlapedia® Online.​" Democratic Republic of the  Congo ­ Atlapedia® Online. 3 Apr. 2011.  Retreived on May 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.atlapedia.com/online/countries/DemRepCongo.htm    IRIN. "​Goma's Aid Economy a Blessing and Curse.​"  11 Sept. 2013.  47     
  49. 49.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from:   http://www.irinnews.org/news/2013/09/11/goma%E2%80%99s­aid­economy­blessing­and­curse    Said, Sammy. "​Countries with the Lowest Household Average Salary.​" The Richest Countries with the  Lowest Household Average Salary Comments. 24 Sept. 2013.   Retrieved May 16, 2016 from:  http://www.therichest.com/business/economy/countries­with­the­lowest­household­average­salary/?view =all     "​Trading Economics: Republic of the Congo Unemployment Rate | 2010­2016 | Data | Chart.​" Republic  of the Congo Unemployment Rate | 2010­2016 | Data | Chart. 4 Mar. 2010.   Retreived on May 16, 2017 from: ​http://www.tradingeconomics.com/congo/unemployment­rate    "​World Bank: Democratic Republic of Congo Overview.​" Democratic Republic of Congo Overview. 8  Apr. 2016.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/drc/overview     "​World Data Atlas: World Development Indicators, Democratic Republic of the Congo ­ Unemployment  Rate.​" Knoema. 3 Oct. 2015.  Retreived on May 16, 2016 from: ​http://data.worldbank.org/country/congo­dem­rep      Duncan, Blake. "Transport in the Democratic Republic of the Congo." ​CongoForum​.   Retrieved on May 16, 2016: from:​http://www.congoforum.be/en/congodetail.asp?subitem=17                                        48     
  50. 50.   Chapter 5: Government and Politics   Public Health Relevance  Understanding the history and evolution of government structures and systems of politics  of an area allows us to identify the roots to some of the public health concerns in that particular  area. It allows us to understand how certain public health interventions may be received or how  best to implement them. Also, in many areas of the world, the government is heavily involved in  the allocation and distribution of resources to the citizens. Therefore, it is important to know the  historic relationship between the government and public health because this allows us to see how  best the government can support its citizens through interventions.     Pre­colonial and Colonial Governance  What is now as the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was previously known as the  Kingdom of Kongo during the pre­colonial era. As shown in Figure 5.1, the Kingdom of Kongo  was made up of what are now D.R.C and some parts of Gabon and Angola, which are  neighboring countries. This Kingdom operated as a monarchy from the 1300s to the early 1900s  (Africa Federation). The structure of the Kingdom was based on the King having all the power  and a group of elders who helped the king make decisions.         49     
  51. 51.       The coming of European missionaries and explorers brought various changes in the  communities. The introduction of new religions, beliefs and new government structures. The late  1800s, came King Leopold II of Belgium who used humanitarian and missionary work to claim  many parts of the Kingdom of Kongo (Hochschild). King Leopold II is responsible for what is  known as the genocide of the Congolese, which is not formally listed as a genocide under the  Humanitarian Intervention Acts. Leopold II used forced labor policies on indigenous people in  order to collect raw materials such as rubber and ivory. Indigenous people were mistreated if  they did not meet the required or expected labor outcome through beatings, mutilations and  50     
  52. 52.   many times death. King Leopold II is responsible for approximately 1 to 15 million indigenous  Congolese during his expansion. Indigenous Congolese people were exposed to hazardous  conditions when working in mines owned by King Leopold II and his officials (Hochschild).  Many diseases, infections and numerous deaths were a result of the health conditions of millions  of Congolese being undermined by this government structure.     After many years of ruling, King Leopold II ceased to have power after the Scramble of  Afrika between 1884­85. From 1908 Belgium became the formal colonizer of the Kingdom of  Kongo (World History). Similar to the rule of King Leopold II, the health of indigenous people  51     
