Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................
        d.  Individual tax ..................................................................................................
                                           INTRODUCTION When  a  company  decides  to  export  its  product  in  another  ...
     I.       Presentation of the country:           1. Overviews:  Turkey’s dynamic economy is a complex mix of modern in...
 Concerning our project, Turkey would represent a great export platform in order to expand our activities through economic...
       d. Urbanization:  Turkey is characterized by huge cities in which urban concentration is very high. Indeed, 69.1% o...
                                                                   10,5                                                   ...
 the 90’s. Turkey is a country of big cities since 90% of urban population is living in agglomeration of 100.000 inhabitan...
 Turkey are connected to railways so that companies are able to carry goods by combined transport.       c. Maritime 15 Tu...
               Technological innovations: 2.2% of the GDP was invested in R&D in 2007 There are 680 researchers in R&D for...
 In the phone sector, we can observe a conversion of the users from fixed phones to mobile phones. Mobile penetration rate...
        4. Energy and technology Indigenous energy production meets nearly 48% of the total primary energy demand. It was ...
 Advice: As Turkey has already known a military coup in its history, it is important to take this in account because if th...
 Empire in 1913, many confrontations happened between the Turkish soldiers and the area of Kurdistan, due to the fact that...
       3. Local government       a. Environmental polity Turkey has been actively involved in international cooperation ef...
 Nowadays, the GPD per capita stands at US $8,730 dollars37 in 2009, according to the World Bank. In 2002, the GDP per cap...
 the most adapted solution to our project.       d. Labor force in Turkey: The total of labor force in Turkey was reported...
 As information, the average labor cost for the employer in Belgium for the retailing and household goods sector were US $...
 After the global financial crisis came round in 2008 Turkey was in a better position to weather the storm than many other...
                                                                                                    This category includes...
        c. Special Consumption Tax Regarding to the category of goods, luxury goods imported are subject to special consum...
       1) BSEC62, Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation – 1992.  The main members are notably Turkey, Russia,...
 Indeed, our products are not exposed to customs duties, so they are able to be competitive on Turkish market as opposed t...
 to control company’s management. Also for us as, active partners, it enables to have a well‐prepared project and to have ...
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view

4,408

Published on

A deep market analysis of the Turkish market in order to open a luxury ready to wear clothes shop.

1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,408
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
91
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Analysis of Turkish market in term of foreign direct investment view"

  1. 1.  INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................... 3 I.  PRESENTATION OF THE COUNTRY: .................................................................................................. 4  1.  OVERVIEWS: ............................................................................................................................................................... 4  . 2.  GEOGRAPHY AND CLIMATE ...................................................................................................................................... 4  . 3.  DEMOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................................................. 5  a.  General characteristics ....................................................................................................................................... 5  b.  Distribution of wealth: ........................................................................................................................................ 5  c.  Middle and upper class potential: .................................................................................................................. 5  . d.  Urbanization: .......................................................................................................................................................... 6  e.  Level of education: ................................................................................................................................................ 6  . f.  Alphabetization rate: ............................................................................................................................................ 6  g.  Employment ‐ Unemployment: Men/Women ............................................................................................ 6  h.  Structure of household’s expenditures: ........................................................................................................ 7  i.  Health and life expectancy: ................................................................................................................................ 7 II.  INFRASTRUCTURES ............................................................................................................................... 8  1.  TRANSPORT ................................................................................................................................................................ 8  . a.  Road ............................................................................................................................................................................ 8  b.  Railroads ................................................................................................................................................................... 8  d.  Air ................................................................................................................................................................................. 9  2.  INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES ...................................................................................... 9  3.  RAW MATERIALS ..................................................................................................................................................... 11  4.  ENERGY AND TECHNOLOGY ................................................................................................................................... 12 III.  POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................................ 12  1.  INTERNAL POLICY ................................................................................................................................................... 12  a.  Political and administrative framework .................................................................................................. 12  b.  Internal stability ................................................................................................................................................. 12  c.  Turkish government .......................................................................................................................................... 13  d.  Local administration ........................................................................................................................................ 13  . e.  Socio‐economic tension .................................................................................................................................... 13  2.  EXTERNAL POLICY .................................................................................................................................................. 14  . a.  Relationship between Turkish and European Union .......................................................................... 14  b.  The Iraqi and Syrian issues ............................................................................................................................ 14  c.  The “Arab Spring” issues .................................................................................................................................. 14  3.  LOCAL GOVERNMENT ............................................................................................................................................. 15  a.  Environmental polity ........................................................................................................................................ 15  b.  Social and health development .................................................................................................................... 15  c.  Stability policy ...................................................................................................................................................... 15 IV.  ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................................. 15  1.  STATE FINANCE ....................................................................................................................................................... 15  a.  Turkey GDP Growth Rate ................................................................................................................................ 15  b.  Middle class in Turkey: ..................................................................................................................................... 16  e.  Trade balance: ..................................................................................................................................................... 18  f.  Public debts: ........................................................................................................................................................... 18  g.  Inflation rate: ....................................................................................................................................................... 19  2.  MONETARY POLICY ................................................................................................................................................. 19  a.  Interest rate: ......................................................................................................................................................... 20  b.  Exchange rate: ..................................................................................................................................................... 20  3.  FISCAL POLICY ......................................................................................................................................................... 20  a.  Corporate tax ....................................................................................................................................................... 20  b.  Consumption tax: ................................................................................................................................................ 20  c.  Special Consumption Tax ................................................................................................................................ 21 
