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Presentation on Listening: Social media research from IBM Digital Workshop in Milan Italy, June 2011

Presentation on Listening: Social media research from IBM Digital Workshop in Milan Italy, June 2011

A client reference video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_7fjdElwXw

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  • ‘ Listening’ is an important part of any engagement / conversation. You need to understand what your target audience / constituency is saying, in order to provide high quality value and relevant responses. Listening can of course happen via any medium – face to face at an event or in a one on one meeting between seller and client, via a telephone call, via an email survey (where you ask people to provide their thoughts on a specific topic), via a web poll, an online jam, or via ‘tuning in’ to the conversations happening 24/7 on the public web. On the public web, listening can also be called social media research OR social intelligence. This includes: Gathering online conversation via Web scraping tools: scanning news sites, blogs, microblogs and message boards, social networks Gauge overall volume, flow, sourcing, and sentiment of conversations Synthesizing conversational excerpts into overarching insights to identify opportunities Listening can fulfill multiple objectives: Crisis monitoring (real-time listening tool and designated personnel required) Enable you to mine leads Identify most vocal/influential participants to the conversations (internal and external infuencers) Deepen understanding of target audience: allowing us to develop insight into their interests, beliefs, ambitions. This includes u nderstanding the words your target audience / constituency use (informing search keyword selection and copy, as well as creative messaging and content, to enhance SEO). Identify the channels and media where our target audience is conversing ( Websites or communities – who you can partner with and where to engage audience ) Measure the amount of conversation around a topic and related sentiment – develop a baseline, then gauging penetration of and reactions to a campaign, product launch, social media initiative etc. This can form part of ongoing analytics. Indicators to Measure: Preference: Attitudes and disposition (favorable and unfavorable) around IBM Action: Behaviors of IBM’ers and constituents Influence: Identify individuals impacting and driving social conversations around our brands Reach: Viral impact of engagement strategies Overall: Audience insights inform marketing and communications strategies – listening forms a key part of the insights generation phase of constituency planning and also the measurement of efforts on an ongoing basis. (Benchmark and continuously measure the effects of our engagement with our constituency )
  • Objectives: Mine social media for sales leads. Enable IBM sellers to find ready customers and stay connected to them Outcome: Generate leads Make it easy for customers to find our sellers in social media Enable customers to perceive IBM as “tech savvy” and “easy to do business with In 2009, in NA, a pilot was started by WW ibm.com to test: If social media could be used to discover opportunities? Yes! If we could identify potential leads in social media? Yes! If we could develop best practices for successful participation? Yes! If we could learn how to move from engagement to sale? Yes! If we could assess the ROI? Yes! If it could drive leads and sales? Yes! Intelligent Listening Program recognized internally as innovative Intelligent Listening was the 1 st coordinated activity to get sellers to mine for opportunities & respond to these posts in social media. A multi-locale, multi-brand program - coordinated centrally by WW, but managed locally. Recognized as innovative and funded by STG, SWG, ITS & GB. Build skills on the sales team: The program offers training & support -- proven methodologies, key words, best practices and metrics tracking. Sources: Twitter, LinkedIn, IT forums Recognized externally as innovative Case Study: How IBM Uncovers “Millions of Dollars” Worth of Sales Leads with Social Media, eMarketer , April 2010 Evidence that Social Media Really Does Drive Sales Evidence that Social Media Really Does Drive Sales, The Next Web , Sept 2010
  • Objectives: Identify who the influential people are in your industry Discover what is being said about your competitors Outcome: Identify bloggers, journalists, etc., to reach out to build & nurture relationships, potentially create brand advocacy Learn what people think differentiates your brand from competitors Identify IBM emerging influencers
