Intro to the Gospel of Matthew
Session Two
Person of Jesus
Matthew 1:1-2:23
Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17
• The first two chapters of Matthew stand apart from
the rest of the gospel in terms of both...
Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17
• "The book of the genesis," comes from the Greek
translation of the Old Testament (called t...
Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17
• Second, it is clear that David and Abraham
are the most important figures mentioned in
thi...
Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17
• To David God had promised that his
descendants would rule as kings forever in
Israelite hi...
Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17
• There are four points at which Matthew’s
genealogy breaks away from the normal
pattern of ...
Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17
3. The third unusual feature is the mention of
four women: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and the
wife ...
The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25
• This section of Matthew is often called the
birth of Jesus
• However, it is not abou...
The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25
• It has been widely claimed in sermons and
Bible classes that Joseph could have had
M...
The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25
• It is the virgin conception [not birth]of Jesus
that both Matthew and Luke affirm.
•...
The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25
• The message from God had five points.
1. Joseph was not to be afraid
2. pregnancy wa...
The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25
• "Jesus" is the English form of a Greek name
Yeshua
• Hebrew roots meant "Yahweh will...
The Visit of the Magi:Matt 2:1-12
• Matthew 2:1 dates Jesus’ birth during the
reign of Herod the Great
• Matthew 2 implies...
The Visit of the Magi: Matt 2:1-12
• when a tyrannical king is upset, even his subjects
who hate him have reason to be wor...
The Visit of the Magi: Matt 2:1-12
• The key concept in verses 9-12 is worship.
The picture of the magi worshipping Jesus
...
To Egypt and Home: Matt 2:13-23
• The final section of the birth narrative in
Matthew consists of a series of three brief
...
To Egypt and Home: Matt 2:13-23
• The second vignette, verses 16-18, confirms
the wisdom of the flight to Egypt
• Finally,...
Study Questions for Reflection
• First Day: Read the notes on Matthew 1:1-
2:23. Look up the Scripture references given.
•...
Study Questions for Reflection
• Second Day: Read Matthew 3:1-17. Now focus on
Matthew 3:1-12.
• Summarize the message of ...
Study Questions for Reflection
• Third Day: Read Matthew 3:1-17. Focus in on Matthew 3:13-
17.
• Why do you think John was...
Study Questions for Reflection
• Fourth Day: Read Matthew 3:13-4:17. Focus your attention on
Matthew 4:1-11.
• Why do you ...
Study Questions for Reflection
• Fifth Day: Read Matthew 4:1-25. Now focus in on Matthew
4:12-17.
• Matthew explains Jesus...
Study Questions for Reflection
• Sixth Day: Read Matthew 4:1-25. Now focus on
Matthew 4:18-25.
• What is the call of Jesus...
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Intro to matthewsession2

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Intro to matthewsession2

  1. 1. Intro to the Gospel of Matthew Session Two Person of Jesus Matthew 1:1-2:23
  2. 2. Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17 • The first two chapters of Matthew stand apart from the rest of the gospel in terms of both content and style • Chapter 1 consists of two sections: verses 1-17 contain the genealogy of Jesus; verses 18-25 speak of Jesus’ conception by the Holy Spirit and acceptance by Joseph. • Chapter 2 also has two sections: verses 1-12 describe the Magi’s search for the King of the Jews; verses 13-23 contain the report of the early childhood journeys of Jesus as his parents sought safety.
  3. 3. Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17 • "The book of the genesis," comes from the Greek translation of the Old Testament (called the Septuagint) in Genesis 2:4 and 5:1. • A comparison of this genealogy with that found in Luke 3:23-38 reveals a number of differences • First, Matthew states that his genealogy is constructed so there will be fourteen generations in the three major intervals of Israelite history
  4. 4. Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17 • Second, it is clear that David and Abraham are the most important figures mentioned in this genealogy • Both were recipients of significant promises that shaped Jewish identity • To Abraham God had promised the land of Palestine, innumerable descendants, and that they would become a blessing to all nations (Genesis 12:2-3; 13:14-17 give the first statements of these promises).
