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Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 to June 2012

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Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 to June 2012

Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 to June 2012

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  • 1. Acoustics & Sonar Engineering Radar, Missiles & Defense Systems Engineering & Project Management Engineering & Communications APPLIED TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE, LLC Training Rocket Scientists Since 1984 Volume 111 Valid through July 2012 Sign Up to Access Course Samplers TECHNICAL TRAINING PUBLIC & ONSITE SINCE 1984
  • 2. 2 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Applied Technology Institute, LLC 349 Berkshire Drive Riva, Maryland 21140-1433 Tel 410-956-8805 • Fax 410-956-5785 Toll Free 1-888-501-2100 www.ATIcourses.com Technical and Training Professionals, Now is the time to think about bringing an ATI course to your site! If there are 8 or more people who are interested in a course, you save money if we bring the course to you. If you have 15 or more students, you save over 50% compared to a public course. This catalog includes upcoming open enrollment dates for many courses. We can teach any of them at your location. Our website, www.ATIcourses.com, lists over 50 additional courses that we offer. For 26 years, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has earned the TRUST of training departments nationwide. We have presented “on-site” training at all major DoD facilities and NASA centers, and for a large number of their contractors. Since 1984, we have emphasized the big picture systems engineering perspective in: - Defense Topics - Engineering & Data Analysis - Sonar & Acoustic Engineering - Space & Satellite Systems - Systems Engineering with instructors who love to teach! We are constantly adding new topics to our list of courses - please call if you have a scientific or engineering training requirement that is not listed. We would love to send you a quote for an onsite course! For “on-site” presentations, we can tailor the course, combine course topics for audience relevance, and develop new or specialized courses to meet your objectives. Regards, P.S. We can help you arrange “on-site” courses with your training department. Give us a call.
  • 3. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 3 Table of Contents Defense, Missiles, & Radar Combat Systems Engineering UPDATED! Feb 28-Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Cyber Warfare - Theory & Fundamentals NEW! Apr 3-4, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Explosives Technology and Modeling Jun 25-28, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Fundamentals of Rockets & Missiles Jan 31-Feb 2, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mar 6-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 GPS and Other Radionavigation Satellites Jan 30-Feb 2, 2012 • Cape Canaveral, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Mar 12-15, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Apr 16-19, 2012 • Colorado Springs, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS - Intermediate / Joint Range Extension Apr 2-4, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Jun 25-27, 2012 • Chantilly, Virginia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Missile System Design Mar 26-28, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 May 1-3, 2012 • Laurel, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Modern Missile Analysis Mar 19-22, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Multi-Target Tracking & Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Jan 31 - Feb 2, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 May 29-31, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Network Centric Warfare - An Introduction NEW! Mar 6-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Radar 101 / Radar 201 Apr 16-17, 2012 • Laurel, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Radar Systems Design & Engineering Feb 28 - Mar 2, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Space-Based Radar Mar 5-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Strapdown & Integrated Navigation Systems Feb 27-Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Synthetic Aperture Radar - Fundamentals May 7-8, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Jun 4-5, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Synthetic Aperture Radar - Advanced May 9-10, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Tactical Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) NEW! Mar 19-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Overview Mar 19, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals NEW! Mar 20-22, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Engineering & Communications Antenna & Array Fundamentals Feb 28-Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Computational Electromagnetics NEW! May 16-18, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Designing Wireless Systems for EMC NEW! Mar 6-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Digital Signal Processing System Design May 21-24, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Fundamentals of Engineering Probability: Visualization NEW! Apr 9-12, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fundamentals of RF Technology Mar 20-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Grounding & Shielding for EMC Jan 31-Feb 2, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 May 1-3, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Instrumentation for Test & Measurement NEW! Mar 27-29, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Introduction to EMI/EMC Feb 28 - Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Kalman, H-Infinity, & Nonlinear Estimation Jun 12-14, 2012 • Laurel, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Practical Design of Experiments Mar 20-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Signal & Image Processing & Analysis for Scientists & Eng May 22-24, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Wavelets: A Conceptual, Practical Approach Feb 28-Mar 1, 2012 • San Diego, California. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Jun 12-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Wireless Sensor Networking NEW! Jun 11-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Systems Engineering & Project Management Agile Boot Camp Practitioner's Real-World Solutions NEW! Feb - Jun 2012 • (Please See Page 36 For Available Dates) . . . . . . . 36 Agile Project Management Certification Workshop NEW! Feb - May 2012 • (Please See Page 37 For Available Dates) . . . . . . 37 Applied Systems Engineering Apr 16-19, 2012 • Orlando, Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Architecting with DODAF Mar 15-16, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Jun 4-5, 2012 • Denver, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Cost Estimating NEW! Feb 22-23, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Jul 17-18, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 CSEP Preparation Mar 20-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Apr 20-21, 2012 • Orlando, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Fundamentals of COTS-Based Systems Engineering NEW! May 8-10, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering Feb 14-15, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Jun 6-7, 2012 • Denver, Colorado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Model Based Systems Engineering NEW! May 22-24, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Principles of Test & Evaluation Mar 13-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Requirements Engineering with DEVSME NEW! Apr 24-26, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Technical CONOPS & Concepts Master's Course NEW! Mar 13-15, 2012 • Virginia Beach, Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Apr 3-5, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Apr 10-12, 2012 • Virginia Beach, Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 May 8-10, 2012 • Virginia Beach, Virginia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Acoustic & Sonar Engineering Acoustics Fundamentals, Measurements & Applications Apr 10-12, 2012 • Silver Spring, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Jul 17-19, 2012 • Bremmerton, Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Advanced Undersea Warfare May 1-3, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Applied Physical Oceanography Modeling and Acoustics Jun 5-7, 2012 • Slidell, Louisiana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Fundamentals of Passive & Active Sonar NEW! Jul 16-19, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Fundamentals of Random Vibration & Shock Testing Mar 20-22, 2012 • College Park, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 May 8-10, 2012 • Boxborough, Massachusetts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Jul 9-11, 2012 • Boulder, Colorado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Fundamentals of Sonar Transducers Design Apr 10-12, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Mechanics of Underwater Noise May 1-3 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Military Standard 810G Testing NEW! Mar 19-22, 2012 • Boxborough, Massachusetts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Apr 2-5, 2012 • Jupiter, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Jun 18-21, 2012 • Detroit, Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Ocean Optics: Fundamentals & Naval Applications NEW! Jun 12-13, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Sonar Principles & ASW Analysis Jun 11-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Sonar Signal Processing May 15-17, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Underwater Acoustics 201 Apr 24-25, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers NEW! Apr 17-19, 2012 • Silver Spring, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Underwater Acoustics, Modeling and Simulation Jun 11-14, 2012 • Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Vibration & Noise Control Apr 30 - May 3, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Jun 11-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Topics for On-site Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Popular “On-site” Topics & Ways to Register. . . . . . . . . . 64
  • 4. 4 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Combat Systems Engineering February 28 - March 1, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary The increasing level of combat system integration and communications requirements, coupled with shrinking defense budgets and shorter product life cycles, offers many challenges and opportunities in the design and acquisition of new combat systems. This three-day course teaches the systems engineering discipline that has built some of the modern military’s greatest combat and communications systems, using state-of-the-art systems engineering techniques. It details the decomposition and mapping of war-fighting requirements into combat system functional designs. A step-by-step description of the combat system design process is presented emphasizing the trades made necessary because of growing performance, operational, cost, constraints and ever increasing system complexities. Topics include the fire control loop and its closure by the combat system, human-system interfaces, command and communication systems architectures, autonomous and net-centric operation, induced information exchange requirements, role of communications systems, and multi-mission capabilities. Engineers, scientists, program managers, and graduate students will find the lessons learned in this course valuable for architecting, integration, and modeling of combat system. Emphasis is given to sound system engineering principles realized through the application of strict processes and controls, thereby avoiding common mistakes. Each attendee will receive a complete set of detailed notes for the class. Instructor Robert Fry works at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he is a member of the Principal Professional Staff.  Throughout his career he has been involved in the development of new combat weapon system concepts, development of system requirements, and balancing allocations within the fire control loop between sensing and weapon kinematic capabilities. He has worked on many aspects of the AEGIS combat system including AAW, BMD, AN/SPY- 1, and multi-mission requirements development. Missile system development experience includes SM- 2, SM-3, SM-6, Patriot, THAAD, HARPOON, AMRAAM, TOMAHAWK, and other missile systems. What You Will Learn • The trade-offs and issues for modern combat system design. • The role of subsystem in combat system operation. • How automation and technology impact combat system design. • Understanding requirements for joint warfare, net- centric warfare, and open architectures. • Lessons learned from AEGIS development. Course Outline 1. Combat System Overview. Combat system characteristics. Functional description for the combat system in terms of the sensor and weapons control, communications, and command and control. Anti-air Warfare. Anti- surface Warfare. Anti-submarine Warfare. 2. Combat System Functional Organization. Combat system layers and operation. 3. Sensors. Review of the variety of multi- warfare sensor systems, their capability, operation, management, and limitations. 4. Weaponry. Weapon system suites employed by the AEGIS combat system and their capability, operation, management, and limitations.  Basics of missile design and operation. 5. Fire Control Loops. What the fire control loop is and how it works, its vulnerabilities, limitations, and system battlespace. 6. Engagement Control. Weapon control, planning, and coordination. 7. Tactical Command and Contro. Human- in-the-loop, system latencies, and coordinated planning and response. 8. Communications. Current and future communications systems employed with combat systems and their relationship to combat system functions and interoperability. 9. Combat System Development. Overview of the combat system engineering and acquisition processes. 10. Current AEGIS Missions and Directions. Performance in low-intensity conflicts. Changing Navy missions, threat trends, shifts in the defense budget, and technology growth. 11. Network-Centric Operation and Warfare. Net-centric gain in warfare, network layers and coordination, and future directions. Updated! www.aticourses.com/combat_systems_engineering.html Video!
  • 5. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 5 Summary This two-day course is intended for technical and programmatic staff involved in the development, analysis, or testing of Information Assurance, Network Warfare, Network-Centric, and NetOPs systems. The course will provide perspective on emerging policy, doctrine, strategy, and operational constraints affecting the development of cyber warfare systems. This knowledge will greatly enhance participants’ ability to develop operational systems and concepts that will produce integrated, controlled, and effective cyber effects at each warfare level. Instructor Al Kinney is a retired Naval Officer and holds a Masters Degree in electrical engineering. His professional experience includes more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. What You Will Learn • What are the relationships between cyber warfare, information assurance, information operations, and network-centric warfare? • How can a cyber warfare capability enable freedom of action in cyberspace? • What are legal constraints on cyber warfare? • How can cyber capabilities meet standards for weaponization? • How should cyber capabilities be integrated with military exercises? • How can military and civilian cyberspace organizations prepare and maintain their workforce to play effective roles in cyberspace? • What is the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI)? From this course you will obtain in-depth knowledge and awareness of the cyberspace domain, its functional characteristics, and its organizational inter-relationships enabling your organization to make meaningful contributions in the domain of cyber warfare through technical consultation, systems development, and operational test & evaluation. Course Outline 1. Cyberspace as a Warfare Domain. Domain terms of reference. Comparison of operational missions conducted through cyberspace. Operational history of cyber warfare. 2. Stack Positioning as a Maneuver Analog. Exploring the space where tangible cyber warfare maneuver really happens. Extend the network stack concept to other elements of cyberspace. Understand the advantage gained through proficient cyberscape navigation. 3. Organizational Constructs in Cyber Warfare. Inter-relationships between traditional and emerging warfare, intelligence, and systems policy authorities. 4. Cyberspace Doctrine and Strategy. National Military Strategy for Cyberspace Operations. Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI). Developing a framework for a full spectrum cyberspace capabilities. 5. Legal Considerations for Cyber Warfare. Overview of pertinent US Code for cyberspace. Adapting the international Law of Armed Conflict to cyber warfare. Decision frameworks and metaphors for making legal choices in uncharted territory. 6. Operational Theory of Cyber Warfare. Planning and achieving cyber effects. Understanding policy implications and operational risks in cyber warfare. Developing a cyber deterrence strategy. 7. Cyber Warfare Training and Exercise Requirements. Understanding of the depth of technical proficiency and operational savvy required to develop, maintain, and exercise integrated cyber warfare capabilities. 8. Cyber Weaponization. Cyber weapons taxonomy. Weapon-target interplay. Test and Evaluation Standards. Observable effects. 9. Command & Control for Cyber Warfare. Joint Command & Control principles. Joint Battlespace Awareness. Situational Awareness. Decision Support. 10. Survey of International Cyber Warfare Capabilities. Open source exploration of cyber warfare trends in India, Pakistan, Russia, and China. April 3-4, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1090 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Cyber Warfare – Theory & Fundamentals NEW!
  • 6. 6 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 June 25-28, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico $1995 (8:30am - 4:30pm) 4 Day Course! Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This four-day course is designed for scientists, engineers and managers interested in the current state of explosive and propellant technology. After an introduction to shock waves, the current explosive technology is described.  Numerical  methods for evaluating explosive and propellant sensitivity to shock waves are described and applied to vulnerability problems such as projectile impact and  burning to detonation. Instructor Charles L. Mader, Ph.D.,is a retired Fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory and President of a consulting company. Dr. Mader authored the monograph Numerical Modeling of Detonation, and also wrote four dynamic material property data volumes published by the University of California Press. His book and CD-ROM entitled Numerical Modeling of Explosives and Propellants, Third Edition, published in 2008 by CRC Press will be the text for the course. He is the author of Numerical Modeling of Water Waves, Second Edition, published in 2004 by CRC Press. He is listed in Who's Who in America and Who's Who in the World. He has consulted and guest lectured for public and private organizations in several countries. Explosives Technology and Modeling Who Should Attend This course is suited for scientists, engineers, and managers interested in the current state of explosive and propellant technology, and in the use of numerical modeling to evaluate the performance and vulnerability of explosives and propellants. Course Materials Participants will receive a copy of Numerical Modeling of Explosives and Propellants, Third Edition by Dr. Charles Mader, 2008 CRC Press. In addition, participants will receive an updated CD-ROM. What You Will Learn • What are Shock Waves and Detonation Waves? • What makes an Explosive Hazardous? • Where Shock Wave and Explosive Data is available. • How to model Explosive and Propellant Performance. • How to model Explosive Hazards and Vulnerability. • How to use the furnished explosive performance and hydrodynamic computer codes. • The current state of explosive and propellant technology. From this course you will obtain the knowledge to evaluate explosive performance, hazards and understand the literature. Course Outline 1. Shock Waves. Fundamental Shock Wave Hydrodynamics, Shock Hugoniots, Phase Change, Oblique Shock Reflection, Regular and Mach Shock Reflection. 2. Shock Equation of State Data Bases. Shock Hugoniot Data, Shock Wave Profile Data., Radiographic Data, Explosive Performance Data, Aquarium Data,  Russian Shock and Explosive Data. 3. Performance of Explosives and Propellants. Steady-State Explosives. Non-Ideal Explosives – Ammonium Salt-Explosive Mixtures, Ammonium Nitrate-Fuel Oil (ANFO) Explosives, Metal Loaded Explosives.  Non-Steady State Detonations – Build- Up in Plane, Diverging and Converging Geometry, Chemistry of Build-Up of Detonation.  Propellant Performance. 4. Initiation of Detonation. Thermal Initiation, Explosive Hazard Calibration Tests.  Shock Initiation of Homogeneous Explosives.  Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives – Hydrodynamic Hot Spot Model, Shock Sensitivity and Effects on Shock Sensitivity of Composition, Particle Size and Temperature.  The FOREST FIRE MODEL – Failure Diameter, Corner Turning, Desensitization of Explosives by Preshocking, Projectile Initiation of Explosives, Burning to Detonation. 5. Modeling Hydodynamics on Personal Computers. Numerical Solution of One-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional Lagrangian Reactive Flow, Numerical Solution of Two-Dimensional and Three- Dimensional Eulerian Reactive Flow. 6. Design and Interpretation of Experiments. Plane-Wave Experiments, Explosions in Water, Plate Dent Experiments, Cylinder Test, Jet Penetration of Inerts and Explosives, Plane Wave Lens, Regular and Mach Reflection of Shock and Detonation Waves, Insensitive High Explosive Initiators, Colliding Detonations, Shaped Charge Jet Formation and Target Penetration. 7. NOBEL Code and Proton Radiography. AMR Reactive Hydrodynamic code with models of both Build-up TO and OF Detonation used to model oblique initiation of Insensitive High Explosives, explosive cavity formation in water, meteorite and nuclear explosion generated cavities, Munroe jets, Failure Cones, Hydrovolcanic explosions.
