Samsung Mobile BYOD Index:
Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
2
Bring Your Own Device –
The New Corporate Norm
3
Welcome to the new world of corporate IT
– Where Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs are rapidly becoming commonplace....
4
05
12
17
21
25
Table of Contents
BYOD Today and Tomorrow
Drivers of BYOD Adoption
BYOD Program Preferences
The Personal ...
5
BYODTodayandTomorrow
6
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
BYOD Has Gone Mai...
7
Companies are Investing in BYOD
Over one-third (39%) of companies with BYOD policies also formally provide
subsidies for...
8
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
Looking Ahead
In ...
9
BYOD Today and Tomorrow
A Consensus on the Future Move to Mobile – But a Gap on Today’s Use
IT Estimate
IT Estimate*
14%...
10
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
BYOD Policies by...
11
Reimbursement
BASE: Has BYOD policies regarding mobile devices
BYOD Today and Tomorrow
Companies that offer
reimburseme...
12
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
DriversofBYODAdo...
13
Drivers of BYOD Adoption
What is driving the creation of BYOD programs? In many respects it comes down to common sense....
14
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
Security is the ...
15
Increase in Workforce Mobility
Drivers of BYOD Adoption
As noted previously, after security issues, the expanding mobil...
16
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
BYOD – The Human...
17
BYODProgramPreferences
18
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
Factors Driving ...
19
IT and End Users Disagree on Many Factors Regarding BYOD’s Contribution to Increased Productivity
BYOD Program Preferen...
20
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
End Users Value ...
21
ThePersonalSideofBYOD
22
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
The Personal Sid...
23
Work Smartphones for Personal Activities
The Personal Side of BYOD
The blurring boundaries of personal and work life ex...
24
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
The Reliance on ...
25
ResearchMethodology
26
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
Research Methodo...
27
IT Decision Maker Respondent Profile
Research Methodology
5,001 or more
Number of Employees
Mean number of employees: 2...
28
January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
End User Respond...
2013 byod mobile index
2013 byod mobile index
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2013 byod mobile index

  1. 1. Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device
  2. 2. 2 Bring Your Own Device – The New Corporate Norm
  3. 3. 3 Welcome to the new world of corporate IT – Where Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs are rapidly becoming commonplace. In fact, as of December 2012 the majority of companies in the United States now have some form of BYOD program. The programs range from informal programs to programs with formal policies in place outlining the use of personally owned mobile devices to access enterprise applications and data. Yet IT executives and corporate end users are not always in alignment on what defines a good BYOD program. This report provides a fresh look at the drivers behind the BYOD trend from both perspectives. The Samsung Mobile BYOD Index is based on a survey of 250 IT decision makers and a complement of 501 employees from a range of mid-sized and larger companies. The survey was conducted on behalf of Samsung by IDG In November 2012. Complete details on the methodology are available at the end of the report. Aligning programs and policies with the needs of both IT executives and end users is a critical step in creating a successful BYOD program. This report outlines the perspectives of both groups while also benchmarking the growth of BYOD programs in the United States.