  53. 53.   was still not a priority to the Belgian government. Additionally, the coming of Europeans,  brought various new diseases into D.R.C. Diseases that the Africans were not resistant to thus  killing millions of them. Furthermore, under the colonial rule, majority of healthcare services  offered were under missionaries. This attachment of healthcare to missionary work limited the  access Congolese had to healthcare resources. Even today, majority of the health care services  are owned by either missionaries or NGOs, which are located mainly in the capital city; Kinshasa  thus most people living in less urban areas are disadvantaged.    The Democratic Republic of Congo became an independent state in 1960 like many  sub­saharan countries. The first elected prime minister of the Congo is a well known  Pan­Afrikan, Patrice Lumumba (Cordell). Lumumba was heavily involved in the fight for the   Congo to gain independence and was a part of the ​Mouvement National Congolais  (Cordell)​. ​Unfortunately, within twelve weeks after independence, Lumumba was imprisoned  and assassinated.  52     
  54. 54.    The assassination of Lumumba is known as one of the most significant assassinations of  the 20th century due to the presumed influence and response of the United States and the United  Nations, who have continued to have a lot of influence in the politics and governance of the  Democratic Republic of Congo (Nzongola­Ntalaja 2011).    The Congo Wars and Politics  The Democratic Republic of Congo’s politics today have very strong roots in the politics  of the governments during the different wars that have occurred in the past. The Congo Crisis  followed the death of Patrice Lumumba in 1960 until 1966 (The Office of the Historian). The  end of this war led to the the election of Mobutu Sese Seko as president.                   Mobutu Sese Seko was involved in the military that fought during the Congo crisis. He is  also responsible for changing the name of the country to Zaire. He was in power for 31 years and  53     
  55. 55.   during this time he institutionalized corruption (Britannica). Additionally, during ​Mobutu’s  presidency, the corruption led to any economic collapse that affected the country for a long time  (Gettleman 1997). This corruption affected the healthcare sector because it reduced the money  going into healthcare from the national budget and influenced the allocation of resources across  the country as well as who was able to access and afford good healthcare.   The First Congo war from 1996­1997 led to the end of Mobutu Sese Seko’s reign and the  name was changed from Zaire to the Democratic Republic of Congo (French). The Second  Congo War occurred from 1998­ 2003 and is known as Afrika’s deadliest war as it involved  numerous Afrikan countries (World Without Genocide). These wars were also heavily fueled by  the politics that were occurring in neighboring country Rwanda during the 1994 genocide.     21st Century Democratic Republic of Congo Politics  In 2001, current president, H.E. Joseph Kabila  became president. In 2004, H.E. Kabila introduced the  International Criminal Court into D.R.C (CIA World  Fact Book). This was seen as a progressive move  because he showed his passion for justice and fixing the  politics witht the wars that were occurring at that time  especially since there was the issue of a certain  population of genocidaires in the Congo. In 2006, H.E.  Joseph Kabila ran for a second term and these were the  first free elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo (CIA World Fact Book).     54     
  56. 56.         After the 2006 elections, D.R.C became a stable presidential democratic republic (CIA  World Fact Book). At this time, the government had established a bicameral legislature with a  senate board and National Assembly (CIA World Fact Book). The government of D.R.C is  currently a Republic. The legal system used today is based upon the the civil law developed by  the Belgians during the colonial era.    Politics of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo  Goma being at the border of Rwanda had a large population of refugees coming into the  country seeking refuge. Currently, Goma’s internal conflicts are influenced by the high number  of rebel groups in the area. The eastern province where Goma is located has highest numbers of  members of the M23, a local rebel group (BBC).     Effects of 1994 Genocide Against Tutsi on Health  After the 1994 genocide against Tutsi in Rwanda, many Rwandans sought refuge in  Goma, D.R.C. This increased the population of Goma and increased the need and demand for  55     