  • 7. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 7 Fundamentals of Rockets and Missiles January 31 - February 2, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico March 6-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This three-day course provides an overview of rockets and missiles for government and industry officials with limited technical experience in rockets and missiles. The course provides a practical foundation of knowledge in rocket and missile issues and technologies. The seminar is designed for engineers, technical personnel, military specialist, decision makers and managers of current and future projects needing a more complete understanding of the complex issues of rocket and missile technology The seminar provides a solid foundation in the issues that must be decided in the use, operation and development of rocket systems of the future. You will learn a wide spectrum of problems, solutions and choices in the technology of rockets and missile used for military and civil purposes. Attendees will receive a complete set of printed notes. These notes will be an excellent future reference for current trends in the state-of-the-art in rocket and missile technology and decision making. Instructor Edward L. Keith is a multi-discipline Launch Vehicle System Engineer, specializing in integration of launch vehicle technology, design, modeling and business strategies. He is currently an independent consultant, writer and teacher of rocket system technology. He is experienced in launch vehicle operations, design, testing, business analysis, risk reduction, modeling, safety and reliability. He also has 13-years of government experience including five years working launch operations at Vandenberg AFB. Mr. Keith has written over 20 technical papers on various aspects of low cost space transportation over the last two decades. Course Outline 1. Introduction to Rockets and Missiles. The Classifications of guided, and unguided, missile systems is introduced. The practical uses of rocket systems as weapons of war, commerce and the peaceful exploration of space are examined. 2. Rocket Propulsion made Simple. How rocket motors and engines operate to achieve thrust. Including Nozzle Theory, are explained. The use of the rocket equation and related Mass Properties metrics are introduced. The flight environments and conditions of rocket vehicles are presented. Staging theory for rockets and missiles are explained. Non-traditional propulsion is addressed. 3. Introduction to Liquid Propellant Performance, Utility and Applications. Propellant performance issues of specific impulse, Bulk density and mixture ratio decisions are examined. Storable propellants for use in space are described. Other propellant Properties, like cryogenic properties, stability, toxicity, compatibility are explored. Mono-Propellants and single propellant systems are introduced. 4. Introducing Solid Rocket Motor Technology. The advantages and disadvantages of solid rocket motors are examined. Solid rocket motor materials, propellant grains and construction are described. Applications for solid rocket motors as weapons and as cost-effective space transportation systems are explored. Hybrid Rocket Systems are explored. 5. Liquid Rocket System Technology. Rocket Engines, from pressure fed to the three main pump-fed cycles, are examined. Engine cooling methods are explored. Other rocket engine and stage elements are described. Control of Liquid Rocket stage steering is presented. Propellant Tanks, Pressurization systems and Cryogenic propellant Management are explained. 6. Foreign vs. American Rocket Technology and Design. How the former Soviet aerospace system diverged from the American systems, where the Russians came out ahead, and what we can learn from the differences. Contrasts between the Russian and American Design philosophy are observed to provide lessons for future design. Foreign competition from the end of the Cold War to the foreseeable future is explored. 7. Rockets in Spacecraft Propulsion. The difference between launch vehicle booster systems, and that found on spacecraft, satellites and transfer stages, is examined The use of storable and hypergolic propellants in space vehicles is explained. Operation of rocket systems in micro-gravity is studied. 8. Rockets Launch Sites and Operations. Launch Locations in the USA and Russia are examined for the reason the locations have been chosen. The considerations taken in the selection of launch sites are explored. The operations of launch sites in a more efficient manner, is examined for future systems. 9. Rockets as Commercial Ventures. Launch Vehicles as American commercial ventures are examined, including the motivation for commercialization. The Commercial Launch Vehicle market is explored. 10. Useful Orbits and Trajectories Made Simple. The student is introduced to simplified and abbreviated orbital mechanics. Orbital changes using Delta-V to alter an orbit, and the use of transfer orbits, are explored. Special orbits like geostationary, sun synchronous and Molnya are presented. Ballistic Missile trajectories and re-entry penetration is examined. 11. Reliability and Safety of Rocket Systems. Introduction to the issues of safety and reliability of rocket and missile systems is presented. The hazards of rocket operations, and mitigation of the problems, are explored. The theories and realistic practices of understanding failures within rocket systems, and strategies to improve reliability, is discussed. 12. Expendable Launch Vehicle Theory, Performance and Uses. The theory of Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) dominance over alternative Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) is explored. The controversy over simplification of liquid systems as a cost effective strategy is addressed. 13. Reusable Launch Vehicle Theory and Performance. The student is provided with an appreciation and understanding of why Reusable Launch Vehicles have had difficulty replacing expendable launch vehicles. Classification of reusable launch vehicle stages is introduced. The extra elements required to bring stages safely back to the starting line is explored. Strategies to make better RLV systems are presented. 14. The Direction of Technology. A final open discussion regarding the direction of rocket technology, science, usage and regulations of rockets and missiles is conducted to close out the class study. Who Should Attend • Aerospace Industry Managers. • Government Regulators, Administrators and sponsors of rocket or missile projects. • Engineers of all disciplines supporting rocket and missile projects. • Contractors or investors involved in missile development. • Military Professionals. What You Will Learn • Fundamentals of rocket and missile systems. • The spectrum of rocket uses and technologies. • Differences in technology between foreign and domestic rocket systems. • Fundamentals and uses of solid and liquid rocket systems. • Differences between systems built as weapons and those built for commerce.
  • 8. 8 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 GPS and Other Radionavigation Satellites International Navigation Solutions for Military, Civilian, and Aerospace Applications "The presenter was very energetic and truly passionate about the material" " Tom Logsdon is the best teacher I have ever had. His knowledge is excellent. He is a 10!" "Mr. Logsdon did a bang-up job explaining and deriving the theories of special/general relativity–and how they are associated with the GPS navigation solutions." "I loved his one-page mathematical deriva- tions and the important points they illus- trate." Summary If present plans materialize, 128 radionavigation satellites will soon be installed along the space frontier. They will be owned and operated by six different countries hoping to capitalize on the financial success of the GPS constellation. In this popular four-day short course Tom Logsdon describes in detail how these various radionavigation systems work and reviews the many practical benefits they are slated to provide to military and civilian users around the globe. Logsdon will explain how each radionavigation system works and how to use it in various practical situations. January 30 - February 2, 2012 Cape Canaveral, Florida March 12-15, 2012 Columbia, Maryland April 16-19, 2012 Colorado Springs, Colorado $1995 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Radionavigation Concepts. Active and passive radionavigation systems. Position and velocity solutions. Nanosecond timing accuracies. Today’s spaceborne atomic clocks. Websites and other sources of information. Building a flourishing $200 billion radionavigation empire in space. 2. The Three Major Segments of the GPS. Signal structure and pseudorandom codes. Modulation techniques. Practical performance-enhancements. Relativistic time dilations. Inverted navigation solutions. 3. Navigation Solutions and Kalman Filtering Techniques. Taylor series expansions. Numerical iteration. Doppler shift solutions. Kalman filtering algorithms. 4. Designing Effective GPS Receivers. The functions of a modern receiver. Antenna design techniques. Code tracking and carrier tracking loops. Commercial chipsets. Military receivers. Navigation solutions for orbiting satellites. 5. Military Applications. Military test ranges. Tactical and strategic applications. Autonomy and survivability enhancements. Smart bombs and artillery projectiles.. 6. Integrated Navigation Systems. Mechanical and strapdown implementations. Ring lasers and fiber-optic gyros. Integrated navigation systems. Military applications. 7. Differential Navigation and Pseudosatellites. Special committee 104’s data exchange protocols. Global data distribution. Wide-area differential navigation. Pseudosatellites. International geosynchronous overlay satellites. The American WAAS, the European EGNOS, and the Japanese QZSS.. 8. Carrier-Aided Solution Techniques. Attitude- determination receivers. Spaceborne navigation for NASA’s Twin Grace satellites. Dynamic and kinematic orbit determination. Motorola’s spaceborne monarch receiver. Relativistic time-dilation derivations. Relativistic effects due to orbital eccentricity. 9. The Navstar Satellites. Subsystem descriptions. On-orbit test results. Orbital perturbations and computer modeling techniques. Station-keeping maneuvers. Earth- shadowing characteristics. The European Galileo, the Chinese Biedou/Compass, the Indian IRNSS, and the Japanese QZSS. 10. Russia’s Glonass Constellation. Performance comparisons. Orbital mechanics considerations. The Glonass subsystems. Russia’s SL-12 Proton booster. Building dual-capability GPS/Glonass receivers. Glonass in the evening news. Instructor Tom Logsdon has worked on the GPS radionavigation satellites and their constellation for more than 20 years. He helped design the Transit Navigation System and the GPS and he acted as a consultant to the European Galileo Spaceborne Navigation System. His key assignment have included constellation selection trades, military and civilian applications, force multiplier effects, survivability enhancements and spacecraft autonomy studies. Over the past 30 years Logsdon has taught more than 300 short courses. He has also made two dozen television appearances, helped design an exhibit for the Smithsonian Institution, and written and published 1.7 million words, including 29 non fiction books. These include Understanding the Navstar, Orbital Mechanics, and The Navstar Global Positioning System. Each Student willreceive a free GPSreceiver with color mapdisplays! www.aticourses.com/gps_technology.htm Video!
  • 9. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 9 Instructor Patrick Pierson is president of a training, consulting, and software development company with offices in the U.S. and U.K. Patrick has more than 23 years of operational experience, and is internationally recognized as a Tactical Data Link subject matter expert. Patrick has designed more than 30 Tactical Data Link training courses and personally trains hundreds of students around the globe every year. What You Will Learn • The course is designed to enable the student to be able to speak confidently and with authority about all of the subject matter on the right. The course is suitable for: • Operators • Engineers • Consultants • Sales staff • Software Developers • Business Development Managers • Project / Program Managers Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS - Intermediate April 2-3, 2012 Columbia, Maryland June 25-26, 2012 Chantilly, Virginia $1750 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol April 4, 2012 Columbia, Maryland June 27, 2012 Chantilly, Virginia $500 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Intermediate (L16 / F Level-3) Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol (JRE / A Level-1) Summary The Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Intermediate Course is a two-day training course that covers the most important topics effecting Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS.  The course includes 22 instructional modules and is one of our most popular courses.  This course is instructional in nature and does not involve hands-on training. Summary The Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol (JREAP) Introduction course is a one-day training course being offered to students that complete the JTIDS / MIDS Intermediate course.  The course explains the JREAP technology, message components, JREAP protocols, operational procedures, as well as operational support and planning requirements. Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS is a prerequisite. Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS - Intermediate / Joint Range Extension Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Course Outline Day 1 Introduction to Link 16 Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Documentation Link 16 Enhancements System Characteristics Time Division Multiple Access Network Participation Groups J-Series Messages JTIDS / MIDS Pulse Development JTIDS / MIDS Time Slot Components JTIDS / MIDS Message Packing and Pulses JTIDS / MIDS Networks / Nets Day 2 Access Modes JTIDS / MIDS Terminal Synchronization JTIDS / MIDS Network Time JTIDS / MIDS Network Roles JTIDS / MIDS Terminal Navigation JTIDS / MIDS Relays Communications Security JTIDS / MIDS Pulse Deconfliction JTIDS / MIDS Terminal Restrictions Time Slot Duty Factor JTIDS / MIDS Terminals Course Outline Day 3 Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol Topics Include: JREAP History JREAP Documentation JREAP Introduction Common Message Elements JREAP Full Stack Transmission Block Headers Message Group Headers JREAP Application Block JREAP Receipt Compliance JREAP Management Messages MIL-STD 3011 Appendix-B MIL-STD 3011 Appendix-C General Forwarding Requirements JREAP Planning Considerations
  • 10. 10 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Who Should Attend The course is oriented toward the needs of missile engineers, systems engineers, analysts, marketing personnel, program managers, university professors, and others working in the area of missile systems and technology development. Attendees will gain an understanding of missile design, missile technologies, launch platform integration, missile system measures of merit, and the missile system development process. What You Will Learn • Key drivers in the missile design and system engineering process. • Critical tradeoffs, methods and technologies in subsystems, aerodynamic, propulsion, and structure sizing. • Launch platform-missile integration. • Robustness, lethality, guidance navigation & control, accuracy, observables, survivability, reliability, and cost considerations. • Missile sizing examples. • Missile development process. Instructor Eugene L. Fleeman has 47 years of government, industry, academia, and consulting experience in missile system and technology development. Formerly a manager of missile programs at Air Force Research Laboratory, Rockwell International, Boeing, and Georgia Tech, he is an international lecturer on missiles and the author of over 100 publications, including the AIAA textbook, Tactical Missile Design. 2nd Ed. Summary This three-day short course covers the fundamentals of missile design, development, and system engineering. The course provides a system-level, integrated method for missile aerodynamic configuration/propulsion design and analysis. It addresses the broad range of alternatives in meeting cost, performance and risk requirements. The methods presented are generally simple closed-form analytical expressions that are physics-based, to provide insight into the primary driving parameters. Configuration sizing examples are presented for rocket- powered, ramjet-powered, and turbo-jet powered baseline missiles. Typical values of missile parameters and the characteristics of current operational missiles are discussed as well as the enabling subsystems and technologies for missiles and the current/projected state-of-the-art. Sixty-six videos illustrate missile development activities and missile performance. Daily roundtable discussion. Attendees will vote on the relative emphasis of the material to be presented. Attendees receive course notes as well as the textbook, Tactical Missile Design, 2nd edition. Course Outline 1. Introduction/Key Drivers in the Missile Design and System Engineering Process: Overview of missile design process. Examples of system-of-systems integration. Unique characteristics of missiles. Key aerodynamic configuration sizing parameters. Missile conceptual design synthesis process. Examples of processes to establish mission requirements. Projected capability in command, control, communication, computers, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (C4ISR). Example of Pareto analysis. Attendees vote on course emphasis. 2. Aerodynamic Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: Optimizing missile aerodynamics. Shapes for low observables. Missile configuration layout (body, wing, tail) options. Selecting flight control alternatives. Wing and tail sizing. Predicting normal force, drag, pitching moment, stability, control effectiveness, lift-to-drag ratio, and hinge moment. Maneuver law alternatives. 3. Propulsion Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: Turbojet, ramjet, scramjet, ducted rocket, and rocket propulsion comparisons. Turbojet engine design considerations, prediction and sizing. Selecting ramjet engine, booster, and inlet alternatives. Ramjet performance prediction and sizing. High density fuels. Solid propellant alternatives. Propellant grain cross section trade-offs. Effective thrust magnitude control. Reducing propellant observables. Rocket motor performance prediction and sizing. Motor case and nozzle materials. 4. Weight Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: How to size subsystems to meet flight performance requirements. Structural design criteria factor of safety. Structure concepts and manufacturing processes. Selecting airframe materials. Loads prediction. Weight prediction. Airframe and motor case design. Aerodynamic heating prediction and insulation trades. Dome material alternatives and sizing. Power supply and actuator alternatives and sizing. 5. Flight Performance Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: Flight envelope limitations. Aerodynamic sizing-equations of motion. Accuracy of simplified equations of motion. Maximizing flight performance. Benefits of flight trajectory shaping. Flight performance prediction of boost, climb, cruise, coast, steady descent, ballistic, maneuvering, and homing flight. 6. Measures of Merit and Launch Platform Integration / System Engineering: Achieving robustness in adverse weather. Seeker, navigation, data link, and sensor alternatives. Seeker range prediction. Counter-countermeasures. Warhead alternatives and lethality prediction. Approaches to minimize collateral damage. Fusing alternatives and requirements for fuze angle and time delay. Alternative guidance laws. Proportional guidance accuracy prediction. Time constant contributors and prediction. Maneuverability design criteria. Radar cross section and infrared signature prediction. Survivability considerations. Insensitive munitions. Enhanced reliability. Cost drivers of schedule, weight, learning curve, and parts count. EMD and production cost prediction. Designing within launch platform constraints. Internal vs. external carriage. Shipping, storage, carriage, launch, and separation environment considerations. Launch platform interfaces. Cold and solar environment temperature prediction. 7. Sizing Examples and Sizing Tools: Trade-offs for extended range rocket. Sizing for enhanced maneuverability. Developing a harmonized missile. Lofted range prediction. Ramjet missile sizing for range robustness. Ramjet fuel alternatives. Ramjet velocity control. Correction of turbojet thrust and specific impulse. Turbojet missile sizing for maximum range. Turbojet engine rotational speed. Computer aided sizing tools for conceptual design. Soda straw rocket design-build-fly competition. House of quality process. Design of experiment process. 8. Missile Development Process: Design validation/technology development process. Developing a technology roadmap. History of transformational technologies. Funding emphasis. Alternative proposal win strategies. New missile follow-on projections. Examples of development tests and facilities. Example of technology demonstration flight envelope. Examples of technology development. New technologies for missiles. 9. Summary and Lessons Learned. March 26-28, 2012 Columbia, Maryland May 1-3, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Missile System Design www.aticourses.com/tactical_missile_design.htm Video!