  5. 5. Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17 • To David God had promised that his descendants would rule as kings forever in Israelite history (2 Samuel 7:12-16). • The Babylonian Exile had called these promises of God into serious question. • There are four points at which Matthew’s genealogy breaks away from the normal pattern of Old Testament genealogies.
  6. 6. Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17 • There are four points at which Matthew’s genealogy breaks away from the normal pattern of Old Testament genealogies. 1. Matthew mentions Jesus first 2. mention of Judah and his brothers in verse 2 and Jechoniah and his brothers in verse 11 is unusual
  7. 7. Jesus’ Genealogy Matt 1: 1-17 3. The third unusual feature is the mention of four women: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and the wife of Uriah (Bathsheba) 4. The final break from the typical pattern of Jewish genealogies is the introduction of Joseph as the husband of Mary
  8. 8. The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25 • This section of Matthew is often called the birth of Jesus • However, it is not about Christ’s birth but rather is about his conception and the survival of his parent’s marriage • Verse 18 also describes Mary as engaged or betrothed to Joseph. In the Jewish culture of that time, the process of engagement and marriage was quite different from that practiced in modern Western society
  9. 9. The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25 • It has been widely claimed in sermons and Bible classes that Joseph could have had Mary stoned on the basis of Old Testament Law • Matthew describes Joseph as a "just" or "righteous man. • Though Matthew had named the Holy Spirit as the agent of conception in verse 18, this fact was not revealed to Joseph until verse 20
  10. 10. The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25 • It is the virgin conception [not birth]of Jesus that both Matthew and Luke affirm. • Matthew’s concern in this passage is to explain to us how Jesus came to have Joseph’s lineage for his genealogy • Joseph’s thinking regarding the divorce was interrupted by an angel of the Lord who appeared to him in a dream
  11. 11. The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25 • The message from God had five points. 1. Joseph was not to be afraid 2. pregnancy was the product of the Holy Spirit 3. unborn child would be a son 4. Joseph was to name him Jesus 5. the child would save his people from their sins.
  12. 12. The Miracle of Jesus: Matt 1: 18-25 • "Jesus" is the English form of a Greek name Yeshua • Hebrew roots meant "Yahweh will save • Verse 23 introduces the name Emmanuel God is with us
  13. 13. The Visit of the Magi:Matt 2:1-12 • Matthew 2:1 dates Jesus’ birth during the reign of Herod the Great • Matthew 2 implies that the magi arrived in Bethlehem some while after Jesus was born. • The term "Magi" referred to magicians and astrologers • The message that the king of the Jews had been born led the magi to logically travel to Jerusalem
  14. 14. The Visit of the Magi: Matt 2:1-12 • when a tyrannical king is upset, even his subjects who hate him have reason to be worried. • That Herod would have consulted with the chief priests and scribes is also surprising • Matthew paraphrases the quotation from Micah 5:2 fairly freely. The Hebrew text of Micah 5:2 depreciates Bethlehem. Matthew turns it around to heighten respect for Bethlehem by his phrase, "by no means the least."
  15. 15. The Visit of the Magi: Matt 2:1-12 • The key concept in verses 9-12 is worship. The picture of the magi worshipping Jesus came to be seen as fulfillment of such scriptures as Psalm 72:10ff and Isaiah 60:1ff. • Gold and frankincense are mentioned in Psalm 72:15 and Isaiah 60:6 • Psalm 45:8 and Song of Solomon 3:6 show that myrrh was also seen as a gift fit for a king
  16. 16. To Egypt and Home: Matt 2:13-23 • The final section of the birth narrative in Matthew consists of a series of three brief vignettes taking Jesus to Egypt and then to Nazareth. Each is anchored by a quotation from the Old Testament. • The first narrative describes the angelic revelation that the new family should flee to Egypt.
