Hinkle

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Hinkle

  1. 1. TORNADOES<br />By: Alyssa Hinkle<br />EDU 290<br />8:00-9:15<br />http://www.fema.gov/kids/p_tor03.htm<br />
  2. 2. How are they formed?<br />There is no exact way to know how tornadoes are formed.<br />USUALLY they occur when:<br /> cool dry air from the north AND warm moist air from the south mix together.<br />http://www.jason.org/uploads/PublicUploads/CuteSoft/Thunderstorm%20Formation.jpg<br />
  3. 3. When do these storms occur?<br />Normally tornadoes occur from March to August.<br /> But,<br />Under the right conditions they can occur anytime, anyplace.<br />Microsoft Clipart<br />
  4. 4. Where do they occur?<br />The United States is the country where tornadoes are most likely to occur, anywhere in the world.<br />Microsoft Clipart<br />The most common place is in Tornado Alley.<br />
  5. 5. Tornado Alley<br /><ul><li>Tornado Alley is in the United States.
  6. 6. This is where most tornadoes happen.
  7. 7. It includes the central Plains from Texas to Nebraska.</li></ul>But, a tornado can still happen ANYWHERE!<br />http://www.nationalgeographic.com/eye/tornadoes/effect.html<br />
  8. 8. Library.thinkquest.org/J001246/tornado.htm<br />ALLEY<br />TORNADO<br />Nebraska<br />Kansas<br />Texas<br />Oklahoma<br />
  9. 9. HOW BIG?<br />Tornadoes are measured by the Fujita scale and rated F0-F5.<br /><ul><li>F0 is the smallest tornado
  10. 10. F5 is the largest tornado</li></ul>Fujita Scale<br />The winds are stronger and there is more damage when the tornado is bigger!<br />http://www.fema.gov/kids/fscale.htm<br />
  11. 11. FACT<br />“In an average year in the United States, 800 tornadoes are reported nationwide…”<br />-National Geographic<br />
  12. 12. So, how are tornadoes detected?<br />Forecasters gather data from: <br />Satellite imagery <br />Radar<br />Weather stations <br />Weather balloons<br />Lightning detection networks<br />http://www.nationalgeographic.com/eye/tornadoes/science.html<br />
  13. 13. PHOTOS<br />Photo of a tornado.<br />Damage after a tornado<br />http://www.fema.gov/kids/p_tor.htm<br />
  14. 14. TORNADO VIDEO!<br />http://www.fema.gov/kids/media/tornado.ra<br />
  15. 15. Safety Tips<br />http://www.fema.gov/kids/knw_tor.htm<br />
  16. 16. SAFETY<br /><ul><li>Listen to the radio or watch television for weather updates.
  17. 17. If you see people who are injured:
  18. 18. Do not move them unless they are in immediate danger!
  19. 19. Call for help right away!
  20. 20. After a tornado:
  21. 21. Watch for broken glass and power lines that are downed!</li></ul>TIPS<br />http://www.fema.gov/kids/knw_tor.htm<br />
  22. 22. Tornado watch<br />A tornado watch means a tornado is possible with the current weather.<br />What should you do?<br />
  23. 23. Tornado warning<br />A tornado warning means that a tornado has been spotted and touched the ground.<br />What should you do?<br />
  24. 24. Most tornadoes are weak…<br />BUT, they all can become dangerous very fast.<br />Knowing about tornadoes and how to stay safe will help protect others and YOU!<br />
  25. 25. First, each group is going to make a tornado in a bottle.<br />Now, you will draw your own tornado.<br />Then, write a paragraph about what you have learned about tornadoes and how you would feel if you were near the tornado you have drawn.<br />Finally, do you think the tornado in the bottle looks like the photos and videos we have seen?<br />

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