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    New jersey New jersey Document Transcript

    • New Jersey Maywood Chemical Works Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Wayne Site Middlesex Sampling Plant DuPont & Company Long-Term Stewardship Site Highlights DuPont and Company (page 3) unknown Maywood Chemical Works (page 5) unknown Middlesex Sampling Plant (page 7) unknown Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (page 9) Major Activities· groundwater monitoring and surveillance Site Size· 36 hectares (88.5 acres) Start/End Years · 2000/201 0 Estimated Average Annual Cost FY 2000-2006 · $280,000 Wayne Site (page 15) unknown
    • Table of Contents Table of Contents Dupont & Company ...................................................................... 3 Maywood Chemical Works ................................................................ 5 Middlesex Sampling Plant ................................................................ 7 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory ........................................................ 9 Wayne Site ............................................................................ 15 New Jersey 1
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NOAA) Long-Tenn Stewm·dship Report New Jersey 2
    • Dupont & Company DUPONT & COMPANY 1 SITE SUMMARY The DuPont & Company site (also known as the DuPont Chambers Dye Works) is located in the Townships of Pennsville and Penns Grove on the southeastern shore of the Delaware River and is adjacent to the residential community of Deepwater, New Jersey. The site is bordered on the north by a DuPont property (the Carneys Works), on the east by U.S. Route 130, on the south by Salem Canal, and on the west by the Delaware River. During the 1940s E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company (DuPont) produced uranium products and conducted research on uranium hexafluoride in three buildings at the site. These activities were conducted first for the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development and later under contract to the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor agencies of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The activities that DuPont conducted in support of these contracts resulted in the contamination of onsite buildings and soil and generated radiological waste. After these activities ceased, all the contaminated equipment were removed and taken to the AEC portion of the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works in Lewiston, NY. Building decontamination was conducted in 1948 under the direction of the AEC. A radiation survey was then conducted by the AEC, and the buildings were subsequently released to DuPont. A further survey in 1977 found elevated levels of uranium in Building 845, where uranium peroxide was produced, and in surface and subsurface soils. This led to the DuPont & Company Site's inclusion in the DELAWARE NEW JERSEY Meadows National Wildlife Refuge -Miles Dupont & Company 1 The DuPont & Company site is one of the 21 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where cleanup responsibility was transferred to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) in accordance with the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act for FY 1998. At these 21 sites, the Corps is responsible for remediation and DOE is responsible for long-term stewardship activities, if any are deemed necessary. The cleanup decisions for these sites are not yet final and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required for these sites, if any, is not yet known. New Jersey 3
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Stewardship Rep01·t Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). The Corps' remedial action for this site is not yet complete and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required, if any, is not yet known. For additional information about the DuPont & Company site, please contact: Public Affairs Office Philadelphia District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers W anamak:er Building 100 Penn Square East Philadelphia, PA 19107-3390 Phone:215-656-6516 or visit the Internet website at: http://www.nap.usace.army.miV New Jersey 4
    • Maywood Chemical Works MAYWOOD CHEMICAL WORKS 1 SITE SUMMARY The areas comprising the Maywood Chemical Works Site are located in a highly developed area of Bergen County that includes residential, commercial, and municipal property in the Boroughs of Maywood and Lodi and the Township of Rochelle Park inNew Jersey. The Maywood Chemical Works Site includes the following areas: (1) the Maywood Interim Storage Site; (2) the Stepan property, an active chemical plant; and (3) about 80 residential, commercial and governmental properties in Maywood, Lodi, and Rochelle Park. The Maywood Interim Storage Site is bordered by State Route 17 on the west, the New York Susquehanna and Western Railroad line on the north, and commercial and industrial properties on the south and east. From 1916 to 1956, Maywood Chemical Works extracted thorium and rare earth elements from monazite sands for use in commercial products. During the operation of this plant, radioactive waste migrated or was moved offsite and contaminated the surrounding areas. Contamination spread via the former Lodi Brook, which ran south past the site and into the Borough of Lodi. Thorium waste in the brook settled onto properties along its path where commercial buildings and residential houses were later built. Wastes were also used as fill or mulch around the area. Stepan Company acquired the Maywood Chemical Works in the late 1950s. The company began cleaning up the residual thorium waste by partially stabilizing the residues and tailings. During the 1960s, Stepan Company Maywood Chemical Works 1 The Maywood Chemical Works is one of the 21 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where cleanup responsibility was transferred to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) in accordance with the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act for FY 1998. At these 21 sites, the Corps is responsible for remediation and DOE is responsible for long-term stewardship activities, if any are deemed necessary. The cleanup decisions for these sites are not yet final and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required for these sites, if any, is not yet known. New Jersey 5