  • 11. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 11 March 19-22, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Instructor Dr. Walter R. Dyer is a graduate of UCLA, with a Ph.D. degree in Control Systems Engineering and Applied Mathematics. He has over thirty years of industry, government and academic experience in the analysis and design of tactical and strategic missiles. His experience includes Standard Missile, Stinger, AMRAAM, HARM, MX, Small ICBM, and ballistic missile defense. He is currently a Senior Staff Member at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and was formerly the Chief Technologist at the Missile Defense Agency in Washington, DC. He has authored numerous industry and government reports and published prominent papers on missile technology. He has also taught university courses in engineering at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. What You Will Learn You will gain an understanding of the design and analysis of homing missiles and the integrated performance of their subsystems. • Missile propulsion and control in the atmosphere and in space. • Clear explanation of homing guidance. • Types of missile seekers and how they work. • Missile testing and simulation. • Latest developments and future trends. Summary This four-day course presents a broad introduction to major missile subsystems and their integrated performance, explained in practical terms, but including relevant analytical methods. While emphasis is on today’s homing missiles and future trends, the course includes a historical perspective of relevant older missiles. Both endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missiles (missiles that operate in the atmosphere and in space) are addressed. Missile propulsion, guidance, control, and seekers are covered, and their roles and interactions in integrated missile operation are explained. The types and applications of missile simulation and testing are presented. Comparisons of autopilot designs, guidance approaches, seeker alternatives, and instrumentation for various purposes are presented. The course is recommended for analysts, engineers, and technical managers who want to broaden their understanding of modern missiles and missile systems.  The analytical descriptions require some technical background, but practical explanations can be appreciated by all students. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Brief history of Missiles. Types of guided missiles. Introduction to ballistic missile defense.- Endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missile operation. Missile basing. Missile subsystems overview. Warheads, lethality and hit-to-kill. Power and power conditioning. 2. Missile Propulsion. The rocket equation. Solid and liquid propulsion. Single stage and multistage boosters. Ramjets and scramjets. Axial propulsion. Divert and attitude control systems. Effects of gravity and atmospheric drag. 3. Missile Airframes, Autopilots And Control. Phases of missile flight. Purpose and functions of autopilots. Missile control configurations. Autopilot design. Open-loop autopilots. Inertial instruments and feedback. Autopilot response, stability, and agility. Body modes and rate saturation. Roll control and induced roll in high performance missiles. Radomes and their effects on missile control. Adaptive autopilots. Rolling airframe missiles. 4. Exoatmospheric Missiles For Ballistic Missile Defense. Exoatmospheric missile autopilots, propulsion and attitude control. Pulse width modulation. Exo- atmospheric missile autopilots. Limit cycles. 5. Missile Guidance. Seeker types and operation for endo- and exo-atmospheric missiles. Passive, active and semi active missile guidance. Radar basics and radar seekers. Passive sensing basics and passive seekers. Scanning seekers and focal plane arrays. Seeker comparisons and tradeoffs for different missions. Signal processing and noise reduction 6. Missile Seekers. Boost and midcourse guidance. Zero effort miss. Proportional navigation and augmented proportional navigation. Biased proportional navigation. Predictive guidance. Optimum homing guidance. Guidance filters. Homing guidance examples and simulation results. Miss distance comparisons with different homing guidance laws. Sources of miss and miss reduction. Beam rider, pure pursuit, and deviated pursuit guidance. 7. Simulation And Its Applications. Current simulation capabilities and future trends. Hardware in the loop. Types of missile testing and their uses, advantages and disadvantages of testing alternatives. Modern Missile Analysis Propulsion, Guidance, Control, Seekers, and Technology www.aticourses.com/missile_systems_analysis.htm Video!
  • 12. 12 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Stan Silberman is a member of the Senior Technical Staff at the Johns Hopkins Univeristy Applied Physics Laboratory. He has over 30 years of experience in tracking, sensor fusion, and radar systems analysis and design for the Navy,Marine Corps, Air Force, and FAA. Recent work has included the integration of a new radar into an existing multisensor system and in the integration, using a multiple hypothesis approach, of shipboard radar and ESM sensors. Previous experience has included analysis and design of multiradar fusion systems, integration of shipboard sensors including radar, IR and ESM, integration of radar, IFF, and time-difference-of- arrival sensors with GPS data sources. Revised With Newly Added Topics Summary The objective of this course is to introduce engineers, scientists, managers and military operations personnel to the fields of target tracking and data fusion, and to the key technologies which are available today for application to this field. The course is designed to be rigorous where appropriate, while remaining accessible to students without a specific scientific background in this field. The course will start from the fundamentals and move to more advanced concepts. This course will identify and characterize the principle components of typical tracking systems. A variety of techniques for addressing different aspects of the data fusion problem will be described. Real world examples will be used to emphasize the applicability of some of the algorithms. Specific illustrative examples will be used to show the tradeoffs and systems issues between the application of different techniques. What You Will Learn • State Estimation Techniques – Kalman Filter, constant-gain filters. • Non-linear filtering – When is it needed? Extended Kalman Filter. • Techniques for angle-only tracking. • Tracking algorithms, their advantages and limitations, including: - Nearest Neighbor - Probabilistic Data Association - Multiple Hypothesis Tracking - Interactive Multiple Model (IMM) • How to handle maneuvering targets. • Track initiation – recursive and batch approaches. • Architectures for sensor fusion. • Sensor alignment – Why do we need it and how do we do it? • Attribute Fusion, including Bayesian methods, Dempster-Shafer, Fuzzy Logic. Multi-Target Tracking and Multi-Sensor Data Fusion January 31 - February 2, 2012 Columbia, Maryland May 29-31, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. 2. The Kalman Filter. 3. Other Linear Filters. 4. Non-Linear Filters. 5. Angle-Only Tracking. 6. Maneuvering Targets: Adaptive Techniques. 7. Maneuvering Targets: Multiple Model Approaches. 8. Single Target Correlation & Association. 9. Track Initiation, Confirmation & Deletion. 10. Using Measured Range Rate (Doppler). 11. Multitarget Correlation & Association. 12. Probabilistic Data Association. 13. Multiple Hypothesis Approaches. 14. Coordinate Conversions. 15. Multiple Sensors. 16. Data Fusion Architectures. 17. Fusion of Data From Multiple Radars. 18. Fusion of Data From Multiple Angle-Only Sensors. 19. Fusion of Data From Radar and Angle-Only Sensor. 20. Sensor Alignment. 21. Fusion of Target Type and Attribute Data. 22. Performance Metrics. www.aticourses.com/radar_tracking_kalman.htm Video!
  • 13. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 13 Instructor Jerry LeMieux, PhD is a pilot and engineer with over 40 years and 10,000 hours of aviation experience. He has over 30 years of experience in operations, program management, systems engineering, R&D and test and evaluation for AEW, fighter and tactical data link acquisition programs. He led 1,300 personnel and managed 100 network and data link acquisition programs with a five year portfolio valued at more than $22 billion. He served at the numbered Air Force Level, responsible for the development, acquisition and sustainment of over 300 information superiority, combat ops and combat support programs that assure integrated battlespace dominance for the Air Force, DoD, US agencies and Allied forces. In civilian life he has consulted on numerous airspace issues for the US Federal Aviation Administration, Air Force, Army, Navy, NASA and DARPA . He holds a PhD in electrical engineering and is a graduate of Air War College and Defense Acquisition University. Summary This 3 day course will cover a variety of Network Centric Warfare (NCW) related topics. You will learn the concepts, theories and principles of how networking sensors, shooters and decision makers can improve warfighting capabilities. The various elements and enabling technologies for NCW are discussed. You will learn how sensors, precision weapons, data links and command and control systems are connected together to provide the right information to the right warfighter at the right time. Additionally, you will learn how to develop models to simulate the performance of a network centric architecture. You will learn about the metrics, MOPs, MOEs, KPPs, KIPS and the network centric checklist that are all used for test and evaluation. You will view examples of various NCW systems for the US Army (Warrior Information Network) and the US Navy (FORCEnet). Finally, case studies will be presented on Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below Blue Force Tracking, Air Combat w & without Link 16, Close Air Support & US/UK Coalition Operations during OIF. Network Centric Warfare – An Introduction Compressing the Kill Chain March 6-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Definition, concept, tenants & principles, benefits, platform vs. network, origins, theories, domains of conflict, common operational picture example, net centricity, network centric operations. 2. Networking the Kill Chain Target characteristics. Targeting process, deliberate targeting, dynamic targeting, time sensitive targets, the find, fix, target, track, engage, and assess (F2T2EA) cycle, NCW kill chain. 3. Sensors & Precision Weapons. Sensors: Optical, thermal, SAR, AMTI, GMTI. Weapons: JDAM, LGB, JSOW and GAM precision weapons. 4. Networks and Data Links. Global information grid & mobile ad-hoc networking, TADIL A, C & J, common data link, improved data modem, Army Tactical Data Link 1, Patriot Digital Information Link, Tactical Information Broadcast System, EPLRS/SADL, Joint Tactical Radios. 5. Networked Command and Control. Joint Battle Management Command and Control, definition, core warfighting capabilities, operational concept, mission threads, integrated architecture, Australia Boeing NC3S. 6. NCW Enabling Technologies. Key issues, sensors, precision weapons & information processing technologies, ultra-wideband optical communications, software and programmable radios, RF beam forming, IP networking, upgraded embedded computers & displays, FPGA, Ethernet switch boards, distributed processing, reconfigurable networking, distributed resource management, transformational satellite communications, GIG bandwidth expansion. 7. Network Centric Frameworks Zachman framework. Dept of Defense Architecture Framework, The Open Group Architecture Framework, IEEE 1471 Standard & conceptual frameworks. 8. Network Centric Architectures client server architecture. Two & three tier client server, thin client, thick client, distributed objects architecture, Common Objects Request Broker Architecture (COBRA), peer to peer architecture, service oriented architecture, Network Centric Enterprise Services and Network Centric Service Oriented Enterprise. 9. NCW Modeling and Simulation. Complexity theory, nonlinear interaction, decentralized control, self organization, nonequilibrium order, adaptation, collective dynamics, entropy based modeling, OSI Model, Amdahl?s Law, and agent based modeling & simulation. 10. NCW Test and Evaluation. Reason metrics, physical metrics, measures of performance, measures of effectiveness, net ready KPP, key interface profiles (KIPs), information assurance, net centric checklist. 11. NCW Implementation. Key elements, horizontal fusion, sense and respond logistics, cultural change and education, Standing Joint Force Headquarters, collaborative information environment, distributive common ground/surface system, dynamic Joint ISR concept, Joint Interagency Coordination Group, Army Warrior Information Network, Navy FORCEnet, Air Force: parallel warfare, effect based operations, command and control constellation, network centric collaborative targeting. Allied implementations: Australia, Canada, New Zealand & UK. 12. Case Studies. Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below Blue Force Tracking, Air Combat with and without Link 16, Close Air Support, US/UK Coalition Operations during Operation Iraqi Freedom. What You Will Learn • Concepts, NCW Principles, Network Centric Operations. • How NCW can Compress the Kill Chain. • Sensors & Precision Weapons as Network Elements. • Data Links used for NCW Communications. • Networked Command & Control, Australia Boeing NC3S. • Network Centric Enabling Technologies. • NCW Frameworks & Architectures. • NCW Modeling & Simulation and Test & Evaluation. • NCW Implementation Including Army WIN & Navy FORCEnet. • Case Studies from Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, Air Combat, Army Force Tracking and US/UK Coalition Operations. NEW!
