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Real World Math
 

Real World Math

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    Real World Math Real World Math Presentation Transcript

    • Critical Thinking. Global Perspective. Informed Action. Real World Math: Engaging Students through Global Issues Dave Wilton Assistant Outreach Director www.facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Agenda Your Visions Who is Facing the Future? Why Real World Math? From the Teacher Perspective From the Student Perspective Give and Take Reward for Your Patience Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • About Facing the Future  Seattle-based nonprofit founded in 1995  Interdisciplinary global issues and sustainability curriculum for K-12  Over 1.5 million students reached annually  All 50 U.S. states and over 100 countries  Professional development and consulting www.facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Using Math & Real World Data to Develop Global Competence Globally competent students must have the knowledge and skills to:  Investigate the World  I’m Curious  Weigh Perspectives  I Have an Opinion  Communicate Ideas  I Want to Share It  Take Action  I Want to Be Involved  Apply Interdisciplinary  I Want Bring My Talents & Disciplinary Expertise to Bear ~ Anthony Jackson, Asia Society VP of Education Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Defining Sustainability “Meeting our own needs without limiting the ability of future generations to meet their needs” World Commission on Environment & Development, 1987 Social Well-being Sustainable Communities Strong Flourishing Environment Economy Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Think, Pair, Share What is one thing you are currently doing to engage students with mathematics in the world? (If you momentarily can‟t think of anything, what is something you would like to do?) Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • “When Will I Ever Use This?” Teachers requested:  Engaging „hook‟ activities  Un-manipulated, real world data  Purposeful mathematics skill development  Content knowledge acquisition using meaningful issues Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Global Issues (Algebra + Geometry) = Real World Math  Teacher‟s Guide & Student Workbook  15 NCTM aligned lessons  State alignments by September 2010  Aligned with popular U.S. math texts  Students use 21st-century skills  Critical thinking  Collaboration  Global perspective  Multiple points of implementation:  Hook activities at start of a unit  Reinforcement of learned concepts  Assessment of learning  Individual, small group, whole class Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • 15 Engaging Lessons 1. Number Patterns: Waste & 9. Solving Inequalities: Carbon Recycling Emissions 2. Introduction to Algebra: 10. Spatial Thinking: Solar Power Poverty & Microcredit 11. Area & Transformations: 3. Modeling Integers: Wildlife Habitats Population Growth 12. Surface Area & Volume: 4. Solving Algebraic Equations: Sustainable Design Food Choices 13. Linear Functions: Systems & 5. Data & Graphs: Youth Global Education Conflict 14. Midpoint & Distance Formulas: 6. Number Theory: Resource Distribution Consumption Choices 15. Data Analysis: Quality of Life 7. Rational Numbers: Financial Decisions 8. Proportion, Percent, & Probability: Global Health Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 1 Number Patterns: Waste & Recycling Critical Thinking Questions:  What are historic and current recycling trends in the US?  What are the impacts of waste disposal?  What are ways to reduce impacts of US produced waste? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 1 Number Patterns: Waste & Recycling Objectives:  Create expressions containing variables that represent real world patterns  Explore patterns of US disposal and recycling  Use tables and graphs to organize data  Identify number patterns Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Iceberg Model for understanding root causes and leverage points of global issues Copyright © 2010, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 1 Number Patterns: Waste & Recycling Introductory Activity: In small groups, answer these questions about the items on the next slide:  Where does it go after it’s used?  Can it be reused? If so, how? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 1 Number Patterns: Waste & Recycling Introductory Activity: In small groups, answer these questions about the items on the next slide:  Where does it go after it’s used?  Can it be reused? If so, how? Questions for the whole group:  Is it OK for all these to be landfilled?  How many plastic bottles do you use in a day?  How many are used in the U.S. in 5 minutes? 2 million Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Waste Not, Want Not 2. How many plastic bottles are used in 1 day 24 mil. bottles per hour x 24 hours = 576 mil. bottles 3. If 1/3 are recycled daily, how many are not? 2/3 x 576 = 384 mil. bottles OR 576 – (1/3 x 576)= 384 mil. bottles 4. 2 consequences of NOT recycling plastic bottles? 5. Create an equation to solve for number of bottles recycled for any number of hours where B=Bottles & H=Hours B = H x 24 mil. bottles Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Waste Not, Want Not 6. Organize this data 5.5 into a line graph 4.6 7. Predict the number of pounds per day the average person will discard in 2020 approx. 