  4. 4. 4 05 12 17 21 25 Table of Contents BYOD Today and Tomorrow Drivers of BYOD Adoption BYOD Program Preferences The Personal Side of BYOD Research Methodology
  5. 5. 5 BYODTodayandTomorrow
  6. 6. 6 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device BYOD Has Gone Mainstream 61% of all companies currently have some form of BYOD policy in place, with only 15% of companies explicitly prohibiting use of personal mobile devices: • 29% have a formal BYOD program • 31% have an informal program • 39% do not have a BYOD program • 24% have no policy (formal or informal) but do not explicitly prohibit the use of personal mobile devices • 15% explicitly prohibit the use of personal mobile devices • There are no differences across company size – in fact the percentage difference in the implementation of BYOD policies among small (101-500 employees), mid-sized (501 to 1,000 employees) and large (1,001 or more employees) is, on average, less than two points across most measures. “Of companies surveyed with no formal BYOD policies in place, nearly half (44%) consider the need to create BYOD policies a high priority.” 15% 24% 31% 29%Have a formal BYOD program Have an informal BYOD program Have no policy (formal or informal) but do not explicitly prohibit the use of personal mobile devices Prohibit the use of personal mobile devices
  7. 7. 7 Companies are Investing in BYOD Over one-third (39%) of companies with BYOD policies also formally provide subsidies for the purchase of BYOD devices and almost one-third of companies additionally informally provide subsidies or reimbursement. BYOD Today and Tomorrow Formally provide subsidies/reimbursement Informally provide subsidies/reimbursement No subsidies or reimbursement Not sure 39% 31% 28% 1% Formally provide subsidies/reimbursement Informally provide subsidies/reimbursement No subsidies or reimbursement Not sure 39% 31% 28% 1% BASE: Has BYOD policies regarding mobile devices
  8. 8. 8 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device Looking Ahead In general, companies are comfortable with the inherent flexibility BYOD programs offer as they look to include multiple device options and make BYOD a standard company policy. 90% 73% 66%83% 76% 84% Think that BYOD programs will be the norm for companies within the next two years Feel it is at least somewhat likely that their company will have specifically identified preferred BYOD operating systems (e.g. iOS, Android, Windows, Blackberry OS) Consider it at least somewhat likely that they will have a pre-approved BYOD device list in place Consider it at least somewhat likely that they will have an approved manufacturer list for BYOD devices in place Consider it at least somewhat likely that their company will have expanded its BYOD options significantly to include multiple device options Believe their company will have formal BYOD policies in place (continued or new) within the next two years
  9. 9. 9 BYOD Today and Tomorrow A Consensus on the Future Move to Mobile – But a Gap on Today’s Use IT Estimate IT Estimate* 14% 31% 45% 24% 31% 49% End Users Report End Users Report** End users are adopting mobile devices as their primary computing device faster than IT decision makers estimate. Currently, nearly one-quarter (24%) of employees report that a mobile device is their primary computing device for work related activities—10% higher than IT decision makers estimate. Mobile device is the primary computing device Mobile device is the primary computing device: in two years Mobile device is the primary computing device: in five years Looking ahead, both groups have a consensus view on the move to mobile, but given IT decision makers current underestimation it is fair to view these as conservative predictions. *Mean of best estimate of the percentage of employees who are (or will be) using their mobile device (smartphone or tablet) as their primary computing device for work-related activities **At least somewhat agree that “My mobile device will most likely be my primary computing device for work-related activities”
  10. 10. 10 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device BYOD Policies by Employee Type Employee types allowed to use their own personal mobile devices (smartphones or tablets) to access enterprise applications and data BASE: Has BYOD policies regarding mobile devices 97% 94% 82% 80% Executive Leadership Sales Non-Executive Management Other Line Level or Support Employees “Intotal,71%ofcompanieswith BYOD policies in place extend the option to all employees. Only 2% restrict the option to Executive Leadership.”
  11. 11. 11 Reimbursement BASE: Has BYOD policies regarding mobile devices BYOD Today and Tomorrow Companies that offer reimbursement as a matter of policy. This is one of the few areas where a significant gap between small companies (31%) and large companies (48%) exists Do not have a formal reimbursement policy in place but report that subsidies may still be granted 39% 31% “52% of companies are currently evaluating/interested in or have already implemented mobile upgrades and purchase incentives for BYOD devices as a means to manage IT infrastructure costs.”
  12. 12. 12 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device DriversofBYODAdoption
  13. 13. 13 Drivers of BYOD Adoption What is driving the creation of BYOD programs? In many respects it comes down to common sense. Over three-quarters (77%) of employees at least somewhat agreed with the statement that “carrying separate work and personal phones simply doesn’t make sense.”