  • Start by contacting the social intelligence centre (Susan Emerick, Amy Laine, Ranjun Chauhan, XXX?) – Partnership with CIO, SWG, Ben’s team They have many visibility across listening projects. avoid duplication of effort. You can proactively monitor select keywords mentioned in blogs, news stories, videos, and Google groups yourself (even set up an RSS feed of all mentions you are monitoring), and determine the frequency of notification (daily, weekly, etc.) These free tools may provide sufficient data. If not, this process is likely to help you define the brief for listening via a paid tool. Once you have defined what you are listening for it may be worthwhile formalising the listening program e.g. securing staff to listen using free tools or funding for MI or agency to utilise paid tools such as Converseon, CCI, Banter We use Converseon primarily for now (Converseon is our agency of record currently for social research) Cognos Consumer Insights (CCI) and Banter are IBM tools FREE TOOLS Google Alerts: This is an extremely popular and effective social media monitoring tool. Google Alerts allows you to create keyword searches for the name of your business or the names of your competitors. You will then receive the results of your searches in your inbox or through your RSS feeds. If you combine Google Alerts with iGoogle (Google’s portal), you can build a concise page that will contain the most current results for the keywords that you have chosen. You should definitely consider using Google Alerts. It doesn’t cost any money and it is very easy to set up.   Twitter Advanced Search: When you use the advanced feature of Twitter’s search tool, you can generate very powerful searches. Once your search has been set up, you can save the search terms as an RSS feed so that the information that you are receiving is always current.   HootSuite: You can manage multiple social media accounts across LinkedIn, Foursquare, Twitter, Facebook, WordPress and MySpace. Even though HootSuite is actually an account management tool, it has a very large user base and has powerful functionality. When you have updates, you can add them to more than one social media profile at a time, click through, automate updates and monitor your buzz. http:// socialmention.com /   http://48ers.com/   http:// www.google.com/landing/realtime /   Reiterate - Coordination is Key: It will be important to coordinate and manage findings – i.e. mentions of key words or phrases in the social space. Check whether someone else in a country that speaks your language is monitoring the same works & phrases – if so, perhaps they can simply send you a regular feed?
  • Lets look at the opportunity Listening offers us – and the risks around not Listening “ Recommendations from personal acquaintances or opinions posted by consumers online are the most trusted forms of advertising, Ninety percent or consumers surveyed noted that they trust recommendations from people they know, while 70 percent trusted consumer opinions posted online.” Source: Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey of over 25,000 Internet consumers from 50 countries. Many of our clients & prospects are now active in social media. Each study has slightly different questions and percentages. One the slide you’ll see: According to IBM LDP Team Consultation. July 21, 2009. Coordinating Business Execution in Social Networks , 95% of business decision makers and influencers are active in social computing Source: IBM LDP Team Consultation. July 21, 2009. Coordinating Business Execution in Social Networks. Over 70% of IT buyers use social media for recommendations and pricing on IBM-type offerings. Source: Forrester, 2009 Of course this represents an opportunity – but also a risk. Our competitors (HP, Oracle, Dell, Microsoft) are reaching out to customers in social media. We see them responding to these posts as well (often faster and more consistently than we do). If we don’t master this space, our competitors may benefit.
  • What is your objective for listening ; how will you use your findings in your plan? What constituency are you addressing? – what are their shared interests, beliefs and ambitions? Does any previous listening exist? If you don’t know, it’s best to check with your local cross functional M&C Digital Leader and/or social intelligence centre of competency , to avoid duplication of work efforts. Is there an existing list of keywords ? If yes, has this been localised? Have you gone into AdWorks and looked at the similar, words they suggest too? What words and phrases matter most to this group of people? – which words do they use? What is their vernacular / common language?? We need to listen for these terms – and use them in our search efforts. Do you know who the influencers and experts are in this group of people? IBM experts and external experts. The Expert Locator tool within the Social Business @ IBM site may help you locate IBM experts. Where are these people talking? Do external experts have their own media, e.g. blogs, or are they guest writers on others publications? Do they speak at events? Which sites and which events are influential places? What information is currently available on the topics you are seeking to learn about? What tools / technology platform will you use to listen? - Given social media research vendors are different locally (infrastructure; web / social site popularity & usage behavior), which tools offer the best listening options in your market? W e talked through some options previously: Converseon , IBM tools such as CCI, Banter or any of the array of free tools; Google Alerts, Twitter Advanced Search, Social Mention etc Is this an ongoing program or short-term project? How frequently will you listen? (yearly, quarterly, monthly, real time) This is not an exhaustive list – but some questions that may help you clarify where to start and what to listen for. The key here is to get started – experience has shown that listening for 20 minutes per day (e.g. using free tools) is more effective than listening for the equivalent hours once per week. You may be surprised what you learn and gain from starting a regular listening practice!