4.6 to 5.5 lbs Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Waste Not, Want Not 8. All materials except plastics and food scraps make up 76% of our waste stream. The % of plastics is the same as the % of food scraps. What % of our waste stream is plastics? (100% - 76%) / 2 = 12% 9. Recycling 4,050 20 oz. bottles saves 1 cubic yard of landfill space. How many bottles need to be recycled to save 50 cubic yards of landfill space? 4,050 x 50 = 202,500 Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Waste Not, Want Not Discussion Questions Is it important to recycle as much as we can? What are other ways to reduce the amount of waste we produce? Where is the closest landfill to your house? What factors influence their location? Would you want one near you? Will the amount of waste generated per person in the U.S. continue to increase? What kinds of materials are recyclable in your community? What are barriers to recycling and ways to overcome them? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Additional Resources Partial Zoom Images retrieved from www.chrisjordan.com Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Additional Resources Trash Track:  Partnership between the Seattle Public Library and MIT  Tagging everyday items with GPS locators to follow them through the “removal chain” http://senseable.mit.edu/trashtrack Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Action Project Find alternatives for items currently being thrown in landfills. Organize a campaign to support reuse of at least one of the items from the lesson introduction. Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Ecological Footprint: Watch Where You Step Ecological Footprint: The area of the Earth‟s productive surface (land and sea) that it takes to produce the goods and services necessary to support a given human lifestyle. Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Ecological Footprint: Watch Where You Step Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Ecological Footprint: Watch Where You Step Choose a: Favorite Meal Favorite Object Item of Clothing Mode of Diagram: Transportation Resources Processes Impacts Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Photos courtesy of Ben Wheeler
    • Ecological Footprint: Watch Where You Step Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Ecological Footprint Calculators www.footprintnetwork.org www.myfootprint.org www.zerofootprintkids.com Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Ecological Footprint: Additional Resources  www.storyofstuff.com “A 20-minute, fast-paced, fact-filled look at our production and consumption patterns. The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to create a more sustainable and just world. It'll teach you something, it'll make you laugh, and it just may change the way you look at all the stuff in your life forever.”  www.sightline.org “Follows a day in the life of a fictional, typical middle-class resident of Seattle. Tracing back the layers of distribution, commerce, and production involved in everyday consumer goods Stuff is an engaging and fact-packed look at the people and places that are affected every time you sip your coffee, tie your shoes, click your mouse, step on the gas, or read a book.” Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Facing the Future Resources Teacher Lesson Plan Books Over 25 lessons available for free at www.facingthefuture.org 1-2 week curriculum units All available online to WA teachers for free Student textbooks Preview chapters available online Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Staying Connected  Visit www.facingthefuture.org  Sign up for FTF e-newsletter  Be a Peer Educator  Provide feedback via survey  Contact FTF: dave@facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • “We must teach our students that they can be architects of the future, rather than its victims.” ~ Buckminster Fuller, Architect and Philosopher
    • 15 Engaging Lessons 1. Number Patterns: Waste & 9. Solving Inequalities: Carbon Recycling Emissions 2. Introduction to Algebra: 10. Spatial Thinking: Solar Power Poverty & Microcredit 11. Area & Transformations: 3. Modeling Integers: Wildlife Habitats Population Growth 12. Surface Area & Volume: 4. Solving Algebraic Equations: Sustainable Design Food Choices 13. Linear Functions: Systems & 5. Data & Graphs: Youth Global Education Conflict 14. Midpoint & Distance Formulas: 6. Number Theory: Resource Distribution Consumption Choices 15. Data Analysis: Quality of Life 7. Rational Numbers: Financial Decisions 8. Proportion, Percent, & Probability: Global Health Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 2 Introduction to Algebra: Poverty & Microcredit Critical Thinking Questions:  What are some solutions to ending extreme poverty?  What is microcredit and how can it help alleviate poverty? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 2 Introduction to Algebra: Poverty & Microcredit Objectives:  Investigate microcredit as a solution to extreme poverty  Consider what it means to live in extreme poverty  Brainstorm solutions to extreme poverty  Evaluate formulas for different values  Solve multi-step equations Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 2 Introduction to Algebra: Poverty & Microcredit Introductory Activity: How much would you pay for the following items? Movie ticket Bus fare Cup of coffee 3-course dinner Could you buy any for under $2 Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Let’s Go Shopping  Where can you buy each item for the lowest price?  Which city is most expensive? Think, Pair, Share  Is it feasible to live on $2 a day?  What % of world‟s people live on $2 a day or less?  What would life be like?  Where would you live and work?  What would you eat?  How could the number of people living in extreme poverty be reduced?
