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Deand Curve   Suburbs Have Come To Being Dependent Economic Entities
 

Deand Curve Suburbs Have Come To Being Dependent Economic Entities

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    Deand Curve   Suburbs Have Come To Being Dependent Economic Entities Deand Curve Suburbs Have Come To Being Dependent Economic Entities Presentation Transcript

    • Suburbs have come to be independent economic entities These sibling locations include communities that may be large such as Navi Mumbai or small such as Salt Lake or spontaneously arisen such as large tracts of Ghaziabad, with good urban planning such as Noida or without quality infrastructure such as Gurgaon Source: Market Skyline of India Demand Curve No analysis on the top Indian cities can be complete without a mention of the suburbs around them. Typically, a suburb is a residential area or community outlying a city such that those living in the suburb can commute to the main city for their economic needs. Internationally, the term suburb conjures up images of a relatively unspoilt, less densely populated and predominantly residential community close to a city. In India, it is difficult to find such conditions. Whether it is Gurgaon, or Salt Lake, we find them to be economic entities quite independent from the larger city near which they are located.
    • For instance, Noida, Ghaziabad, Faridabad, and Gurgaon are much more These sibling than mere suburbs of New Delhi. But they are also not large enough to be called New Delhi’s twins. These are younger cities which may, one day, even locations include overtake New Delhi. communities that There are quite a few such locations in India. There is Salt Lake near Kolkata, may be large such as Navi Mumbai in Thane district, the communities on Bangalore-Hosur and Bangalore-Mysore routes in Bangalore rural district, Pimpri Chinchwad near Navi Mumbai or small Pune, and so on. And there are many more across the country, not as well such as Salt Lake or known yet, but will be known soon enough. spontaneously arisen These cities typically fulfil an important need that the larger city was unable to such as large tracts offer. In the initial phase they may have been unidimensional but over time they have gained a distinct character and momentum of their own. The lack of of Ghaziabad, with office space in New Delhi, the lack of new residential areas in Kolkata and good urban planning expensive real estate in Mumbai have contributed to the growth of Salt Lake, such as Noida or Gurgaon, and Navi Mumbai. Now all three are more than just real estate alternatives to larger neighbours. without quality These sibling locations include communities that may be large such as Navi infrastructure such as Mumbai or small such as Salt Lake or spontaneously arisen such as large Gurgaon tracts of Ghaziabad, with good urban planning such as Noida or without quality infrastructure such as Gurgaon. Some have a large concentration of high-income households such as Gurgaon, others like those around Kolkata Source: Market Skyline of India have a large number of poor, still others such as Navi Mumbai tend to have a large middle class. There is only one thing in common between them—they are in the geographical vicinity of a larger city. And they are increasingly becoming Demand Curve more important than their older sibling. Demand Curve is a weekly column by research firmIndicus Analytics Pvt. Ltd on consumer trends and markets.