  2. 2.   d.  Individual tax ....................................................................................................................................................... 21  4.  LEGISLATIVE CONTEXT AND TRANSACTION COST ............................................................................................. 21  a.  Market access and world trade organization ........................................................................................ 21  b.  Custom duties ....................................................................................................................................................... 22  c.  Tax exemptions .................................................................................................................................................... 22  d.  Foreign Direct Investment in Turkey ......................................................................................................... 23  e.  Intellectual property right .............................................................................................................................. 23  f.  Corruption .............................................................................................................................................................. 23  g.  Company establishment and needed certificates ................................................................................. 23 V.  PROFILE OF THE TARGETED MARKET ......................................................................................... 24  1.  POTENTIAL AND SIZE OF THE MARKET ............................................................................................................... 24  a.  General .................................................................................................................................................................... 24  b.  Consumer pattern .............................................................................................................................................. 24  . c.  Istanbul ................................................................................................................................................................... 24  . d.  Competition ........................................................................................................................................................... 24  2.  TEXTILE MARKET IN TURKEY ............................................................................................................................... 25  a.  General .................................................................................................................................................................... 25  b.  Fashion in Istanbul ............................................................................................................................................ 25 VI.  EMPLOYMENT DETAILS ................................................................................................................... 25  1.  WORKING CONDITIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 25  2.  LEGAL HOLIDAY AND PAID LEAVE ........................................................................................................................ 26 VII.  COUNTY RISKS MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................... 26  1.  GENERAL .................................................................................................................................................................. 26  a.  Rating country ..................................................................................................................................................... 26  b.  Business environment ....................................................................................................................................... 26  c.  Turkish market .................................................................................................................................................... 26  2.  TYPE OF COLLABORATION ..................................................................................................................................... 27  3.  LOCALIZATION OF INVESTMENT ........................................................................................................................... 27  4.  INSURANCE ............................................................................................................................................................... 27 VIII.  COMMUNICATION ........................................................................................................................... 28  1.  MEDIA ....................................................................................................................................................................... 28  a.  Print media ............................................................................................................................................................ 28  b.  Internet Radio Television and Cinema: ..................................................................................................... 28  2.  BARRIERS ................................................................................................................................................................. 29  3.  SPONSORSHIP .......................................................................................................................................................... 29  4.  STRATEGY ................................................................................................................................................................. 29  5.  POSITIONING ............................................................................................................................................................ 29 IX.  CULTURAL ASPECT ............................................................................................................................ 30  1.  GENERALITIES ......................................................................................................................................................... 30  c.  Language ................................................................................................................................................................ 30  d.  Religion ................................................................................................................................................................... 30  2.  BUSINESS CULTURES .............................................................................................................................................. 30  3.  NEGOTIATION .......................................................................................................................................................... 31  4.  APPOINTMENTS ....................................................................................................................................................... 31 CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................................................ 32  .BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................................ 33  .APPENDIX LIST ............................................................................................................................................. 35     2 
  3. 3.   INTRODUCTION When  a  company  decides  to  export  its  product  in  another  country,  the  choice  has  to  be  made carefully.  Emerging  countries  are  promising  markets  for  the  investors  and  represent  a  great opportunity to enlarge their activities and profit.  Making decisions to enlarge business and investing in a new marketplace can be a risk, because of a lack of information, and launching on a new market signifies also adapting another way to negotiate your business. By and large, emerging countries are characterized by a high economic growth rate and a great development potentiality. However, to be more realistic before investing to a new area, it will be important  to  analyze  the  country  by  taking  into  account  several  economic  indicators,  such  as; the GDP, the wealth per inhabitant, the solvency, the policy, the legal environment and the level of corruptions of the country. Given that, the republic of Turkey is known as candidate of European Union, with a fast growing economy  with  low  production  costs  and  cheap  labor  force  during  last  decade.  Consequently, Turkey  is  a  good  model  to  illustrate  the  analysis  of  an  emerging  market  and  avoiding  risks occurred in the country.  In order to implement a shop selling up market Belgian brand Essentiel Istanbul, one of the most dynamic cities of Turkey, appears as a relevant choice.     Throughout  this  work,  we  will  analyze  all  the  factors  that  a  foreign  investor  should  take  into account.  We  will  also  attempt  to  answer  fundamental  questions  such  as:  how  to  approach  an emerging market? How to manage its instability? How to face the cultural gap?         3 