  57. 57.   healthcare resources. However, the government was unable to meet the high demand of  resources. For example, with the increased population, there was still the same number of  hospitals and healthcare centers tending to almost three times more people.  Some Rwandan women who had come into Goma had been sexually abused during the  war thus being infected with HIV/AIDS and many came pregnant with their unborn child also  having high chances of being born with HIV/AIDS. In the refugee camps, there was a high  prevalence of sexual violence from either local people or the officials. This led to even more  people being exposed to HIV/AIDS thus an increase in HIV/AIDS and increase mental health  issues stemming from trauma. Living in refugee camps made it easy for diseases to spread  because of the high number of people living in the area. The number of diarrhoeal diseases  increased because of lack of resources to cater to the number of people present.      Public Health Implications  Considering the power and influence of the government in allocating resources,  understanding the history and structure of the government should be primary to public health  practitioners. From the colonial times to when D.R.C was named an independent state, the  structures of government have influenced the health sector tremendously. From the hazardous  working conditions that exposed Congolese to different health threats to the new diseases  exported by the European colonizers to the corruption in the healthcare system that limited  access; the health of Congolese at large and especially in Goma has continued to show much  need for improvement. Goma’s health sector in particular was affected by the 1994 Rwandan  genocide and its effects continue to show today. The prevalence of HIV/AIDS, high rates of  56     
  58. 58.   sexual violence and the high rates of mental health issues can be attributed to the immigration of  Rwandan refugees in Goma.      References  BBC News."DR Congo Soldiers and M23 Rebels Clash near Goma."  N.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2016.  Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.bbc.com/news/world­africa­24675814    The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Mobutu Sese Seko." Encyclopedia Britannica Online.  Encyclopedia Britannica, July 2014.   Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.britannica.com/biography/Mobutu­Sese­Seko    The Congo, Decolonization, and the Cold War, 1960–1965." US Dept. of State. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 May  2016.  Retrieved on March 17, 2016 from: ​https://history.state.gov/milestones/1961­1968/congo­decolonization    Cordell, Dennis D. "Patrice Lumumba." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, Oct.  2015.   Received on March 17, 2016 from:  ​http://www.britannica.com/biography/Patrice­Lumumba    "THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO." THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO. N.p.  Retrieved March 16, 206 from:   http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?ParagraphID=ozo    "Forgotten History: King Leopold and The Congo ­ Global Black History." Global Black History. N.p.,  29 Feb. 2012.   Retrieved on March 16 from:  http://www.globalblackhistory.com/2012/02/forgotten­history­king­leopold­and.html    French, Howard. "Mobutu's 32­Year Reign." NY Times. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2016.   Retreived on March 16, 2016 from:  https://partners.nytimes.com/library/world/africa/051797zaire­mobutu.html    Gettleman, Jeffrey. "The World’s Worst War." The New York Times. The New York Times, 15 Dec.  2012.   Retrieved March 17, 2016 from:   Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/16/sunday­review/congos­never­ending­war.html?_r=0    "History Kingdom of Kongo." Federation of the Free States of Africa. N.p.,  Retrived on March 16, 22106 from: ​http://www.africafederation.net/Kongo_History.htm    Hochschild, Adam. "Leopold II." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, Mar. 2016.  57     
  59. 59.   Retrieved on March 17, 2016 from:  http://www.britannica.com/biography/Leopold­II­king­of­Belgium​http://www.walkingbutterfly.com/2010 /12/22/when­you­kill­ten­million­africans­you­arent­called­hitler/    Nzongola­Ntalaja, Georges. "Patrice Lumumba." The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 17 Jan. 2011.   Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from:  http://www.theguardian.com/global­development/poverty­matters/2011/jan/17/patrice­lumumba­50th­ann iversary­assassination    World Fact Book. "DRC." N.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2016.  Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from:  http://www.ciaworldfactbook.us/africa/democratic­republic­of­the­congo.html    World Without Genocide."Democratic Republic of the Congo « World Without Genocide ­ Working to  Create a World Without Genocide."  N.p.,  Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from: ​http://worldwithoutgenocide.org/genocides­and­conflicts/congo                    58     
  60. 60.   Part II: Community Health  Analysis                     59     