  • 14. 14 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 RADAR 201 Advances in Modern Radar April 17, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $650 (8:30am - 4:00pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $5000 each Off The Course Tuition." RADAR 101 Fundamentals of Radar April 16, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $650 (8:30am - 4:00pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $5000 each Off The Course Tuition." Summary This concise one-day course is intended for those with only modest or no radar experience. It provides an overview with understanding of the physics behind radar, tools used in describing radar, the technology of radar at the subsystem level and concludes with a brief survey of recent accomplish-ments in various applications. ATTEND EITHER OR BOTH RADAR COURSES! Summary This one-day course is a supplement to the basic course Radar 101, and probes deliberately deeper into selected topics, notably in signal processing to achieve (generally) finer and finer resolution (in several dimensions, imaging included) and in antennas wherein the versatility of the phased array has made such an impact. Finally, advances in radar's own data processing - auto-detection, more refined association processes, and improved auto-tracking - and system wide fusion processes are briefly discussed. Radar 101/201 Course Outline 1. Introduction. The general nature of radar: composition, block diagrams, photos, types and functions of radar, typical characteristics. 2. The Physics of Radar. Electromagnetic waves and their vector representation. The spectrum bands used in radar. Radar waveforms. Scattering. Target and clutter behavior representations. Propagation: refractivity, attenuation, and the effects of the Earth surface. 3. The Radar Range Equation. Development from basic principles. The concepts of peak and average power, signal and noise bandwidth and the matched filter concept, antenna aperture and gain, system noise temperature, and signal detectability. 4. Thermal Noise and Detection in Thermal Noise. Formation of thermal noise in a receiver. System noise temperature (Ts) and noise figure (NF). The role of a low- noise amplifier (LNA). Signal and noise statistics. False alarm probability. Detection thresholds. Detection probability. Coherent and non-coherent multi-pulse integration. 5. The sub-systems of Radar. Transmitter (pulse oscillator vs. MOPA, tube vs. solid state, bottled vs. distributed architecture), antenna (pattern, gain, sidelobes, bandwidth), receiver (homodyne vs. super heterodyne), signal processor (functions, front and back- end), and system controller/tracker. Types, issues, architectures, tradeoff considerations. 5. Current Accomplishments and Concluding Discussion. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Radar’s development, the metamorphosis of the last few decades: analog and digital technology evolution, theory and algorithms, increased digitization: multi-functionality, adaptivity to the environment, higher detection sensitivity, higher resolution, increased performance in clutter. 2. Modern Signal Processing. Clutter and the Doppler principle. MTI and Pulse Doppler filtering. Adaptive cancellation and STAP. Pulse editing. Pulse Compression processing. Adaptive thresholding and detection. Ambiguity resolution. Measurement and reporting. 3. Electronic Steering Arrays (ESA): Principles of Operation. Advantages and cost elements. Behavior with scan angle. Phase shifters, true time delays (TTL) and array bandwidth. Other issues. 4. Solid State Active Array (SSAA) Antennas (AESA). Architecture. Technology. Motivation. Advantages. Increased array digitization and compatibility with adaptive pattern applications. Need for in-place auto-calibration and compensation. 5. Modern Advances in Waveforms. Pulse compression principles. Performance measures. Some legacy codes. State-of-the-art optimal codes. Spectral compliance. Temporal controls. Orthogonal codes. Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) radar. 6. Data Processing Functions. The conventional functions of report to track correlation, track initiation, update, and maintenance. The new added responsibilities of managing a multi-function array: prioritization, timing, resource management. The Multiple Hypothesis tracker. 7. Concluding Discussion. Today’s concern of mission and theatre uncertainties. Increasing requirements at constrained size, weight, and cost. Needs for growth potential. System of systems with data fusion and multiple communication links. Dr. Menachem Levitas received his BS, maxima cum laude, from the University of Portland and his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 1975, both in physics. He has forty one years experience in science and engineering, thirty three of which in radar systems analysis, design, development, and testing for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and FAA. His experience encompasses many ground based, shipboard, and airborne radar systems. He has been technical lead on many radar efforts including Government source selection teams. He is the author of multiple radar based innovations and is a recipient of the Aegis Excellence Award for his contribution toward the AN/SPY-1 high range resolution (HRR) development.  For many years, prior to his retirement in 2011, he had been the chief scientist of Technology Service Corporation / Washington. He continues to provide radar technical support under consulting agreements. Instructor
  • 15. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 15 Radar Systems Design & Engineering Radar Performance Calculations What You Will Learn • What are radar subsystems. • How to calculate radar performance. • Key functions, issues, and requirements. • How different requirements make radars different. • Operating in different modes & environments. • Issues unique to multifunction, phased array, radars. • How airborne radars differ from surface radars. • Today's requirements, technologies & designs. Instructors Dr. Menachem Levitas is the Chief Scientist of Technology Service Corporation (TSC) / Washington. He has thirty-eight years of experience, thirty of which include radar systems analysis and design for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and FAA. He holds the degree of Ph.D. in physics from the University of Virginia, and a B.S. degree from the University of Portland. Stan Silberman is a member of the Senior Technical Staff of Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He has over thirtyyears of experience in radar systems analysis and design for the Navy, Air Force, and FAA. His areas of specialization include automatic detection and tracking systems, sensor data fusion, simulation, and system evaluation. Summary This four-day course covers the fundamental principles of radar functionality, architecture, and performance. Diverse issues such as transmitter stability, antenna pattern, clutter, jamming, propagation, target cross section, dynamic range, receiver noise, receiver architecture, waveforms, processing, and target detection, are treated in detail within the unifying context of the radar range equation, and examined within the contexts of surface and airborne radar platforms. The fundamentals of radar multi-target tracking principles are covered, and detailed examples of surface and airborne radars are presented. This course is designed for engineers and engineering managers who wish to understand how surface and airborne radar systems work, and to familiarize themselves with pertinent design issues and with the current technological frontiers. Course Outline 1. Radar Range Equation. Radar ranging principles, frequencies, architecture, measurements, displays, and parameters. Radar range equation; radar waveforms; antenna patterns types, and parameters. 2. Noise in Receiving Systems and Detection Principles. Noise sources; statistical properties; noise in a receiving chain; noise figure and noise temperature; false alarm and detection probability; pulse integration; target models; detection of steady and fluctuating targets. 3. Propagation of Radio Waves in the Troposphere. Propagation of Radio Waves in the Troposphere. The pattern propagation factor; interference (multipath) and diffraction; refraction; standard and anomalous refractivity; littoral propagation; propagation modeling; low altitude propagation; atmospheric attenuation. 4. CW Radar, Doppler, and Receiver Architecture. Basic properties; CW and high PRF relationships; the Doppler principle; dynamic range, stability; isolation requirements; homodynes and superheterodyne receivers; in-phase and quadrature; signal spectrum; matched filtering; CW ranging; and measurement accuracy. 5. Radar Clutter and Clutter Filtering Principles. Surface and volumetric clutter; reflectivity; stochastic properties; sea, land, rain, chaff, birds, and urban clutter; Pulse Doppler and MTI; transmitter stability; blind speeds and ranges,; Staggered PRFs; filter weighting; performance measures. 6. Airborne Radar. Platform motion; iso-ranges and iso- Dopplers; mainbeam and sidelobe clutter; the three PRF regimes; ambiguities; real beam Doppler sharpening; synthetic aperture ground mapping modes; GMTI. 7. High Range Resolution Principles: Pulse Compression. The Time-bandwidth product; the pulse compression process; discrete and continuous pulse compression codes; performance measures; mismatched filtering. 8. High Range Resolution Principles: Synthetic Wideband. Motivation; alternative techniques; cross-band calibration. 9. Electronically Scanned Radar Systems. Beam formation; beam steering techniques; grating lobes; phase shifters; multiple beams; array bandwidth; true time delays; ultralow sidelobes and array errors; beam scheduling. 10. Active Phased Array Radar Systems. Active vs. passive arrays; architectural and technological properties; the T/R module; dynamic range; average power; stability; pertinent issues; cost; frequency dependence. 11. Auto-Calibration and Auto-Compensation Techniques in Active Phased. Arrays. Motivation; calibration approaches; description of the mutual coupling approach; an auto-compensation approach. 12. Sidelobe Blanking. Motivation; principle; implementation issues. 13. Adaptive Cancellation. The adaptive space cancellation principle; broad pattern cancellers; high gain cancellers; tap delay lines; the effects of clutter; number of jammers, jammer geometries, and bandwidths on canceller performance; channel matching requirements; sample matrix inverse method. 14. Multiple Target Tracking. Definition of Basic terms. Track Initiation, State Estimation & Filtering, Adaptive and Multiple Model Processing, Data Correlation & Association, Tracker Performance Evaluation. February 28 - March 2, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  • 16. 16 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Space-Based Radar March 5-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1990 (8:30am - 4:00pm) (Last Day 8:30am - 12:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most versatile remote sensor. It is an all-weather sensor that can penetrate cloud cover and operate day or night from space-based or airborne systems. This 4.5-day course provides a survey of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) applications and how they influence and are constrained by instrument, platform (satellite) and image signal processing and extraction technologies/design. The course will introduce advanced systems design and associated signal processing concepts and implementation details. The course covers the fundamental concepts and principles for SAR, the key design parameters and system features, space-based systems used for collecting SAR data, signal processing techniques, and many applications of SAR data. Instructors Bart Huxtable has a Ph.D. in Physics from the California Institute of Technology, and a B.Sc. degree in Physics and Math from the University of Delaware. Dr. Huxtable is President of User Systems, Inc. He has over twenty years experience in signal processing and numerical algorithm design and implementation emphasizing application-specific data processing and analysis for remote sensor systems including radars, sonars, and lidars. He integrates his broad experience in physics, mathematics, numerical algorithms, and statistical detection and estimation theory to develop processing algorithms and performance simulations for many of the modern remote sensing applications using radars, sonars, and lidars. Dr. Keith Raney has a Ph.D. in Computer, Information and Control Engineering from the University of Michigan, an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, and a B.S. degree from Harvard University. He works for the Space Department of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, with responsibilities for earth observation systems development, and radar system analysis. He holds United States and international patents on the Delay/Doppler Radar Altimeter. He was on NASA’s Europa Orbiter Radar Sounder instrument design team, and on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter instrument definition team. Dr. Raney has an extensive background in imaging radar theory, and in interdisciplinary applications using sensing systems. Course Outline 1. Radar Basics. Nature of EM waves, Vector representation of waves, Scattering and Propagation. 2. Tools and Conventions. Radar sensitivity and accuracy performance. 3. Subsystems and Critical Radar Components. Transmitter, Antenna, Receiver and Signal Processor, Control and Interface Apparatus, Comparison to Commsats. 4. Fundamentals of Aperture Synthesis. Motivation for SAR, SAR image formation. 5. Fourier Imaging. Bragg resonance condition, Born approximation. 6. Signal Processing. Pulse compression: range resolution and signal bandwidth, Overview of Strip- Map Algorithms including Range-Doppler algorithm, Range migration algorithm, Chirp scaling algorithm, Overview of Spotlight Algorithms including Polar format algorithm, Motion Compensation, Autofocusing using the Map-Drift and PGA algorithms. 7. Radar Phenomenology and Image Interpretation. Radar and target interaction including radar cross-section, attenuation & penetration (atmosphere, foliage), and frequency dependence, Imagery examples. 8. Visual Presentation of SAR Imagery. Non- linear remapping, Apodization, Super resolution, Speckle reduction (Multi-look). 9. Interferometry. Topographic mapping, Differential topography (crustal deformation & subsidence), Change detection. 10. Polarimetry. Terrain classification, Scatterer characterization. 11. Miscellaneous SAR Applications. Mapping, Forestry, Oceanographic, etc. 12. Ground Moving Target Indication (GMTI). Theory and Applications. 13. Image Quality Parameters. Peak-to-sidelobe ratio, Integrated sidelobe ratio, Multiplicative noise ratio and major contributors. 14. Radar Equation for SAR. Key radar equation parameters, Signal-to-Noise ratio, Clutter-to-Noise ratio, Noise equivalent backscatter, Electronic counter measures and electronic counter counter measures. 15. Ambiguity Constraints for SAR. Range ambiguities, Azimuth ambiguities, Minimum antenna area, Maximum area coverage rate, ScanSAR. 16. SAR Specification. System specification overview, Design drivers. 17. Orbit Selection. LEO, MEO, GEO, Access area, Formation flying (e.g., cartwheel). 18. Example SAR Systems. History, Airborne, Space-Based, Future. What You Will Learn • Basic concepts and principles of SAR and its applications. • What are the key system parameters. • How is performance calculated. • Design implementation and tradeoffs. • How to design and build high performance signal processors. • Current state-of-the-art systems. • SAR image interpretation.
  • 17. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 17 Strapdown & Integrated Navigation Systems Guidance, Navigation & Control Engineering What You Will Learn • What are the key differences between gimballing and strapdown Intertial Navigation Systems? • How are transfer alignment operations being carried out on modern battlefields? • How sensitive are today’s solid state accelerometers and how are they currently being designed? • What is a covariance matrix and how can it be used in evaluating the performance capabilities of Integrated GPS/INS Navigation Systems? • How do the Paveway IV smart bombs differ from their predecessors? • How are MEMS devices manufactured and what practical functions do they perform? • What is the deep space network and how does it handle its demanding missions? February 27 - March 1, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary In this highly structured 4-day short course – specifically tailored to the needs of busy engineers, scientists, managers, and aerospace professionals – Thomas S. Logsdon will provide you with new insights into the modern guidance, navigation, and control techniques now being perfected at key research centers around the globe. The various topics are illustrated with powerful analogies, full-color sketches, block diagrams, simple one-page derivations highlighting their salient features, and numerical examples that employ inputs from today’s battlefield rockets, orbiting satellites, and deep- space missions. These lessons are carefully laid out to help you design and implement practical performance- optimal missions and test procedures. Instructor Thomas S. Logsdon has accumulated more than 30 years experience with the Naval Ordinance Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas, Lockheed Martin, Boeing Aerospace, and Rockwell International. His research projects and consulting assignments have included the Tartar and Talos shipboard missiles, Project Skylab, and various deep space interplanetary probes and missions. Mr. Logsdon has also worked extensively on the Navstar GPS, including military applications, constellation design and coverage studies. He has taught and lectured in 31 different countries on six continents and he has written and published 1.7 million words, including 29 technical books. His textbooks include Striking It Rich in Space, Understanding the Navstar, Mobile Communication Satellites, and Orbital Mechanics: Theory and Applications. Course Outline 1. Inertial Navigation Systems. Fundamental Concepts. Schuller pendulum errors. Strapdown implementations. Ring laser gyros. The Sagnac effect. Monolithic ring laser gyros. Fiber optic gyros. Advanced strapdown implementations. 2. Radionavigation’s Precise Position-Fixing Techniques. Active and passive radionavigation systems. Pseudoranging solutions. Nanosecond timing accuracies. The quantum-mechanical principles of cesium and rubidium atomic clocks. Solving for the user’s position. 3. Integrated Navigation Systems. Intertial navigation. Gimballing and strapdown navigation. Open- loop and closed-loop implementations. Transfer alignment techniques. Kalman filters and their state variable selections. Test results. 4. Hardware Units for Inertial Navigation. Solid-state accelerometers. Initializing today’s strapdown inertial navigation systems. Coordinate rotations and direction cosine matrices. "MEMS devices." and "The beautiful marriage between MEMS technology and the GPS." Spaceborne inertial navigation systems. 5. Military Applications of Integrated Navigation. Translator implementations at military test ranges. Military performance specifications. Military test results. Tactical applications. The Trident Accuracy Improvement Program. Tomahawk cruise missiles. 6. Navigation Solutions and Kalman Filtering Techniques. Ultra precise navigation solutions. Solving for the user’s velocity. Evaluating the geometrical dilution of precision. Kalman filtering techniques. The covariance matrices and their physical interpretations. Typical state variable selections. Monte Carlo simulations. 7. Smart bombs, Guided Missiles, and Artillery Projectiles. Beam-riders and their destructive potential. Smart bombs and their demonstrated accuracies. Smart and rugged artillery projectiles. The Paveway IV smart bombs. 8. Spaceborne Applications of Integrated Navigation Systems. On-orbit position-fixing on early satellites. The Twin Grace satellites. Guiding tomorrow’s booster rockets. Attitude determinations for the International Space Station. Cesium fountain clocks in space. Relativistic corrections for radionavigation satellites. 9. Today’s Guidance and Control for Deep Space Missions. Putting ICBM’s through their paces. Guiding tomorrow’s highly demanding missions from the Earth to Mars. JPL’s awesome new interplanetary pinball machines. JPL’s deep space network. Autonomous robots swarming along the space frontier. Driving along tomorrow’s unpaved freeways in the sky.
  • 18. 18 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Synthetic Aperture Radar What You Will Learn • Basic concepts and principles of SAR. • What are the key system parameters. • Design and implementation tradeoffs. • Current system performance. Emerging systems. What You Will Learn • How to process data from SAR systems for high resolution, wide area coverage, interferometric and/or polarimetric applications. • How to design and build high performance SAR processors. • Perform SAR data calibration. • Ground moving target indication (GMTI) in a SAR context. • Current state-of-the-art. Fundamentals May 7-8, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico June 4-5, 2012 Columbia, Maryland Instructor: Dr. Keith Raney $1090 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Advanced May 9-10, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico Instructor: Bart Huxtable $1090 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Course Outline 1. SAR Imagery: Mechanisms and Effects. Backscatter. SAR, from backscatter through the radar and processor to imagery. Side- (and down-) looking geometry. Slant-range to ground-range conversion. The microwave spectrum. Frequency and wavelength. Effects of wavelength. Specular (forward and backward), discrete, and diffuse scattering. Shadowing. Cardinal effect. Bragg scattering. Speckle; its cause and mitigation. The Washington Monument. 2. Applications Overview. SAR milestones and pivotal contributions. Typical SAR designs and modes, ranging from pioneering classic, single channel, strip mapping systems to more advanced wide-swath, polarimetric, spotlight, and interferometric designs. A survey of important applications and how they influence the SAR system. Examples will be drawn from SeaSat, Radarsat-1/2, ERS-1/2, Magellan (at Venus), and TerraSAR-X, among others. 3. System Design Principles. Part I, Engineering Perspective: System design of an orbital SAR depends on classical electromagnetic and related physical principles, which will be concisely reviewed. The SAR radar equation. Sampling, which leads to the dominant SAR design constraint (the range-Doppler ambiguity trade-off) impacts fundamental parameters including resolution, swath width, signal-to- (additive) noise ratio, signal-to-speckle (a multiplicative noise) ratio, and ambiguity ratios. Part II, User Perspective: Complex vs real (power or square-root power) imagery. Noise-equivalent sigma-zero. The SAR Greed Factor. The six Axioms that describe top-level SAR properties from the user’s perspective. The SAR Image Quality parameter (the fundamental resolution-multi-look metric of interest to the user) will be described, and its influence will be reviewed on system design and image utility.. 4. SAR Polarimetry. Electromagnetic polarimetric basics. A review of the polarimetric combinations available for SAR architecture, including single-polarization, dual polarization, compact polarimetry, and full (or quadrature) polarimetry. Benefits and disadvantages of polarimetric SARs. Hybrid-polarimetric radars. Examples of typical applications. “Free” applications and analysis tools. Future outlook. 5. SAR Interferometry. Electromagnetic polarimetric basics. A review of the polarimetric combinations available for SAR architecture, including single-polarization, dual polarization, compact polarimetry, and full (or quadrature) polarimetry. Benefits and disadvantages of polarimetric SARs. Hybrid-polarimetric radars. Examples of typical applications. “Free” applications and analysis tools. Future outlook. 6. Current Orbital SARs. These include Europe’s ENVISAT, Canada’s Radarsat-2, Germany’s TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X. With requests from students in advance, any (unclassified) orbital SAR may be presented as a case study. 7. Future Orbital SARs. Important examples include ALOS-2 (Japan), RISAT-1 (India), SAOCOM (Argentina), and the Radarsat Constellation Mission (Canada). With advance notice from prospective students, any known forthcoming mission could be presented as a case study. 8. Open Questions and Discussion. Overview of the best professional SAR conferences. Topics raised by participants will be discussed, as interest and curiosity indicate. Course Outline 1. SAR Review Origins. Theory, Design, Engineering, Modes, Applications, System. 2. Processing Basics. Traditional strip map processing steps, theoretical justification, processing systems designs, typical processing systems. 3. Advanced SAR Processing. Processing complexities arising from uncompensated motion and low frequency (e.g., foliage penetrating) SAR processing. 4. Interferometric SAR. Description of the state- of-the-art IFSAR processing techniques: complex SAR image registration, interferogram and correlogram generation, phase unwrapping, and digital terrain elevation data (DTED) extraction. 5. Spotlight Mode SAR. Theory and implementation of high resolution imaging. Differences from strip map SAR imaging. 6. Polarimetric SAR. Description of the image information provided by polarimetry and how this can be exploited for terrain classification, soil moisture, ATR, etc. 7. High Performance Computing Hardware. Parallel implementations, supercomputers, compact DSP systems, hybrid opto-electronic system. 8. SAR Data Calibration. Internal (e.g., cal- tones) and external calibrations, Doppler centroid aliasing, geolocation, polarimetric calibration, ionospheric effects. 9. Example Systems and Applications. Space- based: SIR-C, RADARSAT, ENVISAT, TerraSAR, Cosmo-Skymed, PalSAR. Airborne: AirSAR and other current systems. Mapping, change detection, polarimetry, interferometry.