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Stewardship Rep01·t transferred contaminated material from one area of the site to burial pits on the Stepan property. In the 1980s, radioactive materials were discovered in the northeastern corner of the site. Subsequent surveys indicated that the contamination extended beyond site boundaries and, consequently, several residential vicinity properties required remediation. The primary radioactive contaminants are thorium232 and its decay products, as well as uranium and radium226. The primary chemical contaminants are heavy metals and rare earth elements. The risk to the public from these contaminants is minimal. Concentrations are generally low and much of the material is inaccessible (subsurface or beneath structures). The Maywood Site was added to the Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. At the direction of Congress in the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, the site was designated for cleanup under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Additionally, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between DOE and the Borough of Maywood in the 1980s concerning the removal of the Maywood Interim Storage Pile. The Corps' remedial action for the Maywood Chemical Works Site is not yet complete and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required, if any, is not yet known. For additional information about the Maywood Chemical Works, please contact: Chief of Public Affairs New York District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacob K. Javits Federal Building 26 Federal Plaza New York, NY, 10278-0090 Phone: 212-264-0100 or visit the Internet website at: http://www.nan.usace.army.miV New Jersey 6
    • Middlesex Sampling Plant MIDDLESEX SAMPLING PLANT 1 SITE SUMMARY The Middlesex Sampling Plant is located in the Borough of Middlesex in New Jersey, approximately 56 kilometers (35 miles) northeast of Trenton and 42 kilometers (26 miles) southwest of Newark. The site is bordered on the east by residential properties on Mountain A venue, on the south by William Street, and on the north by the Lehigh Valley Railroad line. In the 1940s, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), an early predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), established the Middlesex Sampling Plant to sample, store, and ship uranium and thorium ores. When MED operations at the site ceased in 1955, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the successor agency to the MED and a predecessor agency to DOE, used this site to store and sample thorium. In the 1960s, operations at the Middlesex Sampling Plant were terminated and all remaining thorium sampling activities were transferred to the Feed Materials Production Center and to the Weldon Spring Plant. The activities that took place at the site during the 1950s and 1960s contaminated not only onsite soil and facilities but also vicinity properties and a nearby municipal landfill. Primary contaminants at the site include uranium, radium, thorium, lead, and organics. NEW JERSEY Belle Mead General Depot Miles Middlesex Sampling Plant 1 The Middlesex Sampling Plant is one of the 21 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where cleanup responsibility was transferred to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) in accordance with the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act for FY 1998. At these 21 sites, the Corps is responsible for remediation and DOE is responsible for long-term stewardship activities, if any are deemed necessary. The cleanup decisions for these sites are not yet final and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required for these sites, if any, is not yet known. New Jersey 7
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Tet·m Stewanlship Report When ABC activities were terminated, onsite structures were decontaminated to levels that met the current standards. From the late 1960s until the late 1970s, the site was used by the U.S. Marine Corps. In 1978, the DOE assumed custody of the site and the site was designated for cleanup under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Army Corps of Engineers' remedial action for the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site is not yet complete and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required, if any, is not yet known. For additional information about the Middlesex Sampling Plant, please contact: Chief of Public Affairs New York District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacob K. Javits Federal Building 26 Federal Plaza New York, NY, 10278-0090 Phone: 212-264-0100 or visit the Internet website at: http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/ New Jersey 8
    • Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY 1.0 SITE SUMMARY 1.1 Site Description and Mission The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP HIGHLIGHTS Collaborative National Center for plasma and fusion science. The Laboratory is located on 36 hectares (88.5 Major Long-Term Stewardship Activitiesacres) of property leased from Princeton University on groundwater monitoring and surveillance the James Forrestal Campus, in Plainsboro Township, Total Site Area- 36 hectares (88.5 acres) Middlesex County, New Jersey. The Laboratory Estimated Volume of Residual Contaminantsoperates several devices, including the National groundwater 189,270 cubic meters (247,556 cubic yards) Spherical Torus Experiment on Princeton University's Long-Term Stewardship Start-End Years- 2000-2010 campus. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, which Average Annual Long-Term Stewardship Cost achieved world-record energy output, is currently FY2000-2006- $280,000 undergoing dismantlement and will be completed by Landlord- U.S. Department of Energy, Office of 2003. Other site facilities include maintenance shops, Science warehouses, transformer yards, storage buildings, administrative offices, educational facilities, and miscellaneous trailers. Princeton University is the operating contractor for the Laboratory. DOE's lease with Princeton University expires in 2026, unless DOE decides to terminate it earlier. