Eolfc 2013   dr betsy donald - experiences in innovative local food processing
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Eolfc 2013 dr betsy donald - experiences in innovative local food processing

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The Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference (EOLFC 2013) provided a great opportunity to share information, learn about success stories and gather information on innovative local food businesses, ...

The Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference (EOLFC 2013) provided a great opportunity to share information, learn about success stories and gather information on innovative local food businesses, projects and best practices. The conference was organized by KEDCO (Kingston Economic Development Corporation) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Food and the Ministry of Rural Affairs. The theme of the conference was Innovation Driving Local Food and it was held December 3, 2013 at the Ambassador Hotel in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Betsy Donald presentation on Experiences in Innovative local food processing.

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Eolfc 2013   dr betsy donald - experiences in innovative local food processing Eolfc 2013 dr betsy donald - experiences in innovative local food processing Presentation Transcript

  • Innovation in Local Food Processing: how are we doing? Betsy Donald, Queen’s University “Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference: innovation driving local food”, December 2&3, 2013 Kingston, Ontario
  • Innovation in Local Food Processing • Why Kraft to Craft? – an update • What are the trends in local food processing? • How can we do better?
  • Revisiting Kraft to Craft • Ten years ago, “creative craft food” described elements of a newer food system • Creative craft food included specialty, local, organic, ethnic, and fair-trade foods that had supply networks distinct from mainstream ones • Creative craft food offered innovative solutions to ecological, social and health concerns • Today we know much more about the complexities of “creative food” chains Donald (2009) From Kraft to Craft: innovation and creativity in Ontario’s Food Economy
  • Old ‘Industrial Food’ Economy Typical Company Source of economic power New ‘Creative Food’ Economy Kraft – cheese products Craft/artisanal cheese Economic power is centralized Economic power is diffused and decentralized to individual, highly creative workers, firms and extrafirm institutions Quality is a measure of taste, Source of quality Quality is a measure of added value terroir, and talent of and innovation in highly-processed environments entrepreneurs Enterprise attitude towards place Little relationship between place and product making. Place becomes central to quality food making, marketing and consuming
  • Old ‘Industrial Food’ Economy Typical Company Source of economic power New ‘Creative Food’ Economy Kraft – cheese products Craft/artisanal cheese Economic power is centralized Economic power is diffused and decentralized to individual, highly creative workers, firms and extrafirm institutions Quality is a measure of taste, Source of quality Quality is a measure of added value terroir, and talent of and innovation in highly-processed environments entrepreneurs Enterprise attitude towards place Little relationship between place and product making. Place becomes central to quality food making, marketing and consuming
  • Old ‘Industrial Food’ Economy Typical Company Source of economic power New ‘Creative Food’ Economy Kraft – cheese products Craft/artisanal cheese Economic power is centralized Economic power is diffused and decentralized to individual, highly creative workers, firms and extrafirm institutions Quality is a measure of taste, Source of quality Quality is a measure of added value terroir, and talent of and innovation in highly-processed environments entrepreneurs Enterprise attitude towards place Little relationship between place and product making. Place becomes central to quality food making, marketing and consuming
  • A Tale of Three Tomatoes Blay-Palmer and Donald (2006) A Tale of Three Tomatoes, Economic Geography, 82(4), 383-399
  • Heinz just one in a wave of recent plant closings • • • • Heinz to close plant in Leamington – 740 jobs lost Smuckers closed its Bick’s Pickles plant– 150 jobs lost Lance Canada’s LTD. Bakery will close– 130 jobs lost Canada Bread Co., Ltd. and Kraft soon to close plants
  • The slow economic recovery is affecting all aspects of food
  • Nevertheless Creative “Craft” Food is holding its own • This segment of the food industry is resilient • Some levelling off of organic and some high-end specialty segments immediately after the recession and continuing. • There is sustained interest in local and ‘whole’ food and its role in health and community well-being • This interest has spawned policy innovation in local food systems • Those regions with an ethos and history of sustainable food are fairing better than those without
  • Number of Selected Specialty Product Introductions 20012009 1200 1000 Beverages 800 Bakery Confectionary 600 Sauces and Seasonings 400 Snacks Spreads 200 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
  • Total U.S. Organic Food Sales 20002009 (Millions $) 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 Source: Organic Trade Association 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
  • Percentage (%) Change in Total U.S. Organic Food Sales 2000-2009 25 20 15 10 5 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 Source: Organic Trade Association 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
  • Local and place-based is the new organic • “The Whole Foods movement is the ‘Age of the Unthinkable’ for processed foods” • Food Navigator, April 5, 2011 • Places that have successful food producers and manufactures are those that already have an ethos of incorporating sustainable and fairness elements into products and processes
  • “All natural”/“local” are leading
  • “All natural”/“local” are leading
  • “All natural”/“local” are leading
  • “All natural”/“local” are leading
  • “All natural”/”local” are leading
  • Changing face of the food entrepreneur • New food entrepreneurs differ from back- to-the-landers of the 1960s • The new entrepreneurs are often well educated children of baby boomers who add business acumen to the idealism of an older generation • New food entrepreneurs are engaged in solving pressing societal problems like energy use, food safety, hunger, community development Back40 veg, PEC
  • How are we doing in Eastern Ontario? • Eastern Ontario has seen an explosion of interest in local food and there is evidence of successful small-scale local food producers and processors • Government programs and policies are helping to revive the local food industry (e.g., investments in micro-dairies, food hubs, incubators etc.) • But more can be done
  • How can we do better? • Embrace new opportunities (e.g., local, healthy snacking, waste reduction) • Facilitate entrepreneurship • Continue to develop infrastructure for local food products • Develop better collaboration with all actors in the food chain for a place-based food vision – must think regionally • Conduct a foodie IQ test for Eastern Ontario – benchmark against other regions • Engage better marketing services for local producers of high quality food and drink – again a regional plan
  • Thank you! • Thanks to the hosts and especially to Judy Coward, OMAF and all staff and entrepreneurs who make local food happen • Betsy Donald, Queen’s University, Geography Department • Betsy.donald@queensu.ca • New research - Donald, B. 2013. Food retail and access after the crash: rethinking the food desert problem. Journal of Economic Geography, 13(2), 231-237. • Donald, B. 2013.“The Rise and Fall of the American Industrial Foodscape” , July 24, Summer Scholar Series, British Library, London, UK.