  • 19. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 19 Instructor Timothy D. Cole is president of a consulting firm. Mr. Cole has developed sensor & data exfiltration  solutions employing EO/IR sensors with augmentation using low-cost wireless sensor nets. He has worked several sensor system programs that addressed ISR including military-based cuing of sensors, intelligence gathering, first responders, and border protection. Mr. Cole holds multiple degrees in Electrical Engineering as well as in Technical Management. He has been awarded the NASA Achievement Award and was a Technical Fellow at Northrop Grumman. He has authored over 25 papers associated with ISR sensors, signal processing, and modeling. Summary This three-day course addresses System Engineering aspects associated with Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) programs and. Application to security, target acquisition and tracking, terminal guidance for weapon systems, and seamless integration of distributed sensor heterogeneous systems with intuitive situational display is provided. The course is designed for the lead engineers; systems engineers, researchers, program managers, and government directors who desire a framework to solve the competing objectives relating to ISR & security missions relating to regional force protection, asset monitoring, and/or targeting. The course presents an overview of tactical scale ISR systems (and missions), requirements definition and tracking, and provides technical descriptions relating to underlying sensor technologies, ISR platform integration (e.g., UAV- based sensor systems), and measures of system performance with emphasis on system integration & test issues. Examples are given throughout the conduct of the course to allow for knowledgeable assessment of sensor systems, ISR platform integration, data exfiltration and network connectivity, along with discussion of the emerging integration of sensors with situational analyses (including sensor web enablement), application of open geospatial standards (OGC), and attendant enabling capabilities (consideration of sensor modalities, adaptive processing of data, and system “impact” considerations). Strategic and classified ISR aspects are not presented within this unclassified course. Tactical Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) System Engineering Overview of leading-edge, ISR system-of-systems March 19-21, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Overview of ISR Systems. including definitions, approaches, and review of existing unclassified systems. 2. Requirement Development, Tracking, and Responsive Design Implementation(s). 3. Real-time Data Processing Functionality. 4. Data Communication Systems for Tactical ISR. 5. ISR Functionality. Target acquisition and tracking, including ATR. Target classification. Targeting systems (e.g., laser-guided ordnance). 6. Tactical ISR Asset Platforms. Air-based (includes UAVs). Ground-based. Vehicle-based. 7. Sensor Technologies, Capabilities, Evaluation Criteria, and Modeling Approach. Electro-optical imagers (EO/IR). Radar (including ultrawideband, UWB). Laser radar. Biochemical sensing. Acoustic monitoring. Ad hoc wireless sensor nodes (WSN). Application of sensor modalities to ISR. Tagging, tracking & Locating targets of interest (TTL). Non-cooperative target identification (NCID). 8. Concurrent Operation and Cross-correlation of ISR Sensor Data Products to Form Comprehensive Evaluation of Current Status. 9. Test & Evaluation Approach. 10. Human Systems Integration and Human Factors Test & Evaluation. 11. Modeling & Simulation of ISR System Performance. 12. Service Oriented Architectures and IP Convergence. Sensor web enablement. Use of metadata. Sensor harmonization. Re-use and cooperative integration of ISR assets. 13. Situational Analysis and Display. Standardization. Heuristic manipulation of ISR system operation and dataflow/processing. 14. Case Studies: Tactical ISR System Implementation and Evaluation. What You Will Learn • How to analyze and implement ISR & security concerns and requirements with a comprehensive, state-of-the- art ISR system response. • Understanding limitations and major issues associated with ISR systems. • ISR & security requirement development and tracking pertaining to tactical ISR systems, how to audit top-level requirements to system element implementations. • Sensor technologies and evaluation techniques for sensor modalities including: imagers (EO/IR), radar, laser radar, and other sensor modalities associated with tactical ISR missions. • Data communications architecture and networks; how to manage the distributed ISR assets and exfiltrate the vital data and data. • ISR system design objectives and key performance parameters. • Situational analyses and associated common operating display approaches; how best to interact with human decision makers. • Integration of multi-modal data to form comprehensive situational awareness. • Emerging standards associated with sensor integration and harmonization afforded via sensor web enablement technology. • Examples of effective tactical ISR systems. • Tools to support evaluation of ISR components, systems, requirements verification (and validation), and effective deployment and maintenance. • Modeling & simulation approaches to ISR requirements definition and responsive ISR system design(s); how to evaluate aspects of an ISR system prior to deployment and even prior to element development – how to find the ISR “gaps”. NEW!
  • 20. 20 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Mark N. Lewellen has nearly 25 years of experience with a wide variety of space, satellite and aviation related projects, including the Predator/Shadow/Warrior/Global Hawk UAVs, Orbcomm, Iridium, Sky Station, and aeronautical mobile telemetry systems. More recently he has been working in the exciting field of UAS. He is currently the Vice Chairman of a UAS Sub-group under Working Party 5B which is leading the US preparations to find new radio spectrum for UAS operations for the next World Radiocommunication Conference in 2011 under Agenda Item 1.3. He is also a technical advisor to the US State Department and a member of the National Committee which reviews and comments on all US submissions to international telecommunication groups, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). What You Will Learn • Categories of current UAS and their aeronautical capabilities. • Major manufactures of UAS. • The latest developments and major components of a UAS. • What type of sensor data can UAS provide. • Regulatory and spectrum issues associated with UAS? • National Airspace System including the different classes of airspace. • How will UAS gain access to the National Airspace System (NAS). Unmanned Aircraft Systems Overview Engineering, Spectrum, and Regulatory Issues Associated with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Summary This one-day course is designed for engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS. The course provides the "big picture" for those who work outside of the discipline. Each topic addresses real systems (Predator, Shadow, Warrior and others) and real-world problems and issues concerning the use and expansion of their applications. Course Outline 1. Historic Development of UAS Post 1960’s. 2. Components and latest developments of a UAS. Ground Control Station, Radio Links (LOS and BLOS), UAV, Payloads. 3. UAS Manufacturers. Domestic, International. 4. Classes, Characteristics and Comparisons of UAS. 5. Operational Scenarios for UAS. Phases of Flight, Federal Government Use of UAS, State and Local government use of UAS. Civil and commercial use of UAS. 6. ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) of UAS. Optical, Infrared, Radar. 7. Comparative Study of the Safety of UAS. In the Air and On the ground. 8. UAS Access to the National Airspace System (NAS). Overview of the NAS, Classes of Airspace, Requirements for Access to the NAS, Issues Being Addressed, Issues Needing to be Addressed. 9. Bandwidth and Spectrum Issues. Band- width of single UAV, Aggregate bandwidth of UAS population. 10. International UAS Issues. WRC Process, Agenda Item 1.3 and Resolution 421. 11. UAS Centers of Excellence. North Dakota, Las Cruses, NM, DoD. 12. Worked Examples of Channeling Plans and Link/Interference Budgets. Shadow, Preda- tor/Warrior. 13. UAS Interactive Deployment Scenarios. March 19, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $700 (8:30am - 4:30pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 each Off The Course Tuition." www.aticourses.com/unmanned_aircraft_systems.html Video!
  • 21. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 21 Instructor Jerry LeMieux, PhD is an International lecturer and consultant with over 40 years and 10,000 hours of aviation experience. He has over 30 years of experience in operations, program management, systems engineering, R&D and test and evaluation for AEW, fighter and tactical data link acquisition programs. As the Network Centric Systems Wing Commander he led 1,300 personnel and managed 100 network and data link acquisition programs with a five year portfolio valued at more than $22 billion. In civilian life he has consulted on numerous airspace issues for the US FAA, USAF, Army, Navy, NASA and DARPA. He holds a PhD in electrical engineering and is a graduate of Air War College and Defense Acquisition University. He has over 20 years experience lecturing at major Universities including MIT, Boston University, University of Maryland, Daniel Webster College and Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. Dr LeMieux is a National expert on sense and avoid systems for UAS and is currently working with the FAA and RTCA to integrate UAS into USNational Airspace. What You Will Learn • Basic Definitions, Attributes and Components. • Military & Space Missions and Future Civilian Roles. • Characteristics of UAS Sensors. • UAS Communications and Data Links. • NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 4586. • UAS Weapon Design Process and Current Weapons. • Need for Regulation and Problems with Airspace Integration. • Ground and Airborne Sense & Avoid Systems. • Lost Link and ATC Communication/Management Procedures. • Principles of UAS Design & Alternative Power. • Improving Reliability with Fault Tolerant Control Systems. • Principles of Autonomous Control & Alternative Navigation. • Future Capabilities Including Space Transport, Hypersonic, UCAS, Pseudo-satellites and Swarming. Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Design, Weaponization, & Future Capabilities Summary This 3-day, classroom and practical instructional program provides individuals or teams entering the unmanned aircraft system (UAS) market with the need to ‘hit the ground running’. Delegates will gain a working knowledge of UAS system classification, payloads, sensors, communications and data links. You will learn the UAS weapon design process and UAS system design components. The principles of mission planning systems and human factors design considerations are described. The critical issue of integrating UAS in the NAS is addressed in detail along with major considerations. Multiple roadmaps from all services are used to explain UAS future missions. Course Outline 1. UAS Basics. Definition, attributes, manned vs unmanned, design considerations, life cycle costs, air vehicle, payload, data link, ground control station, communications, payload, mission profiles, survivability. 2. UAS Types & Civilian Roles. Type: By military group, size, endurance, altitude, wing loading, performance, and capabilities, small, MALE, HALE, UK & International classifications, law en- forcement, disaster relief, fire detection & assessment, customs & border patrol, nuclear inspection. 3. UAS Military Operations: Intelligence, Surveillance Re- connaissance (ISR), Global Hawk, Small UAS & Tactical Mis- sions, Precision Strike, Predator, Reaper, UAS for Close Air Support (CAS), Armed UAS CAS, Other Military Missions, UAS Airspace Integration, 1st Air-to-Air Combat. 4. Sensor s & Characteristics: Sensor Resolution, TargetAc- quisition, Atmospheric Absorption, Black Body Radiation, Elec- tro Optical (EO), Infrared (IR), Multi Spectral Imaging (MSI), Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) Light Detection & Ranging (LIDAR), Chemical, Biological, Radiological & Nuclear (CBRN) Detection, Laser Range Finder, EO/IR Gimbal Packages Radar Basics, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), SAR Packages, Sig- nals Intelligence (SIGINT), Atmospheric Weather Effects, Space Weather Effects, Sensor Data Rates, Sensor Technology Trends. 5. Communications & Data Links. Current State of Data Links, Future Data Link Needs, Line of Sight Fundamentals, Beyond Line of Sight Fundamentals, UAS Communications Failure, Link Enhancements, Common Data Link (CDL), Tactical Common Data link (TCDL), STANAG 4586, VCS 4586, VMF and Link 16 Integration, Multi UAS Control, UGCS. 6. UAS Weaponization. UAS Design Process,Airframe Design, Considerations, Launch & Recovery Methods, Propulsion Considerations, Communications, Navigation, Control & Stability, Ground Control Station, Support Equipment, Transportation. 7. Improving UAS Reliability. Causes of Failures, Reliability Calculations, Mishap Rates, Predator Case Study, Failure Mode Findings, Fault Tolerance, Redundancy, Fault Tolerant Control Architecture, Fault Detection & Identification, Reconfigurable Flight Controllers. 8. Federal Regulation & DoD Operations. UAS Demand, UAS Regulation Problems, Lost Link & Air Traffic Management, Spectrum Protection, Airspace Categories, UAS Operations, Airspace Problems. 9. Civil Airspace Integration and Sense and Avoid. Civil UAS News, Capability Needs, Technology Requirements, RTCA SC-203, Civil Requirements: Equivalent Level of Safety, System Safety Analysis, TCAS ADS-B, EO, Acoustic & Microwave Sen- sors. 10. UAS Autonomous Control & Alternatives to GPS Navigation. Vision, Definitions, Automatic Control, Automatic Air-to-Air Refueling, Intelligent Control, Intelligent Control Techniques, Alternatives to GPS Navigation Systems. 11. Case Studies. (1) Alternative Power: Solar Cells, Solar Wing Design, Energy Balance, Energy Storage, Fuel Cell Operation (2) Multiple UAS Swarming: Multiple UAS Control, Swarming Characteristics & Concepts, Emergent Behavior, Swarming Algorithms, Swarm Communications. 12. Future Capabilities. Space UAS & Global Strike, Advanced Hypersonic Weapon, Submarine Launched UAS, UCAS, Pseudo-satellites, Future Military Missions & Technologies. March 20-22, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. NEW!
  • 22. 22 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Course Outline 1. Basic Concepts In Antenna Theory. Beam patterns, radiation resistance, polarization, gain/directivity, aperture size, reciprocity, and matching techniques. 2. Locations. Reactive near-field, radiating near- field (Fresnel region), far-field (Fraunhofer region) and the Friis transmission formula. 3. Types of Antennas. Dipole, loop, patch, horn, dish, and helical antennas are discussed, compared, and contrasted from a performance/applications standpoint. 4. Propagation Effects. Direct, sky, and ground waves. Diffraction and scattering. 5. Antenna Arrays and Array Factors. (e.g., uniform, binomial, and Tschebyscheff arrays). 6. Scanning From Droadside. Sidelobe levels, null locations, and beam broadening. The end-fire condition. Problems such as grating lobes, beam squint, quantization errors, and scan blindness. 7. Beam Steering. Phase shifters and true-time delay devices. Some commonly used components and delay devices (e.g., the Rotman lens) are compared. 8. Measurement Techniques Ised In Anechoic Chambers. Pattern measurements, polarization patterns, gain comparison test, spinning dipole (for CP measurements). Items of concern relative to anechoic chambers such as the quality of the absorbent material, quiet zone, and measurement errors. Compact, outdoor, and near-field ranges. 9. Questions and Answers. Summary This three-day course teaches the basics of antenna and antenna array theory. Fundamental concepts such as beam patterns, radiation resistance, polarization, gain/directivity, aperture size, reciprocity, and matching techniques are presented. Different types of antennas such as dipole, loop, patch, horn, dish, and helical antennas are discussed and compared and contrasted from a performance- applications standpoint. The locations of the reactive near-field, radiating near-field (Fresnel region), and far- field (Fraunhofer region) are described and the Friis transmission formula is presented with worked examples. Propagation effects are presented. Antenna arrays are discussed, and array factors for different types of distributions (e.g., uniform, binomial, and Tschebyscheff arrays) are analyzed giving insight to sidelobe levels, null locations, and beam broadening (as the array scans from broadside.) The end-fire condition is discussed. Beam steering is described using phase shifters and true-time delay devices. Problems such as grating lobes, beam squint, quantization errors, and scan blindness are presented. Antenna systems (transmit/receive) with active amplifiers are introduced. Finally, measurement techniques commonly used in anechoic chambers are outlined. The textbook, Antenna Theory, Analysis & Design, is included as well as a comprehensive set of course notes. What You Will Learn • Basic antenna concepts that pertain to all antennas and antenna arrays. • The appropriate antenna for your application. • Factors that affect antenna array designs and antenna systems. • Measurement techniques commonly used in anechoic chambers. This course is invaluable to engineers seeking to work with experts in the field and for those desiring a deeper understanding of antenna concepts. At its completion, you will have a solid understanding of the appropriate antenna for your application and the technical difficulties you can expect to encounter as your design is brought from the conceptual stage to a working prototype. Instructor Dr. Steven Weiss is a senior design engineer with the Army Research Lab. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the Rochester Institute of Technology with Master’s and Doctoral Degrees from The George Washington University. He has numerous publications in the IEEE on antenna theory. He teaches both introductory and advanced, graduate level courses at Johns Hopkins University on antenna systems. He is active in the IEEE. In his job at the Army Research Lab, he is actively involved with all stages of antenna development from initial design, to first prototype, to measurements. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in both Maryland and Delaware. February 28 - March 1, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Antenna and Array Fundamentals Basic concepts in antennas, antenna arrays, and antennas systems
  • 23. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 23 May 16-18, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. What You Will Learn • A review of electromagnetic, antenna and scattering theory with modern application examples. • An overview of popular CEM methods with commercial codes as examples. • Tutorials for numerical algorithms. • Hands-on experience with FEKO Lite to demonstrate wire antennas, modeling guidelines and common user pitfalls. • An understanding of the latest developments in CEM, hybrid methods and High Performance Computing. From this course you will obtain the knowledge required to become a more expert user. You will gain exposure to popular CEM codes and learn how to choose the best tool for specific applications. You will be better prepared to interact meaningfully with colleagues, evaluate CEM accuracy for practical applications, and understand the literature. Course Outline 1. Review of Electromagnetic Theory. Maxwell’s Equations, wave equation, Duality, Surface Equivalence Principle, boundary conditions, dielectrics and lossy media. 2. Basic Concepts in Antenna Theory. Gain/Directivity, apertures, reciprocity and phasors. 3. Basic Concepts in Scattering Theory. Reflection and transmission, Brewster and critical angles, RCS, scattering mechanisms and canonical shapes, frequency dependence. 4. Antenna Systems. Various antenna types, feed systems, array antennas and beam steering, periodic structures, electromagnetic symmetry, system integration and performance analysis. 5. Overview of Computational Methods in Electromagnetics. Introduction to frequency and time domain methods. Compare and contrast differential/volume and integral/surface methods with popular commercial codes as examples (adjusted to class interests). 6. Finite Element Method Tutorial. Mathematical basis and algorithms with application to electromagnetics. Time domain and hybrid methods (adjusted to class background). 7. Method of Moments Tutorial. Mathematical basis and algorithms (adjusted to class mathematical background). Implementation for wire antennas and examples using FEKO Lite. 8. Finite Difference Time Domain Tutorial. Mathematical basis and numerical algorithms, parallel implementations (adjusted to class mathematical background). 9. Transmission Line Matrix Method. Overview and numerical algorithms. 10. Finite Integration Technique. Overview. 11. Asymptotic Methods. Scattering mechanisms and high frequency approximations. 12. Hybrid and Advanced Methods. Overview, FMM, ACA and FEKO examples. 13. High Performance Computing. Overview of parallel methods and examples. 14. Summary. With emphasis on practical applications and intelligent decision making. 15. Questions and FEKO examples. Adjusted to class problems of interest. Computational Electromagnetics Summary This 3-day course teaches the basics of CEM with electromagnetics review and application examples. Fundamental concepts in the solution of EM radiation and scattering problems are presented. Emphasis is on applying computational methods to practical applications. You will develop a working knowledge of popular methods such as the FEM, MOM, FDTD, FIT, and TLM including asymptotic and hybrid methods. Students will then be able to identify the most relevant CEM method for various applications, avoid common user pitfalls, understand model validation and correctly interpret results. Students are encouraged to bring their laptop to work examples using the provided FEKO Lite code. You will learn the importance of model development and meshing, post-processing for scientific visualization and presentation of results. Participants will receive a complete set of notes, a copy of FEKO and textbook, CEM for RF and Microwave Engineering. Instructor Dr. Keefe Coburn is a senior design engineer with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. He has a Bachelor's degree in Physics from the VA Polytechnic Institute with Masters and Doctoral Degrees from the George Washington University. In his job at the Army Research Lab, he applies CEM tools for antenna design, system integration and system performance analysis. He teaches graduate courses at the Catholic University of America in antenna theory and remote sensing. He is a member of the IEEE, the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES), the Union of Radio Scientists and Sigma Xi. He serves on the Configuration Control Board for the Army developed GEMACS CEM code and the ACES Board of Directors. NEW!