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's primary mission is to conduct research and development of nuclear fusion technology as an attractive energy source. The Laboratory also historically provided research and development for fusion energy programs sponsored by DOE and its predecessor agencies. Research at the Laboratory began in 1959 with construction of the Model C-Stellerator, which was later converted to a pulseoperated device. Past activities and operations contaminated the soil and groundwater at the site with volatile organic compounds (petroleum, hydrocarbons, and solvents). All site remediation activities have been completed for soil, allowing unrestricted use of the site (with respect to soil). Groundwater in the shallow aquifer along the southern portion of the site, which comprises a surface area of about 12 hectares (30 acres), contains relatively low levels of chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The Laboratory continues to generate waste, including oils, solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, and low-level radioactive wastes. Waste is neither treated nor disposed of onsite, but it is collected in satellite accumulation areas before it is transferred to offsite locations. Hazardous waste is sent to commercial facilities, and low-level radioactive waste is shipped to other DOE sites for disposal. 1.2 Site Cleanup and Accomplishments DOE completed soil remediation activities at Site C/D on the university campus in 1999. Soil contamination consisted of chromium (a heavy metal) and oil-related organic compounds. Approximately 153 cubic meters (200 cubic yards) of the metal-contaminated soil were excavated and disposed of at a commercial facility permitted to accept hazardous waste. Approximately 30 cubic meters (40 cubic yards) of organics-contaminated soil were removed and disposed offsite. All contaminated soils were remediated to cleanup standards dictated by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. In 2000, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection released the site (with respect to soil) for unrestricted use under a "No Further Action Determination." Because of the success of the soil removal actions, and the full characterization of the soils throughout the site, long-term monitoring of the soil is not required. New Jersey 9
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Tenn Stewardship Report ~ Groundwater Contamination 0 I ,000 2,000 Feet Basin Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory The single medium of concern that remains at the site is the groundwater contamination within the shallow aquifer, which most likely resulted from surface spills of solvents. This medium will require long-term stewardship activities. All surface water from the building sumps is discharged into a lined stormwater detention basin, which discharges into a nearby brook. The discharge to the brook is routinely monitored in compliance with a State of New Jersey surface water discharge permit. Because of the natural degradation of the volatile organic compounds within the aquifer, dilution, and volatilization, residual volatile organic compounds are below the regulatory discharge limit to the brook. If volatile organic compounds levels in the discharge rise in the future, mitigation measures may be necessary. New Jersey 10
    • Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2.0 SITE· WIDE LONG· TERM STEWARDSHIP 2.1 Site-Wide Long-Term Stewardship Activities Because of the contamination resulting from past operations, long-term stewardship activities will be required at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These activities, for the most part, will involve groundwater monitoring and surveillance to prevent contaminants from migrating offsite. Currently, DOE anticipates monitoring will continue until 2010. Soils are not subject to long-term stewardship activities since they have been remediated to acceptable levels and the site is no longer restricted for use. No institutional controls are required under the "No Further Action Determination" issued by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. However, because DOE leases the 36 hectares (88.5 acres) of property from Princeton University, DOE is bound by the terms of the lease agreement to return the property to Princeton University free from environmental hazards. SITE ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Removed or closed in-place all (11) underground storage tank systems and associated contaminated soil. Added six above-ground, secondarilyconfined tanks (1989-1993) • Installed impermeable line in retention basin for collecting onsite surface water and groundwater from building dewatering sumps (1995) • Completed two soil removal actions: 153 cubic meters (200 cubic yards) of soil contaminated with heavy metal (chromium); 30 cubic meters (40 cubic yards) of organics-contaminated soil • Baseline ecological evaluation found no evidence of impacts to vegetation or wildlife attributable to onsite environmental conditions (1998) • All identified areas of concern (10) for soil contamination characterized, determined clean, and no further action issued by State of New Jersey for soil (2000) ANTICIPATED SITE The New Jersey Department of Environmental ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS OF 2006 Protection will implement an institutional control designated as a "classification exception area" for the • Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will continue contaminated groundwater plume at the Laboratory. to monitor the natural attenuation of groundwater The "classification exception area" functions as a deed contaminants at least until2010 restriction on groundwater at the site, preventing its unauthorized use. The "classification exception area" designation also provides regulatory