  4. 4.   I. Presentation of the country:   1. Overviews:  Turkey’s dynamic economy is a complex mix of modern industry and commerce along with a traditional agriculture sector that still accounts for about 25% of employment. It has a strong and rapidly growing private sector, and while the state remains a major participant in basic industry, banking, transport, and communication, this role has been diminishing as Turkey’s privatization program continues.  The largest industrial sector is textiles and clothing, which accounts for one‐third of industrial markets with the end of global quota system. However, other sectors, notably the automotive and electronics industries are rising in importance and have surpassed textiles within Turkey’s export mix.  Real GDP growth has exceeded 6% in many years, but this strong expansion has been interrupted by sharp declines in output in 1994, 1999, and 2001. Due to global economic conditions, GDP fell to a 0.9% annual rate in 2008, and contracted by 6% in 2009. Inflation fell to 5.9% in 2009 –a 34‐ year low.  Despite the strong economic gains from 2002‐2007, which were largely due to renewed investor interest in emerging markets, IMF backing, and tighter fiscal policy, the economy has been burdened by a high current account deficit and high external debt.  Further economic and judicial reforms and prospective European Union membership are expected to continue boosting foreign direct investment.  The stock value of FDI stood at more than $ 180 billion at year‐end 2009. Privatization sales are currently approaching $ 39 billion.  In 2007 and 2008, Turkish financial markets weathered significant domestic political turmoil, including turbulence sparked by controversy over the selection of former foreign Minister Abdullah GUL as Turkey’s 11th president and the possible closure of Justice and Development Party (AKP).  Turkey’s financial market and banking system also weathered the 2009 global financial crisis and did not suffer significant declines due to banking and structural reforms implemented during the country’s own financial crisis in 2001. Economic fundamentals are rigorous, but the Turkish economy may be faced with more negative economic indicators in end 2011 ‐ 2012 as the global economic slowdown continues to curb demand for Turkish exports.  In addition, Turkey’s related to policy‐making, and fiscal balances leave the economy vulnerable to destabilizing shifts in investor confidence.  2. Geography and climate The Turkish superficies is about 780,000Km2.  The European part of the territory is 24,378 km2. Its highest mount (Agri) has an altitude of 5,165 meters. The Turkish seacoasts represent around 8,000 kilometers.1 Thanks to the Turkish geographic localization, it is considered like a border between European countries (Russia – Mediterranean and Balkans) and Asian countries (The Middle‐East). Turkey is a link between occidental and oriental world. Then it represents a geostrategic localization. The existing pipelines and related projects between Europe en The Middle‐East are great examples.                                                         1 http://www.bibliomonde.com/donnee/turquie‐territoire‐112.html    4 
  5. 5.  Concerning our project, Turkey would represent a great export platform in order to expand our activities through economic potential areas such as Russia, Bulgaria, Rumania and the Middle East.  The Turkish weather in the West is great during the summer and should not fall under zero during the winter, keeping the roads usable. Therefore it should not represent a risk for transportation. However, the western part of Turkey is known to have regular earthquakes that should be taken into account.  3. Demography   a. General characteristics The Turkish population reaches 76.81 millions in 2010 with a population growth rate of 1.31%2. The death rate of the population is 6.1 deaths/1.000. The ethnic proportion is 70‐75% Turkish, 18% of Kurdish, 7‐12% of other minorities. Age structure is the following: 0 ‐ 14 years:    27.2% 15 – 64 years:    66.7% 65 years and other:   6.1%.  b. Distribution of wealth:  The richest 10% of the population get 31.3% of the total incomes. The richest 20% get 47.1% of the total. While the poorest 20% get only 5.4% of total incomes3. The GINI coefficient of Turkey, for urban areas is 41.That means big disparities. As an example, the most unequal countries (as Brazil, Guatemala, Honduras…) have a coefficient of 604.   c. Middle and upper class potential: In big cities, 12% is classified upper class, and 30% middle‐class. As an example, Istanbul’s population reaches 12.7 millions. The addition of upper and middle‐class populations reaches more than 5 millions.  The purchasing power of the population in term of PPP was $13,9055 in the end 2009 despite the global economic conditions.  This part of the urban population is an interesting consuming base making big cities good market seeking for investors. As an example, Turkey is up to seven times the Belgian market size. That’s why Turkey is considered as an extremely dense market. Population is mainly young with an average of 26 years old. Considering this and the next information about the level of education, and focusing on big cities where the investments are likely interesting, it could be attractive for investors on both points:   o The possibility to find alphabetized Turkish employees to work as sellers or in other  posts, keeping in mind that young people could be more flexible about working hours or  salaries than other people who already have founded a family.  o In a long‐term context, a growing consumer base, characterized by its level of purchasing  power due to the level of qualification of the population.                                                         2 Databank of the World Bank 3 World Bank 2006  4 Turkstat 2007 5 http://www.worldbank.org/    5 
  6. 6.   d. Urbanization:  Turkey is characterized by huge cities in which urban concentration is very high. Indeed, 69.1% of the population is based in the big urban areas of the country 6.  Main cities are: Istanbul: 12,782,000 inhabitants Ankara (capital): 3,700,000 inhabitants Izmir: 3,200,000 inhabitants7  e. Level of education: The Turkish national education system designed to meet the educational needs of individuals, is composed of formal and non‐formal education, which complement each other. Formal education includes pre‐school education, primary education, and secondary education and higher education institutions.  Turkey has a high‐quality education tradition coming through the history. Today there is 8 years compulsory primary education, which is being carried out for more than ten years. This obligatory education sharply increases moderate rate.  The higher education, the ceiling of education, is under the authority of the Board of Higher Education (YOK), which has administrative autonomy that saves it from political fluctuations. In 2009, 450,000 qualified students from universities and 550,000 bachelors were adding at the total Turkish workers. When we make a link between those figures and the 67% of population from 15 to 64 years old, we can observe that only 0.9% of them get a university degree and 1.1% of them get bachelors degree in one‐year time. This is not a lot in comparison with Belgium. So, currently we can’t consider Turkish labor force as qualified, but as an alphabetized population turning to a qualified population. However, the OECD criticized several times the Turkish education system because it focuses on the best students and advices them to follow further studies instead of giving access to education to the widest range of the population.  Considering the graph of EUROSTAT in appendix 1, we can observe that Turkey stands out from other countries by the qualification of his labor force.  f. Alphabetization rate:  The alphabetization rate, for adults from 15 years and more, is 89%.  Considering the young part of the population (the majority population, constituting our main target) between 15 and 24 years old, alphabetization rate reaches 96%8.                 It demonstrates that the youth takes precedence over past generations.  92% of the girls finish primary education, against 95% by the boys.  The subscription rate (net) in secondary education is 74% (2008) The gross subscription rate in high schools is only 38%. (2008)  But we have to emphasize the positive evolution of these figures (37% in 2007, 35% in 2006, 32% 1n 2005).  g. Employment ‐ Unemployment: Men/Women                                                         6 Turkstat 2009 7 Data 2007 8 Chiffres de 2007 mis à disposition par la banque mondiale    6 
  7. 7.   10,5 10The unemployment rate for the active  9,5population is 9.4%. It is interesting to notice the  Tx 9positive slowdown of the unemployment rate from 2005(10.3%)9.   8,5 2005 2006 2007 2008 An alphabetized labor force, cheap (US $102009; 430 gross a month for a worker, more or less US $855 for a higher function) and important sized, with 24.7 millions of professionals, the volume of the Turkish labor force makes it reach the 5th rank in Europe.  h. Structure of household’s expenditures: Appendix 2: We can see here that the most important expense item is housing and rent 28.2%. The lowest expense items are education, health, culture and leisure. Unfortunately, we have to notice the importance of such expense items if we want to enhance the Turkish development and facilitate the growth of the purchasing power.   Appendix 3: We see that in 2007, the average of monthly consumption expenditures of households reached $946 in total. For the clothing and foot wear item, it’s 6% of the total, that’s more or less worth $57. That’s why we have to understand that, even if mode and fashion wearing attract Turks, only the richest is able to afford luxury clothes.   i. Health and life expectancy: The total average of life expectancy for men and women is 72 years old10. Theoretically, the Turks can live old considering their health. Children mortality is high (19% in 200911), but slowing down from 2005 (25%).  j. Characteristics of big Turkish cities: Istanbul: 7700 inhabitants per sq. km (the highest in Europe)  Main cities:  Istanbul: 12,7 million inhabitants.  Ankara (capital): 4,4 million inhabitants.  Izmir: 3,7 million inhabitants  Evolution or rural population and urbanization rate   The urban population went through a real “boom” from the 60’s to finally stabilize itself during                                                         9 Banque Mondiale chiffres 2008 10 Unicef 2008 11 World Bank    7 