    • Microcredit Business Plan 1. Calculate your total operational costs (TOC) TOC = Sc + (n x Mc) Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Microcredit Business Plan 2. Calculate your profit P = n (S – Mc) Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Action Project Organize a “Penny Challenge” to support a microcredit organization Each penny = 1 point All other money is negative points (can be put in competitor‟s container to decrease points but increase total money raised). Trickle Up www.trickleup.org Grameen Bank www.grameen-info.org Kiva www.kiva.org Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • www.globalrichlist.com
    • www.globalrichlist.com
    • Microcredit for Sustainable Development Curriculum Extension Using Engaging Students Through Global Issues  40 activity-based lessons  Subject areas and key concepts  National standards alignment  Timing and step-by-step instructions  Materials needed and handouts  Assessment questions  Extension activities  Connections to technology, literacy, math, art  Action project ideas  Recommended resources such as: films, books, websites Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • FTF Activity-Based Lesson: “Microcredit for Sustainable Development” Research a developing country Apply for a $100 microcredit grant to start a business Create a poster and presentation of your plan and have plan approved by a panel of “experts” Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • 15 Engaging Lessons 1. Number Patterns: Waste & 9. Solving Inequalities: Carbon Recycling Emissions 2. Introduction to Algebra: 10. Spatial Thinking: Solar Power Poverty & Microcredit 11. Area & Transformations: 3. Modeling Integers: Wildlife Habitats Population Growth 12. Surface Area & Volume: 4. Solving Algebraic Equations: Sustainable Design Food Choices 13. Linear Functions: Systems & 5. Data & Graphs: Youth Global Education Conflict 14. Midpoint & Distance Formulas: 6. Number Theory: Resource Distribution Consumption Choices 15. Data Analysis: Quality of Life 7. Rational Numbers: Financial Decisions 8. Proportion, Percent, & Probability: Global Health Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 3 Modeling Integers: Population Growth Critical Thinking Questions:  What factors drive population growth?  What are impacts of population growth and loss?  How is population connected to other global issues? Objectives:  Consider consequences of positive and negative population growth  Define population growth rate  Examine population trends  Recognize and identify integers  Add integers with same and different signs  Solve equations with integers  Plot integers on a coordinate plane Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 3 Modeling Integers: Population Growth Introductory Activity: What is a real life example of:  A positive integer?  A negative integer Can you have a negative number of people? As a group, line up from largest to smallest number of children born per 100 women  What if all countries had the same birthrate as Mali (734 per 100)? What about Singapore (108 per 100)?  Why might some countries have higher rates than others? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • The Ups & Downs of Population 1. What do you already know about population growth: a. Do most countries have declining or growing populations? b. Name 1 thing that might lead to increase c. Name 1 thing that might lead to decline 2. Look at the age-gender structure of Japan in 2000: a. In 2000, were most people in Japan old, young, or somewhere in between? b. How will the age structure be different in 50 years? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • The Ups & Downs of Population 3. Calculate the number of people in each age group using the following equation: P2050 = P2000 + C 6,627,109 4. How will the number of people 7,412,041 older than 50 change from 2000 7,938,791 to 2050? 8,605,113 5. Which 10-year age group will 10,664,338 lose the greatest number? 11,665,199 12,738,388 6. What is 1 way the predicted 14,578,186 population for 2050 might affect 13,444,661 Japan? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • The Ups & Downs of Population 7. How will India‟s population differ from Japan‟s in 2050? 8. What is 1 way the predicted population for 2050 might affect India? 9. Japan‟s growth rate is -0.139%, what integer is closest to this numeric value? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • The Ups & Downs of Population 10. Plot the coordinate pairs in the table on the a coordinate plane to show how Japan‟s population is changing 11. What is the trend of the graph? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • The Ups & Downs of Population Discussion Questions What are some negative consequences of a declining population? Positive consequences? What are some negative consequences of a growing population? Positive consequences? Will India‟s and Japan‟s future populations match those shown on the populations pyramids? What are some humane ways to slow population growth? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 4 Algebraic Equations: Food Choices Critical Thinking Questions:  What choices can people make to ensure a healthy lifestyle?  How are eating habits related to future well-being?  How are individual and community well-being interconnected? Objectives:  Write and solve multi-step equations  Use tables to solve real-life problems  Recognize the connection between health, nutrition, exercise  Understand that daily choices can affect an individual‟s well-being Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 4 Algebraic Equations: Food Choices Introductory Activity: Jumping jacks for 10 seconds  How many calories burned? How would you define “health”?  