  • 24. 24 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 March 6-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. What You Will Learn • Awareness of EMI as a potentially severe problem area associated with wireless electronic equipment and systems. • Understanding of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) interactions between transmitters and receivers Analysis techniques that will identify, localize and define (EMI) problem areas before rather than after time, effort and dollars are wasted. • More timely and economical corrective measures. Who Should Attend Students are assumed to have an engineering background. In this course mathematical concepts are presented only as an aid to understanding of the various physical phenomena. Several years of education for a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Engineering Degree or several years experience in the engineering community is desirable. Course Outline Day 1 Introduction Wireless Systems Types of Service System Design Considerations System Design Example Spectrum Management Transmitter and Receiver EMI Interactions Definition of EMC/EMI Terms and Units EMC Requirements for RF Systems Wireless System EMC Major EMC Considerations System Specific EMC Considerations Day 2 Transmitter Considerations for EMC Design Fundamental Emission Characteristics. Harmonic Emission Characteristics. Nonharmonic Emission Characteristics. Transmitter Emission Noise. Transmitter lntermodulation. Receiver Considerations for EMC Design. Co-Channel Interference. Fundamental Susceptibility. Adjacent-Signal Susceptibility. Out-of-Band Susceptibility Receiver Performance Threshold. Antenna Considerations for EMC Classes of Antennas Intentional-Radiation Region Characteristics Unintentional - Radiation Region Characteristics Near-Field Characteristics Day 3 Propagation Modes Characteristics of Free Space Propagation. Plane Earth Model. Okumura Model. Egli Model. Complex Cosite / Coplatform Coupling. System Electromagnetic Effectiveness. EMI Performance of Spread-Spectrum Systems. Modulation Considerations for EMC (AM, FM, FSK, PSK, etc.) Signal Format for EMC Single Channel and Multiple Users. EMI Mitigation (Antenna Decoupling. Frequency Management. Interference Cancellation). System Design Tradeoffs. Sample Problems. For more outline details please visit: www.aticourses.com/Designing_Wireless_Systems_For_ EMC.htm Designing Wireless Systems for EMC Summary In order to permit efficient use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum, engineers and technicians responsible for the planning, design, development, installation and operation of wireless systems must have a methodology for achieving electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). This 3-day course provides a methodology for using EMC analysis techniques and tools for planning, designing, installing and operating wireless systems that are free from EMI problems. Careful application of these techniques at appropriate stages in the wireless system life cycle will ensure EMC without either the wasteful expense of over-engineering or the uncertainties of under-engineering. This course discusses the basic EMI problems and describes the role and importance of analysis in achieving EMC in the co-site or co- platform electromagnetic environment. It introduces the student to the basic co-site/co-platform EMC analysis techniques. The EMI interactions that can occur between a transmitter and a receiver are identified and analysis techniques and tools that may be used in the planning, design, development, installation and operation of wireless systems that are free of EMI are provided. The course is specifically directed toward EMI signals that are generated by potentially interfering transmitters, propagated and received via antennas and cause EMI in RF receivers.  Mathematical models for the overall transmitter receiver EMI interactions and the EMI characteristics of transmitters, receivers, antennas, propagation and system performance are presented. Instructor Dr. William G. Duff (Bill) received a BEE degree from George Washington University in 1959, a MSEE degree from Syracuse University in 1969, and a DScEE degree from Clayton University in 1977. Bill is an independent consultant specializing in EMI/EMC. He worked for SENTEL and Atlantic Research and taught courses on electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). He is internationally recognized as a leader in the development of engineering technology for achieving EMC in communication and electronic systems. He has more than 40 years of experience in EMI/EMC analysis, design, test and problem solving for a wide variety of communication and electronic systems. He has extensive experience in assessing EMI at the circuit, equipment and/or the system level and applying EMI mitigation techniques to "fix" problems. Bill has written more than 40 technical papers and five books on EMC. He is a NARTE Certified EMC Engineer. Bill has been very active in the IEEE EMC Society. He served on the Board of Directors, was Chairman of the Fellow Evaluation Committee and is an Associate Editor for the Newsletter. He is an IEEE Fellow, a past president of the IEEE EMC Society and a past Director of the Electromagnetics and Radiation Division of IEEE. NEW!
  • 25. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 25Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 25 Digital Signal Processing System Design With MATLAB Code and Applications to Sonar and other areas of client interest What You Will Learn • What are the key DSP concepts and how do they relate to real applications? • How is the optimum real-time signal processing flow determined? • What are the methods of time domain and frequency domain implementation? • How is an optimum DSP system designed? • What are typical characteristics of real DSP multirate systems? • How can you use MATLAB to analyze and design DSP systems? From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to perform basic DSP systems engineering calculations, identify tradeoffs, interact meaningfully with colleagues, evaluate systems, and understand the literature. Students will receive a suite of MATLAB m-files for direct use or modification by the user. These codes are useful to both MATLAB users and users of other programming languages as working examples of practical signal processing algorithm implementations. Instructor Joseph G. Lucas has over 35 years of experience in DSP techniques and applications including EW, sonar and radar applications, performance analysis, digital filtering, spectral analysis, beamforming, detection and tracking techniques, finite word length effects, and adaptive processing. He has industry experience at IBM and GD-AIS with radar, sonar and EW applications and has taught classes in DSP theory and applications. He is author of the textbook: Digital Signal Processing: A System Design Approach (Wiley). Summary This four-day course is intended for engineers and scientists concerned with the design and performance analysis of signal processing applications. The course will provide the fundamentals required to develop optimum signal processing flows based upon processor throughput resource requirements analysis. Emphasis will be placed upon practical approaches based on lessons learned that are thoroughly developed using procedures with computer tools that show each step required in the design and analysis. MATLAB code will be used to demonstrate concepts and show actual tools available for performing the design and analysis. May 21-24, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Discrete Time Linear Systems. A review of the fundamentals of sampling, discrete time signals, and sequences. Develop fundamental representation of discrete linear time-invariant system output as the convolution of the input signal with the system impulse response or in the frequency domain as the product of the input frequency response and the system frequency response. Define general difference equation representations, and frequency response of the system. Show a typical detection system for detecting discrete frequency components in noise. 2. System Realizations & Analysis. Demonstrate the use of z-transforms and inverse z-transforms in the analysis of discrete time systems. Show examples of the use of z- transform domain to represent difference equations and manipulate DSP realizations. Present network diagrams for direct form, cascade, and parallel implementations. 3. Digital Filters. Develop the fundamentals of digital filter design techniques for Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) and Develop Finite Impulse Response filter (FIR) types. MATLAB design examples will be presented. Comparisons between FIR and IIR filters will be presented. 4. Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFT). The fundamental properties of the DFT will be presented: linearity, circular shift, frequency response, scallo ping loss, and effective noise bandwidth. The use of weighting and redundancy processing to obtain desired performance improvements will be presented. The use of MATLAB to calculate performance gains for various weighting functions and redundancies will be demonstrated. . 5. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The FFT radix 2 and radix 4 algorithms will be developed. The use of FFTs to perform filtering in the frequency domain will be developed using the overlap-save and overlap-add techniques. Performance calculations will be demonstrated using MATLAB. Processing throughput requirements for implementing the FFT will be presented. 6. Multirate Digital Signal Processing. Multirate processing fundamentals of decimation and interpolation will be developed. Methods for optimizing processing throughput requirements via multirate designs will be developed. Multirate techniques in filter banks and spectrum analyzers and synthesizers will be developed. Structures and Network theory for multirate digital systems will be discussed. 7. Detection of Signals In Noise. Develop Receiver Operating Charactieristic (ROC) data for detection of narrowband signals in noise. Discuss linear system responses to discrete random processes. Discuss power spectrum estimation. Use realistic SONAR problem. MATLAB to calculate performance of detection system. 8. Finite Arithmetic Error Analysis. Analog-to-Digital conversion errors will be studied. Quantization effects of finite arithmetic for common digital signal processing algorithms including digital filters and FFTs will be presented. Methods of calculating the noise at the digital system output due to arithmetic effects will be developed. 9. System Design. Digital Processing system design techniques will be developed. Methodologies for signal analysis, system design including algorithm selection, architecture selection, configuration analysis, and performance analysis will be developed. Typical state-of-the- art COTS signal processing devices will be discussed. 10. Advanced Algorithms & Practical Applications. Several algorithms and associated applications will be discussed based upon classical and recent papers/research: Recursive Least Squares Estimation, Kalman Filter Theory, Adaptive Algorithms: Joint Multichannel Least Squares Lattice, Spatial filtering of equally and unequally spaced arrays.
  • 26. 26 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Fundamentals of Engineering Probability Visualization Techniques & MATLAB Case Studies What You Will Learn • How to compute joint, conditional, and marginal probability densities. • How to compute & visualize probability densities of transformed RVs. • How to sum dB-scaled measurements to make sequential Bayesian updates. • How to compute approximations/upper bounds on sums of many RVs using Gaussian and Poisson distributions. • How the bivariate Gaussian is totally characterized by its mean vector and the covariance matrix between its two independent RVs. • How the Gauss-Markov theorem yields a conditional mean estimator for vector measurements and vector states. This course will de-mystify the computational aspects associated with the transformation of multivariate probability densities and give you the confidence to analyze the random variable effects that arise in engineering scenarios. Instructor Dr. Ralph E. Morganstern is an Adjunct Lecturer in Applied Mathematics at Santa Clara University where he teaches graduate-level sequences in Probability and Numerical Analysis. Dr. Morganstern received a Ph.D. in Physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He has published papers on general relativity, astrophysics, and cosmology and served as a referee on The Physical Review and The Astrophysical Journal. Dr. Morganstern has worked in the Aerospace Industry in Silicon Valley California for over 30 years. He has applied fundamental physics concepts to formulate mathematical models and develop efficient algorithms in many engineering areas including image enhancement, atmospheric optics, data fusion, satellite tracking, communications, and SAR and FMCW radar processing. Summary This four-day course gives a solid practical and intuitive understanding of the fundamental concepts of discrete and continuous probability. It emphasizes visual aspects by using many graphical tools such as Venn diagrams, descriptive tables, trees, and a unique 3-dimensional plot to illustrate the behavior of probability densities under coordinate transformations. Many relevant engineering applications are used to crystallize crucial probability concepts that commonly arise in aerospace CONOPS and tradeoffs. April 9-12, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1895 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Probability and Counting. Visualizations via coordinate graphs, tables, trees, and Venn diagrams. Set theory concepts. DeMorgans Rules. Role of Mutually Exclusive (ME) and Collectively Exhaustive (CE) event spaces. Sample Space with equally likely outcomes. Probability computed via combinatorial analysis. 2. Fundamentals of Probability. Axioms of probability. Classical, Frequentist, Bayesian, and ad hoc probability frameworks. Mutually exclusive versus independent events. Inclusion/Exclusion concepts and applications. Comparison of tree, tabular, Venn, and algebraic representations (Man-Hat problem). Conditional probability and its tree interpretation. Repeated independent trials. Binomials, Trinomials, Multinomials. System reliability analysis. 3. Random Variables and Probability Distributions. Random variable probability mass functions (PMFs) and cumulative distribution functions (CDFs). Joint, marginal, and conditional distributions. Discrete RVs under a transformation of coordinates. Distributions for derived RVs. 4-sided dice sum/difference coordinates. Min & max coordinates and order statistics. Mean variance, covariance and linear transformations. 4. Common PMFs. Pairs: {Bernoulli, Binomial} & {Geometric, Negative Binomial}. Common Characteristics: {Hyper-geometric, Poisson, Zeta(Zipf)}. Properties, relationships, plots, and trees. Statistical analysis of Bernoulli Trials. Sum of RVs, convolution. Moment generating function. Engineering examples. 5. Transition to Continuous Probability Concepts. Continuous & mixed probability densities in 1 & 2 dimensions. Dirac delta function and Heaviside step function. Probability Density Function (PDF) and Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) for continuous and mixed distributions. Density transformation techniques: Jacobian Method. CDF method. 3- dimensional visualizations of density transformations. Order statistics for continuous variables. DSP chip with uniform interrupts. Generating Function, RV Sums, and Convolution. 6. Random Processes. Taxonomy of random processes. Bernoulli to Gaussian & Poisson. Sum of Bernoulli RVs to Binomial. Sum of Geometric RVs to Negative Binomial. Discrete Poisson & continuous r- Erlang relationship. Gaussian distribution & standardized variable. Normal Distribution standard table. Continuous PDFs: Uniform, Exponential, Gamma(r-Erlang), Normal, Rayleigh. Properties, relationships, plots, and examples. 7. Approximations & Bounds. Central Limit Theorem, Approximation Techniques for Binomial & Poisson Distributions. DeMoivre-Laplace approximation. Markov & Chebyshev Bounds. Law of Large Numbers. 8. Bivariate & Multivariate Gaussian Distributions. Matrix form of bivariate Gaussian distribution. Transformation of coordinates & covariance matrix. Ellipses of concentration. Standardized look-up table for 2d Gaussians. Covariance Matrix eigenvector-eigenvalue problem. Canonical coordinates & independence. Bayesian update - conditional mean interpretation and visualization. Multivariate Gaussian. Canonical Block diagonal form. Channel & inverse-channel representations. Gauss-Markov theorem for vectorized conditional mean. 9. MatLab Case Studies. Line of sight error analysis for satellite and ocean sensors. Effects of long-tailed duration distributions on Internet Flows. Statistical air traffic pattern generator. NEW!