  8. 8.  the 90’s. Turkey is a country of big cities since 90% of urban population is living in agglomeration of 100.000 inhabitants and more and 37% in cities with more than one million inhabitants. The conversion of farmers to more modern activities increases the weight of the big cities, in terms of percent of the total urban population.  The share of the Istanbul’s agglomeration reaches 22% of total urban population. However, with the economic development of Turkey, the population tends to spread to the periphery. Istanbul still attracts 1/3 of foreign investments and is considered as the financial, commercial and supply center of Turkey. But Istanbul has also to face difficulties, for example, the big disparities of wealth in the population, but also the pollution, the traffic jams, the urban violence and the housing problems12. The economic concentration is clearly located in the west of the country. The 3 main cities are Istanbul, Izmir and Ankara. They all went through the same evolution and face the same problems, except the fact that Istanbul is laying at the first rank for all points: biggest potential market with high qualification of the labor force, the most developed infrastructures, but also higher rents ant the big cities problems that could be disadvantageous for investors.  Istanbul and Izmir have both maritime accesses. (Cf. appendix 4)  II. Infrastructures  1. Transport  Turkey lies between Asia and Europe serving as a bridge geographically, culturally and economically. Its location on two continents plays a central part in Turkish history and gives the country’s transportation and logistic sector a major advantage in serving the markets of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Investments in the transportation system concentrated on land transportation infrastructure and Turkey has developed one of the largest land transportation fleets in Europe.   a. Road The network of highways has been developed and the relative importance of highways has increased. The highway length has reached 64.033 kilometers including 88% of paved roads of which 2.010 are motorways13. Road transportation represents less than 30% in 201014. Since 2000, the authorities have launched several large investment programs to improve the road network through the country, and reduce traffic problem in Istanbul and Ankara.  The motorway network mainly surrounds big cities such as Istanbul and Ankara. It also links both of these cities and it allows commuting Istanbul and Ankara in 5 hours. It takes about 7 hours to commute both of Istanbul – Izmir and Ankara – Izmir.   b. Railroads The railways are state owned and operated. Investments in this sector have been aimed at improving standards so that rail transport can become a competitive alternative to road and air transport. Companies can transport their goods from Turkey to European countries, the Middle East and CIS countries by railway. The length of railways in Turkey is 10,991 kilometers, of which 2,274 are currently electrified. In 2007, 3,1 million tones of cargo were transported. In terms of its rolling stock fleet, Turkey State Railways has 472 mainline locomotive, 58 shunting locomotive, 44‐diesel railcar, 67 electric locomotive, 83 electric railcar, 1985 freight wagon and 1,010 passenger coaches. The harbors in                                                         12« OECD Territorial Reviews » Publication of the OECD 13 http://www.turkstat.gov.tr/PreIstatistikTablo.do?istab_id=352 14 Cf. appendix    8 
  9. 9.  Turkey are connected to railways so that companies are able to carry goods by combined transport.  c. Maritime 15 Turkey, a country surrounded by sea on three sides, places great emphasis on port development and sea transport. The seacoasts of Turkey stretch for 8,333 kilometers. Currently, Turkey owns 56516 commercial boats and has 69 ports, wharves and quays. The main ports are in Istanbul, Izmir, Samsun, Trabzon, Mersin and Iskenderun, which provide modern facilities with advanced infrastructures. As the importance of RoRo (ship which transports vehicles) transportation increases, the usage and number of RoRo ships in transportation are also rising.  In 2007 130,391 shipments were made and 348,213 trucks were carried by Ro‐Ro transportation. The RoRo lines that Turkish companies serves are; Istanbul – Italy, Istanbul Ukraine, Samsun – Novorossisky (Russian Federation), Trabzon – Sochi (Russian Federation), Rize – Poti (Georgia) and more.  d. Air Turkey has airports handling international and domestic flights; the major international terminals being Istanbul (Atatürk), Ankara (Esenboga) and Izmir (Adnan Menderes), Adana, Antalya, Trabzon, Nevsehir‐Kapadokya, Dalaman, Milas‐Borrum and Isparta are major flight points.  According to the General Directorate of State Airports Authority the number of landings was 653.317 and the 402.039 tones of cargo was transported by airway in 2008.   In additional due to the repairs and maintenance services at all airports, the number of international airlines operating in Turkey is increasing each year.  Advice: Focusing on a simple exportation project concerning Belgian Fashion’s goods transportation to Istanbul, the best value for money is a combination of road and maritime freight. Indeed, from Brussels to the port of Genoa17 , in Italy, the transportation will take place by road. Secondly, from Genoa to Izmir or Istanbul18, we will use maritime transportation. Thus, we will save money and time. We can actually expect a 6‐day freight to carry goods from Brussels to Istanbul.     2. Information and Communication Technologies Turkey’s Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) market which includes telecommunications equipment, computer and related equipment, electronic components, audio and video equipment, and other ICT goods such as word processing machines, calculating machines, accounting machines, parts and accessories, was anticipated to reach around US$ 31 billion in 2008, up from the US$ 25.7 billion for 2007 which was nearly 4% of GNP in 2007. The growth rate of Turkish ICT market was estimated 20% at the end of 2008. The share of information technologies in this market is US$ 7.9 billion while that the communication technologies US$ 23.1 billion. Turkey’s IT market which includes computer hardware, computer software, software services and consumer equipment, was estimated to reach US$ 7.9 billion by the end of 2008, up from 6.7 billion in 2007. Turkey’s software market reached US$ 2 billion in 2009, up from 1.6 billion for 2008. Turkish software industry’s growth rate was 28.5% in 2008 and is expected as 20% in 2009.                                                             15 http‐//www.igeme.gov.tr/english/turkey/pdfView.cfm?subID=2 16 https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the‐world‐factbook/ 17 1090 Km 18 5 days    9 
  10. 10.    Technological innovations: 2.2% of the GDP was invested in R&D in 2007 There are 680 researchers in R&D for a million habitants. 17.3% of exported manufactured goods are high technologies in 2007 (23.1% in 2000) 988,514 applications for a patent in 200619  12.5% of imports are ICTs20   15.3% of the populations have a computer21 80.1% of the population is reachable through the phone network 3.2% of the GDP comes from the ICTs in 2009 4.5% of the GDP is invested in the ICTs in 200922  Comment: For an emerging country, Turkey can be considered as innovating in term of technologic speaking. 2.2% of the GDP for new technologies is not so wicked. Then there will not be a problem to provide new technologies equipment in Turkey. It is worth mentioning that the Turkish software market has experienced double‐digit growth over the past years. Turkey’s ICT export grew rapidly over the years, contributing to the Turkey’s substantial economic performance. Export of Turkey reached nearly US$ 4.1 billion in 2008. The major export markets were the UK, Germany, France, Romania, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Iraq, the USA and Syria.  Telecommunication Available technology (figures in appendix 5)  Appendix 6: Turkey is almost last standing following the ICT development indicator23. This market does not provide us a multiple choice of communications media. Thus, we will either have to contribute to the development of the ICT sector in Turkey, trying to launch media awareness dynamics; either opt for more traditional media (by word of mouth, by building of long term relations with customers and the confidence climate and reputation that ensues from it). We have to notice here that the size of the Turkish population, even if penetration rates could be higher, makes it an interesting ICT potential market for investors. Even if the country benefits from the most dynamic ICT market, with a growth rate of 20% since 2001, the penetration rate of internet is lower than in developed countries (29% for Turkey, 59% for France) but it still represents 19 millions (25% of the households) of internet users (this means 6th at the European level). And, with the improvements of the purchasing power, the amount of users is growing up. In this sector, TTnet is dominant with a market share of 95%. There are 81 Internet providers available offering up to 1000 mbit/s speeds. This can be considered as a reasonable speed of connection.  However, Internet censorship is also a problem in Turkey, with courts issuing site‐blocking orders under laws like Law Nr. 5651 on the "Regulation of Publications on the Internet and Suppression of Crimes Committed by means of Such Publications".24                                                         19 WIPO, Unesco, ONU 20 United Nations statistics 2008 21 UIT 2008 22 World Information Technology and science alliance 2009, UIT 23 UIT 24 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_in_Turkey    10 