  17. 17. To Egypt and Home: Matt 2:13-23 • The second vignette, verses 16-18, confirms the wisdom of the flight to Egypt • Finally, Matthew 2:19-23 narrates the return of Jesus to Judea and then the move to Nazareth in Galilee • Perhaps this vagueness is because we can find no scripture that describes the Messiah as coming from Nazareth.
  18. 18. Study Questions for Reflection • First Day: Read the notes on Matthew 1:1- 2:23. Look up the Scripture references given. • Identify one or two new insights that seemed important to you. Why are they important? • Is there a spiritual truth in Matthew 1-2 that is especially significant for you? Jot it down and explain why it is important for you. • Write a brief prayer asking God to help you worship Christ as truly as the Magi did.
  19. 19. Study Questions for Reflection • Second Day: Read Matthew 3:1-17. Now focus on Matthew 3:1-12. • Summarize the message of John the Baptist in your own words. What two or three things does he want his listeners to do? • Verse 3 quotes from Isaiah 40:3. Read Isaiah 40:1- 11. What themes that seem to apply to Jesus do you find in this passage from Isaiah? • Verses 11-12 speak of purification and the judgment of God. What areas of your life need to be purified before you would like to face God's judgment? Ask the Lord to transform you in these areas
  20. 20. Study Questions for Reflection • Third Day: Read Matthew 3:1-17. Focus in on Matthew 3:13- 17. • Why do you think John was reluctant to baptize Jesus? How do 2 Corinthians 5:21 and Hebrews 4:15 contribute to an answer to this question? • Do you think John should have baptized Jesus" Why? Or why not? What do you think Jesus means when he speaks of fulfilling "all righteousness" by means of being baptized? Does Jesus' baptism have any significance for the question of believers being baptized? If so, how? • The voice form heaven seems to use the words of Psalm 2:7 and Isaiah 41:1. read Psalm 2 and Isaiah 42:1-9. What other phrases in those passages remind you of Jesus? Why?
  21. 21. Study Questions for Reflection • Fourth Day: Read Matthew 3:13-4:17. Focus your attention on Matthew 4:1-11. • Why do you think Matthew narrated the story of Jesus' baptism and the story of his temptation back to back? What title for Jesus unites these stories? How does that title suggest an application for us? • Verse 4 quotes from Deuteronomy 8:3. Read Deuteronomy 8. What instructions does that passage have that would help you in the midst of temptation? • Verses 7 and 10 quote form Deuteronomy 6:16 and 13. All of Jesus' responses to Satan came in the words of Scripture quotations. Write a brief statements about how you believe Scripture can help us become victorious over temptation.
  22. 22. Study Questions for Reflection • Fifth Day: Read Matthew 4:1-25. Now focus in on Matthew 4:12-17. • Matthew explains Jesus' ministry in Galilee by quoting Isaiah 9:1-2. Read Isaiah 9:1-7. What other references that describe Jesus or his ministry do you find there. • What is the event that seemed to trigger Jesus' movement to Galilee and the beginning of his ministry? Are you aware of other times when bad news or a crisis led to God beginning a new work? Why do you think this might be a pattern for God? • How does Jesus' message in Matthew 4:17 compare with the message of John the Baptist mentioned in Matthew 3:2? What is different about Jesus from John? Why is that important?
  23. 23. Study Questions for Reflection • Sixth Day: Read Matthew 4:1-25. Now focus on Matthew 4:18-25. • What is the call of Jesus upon Peter and Andrew? To what degree do you think their call is also our calling? Why? • What is the three-part picture of Jesus’ ministry that Matthew gives in verse 23? In what ways does the church continue these three ministries? Do we need to do more than these three? Why or why not? • What is the response to Jesus that these focus verses describe? How do you respond to Christ and to his call upon your life? Write a brief prayer telling him how you respond to him and to his call.

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