  • 27. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 27 What You Will Learn • How to recognize the physical properties that make RF circuits and systems unique • What the important parameters are that characterize RF circuits • How to interpret RF Engineering performance data • What the considerations are in combining RF circuits into systems • How to evaluate RF Engineering risks such as instabilities, noise, and interference, etc. • How performance assessments can be enhanced with basic engineering tools such as MATLAB. From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to understand how RF circuits functions, how multiple circuits interact to determine system performance, to interact effectively with RF engineering specialists and to understand the literature. Instructor Dr. M. Lee Edwards is a private RF Engineering Consultant since January 2007 when he retired from The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). He served for 15 years the Supervisor of the RF Engineering Group in APL’s Space Department. Dr. Edwards’ leadership introduced new RF capabilities into deep space communications systems including GaAs technology and phased array antennas, etc. For two decades Dr. Edwards was also the Chairman of the JHU Masters program in Electrical and Computer Engineering and pioneered many of the RF Engineering courses and laboratories. He is a recipient of the JHU excellence in teaching award and is known for his fundamental understanding of RF Engineering and his creative and insightful approach to teaching. March 20-21, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1150 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Fundamentals of RF Technology Course Outline Day One: Circuit Considerations 1. Physical Properties of RF circuits 2. Propagation and effective Dielectric Constants 3. Impedance Parameters 4. Reflections and Matching 5. Circuit matrix parameters (Z,Y, & S parameters) 6. Gain 7. Stability 8. Smith Chart data displays 9. Performance of example circuits Day Two: System considerations 1. Low Noise designs 2. High Power design 3. Distortion evaluation 4. Spurious Free Dynamic Range 5. MATLAB Assisted Assessment of state-of- the-art RF systems NEW! Summary This two-day course is designed for engineers that are non specialists in RF engineering, but are involved in the design or analysis of communication systems including digital designers, managers, procurement engineers, etc. The course emphasizes RF fundamentals in terms of physical principles behavioral concepts permitting the student to quickly gain an intuitive understanding of the subject with minimal mathematical complexity. These principles are illustrated using modern examples of wireless components such as Bluetooth, Cell Phone and Paging, and 802.11 Data Communications Systems.
  • 28. 28 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Dr. William G. Duff (Bill) received a BEE degree from George Washington University, a MSEE degree from Syracuse University, and a DScEE degree from Clayton University. He is internationally recognized as a leader in the development of engineering technology for achieving EMC in communication and electronic systems. He has more than 40 years of experience in EMI/EMC analysis, design, test and problem solving for a wide variety of communication and electronic systems. He has extensive experience in applying EMI mitigation techniques to "fix" EMI problems at the circuit, equipment and system levels. Bill is a past president of the IEEE EMC Society and a past Director of IEEE Division IV, Electromagnetics and Radiation. He served a number of terms on the EMC Society Board of Directors. Bill has received a number of IEEE awards including the Lawrence G. Cumming Award for Outstanding Service, the Richard R. Stoddard Award for Outstanding Performance and a "Best Paper" award. He was elected to the grade of IEEE Fellow in 1981 and to the EMC Hall of Fame in 2010. Bill has written more than 40 technical papers and 5 books on EMC. He also regularly teaches seminar courses on EMC. He is a NARTE Certified EMC Engineer. What You Will Learn • Examples Of Potential EMI Threats. • Safety Grounding Versus EMI Control. • Common Ground Impedance Coupling. • Field Coupling Into or out of Ground Loops. • Coupling Relationships. • EMI Coupling Reduction Methods. • Victim Sensitivites. • Shielding Theory. • Electric vs Magnetic Field Shielding. • Shielding Compromises. • Trade-offs Between Shielding, Cost, Size, Weight,etc. Summary Grounding and shielding are two of the most effective techniques for combating EMI. This three-day course is designed for engineers, technicians, and operators, who need an understanding of all facets of grounding and shielding at the circuit, PCB, box, equipment and/or system levels. The course offers a discussion of the trade-offs for EMI control through grounding and shielding at all levels. Hardware demonstrations  of the effect of various compromises and resulting grounding and shielding  effectiveness are provided. The compromises that are demonstrated include aperture and seam leakage, and  conductor penetrating the enclosure. The hardware demonstrations also include incorporating various "fixes" and  illustrating their impact. Each attendee will receive a copy of Bill Duff’s new text, Designing Electronic Circuits for EMC. Grounding & Shielding for EMC January 31 - February 2, 2012 Columbia, Maryland May 1-3, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. A Discussion Of EMI Scenarios, Definition Of Terms, Time To Frequency Conversion, Narrowband-Vs-Broadband, System Sensitivities. 2. Potential EMI Threats (Ambient). An Overview Of Typical EMI Levels. A Discussion Of Power Line Disturbances And A Discussion Of Transients, Including ESD, Lightning And EMP. 3. Victim Sensitivities And Behavior. A Discussion Of Victim Sensitivities Including Amplifier Rejection, Out-Of-Band Response, Audio Rectification, Logic Family Susceptibilities And Interference- To- Noise Versus Signal-To-Noise Ratios. 4. Safety Earthing/Grounding Versus Noise Coupling. An Overview Of Grounding Myths, Hard Facts And Conflicts. A Discussion Of Electrical Shock Avoidance (UL, IEC Requirements), Lightning Protection And Lightning Rods And Earthing. 5. Ground Common Impedance Coupling (GCM). A Discussion Of Practical Solutions, From PCB To Room Level. An Overview Of Impedance Of Conductors (Round, Flat, Planes), Class Examples, GCM Reduction On Single Layer Cards, Impedance Reduction, DC Bus Decoupling And Multilayer Boards. 6. GLC Reduction Methods. A Discussion Of Floating And Single-Point Grounds, Balanced Drivers And Receivers, RF Blocking Chokes, Signal Transformers And Baluns, Ferrites, Feed-Through Capacitors And Opto-Electronics. 7. Cable Shields, Balanced Pairs And Coax. A Discussion Of Cable Shields And Compromising Practices, Shielding Effectiveness, Field Coupling, Interactions Of Ground Loops With Balanced Pair Shields, Comprehensive Grounding Rules For Cable Shields, Flat Cables And Connector And Pigtail Contributions To Shielding Effectiveness. 8. Cable-To-Cable Coupling (Xtalk). A Discussion Of The Basic Model, Capacitive And Magnetic Couplings, A Class Example And How To Reduce Xtalk. 9. Understanding Shielding Theory. An Overview Of Near-Field E And H, Far-Field, How A Metal Barrier Performs And Reflection And Absorption. 10. Shielding Effectiveness (SE) Of Barriers. A Discussion Of Performance Of Typical Metals, Low- Frequency Magnetic Shields, Conductive Coatings/Metallized Plastics And Aircraft Composites (CFC). 11. Box Shielding. Leakage Reduction., Calculation Of Apertures SE, Combination Of Multiple Leakages, SE Of Screen Mesh, Conductive Glass, Honeycombs, Component Penetrations (Fuses, Switches, Etc.), And EMI Gaskets.
  • 29. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 29 Instructor Jon Wilson is a Principal Consultant. He holds degrees in Mechanical, Automotive and Industrial Engineering. His 45-plus years of experience include Test Engineer, Test Laboratory Manager, Applications Engineering Manager and Marketing Manager at Chrysler Corporation, ITT Cannon Electric Co., Motorola Semiconductor Products Division and Endevco. He is Editor of the Sensor Technology Handbook published by Elsevier in 2005. He has been consulting and training in the field of testing and instrumentation since 1985. He has presented training for ISA, SAE, IEST, SAVIAC, ITC, & many government agencies and commercial organizations. He is a Fellow Member of the Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology, and a Lifetime Senior Member of SAE and ISA. What You Will Learn • How to understand sensor specifications. • Advantages and disadvantages of different sensor types. • How to avoid configuration and interfacing problems. • How to select and specify the best sensor for your application. • How to select and apply the correct signal conditioning. • How to find applicable standards for various sensors. • Principles and applications. From this course you will learn how to select and apply measurement systems to acquire accurate data for a variety of applications and measurands including mechanical, thermal, optical and biological data. March 27-29, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This three day course, based on the 690-page Sensor Technology Handbook, published by Elsevier in 2005 and edited by the instructor, is designed for engineers, technicians and managers who want to increase their knowledge of sensors and signal conditioning. It balances breadth and depth in a practical presentation for those who design sensor systems and work with sensors of all types. Each topic includes technology fundamentals, selection criteria, applicable standards, interfacing and system designs, and future developments. Instrumentation for Test & Measurement Understanding, Selecting and Applying Measurement Systems 1. Sensor Fundamentals. Basic Sensor Technology, Sensor Systems. 2. Application Considerations. Sensor Characteristics, System Characteristics, Instrument Selection, Data Acquisition & Readout. 3. Measurement Issues & Criteria. Measurand, Environment, Accuracy Requirements, Calibration & Documentation. 4. Sensor Signal Conditioning. Bridge Circuits, Analog to Digital Converters, Systems on a Chip, Sigma-Delta ADCs, Conditioning High Impedance Sensors, Conditioning Charge Output Sensors. 5. Acceleration, Shock & Vibration Sensors. Piezoelectric, Charge Mode & IEPE, Piezoelectric Materials & Structures, Piezoresistive, Capacitive, Servo Force Balance, Mounting, Acceleration Probes, Grounding, Cables & Connections. 6. Biosensors. Bioreceptor + Transducer, Biosensor Characteristics, Origin of Biosensors, Bioreceptor Molecules, Transduction Mechanisms. 7. Chemical Sensors. Technology Fundamentals, Applications, CHEMFETS. 8. Capacitive & Inductive Displacement Sensors. Capacitive Fundamentals, Inductive Fundamentals, Target Considerations, Comparing Capacitive & Inductive, Using Capacitive & Inductive Together. 9. Electromagnetism in Sensing. Electromagnetism & Inductance, Sensor Applications, Magnetic Field Sensors. 10. Flow Sensors. Thermal Anemometers, Differential Pressure, Vortex Shedding, Positive Displacement & Turbine Based Sensors, Mass Flowmeters, Electromagnetic, Ultrasonic & Laser Doppler Sensors, Calibration. 11. Level Sensors. Hydrostatic, Ultrasonic, RF Capacitance, Magnetostrictive, Microwave Radar, Selecting a Technology. 12. Force, Load & Weight Sensors. Sensor Types, Physical Configurations, Fatigue Ratings. 13. Humidity Sensors. Capacitive, Resistive & Thermal Conductivity Sensors, Temperature & Humidity Effects, Condensation & Wetting, Integrated Signal Conditioning. 14. Machinery Vibration Monitoring Sensors. Accelerometer Types, 4-20 Milliamp Transmitters, Capacitive Sensors, Intrinsically Safe Sensors, Mounting Considerations. 15. Optical & Radiation Sensors. Photosensors, Quantum Detectors, Thermal Detectors, Phototransistors, Thermal Infrared Detectors. 16. Position & Motion Sensors. Contact & Non-contact, Limit Switches, Resistive, Magnetic & Ultrasonic Position Sensors, Proximity Sensors, Photoelectric Sensors, Linear & Rotary Position & Motion Sensors, Optical Encoders, Resolvers & Synchros. 17. Pressure Sensors. Fundamentals of Pressure Sensing Technology, Piezoresistive Sensors, Piezoelectric Sensors, Specialized Applications. 18. Sensors for Mechanical Shock. Technology Fundamentals, Sensor Types-Advantages & Disadvantages, Frequency Response Requirements, Pyroshock Measurement, Failure Modes, Structural Resonance Effects, Environmental Effects. 19. Test & Measurement Microphones. Measurement Microphone Characteristics, Condenser & Prepolarized (Electret), Effect of Angle of Incidence, Pressure, Free Field, Random Incidence, Environmental Effects, Specialized Types, Calibration Techniques. 20. Introduction to Strain Gages. Piezoresistance, Thin Film, Microdevices, Accuracy, Strain Gage Based Measurements, Sensor Installations, High Temperature Installations. 21. Temperature Sensors. Electromechanical & Electronic Sensors, IR Pyrometry, Thermocouples, Thermistors, RTDs, Interfacing & Design, Heat Conduction & Self Heating Effects. 22. Nanotechnology-Enabled Sensors. Possibilities, Realities, Applications. 23. Wireless Sensor Networks. Individual Node Architecture, Network Architecture, Radio Options, Power Considerations. 24. Smart Sensors – IEEE 1451, TEDS, TEDS Sensors, Plug & Play Sensors. Course Outline NEW!
  • 30. 30 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Course Outline 1. Examples Of Communications System. A Discussion Of Case Histories Of Communications System EMI, Definitions Of Systems, Both Military And Industrial, And Typical Modes Of System Interactions Including Antennas, Transmitters And Receivers And Receiver Responses. 2. Quantification Of Communication System EMI. A Discussion Of The Elements Of Interference, Including Antennas, Transmitters, Receivers And Propagation. 3. Electronic Equipment And System EMI Concepts. A Description Of Examples Of EMI Coupling Modes To Include Equipment Emissions And Susceptibilities. 4. Common-Mode Coupling. A Discussion Of Common-Mode Coupling Mechanisms Including Field To Cable, Ground Impedance, Ground Loop And Coupling Reduction Techniques. 5. Differential-Mode Coupling. A Discussion Of Differential-Mode Coupling Mechanisms Including Field To Cable, Cable To Cable And Coupling Reduction Techniques. 6. Other Coupling Mechanisms. A Discussion Of Power Supplies And Victim Amplifiers. 7. The Importance Of Grounding For Achieving EMC. A Discussion Of Grounding, Including The Reasons (I.E., Safety, Lightning Control, EMC, Etc.), Grounding Schemes (Single Point, Multi-Point And Hybrid), Shield Grounding And Bonding. 8. The Importance Of Shielding. A Discussion Of Shielding Effectiveness, Including Shielding Considerations (Reflective And Absorptive). 9. Shielding Design. A Description Of Shielding Compromises (I.E., Apertures, Gaskets, Waveguide Beyond Cut-Off). 10. EMI Diagnostics And Fixes. A Discussion Of Techniques Used In EMI Diagnostics And Fixes. 11. EMC Specifications, Standards And Measurements. A Discussion Of The Genesis Of EMC Documentation Including A Historical Summary, The Rationale, And A Review Of MIL- Stds, FCC And CISPR Requirements. Instructor Dr. William G. Duff (Bill) is an independent consultant. Previously, he was the Chief Technology Officer of the Advanced Technology Group of SENTEL. Prior to working for SENTEL, he worked for Atlantic Research and taught courses on electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). He is internationally recognized as a leader in the development of engineering technology for achieving EMC in communication and electronic systems. He has 42 years of experience in EMI/EMC analysis, design, test and problem solving for a wide variety of communication and electronic systems. He has extensive experience in assessing EMI at the equipment and/or the system level and applying EMI suppression and control techniques to "fix" problems. Bill has written more than 40 technical papers and four books on EMC. He also regularly teaches seminar courses on EMC. He is a past president of the IEEE EMC Society. He served a number of terms as a member of the EMC Society Board of Directors and is currently Chairman of the EMC Society Fellow Evaluation Committee and an Associate Editor for the EMC Society Newsletter. He is a NARTE Certified EMC Engineer. What You Will Learn • Examples of Communications Systems EMI. • Quantification of Systems EMI. • Equipment and System EMI Concepts. • Source and Victim Coupling Modes. • Importance of Grounding. • Shielding Designs. • EMI Diagnostics. • EMC/EMI Specifications and Standards. February 28 - March 1, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This three-day course is designed for technicians, operators and engineers who need an understanding of Electromagnetic Interference (EMI)/Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) methodology and concepts. The course provides a basic working knowledge of the principles of EMC. The course will provide real world examples and case histories. Computer software will be used to simulate and demonstrate various concepts and help to bridge the gap between theory and the real world. The computer software will be made available to the attendees. One of the computer programs is used to design interconnecting equipments. This program demonstrates the impact of various EMI “EMI mitigation techniques" that are applied. Another computer program is used to design a shielded enclosure. The program considers the box material; seams and gaskets; cooling and viewing apertures; and various "EMI mitigation techniques" that may be used for aperture protection. There are also hardware demonstrations of the effect of various compromises on the shielding effectiveness of an enclosure. The compromises that are demonstrated are seam leakage, and a conductor penetrating the enclosure. The hardware demonstrations also include incorporating various "EMI mitigation techniques" and illustrating their impact. Each attendee receives a copy of the instructor’s text, Designing Electronic Circuits for EMC. Introduction to EMI/EMC
  • 31. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 31 Instructor Dr. Dan Simon has been a professor at Cleveland State University since 1999, and is also the owner of Innovatia Software. He had 14 years of industrial experience in the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, process control, and software engineering fields before entering academia. While in industry he applied Kalman filtering and other state estimation techniques to a variety of areas, including motor control, neural net and fuzzy system optimization, missile guidance, communication networks, fault diagnosis, vehicle navigation, and financial forecasting. He has over 60 publications in refereed journals and conference proceedings, including many in Kalman filtering. What You Will Learn • How can I create a system model in a form that is amenable to state estimation? • What are some different ways to simulate a system? • How can I design a Kalman filter? • What if the Kalman filter assumptions are not satisfied? • How can I design a Kalman filter for a nonlinear system? • How can I design a filter that is robust to model uncertainty? • What are some other types of estimators that may do better than a Kalman filter? • What are the latest research directions in state estimation theory and practice? • What are the tradeoffs between Kalman, H- infinity, and particle filters? June 12-14, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Dynamic Systems Review. Linear systems. Nonlinear systems. Discretization. System simulation. 2. Random Processes Review. Probability. Random variables. Stochastic processes. White noise and colored noise. 3. Least Squares Estimation. Weighted least squares. Recursive least squares. 4. Time Propagation of States and Covariances. 5. The Discrete Time Kalman Filter. Derivation. Kalman filter properties. 6. Alternate Kalman filter forms. Sequential filtering. Information filtering. Square root filtering. 7. Kalman Filter Generalizations. Correlated noise. Colored noise. Steady-state filtering. Stability. Alpha-beta-gamma filtering. Fading memory filtering. Constrained filtering. 8. Optimal Smoothing. Fixed point smoothing. Fixed lag smoothing. Fixed interval smoothing. 9. Advanced Topics in Kalman Filtering. Verification of performance. Multiple-model estimation. Reduced-order estimation. Robust Kalman filtering. Synchronization errors. 10. H-infinity Filtering. Derivation. Examples. Tradeoffs with Kalman filtering. 11. Nonlinear Kalman Filtering. The linearized Kalman filter. The extended Kalman filter. Higher order approaches. Parameter estimation. 12. The Unscented Kalman Filter. Advantages. Derivation. Examples. 13. The Particle Filter. Derivation. Implementation issues. Examples. Tradeoffs. 14. Applications. Fault diagnosis for aerospace systems. Vehicle navigation. Fuzzy logic and neural network training. Motor control. Implementations in embedded systems. Kalman, H-Infinity, and Nonlinear Estimation Approaches Summary This three-day course will introduce Kalman filtering and other state estimation algorithms in a practical way so that the student can design and apply state estimation algorithms for real problems. The course will also present enough theoretical background to justify the techniques and provide a foundation for advanced research and implementation. After taking this course the student will be able to design Kalman filters, H- infinity filters, and particle filters for both linear and nonlinear systems. The student will be able to evaluate the tradeoffs between different types of estimators. The algorithms will be demonstrated with freely available MATLAB programs. Each student will receive a copy of Dr. Simon’s text, Optimal State Estimation.