  11. 11.  In the phone sector, we can observe a conversion of the users from fixed phones to mobile phones. Mobile penetration rate was 92% in 2008, that means 65,3 millions of users.   Since the negotiation process between Turkey and European Union for membership has been started in 2005. The regulatory framework that is emerging in Turkey in the last few years is largely inspired by that in European Union such as the regulations at interconnection costs lately that plays a critical role to set up a competitive environment. Technologies Authority is persevering to develop the mobile communications industry and to stimulate competition. The main actors in the mobile phone sector, by order of importance, are TÜRKCELL, VODAFONE, AVEA25. In December 2010, there are a total of 61.8 million mobile subscribers with a penetration ratio of 85.1%.  Although 3G services are available only since 2009 in Turkey, it is not a new technology.  Licensing mobile operators to deliver 3G services is delayed compared to western countries due to the Turkey’s market dynamics. On the other hand, since both the infrastructure costs and 3G enabled mobile phone costs are decreased since the introduction of the technology many years ago, mobile operators have been able to offer 3G services to relatively affordable prices26. According to Information and Communications Technologies Authority (ICTA), currently (April 2010), the interconnection rates in Turkey are the lowest rates in Europe after Cyprus (0.0313TL/min or 0.0124€/min)27 However the Turkish ICT market is still lying below most developed countries, it knows real improvement, and dynamic growth.  The State policy is well planned to attract the technological knowledge of foreign investors. And the size of the population is making of Turkey a really big potential market.  3. Raw materials28 Turkey possesses the biggest mine resources for most of minerals in the world. Excluding petroleum and coal there are 53 exploitable minerals and metals and 4,500 mineral deposits in Turkey.  Turkey’s major minerals produced are boron minerals, marble, basalt, feldspar, perlite, pumice and barite. A wide variety of primary metallic minerals are produced as well.  Turkey contains 40% of the world’s marble reserves. The total reserves including proven, probable and possible reserves are about 5 billion m3.  The natural stone sector in Turkey has developed significantly in last ten years. Total nature stone exports were US$1.39 billion in 2008. Processed marble ranks first with a US $887 million exports earning. Black marble takes second place with US $438 million.  Chrome and copper ore are the most significant minerals in the metals sector. Turkey is a major world producer of processed mineral commodities, including refined borates and related chemicals, cement, ceramics and glass. In addition to metallic ore operations, boron production has started in 2009. Turkey possesses approximately 72 % of boron reserves and is the leader exporter of the mineral and boron chemicals in the world.   Oil began flow through the Baku‐Tblisi‐Ceyhan pipeline in May 2006, marking a major milestone that will bring up to 1 million barrels per day from the Caspian to market. Several gas pipelines also are being planned to help move central Asian gas to Europe via Turkey.                                                          25 Atiyas & Doğan, 2007, pp: 501‐ 507 26 http://www.totaltele.com/view.aspx?ID=335766 27 http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom‐Turkey/Local%20Assets/Documents/turkey‐  tr_tmt_ElektronikHaberlesmePazari_2010_170111.pdf.pdf, 2011, p.6 28 Source: CIA World Factbook ‐ Unless otherwise noted, information in this page is accurate as of July 12, 2011    11 
  12. 12.   4. Energy and technology Indigenous energy production meets nearly 48% of the total primary energy demand. It was planned to double Domestic production by 2011 mainly in coal (lignite), which at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also be increased two‐fold at the same time. Primary energy resources, which are produced in Turkey, are hard coal, lignite, asphalted, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric energy and geothermal energy.  Turkey’s established energy supply capacity is 40.000 MW and is dominated by hydro, natural gas and coal resources. The gross electricity production in Turkey reached 198.567 GWh in 2008. Thermal energy is the source of 82.8% of production; hydroelectric energy makes 16.75 % of it. Coal, lignite and imported coal accounted for 28.98%, hydropower 16.77%, fuel oil 6% and natural gas 48.17% of thermal electricity production. The installed electricity capacity of Turkey increased by 3% and reached about 41.987 Mwah in 2008. Electricity consumption of Turkey increased to 198.4 billion KWH in 2008.  With the current energy production of Turkey, we should not have to face power cuts problems when we implement our shop in Istanbul.  III. Political environment The Turkish State is a republic and Turkish Republic is based on a democratic, secular, pluralist and parliamentary system where human rights are protected by law and social justice. The national assembly is elected by popular vote and the nation is governed by the Council of Ministers directed by the Prime Minister. The power to legislate is vested in the Turkish Grand National Assembly (TGNA), which performs this function on behalf of the Turkish Nation. The TGNA comprises 550 members elected by universal suffrage.  The exercise of executive power is vested in and is used by the President and the Council of Ministers. The President, who is Head of State, represents the Republic of Turkey and the unity of the Turkish Nation. Judicial power is exercised by the independent courts on behalf of the Turkish Nation.  1. Internal policy  a. Political and administrative framework Turkey has 81 provinces; themselves divided into districts (957 districts). The provinces and the districts are managed respectively by prefects and sub‐prefects named by the State. The president of the republic is elected by democratic vote. Then, he  names the Prime Minister. The mayors of communes, districts and villages are also elected by the vote for all. In some big cities, there is an administrative level above communes, the “metropolis”. They are elected for 5 years.  b. Internal stability  The Turkish army integrated in the device of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 1952, but The Turkish State has known three military coups: From 1960 to 1961, 1971 to 1973 and 1980 to 1983. The armed forces gathered under the National council of safety (MGK) continued to play a strong social role in the population and exert a significant political influence29. It is only in 2002 that their power started to decrease.  The defense policy of Turkey is designed to preserve and to protect national independence, sovereignty, territorial integrity and vital interests of the country. The armies are located in the Centre of the Caucasus, Middle East and the Balkans, which are the unstable areas in the world.                                                          29 http://www.bibliomonde.com/donnee/turquie‐armee‐129.html    12 
  13. 13.  Advice: As Turkey has already known a military coup in its history, it is important to take this in account because if the army does not agree with the State it can create big tension in the country and affect the business during long time.   c. Turkish government  Article five of the Constitution defines a specific role of the Turkish State: “to provide to the individual the material and spiritual needs necessary to its blooming” 30.  The party in power is the AKP (Party of Justice and Development). Although it preaches a democratic, liberal and pragmatic sight and a modernistic and pro‐European evolution, it is often shown by the principal opposition CHP (Republican People’ s Party) as hiding an Islamic ideology coming from some of its founders (ex‐members of the Party of the Virtue) endangering the laic and democratic character of the Turkish State.  The Constitution goes back to 1982. It has been recently revised (September 2010) in order to be more contemporary and to approach with the European requirements. The proposal of the referendum caused a great political instability.  According to the opposition, the AKP wants to develop an authoritative style, which would compromise the independence and the impartiality of the legal system. As a result, the CHP appealed the constitutional court for the rejection of the proposals of the reforms of the AK. Unfortunately it has been rejected and it only led to minor changes. Finally, the Justice and Development Party AKP gained the referendum concerning the changes in the Constitution. AKP won a record 49.9 percent of the parliamentary elections in June 2011. It’s good to know that the opposition criticized AKP, but the results of the elections show that Turks trust the Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan (AK Party), who has transformed Turkey into one of the worlds fastest‐growing economies.  Now, pointed assertive foreign policy will be facing several foreign policy and domestic challenges (example: refugees in Turkey because Arab Spring, EU membership, Kurds’ problem, new constitution. Those topics will be analyzed further in next chapters)  d. Local administration The Prime Minister failed to win enough seats to call a referendum on a planned new constitution, but this is unlikely to deter him, given his AK Party polled nearly 50 percent of the vote ‐ its highest mark since it first came to power in 2002.  He said he will seek consensus but it remains to be seen how he will approach reform. He may still seek to win defectors from other parties to bring his 32631 majority above the 330 seats required. If he tries to push his way through, as he has done in the past, political tensions will rise.  e. Socio‐economic tension  The Cypriot issue In 1974, when Turkey invaded the island of Cyprus after a government takeover carried out by partisans for a union with Greece, it was decided to divide into two parts. The problem began since the establishment in 1963 of the Turkish Republic of North Cyprus because Turkey didn’t recognize it even if it is today member of the EU. Turkey blocks the access of the Turkish ports and airports to the Greek ships and the Cypriot planes.    The Kurdish issue The Kurds are about 25 to 30 millions people quartered between Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Armenia and Georgia even if the majority lives in Turkey. Since the collapse of the Ottoman                                                         30 http://www.tbmm.gov.tr/ 31 http://www.todayszaman.com/news‐247229‐inside‐erdogans‐office‐the‐day‐after‐big‐victory.html    13 