relief, allowing groundwater contaminants to naturally and passively degrade until the statewide groundwater quality standards are met. Because soil contamination is no longer present at levels above New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection standards and the low levels of groundwater contamination are inaccessible to human contact, exposure to site workers or the public is not a concern. In addition, a baseline ecological evaluation conducted during a site remedial investigation found no adverse environmental impacts from the groundwater contamination. As a result, the site does not require any special physical barriers (e.g., fences) or visual warnings (e.g., signs). Record-keeping activities are required under a Memorandum of Understanding between Princeton University and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, which governed the cleanup activities at the Laboratory. The Laboratory is currently required to maintain all characterization, remediation and monitoring records for a minium of 30 years. In addition, the Laboratory also maintains a public information repository in which copies of applicable remedial investigation documents are kept. STAKEHOWER INVOLVEMENT Technology Development and Deployment Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory deployed lowflow groundwater sampling pumps in all groundwater New Jersey The Laboratory conducts annual briefings with the local municipal Environmental Advisory Committee as part of its ongoing public information efforts. 11
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Stewm·dship Report monitoring wells. This technology consists of small air- driven bladder pumps located at the bottom of each well that gently purges the well water while analyzing various groundwater parameters (e.g., temperature, alkalinity/acidity, redox). Once the parameters have stabilized, a groundwater sample is taken. As a result, the depiction of actual groundwater conditions are more precise, and less waste water is generated during the well purging process. Utilization of this technology will continue for the duration of the long-term stewardship monitoring program. 2.2 Specific Long-Term Stewardship Activities Groundwater The single medium of concern that remains at the site is the groundwater contamination within the shallow aquifer, which most likely resulted from past surface spills of chlorinated solvents. The remediation strategy applied to the volatile organic compounds and petroleum (and approved by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection) is hydraulic control of migration with existing building dewatering pumps, monitoring, and natural attenuation. This remedy- referred to as "hydraulic groundwater control"- will keep contaminants from migrating offsite while chlorinated volatile organic compounds are allowed to naturally degrade within the aquifer. At this time, no engineered groundwater treatment system is required. The progress of natural attenuation will be monitored by quarterly groundwater sampling until New Jersey water quality standards are met. Target cleanup levels are one part per billion for tetrachloroethene, trichlorethene, 1,1,1trichloroethane, and dichloroethenes under New Jersey groundwater quality standards. Approximately 12 hectares (30 acres), with an average saturated thickness of nine meters (30 feet), of the aquifer on the southern boundary of the site is contaminated above New Jersey water standards. This equates to approximately 189,270 cubic meters (247,556 cubic yards) of contaminated groundwater. Monitoring is required to document the selected remedy of hydraulic control and natural contaminant attenuation. 2.3 Regulatory Regime Long-term stewardship activities of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are governed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to the Administrative Code of the New Jersey Technical Requirements for Site Remediation. This regulatory requirement is executed in accordance with a Memorandum of Understanding (Feb. 3, 1993) between Princeton University and theNew Jersey Department of Environmental Protection for the remediating Site C and D of the James Forrestal Campus. The MOU acknowledges that Site CID is leased by DOE and that DOE contracts with Princeton University to manage and operate the Laboratory. A letter issued by the Department's Bureau of Case Management on March 17, 2000, approved the Remedial Investigation/Remedial Action Selection Report and approved the proposed groundwater remedy of hydraulic containment and natural attenuation. All long-term stewardship activities exclusively address the groundwater at the Laboratory. A No Further Action Letter and Covenant Not to Sue for the soil at Princeton was signed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Princeton University on March 28, 2000. No long-term stewardship activities are required for the soils at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Because the long-term remedial activity at the Princeton Plasma Physic Laboratory consists only of the continuation of groundwater monitoring, no additional remedial systems are identified or required at this time. Therefore, a review under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended, is not applicable and no hazardous or low-level radioactive waste will be generated as a result of the selected long-term stewardship activities. New Jersey 12