Listening: social media research Listening: social media research Presentation Transcript

  • Listening: social media research Rowan Hetherington Digital Strategy Enablement, Business Transformation Professional
  • 1. Definition: What is Listening?
    • Listening is monitoring, aggregation and analysis of online conversation
    Monitoring Objectives: Mine social media for sales leads. Enable IBM sellers to find ready prospects / clients and stay connected to them Outcomes: Generate leads Make it easy for customers to find our sellers in social media Enable prospects / clients to perceive IBM as “tech savvy” and “easy to do business with Objective: Find out how many people are talking about specific keywords online, understand natural language used in conversation, where they are talking, and what they are saying Outcomes: Develop insight into your target constituencies Help inform positioning, strategy and search terms for owned, earned, paid content Inform where your brand / engagement should be online (media/PR, etc.) Objective: Monitor and manage potential negative comments about your brand online Outcome: Identify potential PR issues or disgruntled prospects / clients so you can react and attempt to fix the problems before they are widespread Objective: Measure how an ad campaign, product launch or social initiative has impacted the way people talk about your brand online Outcomes: Demonstrate a campaign has caused more people to mention your brand Demonstrate a campaign has changed peoples’ opinions of your brand Benchmark level of influence of IBMers and external influencers Mining Insights Measure Objectives: Identify who the influential people are in your industry Discover what is being said about your competitors Outcomes: Identify bloggers, journalists, etc., to reach out to build & nurture relationships, potentially create brand advocacy Learn what people think differentiates your brand from competitors Identify IBM emerging influencers Identify influencers
  • Example – Intelligent Listening in North America
    • North America Intelligent listening pilot
    • Objectives: Drive sales by mining social media for sales leads
    • Enable IBM sellers to find ready customers and stay connected to customers.
    • Make it easy for customers to find our sellers in social media.
    • Help customers perceive IBM as “tech savvy” and “easy to do business with.”
    • The NA pilot generated:
    • 2009: $2.3 M in OI with 29 leads
    • 2010: $6.7M in OI and $357K wins had over 1,000 discussions
    Mining
    • Example – Identifying external STG influencers
    July 2010 Identify influencers Outside of the U.S., influencers primarily clustered in Europe, particularly in the U.K.
  • Listening practices
    • IBM has established a social intelligence centre of competency to build and use IBM solutions
    • There is no single listening solution – coordination and management of findings is key
    • There are a broad spectrum of practices available, from free ‘do it yourself’ to expensive solutions
      • Converseon
      • Cognos Consumer Insights (CCI)
      • Banter
      • Real time monitoring tools include People Browser, Hootsuite
    • The key is to practice some form of listening – appropriate to your program and available resources, to inform local plans
  • 2. The Opportunity: Consumers are vocal about their opinions. They trust peer opinions more than formalized brand communications Social networks are mainly used by business people to stay in touch with business contacts (58%), get together with special interest groups (54%), find out useful business information (54%), and organise/connect/manage customer groups (51%). Source: A global survey of business social networking, July 2010 “ Social networking sites reach 75.8 percent of all women online and 69.7 percent of men globally .” Source: ComScore, May 2010 “ Who does the consumer listen to?” “ How are you listening to the consumer?”
  • 3. Questions to ask yourselves…
    • What is your objective ; how will you use your findings?
    • What constituency are you addressing?
    • Does any previous listening exist?
    • Is there an existing list of keywords ?
    • What words and phrases matter most to this group of people?
    • Do you know who the influencers and experts are in this group of people?
    • Where are these people talking?
    • What information is currently available on the topics you are seeking to learn about?
    • What tools / technology platform will you use to listen?
    • Is this an ongoing program or short-term project?
    • How frequently will you listen? (yearly, quarterly, monthly, real time)
  • Let’s discuss…