  14. 14.  Empire in 1913, many confrontations happened between the Turkish soldiers and the area of Kurdistan, due to the fact that Turkey refuses the recognition of the Kurds. It increased in 1984 with the rising of the PKK (Party of Kurdistan’s workers), considered as a terrorist organization by the United States and the European Union. 32Although the party is dissolved since 2006, the PKK is always in activity. Recently (31th October 2010), it has been suspected for the attack against the police on the Taksim place in Istanbul.  2. External policy  a. Relationship between Turkish and European Union The negotiations of adhesion have been officially opened since October 200533. Nevertheless, some obstacles remain on the way to the accession of Turkey at the EU which are; commercial relations with Cyprus, freedom of thought or the rights of the Kurdish minority.  Analysts say the government needs to focus on reviving Turkeys EU bid, which remains stalled. The Prime Minister announced that he planned to set up a new ministry for relations with the EU as part of a ministerial shake‐up.  But support for EU membership among Turks is declining and many question why dynamic Turkey would want to enter a union plagued by debt and slow growth. Turkey could break a deadlock in negotiations by opening its ports and airports to traffic from EU member Cyprus. With the election out of the way, a move that dices with nationalist sentiments would be less risky and could be worth taking. It would force the EU to unfreeze several remaining chapters, or subject areas, for negotiation.  b. The Iraqi and Syrian issues Turkey estimates that 3500‐armed men of the PKK are based in the North of Iraq where they are amassing weapons in order to conduct attacks on the Turkish territory. Indeed, it is in Iraq that Kurdistan is the most politically structured. This conflict could cause a destabilization of the North of the country. Turkey threatens to take economic sanctions against Iraq. Despite the declarations of the Iraqi government prohibiting operating on his ground, Turkey carried out an invasion in this area, which generated consequences on oil’s exportations and then, increases of costs.  Next to that, Turkey, Iraq and Syria also struggle for the distribution of common water of the Tiger and Euphrates. Indeed, Turkey carries out a gigantic building project of dams and hydroelectric stations intending to develop water use and to modernize, profiting from its natural resources. The instigated area (South‐East Anatolia) is mainly populated of Kurds, ravaged by the conflicts. There are almost no protecting laws on this subject and no international institution to arbitrate such problems. We have to be careful about this because this situation could lead to future wars.  c. The “Arab Spring” issues Under its “zero problems with neighbors” policy, Turkey has made a huge effort to improve political and economic ties with Middle Eastern neighbors. But, having cultivated good relations with autocratic leaders, Turkeys diplomatic skills are being put to the test by the “Arab Spring” uprisings, as it supports peoples demands for greater democracy in the region. The most pressing crisis is in neighboring Syria. Thousands of refugees have fled to Turkey to escape a bloody crackdown by President Bashar al‐Assad.                                                          32 http://www.lepoint.fr/monde/istanbul‐le‐pkk‐premier‐suspect‐dans‐l‐attentat‐de‐la‐place‐taksim‐01‐11‐2010‐1256868_24.php 33 http://www.euractiv.com/fr/relations‐entre‐l‐ue‐et‐la‐turquie‐fr‐linksdossier‐188670    14 
  15. 15.   3. Local government  a. Environmental polity Turkey has been actively involved in international cooperation efforts to address environmental problems that are complex and mostly related to socio‐economic issues. Turkey, taking into account its national interests and socio‐economic conditions, have become party to a number of conventions34 both at the global and regional level (such as UN, the OECD, OSCE), with a view to contributing to address environmental problems.  b. Social and health development Fin details in appendix 16  c. Stability policy The Turkish government set up a system of liberal regulation of the importations to support the foreign investors.  The law n° 4875 envisages equality between the foreign and the Turkish investors and the freedom of investment for the foreigners. The investors could also benefit from exemption of taxes in free areas inside Turkey35. Turkey introduced a new commercial law aiming the improvement of transparency, of minority rights and reinforcing the principles of governorship of the companies.  Trade policies decisions are made at the governmental level. Advice: Turkish government works really hard to modernize his economy and to attract the investments. Turkey represents a real opportunity in terms of regulation even if the investors should seriously take into account the ethnical and cross‐boarders conflicts of the country. IV. Economic environment   Interest  Growth  Inflation  Current Country  Jobless Rate  Exchange Rate  Rate  Rate  Rate  Account Turkey   6.25%  3.70%  6.31%  10.50%  ‐3438  1.7786   1. State finance  a. Turkey GDP Growth Rate In 2009, Turkey was the 17th world economic power, just after South Korea and Netherland. The GDP (Gross Domestic Product) was $617.1 US billion or 1.00% of the world economy, according to the World Bank. This represents a decrease of 4.74% since 2008. In 2008, the real growth rate of GDP was 0.9% since 2007 and 4.7% from 2006 to 2007. In 2009, Turkey’s GDP was decomposed by sectors like following:  ⇒ Primary (agriculture):   9.3%;   ⇒ Secondary (industry):   25.6%;   ⇒ Tertiary (services):     65.1%36 Its economy is currently in transition from a high degree of reliance on agriculture and heavy industrial economy to a more diversified economy with an increasing and globalizing services sector.                                                         34 http://www.mfa.gov.tr/international‐environmental‐issues.en.mfa 35 http://www.turkiyemiz.gen.tr/france/266‐267.htm 36 http://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the‐world‐factbook/geos/tu.html    15 
  16. 16.  Nowadays, the GPD per capita stands at US $8,730 dollars37 in 2009, according to the World Bank. In 2002, the GDP per capita was US $3,310 and it doesn’t stop growing until now. At the end of 2009, the GDP, in terms of Purchasing power parity (PPP), was US $13,90538. We observe a huge increase at this level, because the PPP in 2007 was US $12,300 and $13,417 in 2008. The purchasing power of the population has continued to increase despite the global economic conditions. However, it is important to point out the informal economy, which represents nearly half of GDP and 40% of the workforce. The informal sector consists of several tens of thousands of businesses that are often subcontractors companies.39 Distribution of family income ‐ Gini index40 Year  Distribution of family income ‐ Gini  Rank  Per cent Change  Date of Information  index 2009  43.6  49  ‐  2003 2010  41  57  ‐5.96 %  2007 This index measures the degree of inequality in the family income distribution in Turkey. The GINI index shows clearly that there is an unequal distribution of Turkish incomes.  It is really important to take GINI coefficient in account, because it is one of the keys, which help us to describe the potential of the market. The population below poverty threshold in Turkey decreased from 20%41 to 17.11% in six years. We can observe a fall of almost 3% of the number of people living below poverty threshold. In comparison with a developed country like Germany, which has only 11% of poor people, Turkey is an emerging country that already has high purchasing power prospects that could afford luxury products but much more poor people. But in the future, the poor part will decrease slowly, offering a good consuming market for any goods.   b. Middle class in Turkey:  The graph in appendix 7 shows clearly that Turkish average annual household’s income grows constantly from 2003 to 2009.  We observe two types of middle classes in Turkey: the lower middle class and the upper middle class.  During the last five years, the annual household’s income growth was mush more important in upper middle class than in lower middle class. This is due to the opening of the market to F.D.I. Because, generally, when F.D.I comes on an emerging market, it often leads to best wages. The local companies are also obliged to increase their wages. Then, wages tends to increase in all the sectors of the country. This is exactly what is happening in Turkey right now.  c. Production capacities and overcapacities: The Turkish clothing industry, with a share of 4.1%, is the 5th largest supplier in the world and the 2nd largest supplier of the European Union. Turkey also ranked 7th in the world production of cotton with about 675 thousand tons of textile during the 2007‐2008 season.  With this information, we believe that the Turkish market is saturated. But the Turkish production is mainly middle‐range “ready‐to‐wear” clothes. The luxury brands have good demand, particularly in local urban areas.  Considering the fact that Turkey is the second supplier of clothing in Europe, it should have good production equipment and a skilled labor force in this sector. That’s why local production will be                                                         37 http://www.worldbank.org/ (2009) 38 http://www.worldbank.org/ 39 http://www.ladocumentationfrancaise.fr/dossiers/europe‐turquie/economie‐turque.shtml 40 http://www.indexmundi.com/turkey/distribution_of_family_income_gini_index.html 41 http://www.nationmaster.com/country/tu‐turkey/eco‐economy    16 