  61. 61.   Chapter 6: Community Resources      Public Health Relevance  Goma does not offer a wide variety of community resources, especially after the  destruction caused by volcanic eruption.  The resources that are available are important for  supporting the health and social needs of the community.  This chapter identifies the community  resources available within Goma, DRC.  More specifically, information regarding hospitals, food  providers, community centers, schools, and churches in Goma will be discussed.    Hospitals    Goma has several general  hospitals and health clinics.  One that is  particularly important to note is the  HEAL Africa Hospital, which is  discussed in detail in Chapter 12; there  is one maternity center and one  psychiatric center within the city.        60     
  62. 62.   Grocery Stores    Inside the city limits of Goma itself,  there is only one supermarket and one butcher  shop.  However, there are two nearby  supermarkets across the border in Rwanda.      Community Center  Goma has one prominent community center:  Centre Culturel de Goma ­ Maison des Jeunes. It is a  youth performance venue that provides music  production, lessons, and instruction to the   community. The group has a social media presence  through Facebook.             61     
  63. 63.   Schools  Goma lacks public libraries, but has  several schools ranging from preschool and  primary education to three colleges within the  city, as well as a neighboring university in  Rwanda.  Several of the schools for younger  children are run by churches and religious  organizations.      Religious Resources  Goma is home to several Christian  churches.  These churches represent different  sects of Christianity, including Catholic,  Protestant, Baptist, and several unspecified  denominations.  There is one nearby mosque in  Rwanda, but none within Goma.  There are no  synagogues.      62     
  64. 64.   Public Health Implications  Goma’s relative lack of community resources, especially functioning hospitals, is a  public health concern. By improving these resources and rebuilding what was damaged by the  volcanic eruption, Goma can optimize resources to support individuals within the community,  especially those who were physically, socially, and psychologically affected by the Rwandan  genocide and the Congo Wars.  The religious resources within Goma provide a strong Christian presence to unify the  community. The musical youth house provides young citizens with mentorship and social  support. Overall, however, Goma lacks a solid foundation of community development.                    63     
  65. 65.   Chapter 7: Behavioral Health     Public Health Relevance   Behavioral patterns within a community heavily influence the overall health of the  population. This chapter will focus on behaviors and circumstances that affect Goma’s public  health, specifically in regards to post­traumatic stress disorder, depression, and sexual violence  as results of the refugee crisis and the internal political conflicts of the DRC. Suicide is a  preventable health disorder largely caused by this PTSD, depression, and anxiety.    Mental Health  The psychological impact of the Rwandan Genocide, refugee crisis, and Congo Wars was  grave. Witnessing and/or experiencing rape, sexual violence, displacement, kidnapping, death,  and murder led to high rates of post­traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. According  to Alexa Hassink, “Approximately 70 percent of men and 80 percent of women reported at least  one traumatic event due to the conflict, including being displaced, being injured, having family  members injured or killed, or being forced to have sex” (Hassink, 2014).   Suicidal thoughts and behaviors became prevalent as a result of these traumas, and Goma  lacks the psychological resources to treat mental health disorders, especially those that are not  immediately life­threatening. Since mental health disorders cannot be physically seen, they are  often overlooked or intentionally ignored. Most carers of the mentally ill consult their local  church leaders, rather than licensed or certified medical professionals. With few other  64     
  66. 66.   alternatives in a region already lacking even the most basic health infrastructure, exorcisms are  keenly sought after. It doesn’t help that many of these traditional health practitioners believe that  mental and physical disorders are the result of witchcraft or demonic possessions, and thus use  highly orthodox methods to cure the illness or extract what some believe are demons (Hassink,  2014).    Sexual Violence and Substance Abuse  Sexual violence in Goma is prevalent, and relates to depression and issues of masculinity  within the male population. Many men were displaced and unemployed as a result of the  Genocide and the Congo Wars, and their resulting economic upheaval. They are unable to  provide for their families, and sink into depression based on feelings of inadequacy and reduced  masculinity. “​Men tended to cope with vulnerability, extreme stress, and trauma through alcohol  and substance abuse and often through continued violence” (Hassink 2014). Feelings of a loss of  manhood also stem from injuries sustained during conflict. Systematic rape and unleashed sexual  brutality against females is used by soldiers and other combatants as a weapon of war and has  become known as the “war within the war” (​Baelani and Dunser 2011).     Public Health Implications  Mental illness is an easily overlooked but very grave epidemic in Goma. Depression and  suicide as triggered by PTSD, anxiety, and loss of self lead to countless invisible public health  concerns. The repeated catastrophes Goma has endured have been detrimental to the  population’s mental health. More mental health resources are necessary for the population to lift  65     
