Developing Multicultural Competency More Than Just Words
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Developing Multicultural Competency More Than Just Words

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Developing Multicultural Competency More Than Just Words Developing Multicultural Competency More Than Just Words Presentation Transcript

  • Developing multicultural competency: More than just words Building on its long-standing commitment to diversity and social action, Beaver Country Day School (BCDS) has moved to significantly increase the integration of multicultural competency development into the learning culture of every classroom. BCDS Presenters: Peter Brooks Rob Connor Nicole Lipson Gabriela Morillo Robert Principe
  • You want change?
    • “ In a nation of 300 million people with intricate, dizzying
    • global connections and information networks, it is juvenile to
    • think that 'change' that endures can come from one man, one
    • administration or one coalition. It is naive — not earnest — to
    • think that civic improvement is primarily 'top down.'”
    •  
    • You Wanted Change? It's Time To Help
    • Dick Meyer 
    • NPR.org, Nov. 6, 2008
  • How about a little cognitive dissonance?
    • The need for change calls educators to take a hard look at
    • exactly what we are teaching relevant to the global needs of
    • the 21 st century.
    • We call it, “getting messy.”
  • Who we are- Beaver Country Day School
    • Independent, coeducational, progressive, college preparatory school
    • 428 students in grades 6-12, 121 in the middle school, 307 in the upper school
    • Average of 15 students per class
    • Founded in 1920, first head of school Eugene Randolph Smith
    • Students come from 54 communities including the city of Boston
    • 48% of students come from public and charter schools, 52% from independent and parochial schools
  • Who we are- Beaver Country Day School
    • 25% of students of color
    • 21% faculty of color
    • 20 languages are spoken at home by our students
    • 25% of students receive financial aid
    • Diversity of family structures
    • Tuition for 2008-2009 is $31,450 for all grades
  • Progressive Education
    • Progressive education came into being to change the world – to effect the moral and social transformation of students (and thus society) in order to move the human condition forward towards a state of perfection. This is not a modest goal, nor is it easily set aside.
    • ( Progressive Education , Peter Gow, April 2005)
  • Deeply committed to individual student success, teachers inspire students to:
    • Act effectively within a genuinely diverse cultural and social framework
    • Serve both school and society with integrity, respect, and compassion
    • BCDS Mission Statement (Excerpt) (Revised January 2006)
  • Hiatt Center for Social Justice Education
    •  
    • Long term goal:
    • Building on Beaver’s long-standing commitment to
    • diversity, multicultural learning, and social action,
    • our goal is to significantly increase the integration
    • of social justice education into the learning culture
    • at BCDS.
    •  
    •  
  • Goal Rationale
    •  
    • The needs of the global community and economy in the 21 st . Century challenge our instructional outcomes to:
      • produce individuals who are capable of communicating and functioning effectively within the changing demographics of today’s workforce
      • produce student who by the nature of their education, are equipped with the understanding and skills to be mobilized as global citizens and act as agents of social change
    The data collected in the 2007-2008 academic year reveals a need for BCDS to strengthen the relationship between social justice education and instructional outcomes.
  • The greatest challenge?
    • Creating the most effective mix of resources,
    • accountability, and inspiration to support risk
    • taking and innovation.
    • “ Transform the hands of the players”
  • Multicultural Competency Development
    • The multicultural competencies give us defined standards for
    • the work.
    • The multicultural competencies are exactly the skills with
    • which students need to be equipped to act as agents of social
    • change.
    • Skill Set A - affirms diversity ( identity )
    • Skill Set B - encourages critical thinking ( lens awareness )
    • Skill Set C - gives students hands-on opportunities ( practice )
  • SJE Alignment – How it all fits - produce individuals who are capable of communicating and functioning effectively within the changing demographics of today’s workforce - produce student who by the nature of their education, are equipped with the understanding and skills to be mobilized as global citizens and act as agents of social change 6-12 grade Sequence Practice (Unit Design - IPGP, Departments – Evaluation) Curriculum, Service Learning, Common Experiences Hiatt Restructuring - integration of social justice education into the learning culture at BCDS Inventory Multicultural Competencies Data Driven
    • learning from the Instructional Leaders doing
    • “ the work on the ground”
    Department Heads Panel
  • Visual Arts Department (Social Justice Goals SY 08-09)
    • Celebrate/Validate the wide range of life experiences and
    • personal narratives that our students share through their
    • work
    •  
    • Establish dialogue with local area schools about social
    • justice through a juried student art show with a social justice
    • theme
    • Establish dialogue with local area artists who address issues
    • of social justice in their life and work
    •  
    • Assess our current use of art history in our curriculum as a
    • means for addressing issues of social justice
  • English Department (Social Justice Goals SY 08-09)
    • Creating more opportunities for real-world learning experiences beyond the traditional
    • Social Justice/ Multicultural Competency Connection : Incorporating more real-world, service learning experiences into our curriculum will give students exposure to realities other than their own, and will enable them to practice skills necessary to be effective citizens.
    •  
    • Developing more progressive methods of grammar instruction and assessment
    • Social Justice/ Multicultural Competency Connection : As part of our grammar instruction, we plan to increase students’ lens awareness by addressing issues of privilege and access more explicitly. Alongside teaching “Standard English,” we must examine, validate, and celebrate the diversity of “Englishes” in which are students are fluent.
    •  
    • Developing a stronger culture of writing
    • Social Justice/ Multicultural Competency Connection : The more we can encourage students to share their writing beyond the classroom, the more exposure they will have to one another’s stories, and the more likely they will be to engage in dialogue about their different realities.
  • Modern Languages Department (Social Justice Goals SY 08-09)
    • Work on a proposal for a French trip for March 2010 (Potential locations to explore Martinique, Guadeloupe, Senegal, Cameroon)
      • trip will focus on providing students with an opportunity to experience first-hand a different world in terms of culture, language, food, environment, etc.
      • trip will include a service learning component within the local communities.
      • these interactions must be designed to benefit both students and the communities visited, with a long term goal of strengthening our connections with these communities.
    •  
    • Make greater use of the Hiatt Center as a resource to build community partnerships for our students to experience authentic collaborative work opportunities
  • Hiatt Center for Social Justice Education www.bcdschool.org/hiattcenter
    • Thank you!