  17. 17.  the most adapted solution to our project.  d. Labor force in Turkey: The total of labor force in Turkey was reported at 25.8 millions of people in 200842. Thus, the employment structure for the period of June 201043 is the following:  • 70.7 % were males. (Inequality between men and women due to the culture)   • 60.3 % had education below high school.  • 60.1 % were regular and casual employees, 25 % were self‐employed or employers,   14.9 % were unpaid workers (family workers without a really declared incomes).  • 60 % worked in establishments consisting of “1‐9 employees”.  • 3 % had an additional job.   • 3.1 % were seeking jobs either to replace the current job or in addition to an existing job.   • 86.8 % of regular employees worked in permanent jobs.  Actual weekly working hours and monthly average labour cost by economic activity of establishment The Actual weekly Monthly distribution working average gross Monthly average of employees hours wage labour cost 2004 2008 2004 2008 2004 2008 2004 2008 Economic activity (NACE Rev.1.1) (%) (hour) (TRY) Total 100,0 100,0 42,1 42,3 964 1 383 1 388 1 833 (C) Mining and quarrying 2,4 1,6 42,0 41,4 984 1 466 1 585 2 222 (D) Manufacturing 47,2 40,9 42,9 42,7 782 1 154 1 129 1 576 (E) Electricity, gas and water supply 3,7 1,1 42,2 40,0 1 514 2 506 2 116 3 593 (F) Construction 5,9 6,4 43,0 43,9 686 844 920 1 055 (G) Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles, motorcycles and personal and household goods 15,0 13,0 43,2 43,0 826 1 316 1 146 1 725 (H) Hotels and restaurants 3,6 4,6 43,7 44,6 630 981 849 1 254 (I) Transport, storage and 9,3 7,0 41,3 41,4 1 278 1 857 1 762 2 558 (J) Financial intermediation 8,7 4,2 36,0 38,0 1 949 3 156 3 031 4 264 (K) Real estate, renting and business activities 4,2 9,5 40,9 42,6 936 1 264 1 277 1 597 (M) Education - 4,0 - 39,0 - 1 630 - 1 993 (N) Health and social work - 5,5 - 41,2 - 1 919 - 2 288 (O) Other community, social and personal service activities - 2,2 - 41,3 - 1 669 - 2 214 Not: Total figures are not comparable since M, N and O activities are not covered in 2004 application.Analyze:  The labor force is defined as the number of people employed plus the number of unemployed but seeking work. The non‐labor force includes those who are not looking for work, who are institutionalized, who are serving in the military but excludes homemakers and other unpaid caregivers and workers in the informal sectors.44 The figures point out the main sectors where the employment rates are the highest. In 2008, it reached 40.2% for the manufacturing sector and 13% for the wholesale, retailing and household goods sector. The decreasing of the percentage of people in the two main sectors could be explained by new jobs created in social and personal services sectors. Nevertheless, there is a disparity between posts in the employment, because only 29.3% of employees in June 2010 are women.  In the retailing and household goods sector, the average labor cost per employee was TRY 2,077 in 2010, representing US $1,168 or € 820.                                                         42 http://www.worldbank.org/ 43 www.turkstat.gov.tr 44 http://www.tradingeconomics.com/Economics/Unemployment‐rate.aspx?Symbol=TRY    17 
  18. 18.  As information, the average labor cost for the employer in Belgium for the retailing and household goods sector were US $3058 or €2146 in 200845. So, from the investor’s point of view, it will be mush more interesting to get local labor force than repatriating employees or workers from Belgium.    e. Trade balance:  The Turkish current account deficit amounted to $15.300 billions in 2005. It represented an increase of 124.80% compared to 2004. In 2006, the deficit reached $23.080 US billion representing a rise of 50.85%. It increases by 12.61% in 2007 and 44.49% in 2008 compared to the results of 2007. 46 According to the World Bank, Turkey reported a current account deficit equivalent US $11 billions 2009 and US $41.4 billion in 2010. We observe that the deficit did not stop to increase until 2009. Currently, Turkey records for a fall of ‐73.56% on its current account deficit. At this level the current account deficit represents 1.78% of the GDP. Turkey’s main exports are: textiles and clothing, automotive, iron and steel, white goods, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and ships. Turkey imports mainly machinery, chemicals, semi‐finished goods, fuels and transport equipment.  Its main trading partners are: European Union (57% exports, 40% imports), mainly Germany, Russia and The United States.47  ⇒ Exports: US $117.4 billions in 2009 and $140.8 billions in 2008  ⇒ Imports: US $166.3 billions in 2009 and $193.9 billions in 2008 We can see that Turkish importations are bigger than exportations, because it is the common policy of most of the emerging countries. Importations are mainly commodities like machinery, raw materials, chemicals, semi‐finished goods, equipment and fuel.  f. Public debts: The public debts of Turkey reached 48.1% of GDP in 2010 against 46.30% of the GDP in 2009. It is below the threshold of 60% fixed by the EU for EU‐members. In comparison with the year 2008, public debts grow of 6.30%. Turkeys external debt stock dropped to $ 268.3 billions in December 2010 (US $278.14 billions in 2008).  We can see that Turkish government repaid US $9.84 billions48 (3.67%) of its external debts during the 2009 year. However, government aims to limit the excess of the threshold of 3% of the GDP budget deficit following the Maastricht criteria. According to the IMF, the Turkish government expects a deficit of 4.9% of GDP in 2010 against 5.5% of GDP in 2009, then 4% in 2011 and 3.2% in 2012.49                                                           45 http://statbel.fgov.be/fr/statistiques/chiffres/travailvie/salaires/mensuels/index.jsp 46 http://www.indexmundi.com/turkey/current_account_balance.html 47 http://www.tradingeconomics.com/Economics/Current‐Account.aspx?Symbol=TRY 48 http://www.worldbulletin.net/news_detail.php?id=52055    18 
  19. 19.  After the global financial crisis came round in 2008 Turkey was in a better position to weather the storm than many other countries. The level of public debt was already relatively low, and although the effects of the recession were still felt, by 2010 the Turkish economy had started to bounce back50 ‐ to the extent that by the beginning of 2011, concerns were being raised over whether the boom was sustainable.  Nevertheless, Investors are uncertain about the use of reserve requirements as a tool to control credit growth, saying banks may simply sell bond holdings to raise funds for lending, given the fierce competition between Turkish lenders for market share.51  g. Inflation rate:      Source: CIA World Factbook ‐ Unless otherwise noted, information in this page is accurate as of January 1, 2011 The average inflation in Turkey was reported at 8,7% in 2010. According IMF, in 2015, Turkeys average inflation is expected to be 4% change.  Nevertheless, it states at 6,31% in August of 2011. Inflation rate refers to a general rise in prices measured against a standard level of purchasing power.  So, even if the inflation rate is currently growing the IMF forecasts are pretty good. When we observe where Turkey is coming from (inflation rate speaking), we can be optimistic about the situation because Turkey had 65% inflation rate in 1999. Thank to its economic policy after the internal economic disasters, Turkey curbs its inflation rate by 13.4% in ten years times.  2. Monetary policy In 2001, a real economic recession and a very high public debt had led to the collapse of the Turkish banking system. The Turkish lira (TRY) was devalued by 50%.  The securing of the FOREX system52 led from 2005 to a convertibility of the new Turkish lira. Reserves of foreign exchange and gold (US$)53                                                                                                                                                                              49 http://www.econostrum.info/Le‐FMI‐tance‐la‐Turquie‐sur‐son‐budget_a3314.html 50 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/country_profiles/1022222.stm 51 http://blogs.ft.com/beyond‐brics/2011/03/04/turkeys‐monetary‐policy‐experiment‐under‐investigation/#ixzz1V0g24FDq 52 Forex system = (the creation of a currency board of backed guarantee funds in foreign currencies) 53 http://www.indexmundi.com/g/g.aspx?v=144&c=tu&l=en    19 
  20. 20.    This category includes not only foreign currency and gold, but also a countrys holdings of Special Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund, and its reserve position in the Fund.  a. Interest rate: The Central Bank of Turkey left its policy rate at 6.25% at its June 2011 meeting54. The monetary authority didn’t touch reserve requirements either, as it preferred to stay on the shelves and see the impact of previous policy changes before making another change.  Fiscal spending is under control and inflation is well mannered, which creates a moderate environment for monetary policy.  b. Exchange rate: Like most other currencies, the Turkish lira lost 10 per cent of its value against a dollar and euro basket during stock market and financial crisis in 2011.  US$ 1 = TRY 1.7786 and € 1 = TRY 2.5342 One of the risks is that Turkish economy is very fragile even if it has not suffered too much from the recent economic crisis.  European Union and the U.S. are the main trading partners of Turkey. If the economic situation of those countries does not improve in the coming years, we could observe Turkish exportations decreasing sharply. This will cause a depreciation of the Turkish lira Moreover, the Turkish government is facing debts wish must be paid. The government has to find a way to pay debts. The risk could be, either an increased of corporate taxation rate, which is currently 20% (very good taxation rate), either decreasing State expenses, or increasing of citizens taxation rate which will cause a decrease in real purchasing power of the population.  3. Fiscal policy  a. Corporate tax The standard corporate income tax rate on business profits is 20%.55 Taxes on dividends are 15%. Turkish and resident companies are taxed on their global income. However, non‐resident companies are only taxed on their income.  b. Consumption tax:   V.A.T: The standard rate of value added tax is 18%.   Communication Tax All types of installations, transfers and telecommunication services given by mobile phone operators are subject to a special 25% communication tax.                                                          54https://www.economy.com/home/login/ds_proLogin_5.asp?script_name=/dismal/pro/release.asp&r=tur_mpolicy&tkr=1108140918 55 http://www.invest.gov.tr/fr‐FR/investmentguide/investorsguide/Pages/Taxes.aspx    20 
