The Anatomy of the IT Industry Workforce
 

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The IT industry workforce is a complex ecosystem. Contrary to popular belief, IT employees are not limited to to the large technology firms or "24/7 in-front-of-a-computer-screen" workdays. This ...

The IT industry workforce is a complex ecosystem. Contrary to popular belief, IT employees are not limited to to the large technology firms or "24/7 in-front-of-a-computer-screen" workdays. This growing field of diversely talented professionals, operates in every industry of the economy

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The Anatomy of the IT Industry Workforce Document Transcript

  • 1. The IT industry workforce is a complex ecosystem. Contrary to popular belief, IT employees are not limited to the large technology firms or “24/7 in-front-of-a-computer-screen” workdays. This growing field of diversely talented professionals, operates in every industry of the economy. As dissected by CompTIA’s IT Industry Outlook 2013 The Anatomy of the IT Industry Workforce IT Industry Employment • In 2012, an estimated 4.6 million workers were employed in the U.S. IT industry • These employees are divided among 168k U.S. employer firms;4.2 million are employed by these firms; 421k are self-employed • The most concentrated sectors for IT industry employment is IT services (1.5 million employed) and telecom/info services (1.5 million employed) • Sixty percent of workers in the IT industry are employed by large firms (500+ workers) IT Occupation Employment There are approximately 4.2 million workers employed in IT occupations non-IT industries. There are several technology-intense peripheral occupations in non-IT industries that require significant levels of technological expertise. Skills Gap Over the past two years, the IT industry skills gap has continued to be perceived as a growing issue. At the same time, close to half of IT executives (43%) feel that the skills gap in the IT industry is equal to that of other industries. 4.6million workers in IT industry 4.16million IT workers are employed by firms 4.16million IT workers are employed by firms 421kIT workers are self employed 4.2million IT workers are employed in core IT occupations • Of these occupations, computer support specialists, software/applications developers and computer systems analysts are the most prevalent core IT jobs (632k; 539k; 487k workers each, respectively) Computer support specialists PERIPHERAL NON-IT INDUSTRY TECH JOBS BIGGEST GROWTH IN NON-IT INDUSTRY TECH JOBSSoftware/applications developers Computer systems analysts • From 2010-2020, the three biggest increases in number of jobs per occupation will occur in Software/Systems software developers (32%), database administrators (31%) and network and computer systems administrators/software and applications developers, (28%) • The top three average annual salaries are for the following occupations: • Computer and Information Systems Managers ($125k) • Computer and Information Research Scientists ($103k) • Computer Hardware Engineers ($101k) • There are 790k U.S. workers in peripheral IT positions 32%Software/systems software developers 31%Database administrators 28%System administrator/software and application developers View additional CompTIA business research at http://www.comptia.org/research/businessandeconomics.aspx CompTIA Research and Market Intelligence provides timely, relevant data and insights for the IT industry. CompTIA has a library of over 100 research reports and whitepapers, with new material published each month. Using rigorous research techniques, CompTIA collects data from tens of thousands of end-users and IT companies on a wide range of issues covering tech trends, channel dynamics and the IT workforce. CompTIA members get this research as part of their member benefits. Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Economic Census. F ast forward to 2020 2 4 6 8 10 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 National unemployment rate in December 2012 was 7.6% IT occupation unemployment rate in December 2012 was 3.8% IT Unemployment In 2012, the national unemployment rate for IT occupations, including computer and mathematical categories, was less than half of the national average for unemployment. The IT industry also continued to add a new number of jobs, leaving us hopeful for continued future growth. • In 2012, the computer and mathematical occupation category added 308,000 new jobs.42%IT managers believe there is a skills gap According to the research consultancy IDC, the global IT market reached $3.6 trillion in 2012 - almost $1 trillion in the U.S. alone. The U.S. IT industry is segmented into several categories with workers spread across various sectors and firm sizes – from multinational corporations to sole proprietorships.