A state of complete mental, physical, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. (WHO) What actions and choices make a person healthy? Create list of common breakfast items.  Which items do you consider healthy? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • You Are What You Eat  Compare 2 students‟ lunches  Calculate missing calories and calcium for Staci  Discuss choices Estelle could make Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • You Are What You Eat Discussion Questions What are some of the choices that Estelle needs to make in order to have a healthier lifestyle? Could any of these choices apply to you? Is everyone capable of making those choices? Why or why not? How could schools help support healthier nutrition and exercise habits of students? What are some ways to reduce childhood obesity? How is your personal health and well-being connected to the well-being of your community? How is the overall health of our country‟s people connected to the well being of our nation? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • You Are What You Eat Additional Resources Action Project  Create a list of 10 foods that are part of a healthy diet  Are these foods available at local food outlets? Why or why not? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • 15 Engaging Lessons 1. Number Patterns: Waste & 9. Solving Inequalities: Carbon Recycling Emissions 2. Introduction to Algebra: 10. Spatial Thinking: Solar Power Poverty & Microcredit 11. Area & Transformations: 3. Modeling Integers: Wildlife Habitats Population Growth 12. Surface Area & Volume: 4. Solving Algebraic Equations: Sustainable Design Food Choices 13. Linear Functions: Systems & 5. Data & Graphs: Youth Global Education Conflict 14. Midpoint & Distance Formulas: 6. Number Theory: Resource Distribution Consumption Choices 15. Data Analysis: Quality of Life 7. Rational Numbers: Financial Decisions 8. Proportion, Percent, & Probability: Global Health Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 5 Data & Graphs: Youth Conflict Critical Thinking Questions:  How do actual youth violence trends compare to public perception?  What factors correlate with reductions in violence  What can people do to increase the peace? Objectives:  Use double bar graphs to represent data  Use line graphs to evaluate changes over time  Create a scatterplot and line of best fit  Examine trends in violent crimes among youth  Explore root causes of youth violence Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 5 Data & Graphs: Youth Conflict Introductory Activity: Sides Debate Question: Youth violence is a major problem in our society. Agree? or Disagree? Think, Pair, Share: Has the rate of violent crimes in US schools increased or decreased in the past 15 years? Support your position Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Increasing the Peace 1. Create a double bar graph using the information in the following table. 2. Explain the trends observed in the graph Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Increasing the Peace * Data unavailable for 2002 & 2004 1. Use the data to create a line graph, showing the trend in the number of violent crimes per 1000 students ages 12-18 in U.S. schools. 2. What trend is emerging over time? 3. What are possible causes for the trends observed? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Increasing the Peace 1. Use the following data to create a scatterplot. 2. Draw a line of best fit. 3. What pattern does the line of best fit reveal? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Increasing the Peace Discussion Questions Based upon the 3 graphs, what observations can you make about youth conflict? Does the media‟s portrayal of youth violence represent the same trends as on the graphs? MS principals cite racial tension and student bullying as the most common problems. HS principals cite gang and extremist activities as the most common problems. What might be reasons for the differences? In HS, approximately twice as many males report carrying a weapon to school than females report. What might be reasons for this difference? What measures do you think would decrease rates of youth conflict even further? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • 15 Engaging Lessons 1. Number Patterns: Waste & 9. Solving Inequalities: Carbon Recycling Emissions 2. Introduction to Algebra: 10. Spatial Thinking: Solar Power Poverty & Microcredit 11. Area & Transformations: 3. Modeling Integers: Wildlife Habitats Population Growth 12. Surface Area & Volume: 4. Solving Algebraic Equations: Sustainable Design Food Choices 13. Linear Functions: Systems & 5. Data & Graphs: Youth Global Education Conflict 14. Midpoint & Distance Formulas: 6. Number Theory: Resource Distribution Consumption Choices 15. Data Analysis: Quality of Life 7. Rational Numbers: Financial Decisions 8. Proportion, Percent, & Probability: Global Health Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 13 Linear Functions: Systems & Global Education Critical Thinking Questions:  How can understanding systems help us find solutions to large and complex problems?  How can we redesign a system to achieve a desired outcome?  