  14. 14. 14 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device Security is the Leading Factor – But Not the Only One IT decision makers report that security is by far the most significant factor that will have an impact on future BYOD policies and decision making. After security, increased workforce mobility is expected to significantly impact BYOD policy development. But the responses of IT decision makers also show that BYOD policy development is multi- faceted and needs to take into account a range of factors. “48% of IT decision makers report that, in general, it is difficult to test and evaluate the security of mobile devices.” In fact, every factor regarding the impact of future BYOD policy development and decision making was rated as an extremely or very significant factor by a majority of by IT decision makers. Percentages represent “Extremely or Very Significant” responses 84% Security requirements 67% Increased workforce mobility 59% Increases in mobile device computing power 58% Executive preference 57% Employee demand 56% Cost efficiencies Factors Impacting Future BYOD Policy Development
  15. 15. 15 Increase in Workforce Mobility Drivers of BYOD Adoption As noted previously, after security issues, the expanding mobility of the workforce is a key factor in the development of BYOD programs. But there are many dimensions to what the increase in mobility means to the end user. 38% feel that they would get more use out of a work tablet than a work laptop 31% already feel that their primary connection to work is through their mobile device 22% would be tempted to make a lateral move to a new company based solely on the guarantee of the latest smartphone throughout their employment
  16. 16. 16 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device BYOD – The Human Factor Almost three quarters (72%) of IT decision makers see value in BYOD programs as a factor for attracting or retaining future employees. BYOD programs are also seen as a means to help employees achieve a better work/life balance. “End users generally agree with IT decision makers on the benefits of BYOD programs and work-life balance: 51% also agree that having a single mobile device helps them balance personal and work lives.” 72% 47% 49% 47% 55% BYOD programs will be an important factor in attracting and retaining future employees BYOD programs are a cost effective way to increase employee productivity Companies without a BYOD program will be at a competitive disadvantage Having a single mobile device helps employees balance personal and work lives BYOD programs are especially important to Millennial/GenY employees
  17. 17. 17 BYODProgramPreferences
  18. 18. 18 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device Factors Driving BYOD Device Decisions Are Not the Same for IT and End Users Security is the most important factor in determining which mobile devices their company will support for BYOD for both IT decision makers and their employees, however IT value this factor as a more critical consideration. The availability of appropriate apps is the consensus second most important factor. However, after these top two factors, hardware features, price point and carrier flexibility are all more important to employees. Percent Responding Critical or Very Important 84% 74% 59% 68% 56% 58% 46% 72% 37% 55% 34% 56% Security - MDM/ encryption capabilities 10% Appropriate apps are available (e.g., CRM, document editing) -9% OS considerations (e.g., Android, Windows, iOS) -2% Hardware features/ functionality -26% Price point -18% Carrier flexibility -22% IT End Users Difference + / -
  19. 19. 19 IT and End Users Disagree on Many Factors Regarding BYOD’s Contribution to Increased Productivity BYOD Program Preferences Company email integration is the basic cost of entry for BYOD devices – but after that there is a divergence in perspectives on how BYOD programs can contribute to productivity gains. Percent Responding Critical or Very Important IT End Users Difference End users more highly value basic web access and the ability to multi-task and share large files than IT decision makers who focus more on access to enterprise applications and underestimate the value of more device oriented functionality and features relative to end users. 82% 85% Ability to send/ receive company email -3% 61% 77% Online access/ Web search capabilities -16% 55% 62% Ability to review and edit documents -7% 49% 28% Access to enterprise productivity applications and resources 21% 46% 64% Ability to multi-task across a variety of functions (e.g. email, document management) -18% 23% 43% Ability to share large files -20% 23% 23% Ability to digitally sign documents 0% 3% 7% None of the above -4% + / -
  20. 20. 20 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device End Users Value Price and Security Over Personal Considerations Bottom line out of pocket cost considerations are the most critical top of mind considerations when it comes to choosing a BYOD program device. But security is also an important consideration for the majority of end users. Additionally, two-thirds (67%) of end users want to use their work phone as a personal phone and about the same amount (64%) value the ability to sync contacts between work and mobile devices. 77% How much of the monthly carrier fees my company will subsidize or reimburse 72% How much of the cost of the mobile device my company will subsidize or reimburse 70% Security features 67% Ability to use my work phone as a personal phone 66% Model of smartphone I am allowed to purchase 64% Ability to sync contacts between work and personal mobile device 60% Choice of carrier service 60% Price point 59% Appropriate apps are available (e.g., CRM, document editing) Percent Responding Critical or Very Important “73% of end users with a work provided smartphone have it password protected compared to 49% of respondents with only a personal mobile phone.”