  21. 21.   c. Special Consumption Tax Regarding to the category of goods, luxury goods imported are subject to special consumption tax at different rates. Special Consumption Tax is charged only once. Taxpayers are manufacturers, exporters or sellers. The tax rate varies between 6.7% and 20%56.   Banking and Insurance Transaction Tax The general rate is 5%. Interest on deposits transactions between banks is taxed at 1% and sales from foreign exchange transactions at 0.1%.   Stamp Duty Stamp duty depends on the value of the document. The general rates vary from 0.165% to 0.825%.   d. Individual tax Income taxation rates for yearly gross earnings from 2010 are as follows:  Income tax rate  Progressive, from 15% to 35% From TRY 0 to 8.70057  15% From TRY 8.701 to 22.000 58  20% From TRY 22.001 to 50.00059  27% Over TRY 50.000  35%  Taxation comparison Belgium – Turkey   Belgium  Turkey VAT   21%  18% Corporate Tax   33.99% including 3% extra  20% Dividend Tax  25%  15% Individual Tax   25 – 50 %  15 – 35 %  It is clearly attractive to set up a company in Turkey, because completely independent from the Belgian fiscal administration. In order to keep on exporting our luxury goods to Turkey, we should only be present in Turkey as a non‐resident company.  Thanks to competitive Turkish corporate tax rate, corporate income will rise and the return on investment will be more efficient.  4. Legislative context and transaction cost  a. Market access and world trade organization  Turkey has particularly ratified the following international conventions:   World Trade Organization60. Essentially, they are contracts guaranteeing member countries important trade rights61.  Concerning the main international economic cooperation, Turkey is member of:                                                          56 kpmg 57 US $4.892 58 US $12.370 59 US $28.113 60  http://www.wto.org/french/thewto_f/whatis_f/tif_f/org6_f.htm 61 http://www.wto.org/french/res_f/doload_f/inbr_f.pdf    21 
  22. 22.   1) BSEC62, Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation – 1992.  The main members are notably Turkey, Russia, Greece, Ukraine, Romania, Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, and Moldova.   The organization’s pillar is The Black Sea Trade and Development Bank that notably support projects in sectors such as telecommunications, manufacturing, financial services, transportation and energy.  2) The Euromed63 (Barcelona Process) The Partnership includes all 27‐member states of the European Union, along with 16 partners across the Southern Mediterranean and the Middle East, including Turkey, Israel, Algeria, Egypt, Croatia, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco and Syria.  3) European Customs Union (1996) It regulates the Customs Union rules between Turkey and the EU, notably on free movement of goods (no customs duties, quotas or measures having equivalent effect and a compliance to the Common Customs Tariff). Turkey has also ratified several multilateral and bilateral agreements with many countries. Agreements between Turkey and Belgium are concerning investments environment. They aim to increase capital exchanges while insuring the stability of investments. It means that it prevents foreign investors from confiscations or expropriations.  All those agreements got a direct impact on business. Indeed, on one hand, they enable trade’s conditions for exportation goods to Turkey and on the other hand, they reduce dramatically risks concerning foreign investments with liberal incentives and reforms on market protecting for investors.  Moreover, it’s obvious that Turkey is an export platform towards other markets. Thanks to localization, to international and to regional trading alliances, Turkey has real potential accesses to economically important countries such as Greece, Romania, and Bulgaria.   b. Custom duties Since Turkey joined the Customs Union of the EU, products coming from the EU move freely without any quantitative restrictions.  A big part of Customs duties on industrial products including textile coming from the EU have dropped from 10% to 0%.   c. Tax exemptions Tax exemptions are concerning: • Benefits for corporations from overseas branches and both domestic and overseas ventures  if they meet certain conditions. • Export of goods and services.  • Deliveries made to diplomatic representatives, consulates and international organizations  with tax exemption status for their employees.  • International transportation  • National purchased or imported machinery and equipment for project meeting the incentive  certificate. However, Textile can only be exempted from VAT only with an exemption certificate.                                                         62 http://www.bsec‐organization.org/member/Pages/member.aspx 63 http://eeas.europa.eu/euromed/index_fr.htm    22 
  23. 23.  Indeed, our products are not exposed to customs duties, so they are able to be competitive on Turkish market as opposed to product coming from other countries. We can expect to have larger prospects and several partners or distributors.  Moreover, our luxury product will not be exposed to VAT if they are sold to diplomatic representatives, consulates and international organizations. This is exactly a part of the customers we want to target.   d. Foreign Direct Investment in Turkey Pro‐business foreign investment policies have been introduced as a part of the liberalization of the Turkish economy. The foreign investment legislation provides a more secure environment for foreign capital by providing support from several bilateral and multilateral agreements and organizations, guaranteeing foreign capital the same rights and obligations as local capital, and guaranteeing the transfer of profits, fees and royalties and the repatriation of capital.   Find foreign investment Low in appendix 15  e. Intellectual property right  Turkey is currently adapting the legal framework for industrial property to the directives of the EU. The main progress in this area are the creation of the Turkish Patent Institute (TPI), the introduction of a regime of penal sanctions and updating of the Trademarks Act through a series of decrees. Moreover, Turkey is a partner of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)64. Find in appendix 12, table on Intellectual Property. Due to the well‐known infringement of luxury fashion in Turkey, we have to check if all of our products are well registered in Belgium. Indeed, thanks to the fact that Turkey got a partnership with the WIPO, registered goods are protected. Trademark registration is a key issue for our business because infringement can involve important cost and sales decrease. It is a risk to take into account.   f. Corruption Turkey is ranked ta the 56th position in the transparency index65. Corruption is still something usual in this country and you can’t do business without being confronted to it. In general, bribery and corruption is the daily routine if you want to do business in Turkey. Contacts with the Turkish authorities are governed by bribery, so you should keep that in mind while estimating your costs. Once again, having a local partner remains very useful in terms of knowing who to pay and how much.  g. Company establishment and needed certificates It is now possible to establish a company just in one day66 when applied to the related Trade Registry Office with the required documents. The company gets its “legal entity” upon registration at the Trade Registry. You can find a detailed list of all the required documents for the company establishment in appendix 13. Appendix 14: The choice of the legal business entities is very important for investors as well as partners. It depends on company’s development perspectives.  As a part of doing business in Turkey, the fittest legal business entity is a general partnership SCS. Indeed, both investor and partner will decide freely the amount of capital. Moreover, that’s the best solution for investor having capitals, wanting to limit their liability and having the right                                                         64 www.wipo.int 65 Source: http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2010/results 66 http‐//www.igeme.gov.tr/english/turkey/pdfView.cfm?subID=3    23 
  24. 24.  to control company’s management. Also for us as, active partners, it enables to have a well‐prepared project and to have freedom concerning businesses decisions.   V. Profile of the targeted market  1. Potential and size of the market   a. General Nowadays, it is estimated that more than 15 million Turks (21% of the population) would benefit from a purchasing power equivalent to the European average. If we cross the PPP US $13,905 with the middle class (15 millions), we can estimate the Turkish market to €208.6 billions per year. Obviously, it doesn’t mean that all of this value will be spent for household’s commodities.   b. Consumer pattern Istanbul’s population reaches 12.782 millions, there is 42% of upper and middle‐class mixed. The addition of upper and middle‐class populations reaches more than 5.3 millions.  The purchasing power of the population in term of PPP was $13,90567 in the end 2009 despite the global economic conditions.  This part of the urban population is an interesting consuming base making big cities good market seeking for investors.  c. Istanbul The population of Istanbul represents 5.3 millions of wealthy people. Thus, US $13.905*5.3 millions equals US $73.7 billions a year. In 2006, 6% of PPP was related to clothing spend. So, the value of this potential market is US $4.42 billions a year. It is important to keep in mind that upper and middle class population could use more than 6% of their purchasing power in luxury clothes. This means that we could even estimate these market values more than US $4.42 billions a year.  d. Competition There are two kinds of competitors:    The direct competitors, namely the brands that sale more or less the same products as  Belgian Fashion like Façonnable, Gant, Tommy Hilfiger, Calvin Klein, Guess, Hugo Boss…  The indirect competitors which are all the other clothing sellers as Tekbir (the H&M  made in Turkey), Massimo Dutti, Vanko, Ottoman Empire, Mango, G‐star, Levis, Adidas,  Diesel…   We also have to be aware that we are not the first company to establish in Turkey and that we have a lot of competitors. However, the market size is big and it should increase, so, we can easily catch some market shares if we practice a diligent commercial strategy.                                                           67 http://www.worldbank.org/    24 

×