What part does education play in creating a stable future? Objectives:  Graph linear functions  Calculate slope  Use systems thinking to look at problems  Discover worldwide trends in primary school completion Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 13 Linear Functions: Systems & Global Education Introductory Activity:  “Bears In The Air” – Only 2 Rules: 1. Everyone must touch the bear 2. Must touch it in the same order each time  Stand in a circle, practice for one round  Time 2 rounds, trying to get faster each round, plot on coordinate plane  Plot slope using first 2 rounds  Use y = mx + b to estimate 8th round  Exploring limits to success Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 13 Linear Functions: Systems & Global Education Bears In The Air Limits to Success 60 50 Time in Seconds 40 30 Time 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Trial Number Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Making the Grade Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Making the Grade Discussion Questions How would life be different for you if you were not able to attend school? What role does education play in shaping the future? What might be some consequences of not encouraging worldwide education? Why are the goals for the 4 regions different from the actual numbers of students completing primary school? Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • 15 Engaging Lessons 1. Number Patterns: Waste & 9. Solving Inequalities: Carbon Recycling Emissions 2. Introduction to Algebra: 10. Spatial Thinking: Solar Power Poverty & Microcredit 11. Area & Transformations: 3. Modeling Integers: Wildlife Habitats Population Growth 12. Surface Area & Volume: 4. Solving Algebraic Equations: Sustainable Design Food Choices 13. Linear Functions: Systems & 5. Data & Graphs: Youth Global Education Conflict 14. Midpoint & Distance Formulas: 6. Number Theory: Resource Distribution Consumption Choices 15. Data Analysis: Quality of Life 7. Rational Numbers: Financial Decisions 8. Proportion, Percent, & Probability: Global Health Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 15 Data Analysis: Quality of Life Critical Thinking Questions:  How does the concept of what is necessary for a high quality of life change over the course of our lives?  What determines quality of life and happiness?  How is quality of life measured? Objectives:  Develop quality of life indicators  Administer a quality of life survey  Organize data using a box and whisker plot  Compare student and adult survey responses  Analyze data by calculating measures of central tendency Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Lesson 15 Data Analysis: Quality of Life Introductory Activity: If you agree with the following statements, please stand up: People who have many friends have a good life. People who make more than enough money to pay their monthly bills have a good life. People who graduate from college have a good life. If everyone in the world was “living the good life,” what would we have in common? (Think about QOL as a positive concept, not just a lack of what is negative. The WHO, defines health as “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmary.”) Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Livin‟ the Good Life Quality of Life Survey Develop questions and survey students and adults to assess QOL based upon several category indicators Must be measurable in units of time or quantities: Number of ____ per ____ Examples for category of Relaxation: Number of hours per week you do your favorite activity Number of days per year you spend on vacation Make sure indicators are designed such that a higher number represents an increase in QOL Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    •  Example of worksheet students can use to collect data  Copy compiled survey results into table below
    • Extensions & Action Projects Investigate traditional and alternative indicators commonly used for QOL: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Genuine Progress Index (GPI) U.N. Human Development Index Publish a QOL Report Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Problems as Opportunities Sharing Positive Stories Activity-based Lessons Action Projects Personal and structural solutions Service Learning Fast Facts, Quick Actions Service Learning Project Database Service Learning Framework Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Facing the Future Professional Development Workshops  Bridging the Achievement Gap  Climate Change  Service Learning  Systems Thinking  Media Literacy  Global Health Connections  Equity and Quality of Life  Sustainable Development www.facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • School & District-wide Transformation for EfS THE CLOUD INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION  Consulting Services Curriculum Mapping Gap/Strength Assessment & Analysis Organizational Change  Curriculum Design Studio in a Box Tools to design your own sustainability lessons  Education for Sustainability Workshops www.cloudinstitute.org Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • K-12 and Teacher Education Resources National Standards Listserv Webinar: November 2009 White Paper on EfS Curricula, PD, Stories, etc. http://www.uspartnership.org/ Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Staying Connected  Visit www.facingthefuture.org  Sign up for FTF e-newsletter  Be a Peer Educator  Provide feedback via survey  Contact FTF: dave@facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future
    • Facing the Future Resources Teacher Lesson Plan Books Over 25 lessons available for free at www.facingthefuture.org 1-2 week curriculum units All available online to WA teachers for free Student textbooks Preview chapters available online Copyright © 2009, Facing the Future