  21. 21. 21 ThePersonalSideofBYOD
  22. 22. 22 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device The Personal Side of BYOD It is no secret that powerful mobile devices, work and productivity go hand in hand. In fact, our survey of employees found that 68% already own a smartphone and 41% own a tablet device – both of these are at levels significantly higher than the adult population in the United States in general. Just over one-quarter (26%) have smartphones that are provided by their employer. This leaves a significant number of smartphone owners who have personally paid for their device – which represents a potential cost savings or productivity boost when they integrated into BYOD programs but also points to the highly personal nature of these devices.
  23. 23. 23 Work Smartphones for Personal Activities The Personal Side of BYOD The blurring boundaries of personal and work life extend to respondents mobile devices. In fact, end users report using their work provided mobile devices for a wide range of personal activities: 68% Web browsing 64% Taking and sharing photos 64% Navigation and maps 60% Personal email 32% Playing games 26% Social networking 22% Mobile banking “Only 19% of respondents indicated that they do not use their work provided smartphone for any personal activities.”
  24. 24. 24 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device The Reliance on Mobile is Personal Responses from end users asked to choose between options involving their smartphone illustrate the depth of the personal connection and reliance upon the device. For starters, it is a near equal split between the inconveniences of having your desktop computer die versus having your smartphone die. Additionally, 45% of end users would rather have no smartphone at all versus having to use a personally paid for smartphone for work related activities – which speaks to the importance of well-structured BYOD programs that adequately address reimbursement. 51% 49%Have your smartphone die Have your desktop die 45% Have no smartphone at all 38% A new tablet as a year end bonus 33% Have separate work and personal smartphones 29% Share your house key with a stranger 25% Lose your wallet 55%Choose and pay for your own work smartphone 62%An extra week of vacation as a year end bonus 67%Have a single smartphone for work and personal use 71%Share your smartphone password with a stranger 75%Lose your smartphone What Would End Users Prefer? Tough Choices Illustrate Their Personal Connections with Mobile Devices
  25. 25. 25 ResearchMethodology
  26. 26. 26 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device Research Methodology The survey was fielded online to a total of 262 qualified IT Decision Maker and 501 End User respondents between November 30, 2012 and December 7, 2012 on behalf of Samsung by IDG. Sample members received an email message inviting them to participate in the survey. Each sample member received a unique URL link to access the survey, which they could click on or paste into their browser. Survey respondents were incentivized with a $250 cash prize. To qualify to complete the survey, respondents had to meet all of the below qualifications: Percentages on single-select questions may not sum to 100 percent due to rounding. IT Decision Makers • Must be employed full-time • Must be employed in an organization with 101 or more employees • Must be employed in an IT or IT-relation function at their organization • Must be employed with a title of Department Head (VP, Director) or higher • Must have a primary residence in the United States End Users • Must be employed full-time • Must be employed in an organization with 101 or more employees • Must NOT be employed in an IT or IT-relation function at their organization • Must be 18 years of age or older • Must have a primary residence in the United States
  27. 27. 27 IT Decision Maker Respondent Profile Research Methodology 5,001 or more Number of Employees Mean number of employees: 2,052 1,001 to 5,000 501 to 1,000 101 to 500 24% 19% 19% 37% 19% Department Head (VP, Director) C-Level/Senior Executive Management (CIO, CTO, EVP, SVP) Title 29% 71%
  28. 28. 28 January 8, 2013 Samsung Mobile BYOD Index: Comparing IT and End User Outlooks on Bring Your Own Device End User Respondent Profile 5,001 or more Number of Employees Mean number of employees: 2,234 1,001 to 5,000 501 to 1,000 101 to 500 28% 18% 32% 22% Non-Management Staff Non-Executive Management (Manager) Department Head (VP, Director) Non-Executive Sales C-Level/Senior Executive Management (CIO, CTO, EVP, SVP) CEO/President Title 53% 23% 15% 4% 4% <1%
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