    • Princeton Plasma Physics Labomtory 2.4 Assumptions and Uncertainties The long-term surveillance and monitoring of the groundwater contamination is assumed to consist of quarterly monitoring for at least 10 years until 2010. No further actions will be required. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will continue to operate as a national laboratory for energy research. Therefore, future use of this facility will remain industrial. 3.0 ESTIMATED LONG· TERM STEWARDSHIP COSTS The estimated costs for long-term stewardship activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are identified in the table below. The annual site-wide cost estimate for long-term stewardship activities is approximately $280,000 per year for the period of fiscal years (FY) 2000-2010. An annual budget of $273,000 (in FY 1999) dollars supported the quarterly groundwater collection and analysis, general maintenance of monitoring wells, administrative reporting and record-keeping. Beginning in FY 2001, these costs and responsibilities will be transferred from DOE's Office of Environmental Management to DOE's Office of Science. Site Long-Term Stewardship Costs (Constant Year 2000 Dollars) Year(s) Amount Year(s) Amount Year(s) Amount FY 2000 $273,000 FY 2008 $281,000 FY 2036-2040 $0 FY 2001 $281,000 FY 2009 $281,000 FY 2041-2045 $0 FY 2002 $281,000 FY 2010 $281,000 FY 2046-2050 $0 FY 2003 $281,000 FY 2011-2015 $0 FY 2051-2055 $0 FY 2004 $281,000 FY 2016-2020 $0 FY 2056-2060 $0 FY 2005 $281,000 FY 2021-2025 $0 FY 2061-2065 $0 FY 2006 $281,000 FY 2026-2030 $0 FY 2066-2070 $0 FY 2007 $281,000 FY2031-2035 $0 4.0 FUTURE USES The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will continue to operate as a national laboratory conducting research in plasma science and fusion energy. Therefore, future use of this facility will remain industrial - as a commercial/research property consistent with past use. With respect to soil contamination, unrestricted use is allowed. The Laboratory and all surrounding properties receive potable water from the public water utility. The Laboratory uses the nearby Delaware and Raritan Canal for process cooling water. The onsite water supply wells are available only for backup fire fighting purposes and are not used for potable purposes. As a result, the existing groundwater contamination has not affected the existing land use as a "commercial/research property." If the Laboratory's lease expires in 2026 without renewal, or is terminated prior to expiration, DOE is bound by the lease agreement to return the property free of environmental hazards. New Jersey 13
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Stewardship Report For additional information about the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, please contact: Jeffrey Makiel, Environmental Engineer P.O. Box 102 Princeton, NJ 08542-0102 Phone: 609-243-3721 or visit the Internet website at http://www.pppl.gov New Jersey 14
    • Wayne Site WAYNE SITE I SITE SUMMARY The Wayne Site is located about 3.2 kilometers (two miles) north of Wayne, New Jersey, in a highly developed area of Passaic County. The site is approximately 58 kilometers (36 miles) northwest of New York City. Between 1948 and 1971, Rare Earths, Inc., and its successor, W.R. Grace and Company, processed monazite sands to recover thorium and other rare earth elements. In 1955, under a contract issued by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the company began to process Government-owned thorium ores for the AEC (ABC-funded thorium processing may have begun as early as 1948). The contract was terminated in 1960. Thereafter, W.R. Grace and Co. processed monazite sands for commercial purposes until 1971. Between 1967 and 1984, the property was leased to and occupied by ElectroNucleonics, Inc. Prior to 1960, radioactive residues from the processing of thorium ores were placed in above-ground piles. From 1960 to 1967, the thorium wastes were buried-- sometime between 1960 and 1964, they were buried in large unlined pits. In 1965, the material was exhumed and buried in smaller pits. From 1967 to 1971, thorium phosphate wastes were shipped to the W.R. Grace and Co. plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Liquid wastes were neutralized in an onsite treatment plant and released into the storm water sewer system, which discharges into Sheffield Brook and, eventually, into the Pompton River. In 1971, at the request ofW.R. Grace and Co., AEC modified the W.R. Grace license to allow only storage. Wayne Site 1 The Wayne Site is one of the 21 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where cleanup responsibility was transferred to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) in accordance with the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act for FY 1998. At these 21 sites, the Corps is responsible for remediation and DOE is responsible for long-term stewardship activities, if any are deemed necessary. The cleanup decisions for these sites are not yet final and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required for these sites, if any, is not yet known. New Jersey 15
    • National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-lerm Stewardship Report After plant operations ceased in 1971, W.R. Grace and Co. partially decontaminated the site. In addition to covering an onsite disposal area with clean fill, the company razed several buildings and buried the resulting rubble and processing equipment in place. The remaining buildings were decontaminated and left intact. The primary contaminants of concern are thorium and radium and their daughter products. Tailings migrated offsite via Sheffield Brook and contaminated vicinity properties. Areas surrounding the railroad spur in nearby Pequannock, where thorium-containing ores were unloaded, were also contaminated. Cleanup has been completed and certified at most of the designated vicinity properties. Radioactive residues from the vicinity property cleanup are in interim storage on the site. The Wayne Site is on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List and is also the subject of a Federal Facilities Agreement between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and EPA. In 1983, Congress authorized the cleanup of the Wayne Site under the Formerly Utilized Site Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). In September of 1984, the Wayne Site was donated to DOE. The Corps' remedial action for the site is not yet complete and, therefore, the extent of long-term stewardship required, if any, is not yet known. For additional information about the Wayne Site, please contact: Chief of Public Affairs New York District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacob K. Javits Federal Building 26 Federal Plaza New York, NY, 10278-0090 Phone:212-264-0100 or visit the Internet website at: http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/ New Jersey 16