  67. 67.   itself out of the damage caused by war and trauma.    References  Baelani, Inipavudu, and Martin Dünser. "Facing Medical Care Problems of Victims of Sexual Violence in  Goma/Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo." ​Conflict and Health​. BioMed Central, 6 Mar. 2011.  Retrieved May 16, 2016 from: ​http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3059296/​>    Hassink, Alexa. "Finding Peace for Men in the DRC." Alliance for Peacebuilding. N.p., 2014. Web.  Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from:  http://buildingpeaceforum.com/2014/03/finding­peace­for­men­in­the­drc/    66     
  68. 68.   Chapter 8: Vital Statistics and Disease  Burden    Public Health Relevance  This chapter on Vital Statistics and Disease burden covers statistics on birth rate,  mortality rate and the prevalence of different health issues such as Cholera, HIV/AIDS and  Malaria in Goma, DRC. By analyzing, studying and recording data, we help public health  practitioners and donors to identify the major issues that a community faces. The statistics also  help in identifying what health issues have continued to grow and become more threats in the  community and what issues have declined. This in turn helps to understand how to better provide  health care and allocate resources in order to tend to the needs of as many people as possibly.    Birth Rates  The birth rate of a place is the number of children born in a year calculated per 1000  people estimated halfway through the year. This is called the crude birth rate.  The birth rate of  the Democratic Republic of Congo has been affected by various factors such as the Congo wars,  the 1994 genocide and the volcanic eruption. ​Figure 8.1 shows the trends of birth rates in D.R.C.  Overall, from 2000­ 2014, the birth rate has decreased from 46.44 to 42.26.     67     
  69. 69.     Death Rate  The birth rate is the number of deaths that occur in a year per 1000 people estimate mid  year. Similar to the birth rates, the death rates in D.R.C have been and continue to be influenced  by the Congo wars, 199e Rwandan genocide, the volcanic eruptions and the prevalence of  different diseases. ​After the 1994 Rwandan genocide,  there was an increase in death rates to 5 to  8 per 10,000 per day by the second month of the crisis (NCBI). Figure 8.2​ illustrates the overall  death rates of the country due to all causes (Index Mundi 2015).  68     
  70. 70.   Infant Mortality Rate              69     
  71. 71.       Infant mortality is the number of deaths in children under the age of one year old  calculated per 1,000 live births, and is estimated mid­year. In 2009, the ​infant mortality rate as  recorded per 1,000 live births was 126 (NCBI). Figure 8.3 illustrates the infant mortality rate of  the DRC, which over the span of 14 years has decreased.  Maternal Mortality Rate  Maternal Mortality Rate is the number of deaths of mothers as calculated per 100,000  live births. In 2008, ​the maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births was recorded as 670  (NCBI). In 2015, the maternal mortality rate had fallen significantly to 442 (Global Health  Observatory). Figure 8.4​ ​illustrates the linear decrease of MMR in DRC from 2008­2010.    70     
  72. 72.     Disease Burden  There are various diseases prevalent in Goma, DRC. The World Health Organization in  its case study of the Democratic Republic of Congo, indicates that ​cases of diarrheal diseases,  hemorrhagic fevers, acute respiratory infections, polio and meningitis were also reported. Almost  97% of the population are exposed to malaria. More than 6.16 million cases were reported in  2011 and 12 680 deaths (World Health Organization 2012). ​Figure 8.5 shows the biggest threats  in this community and percentage of people it is affecting. Diarrhoeal diseases are the diseases  most affecting the community, affecting 12% of the community, malaria at 7% and HIV/AIDS at  3%.                                 Measles  As investigated by the World Health Organization, the measles vaccine coverage varies  from 10% to 97% depending on the zone, with a national coverage estimated at 64% and  71     

×