  • 32. 32 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Practical Design of Experiments March 20-21, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1150 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This two-day course will enable the participant to plan the most efficient experiment or test which will result in a statistically defensible conclusion of the test objectives. It will show how properly designed tests are easily analyzed and prepared for presentation in a report or paper. Examples and exercises related to various NASA satellite programs will be included. Many companies are reporting significant savings and increased productivity from their engineering, process control and R&D professionals. These companies apply statistical methods and statistically- designed experiments to their critical manufacturing processes, product designs, and laboratory experiments. Multifactor experimentation will be shown as increasing efficiencies, improving product quality, and decreasing costs. This first course in experimental design will start you into statistical planning before you actually start taking data and will guide you to perform hands-on analysis of your results immediately after completing the last experimental run. You will learn how to design practical full factorial and fractional factorial experiments. You will learn how to systematically manipulate many variables simultaneously to discover the few major factors affecting performance and to develop a mathematical model of the actual instruments. You will perform statistical analysis using the modern statistical software called JMP from SAS Institute. At the end of this course, participants will be able to design experiments and analyze them on their own desktop computers. Instructor Dr. Manny Uy is a member of the Principal Professional Staff at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). Previously, he was with General Electric Company, where he practiced Design of Experiments on many manufacturing processes and product development projects. He is currently working on space environmental monitors, reliability and failure analysis, and testing of modern instruments for Homeland Security. He earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Case-Western Reserve University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Rice University and the Free University of Brussels. He has published over 150 papers and holds over 10 patents. At the JHU/APL, he has continued to teach courses in the Design and Analysis of Experiments and in Data Mining and Experimental Analysis using SAS/JMP. What You Will Learn • How to design full and fractional factorial experiments. • Gather data from hands-on experiments while simultaneously manipulating many variables. • Analyze statistical significant testing from hands-on exercises. • Acquire a working knowledge of the statistical software JMP. Testimonials ... “Would you like many times more information, with much less resources used, and 100% valid and technically defensible results? If so, design your tests using Design of Experiments.” Dr. Jackie Telford, Career Enhancement: Statistics, JHU/APL. “We can no longer afford to experiment in a trial-and-error manner, changing one factor at a time, the way Edison did in developing the light bulb. A far better method is to apply a computer-enhanced, systematic approach to experimentation, one that considers all factors simultaneously. That approach is called "Design of Experiments..” Mark Anderson, The Industrial Physicist. Course Outline 1. Survey of Statistical Concepts. 2. Introduction to Design of Experiments. 3. Designing Full and Fractional Factorials. 4. Hands-on Exercise: Statapult Distance Experiment using full factorial. 5. Data preparation and analysis of Experimental Data. 6. Verification of Model: Collect data, analyze mean and standard deviation. 7. Hands-on Experiment: One-Half Fractional Factorial, verify prediction. 8. Hands-on Experiment: One-Fourth Fractional Factorial, verify prediction. 9. Screening Experiments (Trebuchet). 10. Advanced designs, Methods of Steepest Ascent, Central Composite Design. 11. Some recent uses of DOE. 12. Summary.
  • 33. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 33 Signal & Image Processing And Analysis For Scientists And Engineers Course Outline 1. Introduction. Basic Descriptions, Terminology, and Concepts Related to Signals, Imaging, and Processing for science and engineering. Analog and Digital. Data acquisition concepts. Sampling and Quantization. 2. Signal Processing. Basic operations, Frequency-domain filtering, Wavelet filtering, Wavelet Decomposition and Reconstruction, Signal Deconvolution, Joint Time-Frequency Processing, Curve Fitting. 3. Signal Analysis. Signal Parameter Extraction, Peak Detection, Signal Statistics, Joint Time – Frequency Analysis, Acoustic Emission analysis, Curve Fitting Parameter Extraction. 4. Image Processing. Basic and Advanced Methods, Spatial frequency Filtering, Wavelet filtering, lookup tables, Kernel convolution/filtering (e.g. Sobel, Gradient, Median), Directional Filtering, Image Deconvolution, Wavelet Decomposition and Reconstruction, Edge Extraction,Thresholding, Colorization, Morphological Operations, Segmentation, B-scan display, Phased Array Display. 5. Image Analysis. Region-of-interest Analysis, Line profiles, Edge Detection, Feature Selection and Measurement, Image Math, Logical Operators, Masks, Particle analysis, Image Series Reduction including Images Averaging, Principal Component Analysis, Derivative Images, Multi-surface Rendering, B-scan Analysis, Phased Array Analysis. Introduction to Classification. 6. Integrated Signal and Image Processing and Analysis Software and algorithm strategies. The instructor will draw on his extensive experience to demonstrate how these methods can be combined and utilized in a post-processing software package. Software strategies including code and interface design concepts for versatile signal and image processing and analysis software development will be provided. These strategies are applicable for any language including LabVIEW, MATLAB, and IDL. Practical considerations and approaches will be emphasized. Instructor Dr. Donald J. Roth is the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Team Lead at a major research center as well as a senior research engineer and consultant with 28 years of experience in NDE, measurement and imaging sciences, and software design. His primary areas of expertise over his career include research and development in the imaging modalities of ultrasound, infrared, x-ray, computed tomography, and terahertz. He has been heavily involved in the development of software for custom data and control systems, and for signal and image processing software systems. Dr. Roth holds the degree of Ph.D. in Materials Science from the Case Western Reserve University and has published over 100 articles, presentations, book chapters, and software products. What You Will Learn • Terminology, definitions, and concepts related to basic and advanced signal and image processing. • Conceptual examples. • Case histories where these methods have proven applicable. • Methods are exhibited using live computerized demonstrations. • All of this will allow a better understanding of how and when to apply processing methods in practice. From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to perform basic and advanced signal and image processing and analysis that can be applied to many signal and image acquisition scenarios in order to improve and analyze signal and image data. Summary Whether working in the scientific, medical, security, or NDT field, signal and image processing and analysis play a critical role. This three-day course is de?signed is designed for engineers, scientists, technicians, implementers, and managers in those fields who need to understand applied basic and advanced methods of signal and image processing and analysis techniques. The course provides a jump start for utilizing these methods in any application. All Students Receive 500-page Slide Set and Complete Set of Interactive Software Examples That Can Be Used On Their Data on a CD. NEW! Recent attendee comments ... “This course provided insight and explanations that saved me hours of reading – and time is money” May 22-24, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  • 34. 34 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor D. Lee Fugal is the Founder and President of an independent consulting firm. He has over 30 years of industry experience in Digital Signal Processing (including Wavelets) and Satellite Communications. He has been a full- time consultant on numerous assignments since 1991. Recent projects include Excision of Chirp Jammer Signals using Wavelets, design of Space-Based Geolocation Systems (GPS & Non-GPS), and Advanced Pulse Detection using Wavelet Technology. He has taught upper-division University courses in DSP and in Satellites as well as Wavelet short courses and seminars for Practicing Engineers and Management. He holds a Masters in Applied Physics (DSP) from the University of Utah, is a Senior Member of IEEE, and a recipient of the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. Summary Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) are in wide use and work very well if your signal stays at a constant frequency (“stationary”). But if the signal could vary, have pulses, “blips” or any other kind of interesting behavior then you need Wavelets. Wavelets are remarkable tools that can stretch and move like an amoeba to find the hidden “events” and then simultaneously give you their location, frequency, and shape. Wavelet Transforms allow this and many other capabilities not possible with conventional methods like the FFT. This course is vastly different from traditional math- oriented Wavelet courses or books in that we use examples, figures, and computer demonstrations to show how to understand and work with Wavelets. This is a comprehensive, in-depth. up-to-date treatment of the subject, but from an intuitive, conceptual point of view. We do look at some key equations but only AFTER the concepts are demonstrated and understood so you can see the wavelets and equations “in action”. Each student will receive extensive course slides, a CD with MATLAB demonstrations, and a copy of the instructor’s new book, Conceptual Wavelets. If convenient we recommend that you bring a laptop to this class.  A disc with the course materials will be provided and the laptop will allow you to utilize the materials in class.  Note: the laptop is NOT a requirement. “This course uses very little math, yet provides an in- depth understanding of the concepts and real-world applications of these powerful tools.” Course Outline 1. What is a Wavelet? Examples and Uses. “Waves” that can start, stop, move and stretch. Real-world applications in many fields: Signal and Image Processing, Internet Traffic, Airport Security, Medicine, JPEG, Finance, Pulse and Target Recognition, Radar, Sonar, etc. 2. Comparison with traditional methods. The concept of the FFT, the STFT, and Wavelets as all being various types of comparisons (correlations) with the data. Strengths, weaknesses, optimal choices. 3. The Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). Stretching and shifting the Wavelet for optimal correlation. Predefined vs. Constructed Wavelets. 4. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Shrinking the signal by factors of 2 through downsampling. Understanding the DWT in terms of correlations with the data. Relating the DWT to the CWT. Demonstrations and uses. 5. The Redundant Discrete Wavelet Transform (RDWT). Stretching the Wavelet by factors of 2 without downsampling. Tradeoffs between the alias-free processing and the extra storage and computational burdens. A hybrid process using both the DWT and the RDWT. Demonstrations and uses. 6. “Perfect Reconstruction Filters”. How to cancel the effects of aliasing. How to recognize and avoid any traps. A breakthrough method to see the filters as basic Wavelets. The “magic” of alias cancellation demonstrated in both the time and frequency domains. 7. Highly useful properties of popular Wavelets. How to choose the best Wavelet for your application. When to create your own and when to stay with proven favorites. 8. Compression and De-Noising using Wavelets. How to remove unwanted or non-critical data without throwing away the alias cancellation capability. A new, powerful method to extract signals from large amounts of noise. Demonstrations. 9. Additional Methods and Applications. Image Processing. Detecting Discontinuities, Self-Similarities and Transitory Events. Speech Processing. Human Vision. Audio and Video. BPSK/QPSK Signals. Wavelet Packet Analysis. Matched Filtering. How to read and use the various Wavelet Displays. Demonstrations. 10. Further Resources. The very best of Wavelet references. "Your Wavelets course was very helpful in our Radar studies. We often use wavelets now instead of the Fourier Transform for precision denoising." –Long To, NAWC WD, Point Wugu, CA "I was looking forward to this course and it was very re- warding–Your clear explanations starting with the big pic- ture immediately contextualized the material allowing us to drill a little deeper with a fuller understanding" –Steve Van Albert, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research "Good overview of key wavelet concepts and literature. The course provided a good physical understanding of wavelet transforms and applications." –Stanley Radzevicius, ENSCO, Inc. What You Will Learn • How to use Wavelets as a “microscope” to analyze data that changes over time or has hidden “events” that would not show up on an FFT. • How to understand and efficiently use the 3 types of Wavelet Transforms to better analyze and process your data. State-of-the-art methods and applications. • How to compress and de-noise data using advanced Wavelet techniques. How to avoid potential pitfalls by understanding the concepts. A “safe” method if in doubt. • How to increase productivity and reduce cost by choosing (or building) a Wavelet that best matches your particular application. February 28 - March 1, 2012 San Diego, California June 12-14, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Wavelets: A Conceptual, Practical Approach
  • 35. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 35 Wireless Sensor Networking (WSN) Motes, Relays & the C4I Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) Instructor Timothy D. Cole is president of a leading edge consulting firm. Mr. Cole has developed sensor & data exfiltration solutions employing WSN under the auspices of DARPA and has applied the underlying technologies to various problems including: military based cuing of sensors, intelligence gathering, first responders, and border protection. Mr. Cole holds degrees in Electrical Engineering (BES, MSEE) and Technical Management (MS). He also has been awarded the NASA Achievement Award and was a Technical Fellow for Northrop Grumman. He has authored over 25 papers. Summary This 4-day course is designed for remote sensing engineers, process control architects, security system engineers, instrumentation designers, ISR developers, and program managers who wish to enhance their understanding of ad hoc wireless sensor networks (WSN) and how to design, develop, and implement these netted sensors to solve a myriad of applications including: smart building installation, process control, asset tracking, military operations and C4I applications, as well as energy monitoring. The concept of low-cost sensors, structured into a large network to provide extreme fidelity with an extensive capability over a large-scale system is described in detail using technologies derived from robust radio- stacked microcontrollers, cellular logic, SOA-based systems, and adroit insertion of adaptive, and changeable, middleware. What You Will Learn • What can robust, ad hoc wireless sensing provide beyond that of conventional sensor systems. • How can low-cost sensors perform on par with expensive sensors. • What is required to achieve comprehensive monitoring. • Why is multi-hopping “crucial” to permit effective systems. • What ‘s required from the power management systems. • What are WSN characteristics. • What do effective WSN systems cost. From this course you will obtain knowledge and ability to perform wireless sensor networking design & engineering calculations, identify tradeoffs, interact meaningfully with ISR, security colleagues, evaluate systems, and understand the literature. Course Outline 1. Introduction To Ad HOC Mesh Networking and The Advent of Embedded Middleware. 2. Understanding the Wireless Ad HOC Sensor Network (WSN) and Sensor Node (“Mote”) Hardware. Mote core (fundamental consists of): radio-stack, low-power microcontroller, ‘GPS’ system, power distribution, memory (flash), data acquisition microsystems (ADC). Sensor modalities. Design goals and objectives. Descriptions and examples of mote passive and active (e.g., ultra wideband, UWB) sensors. 3. Reviewing The Software Required Including Orotocols. Programming environment. Real-time, event-driven, with OTA programming capability, deluge implementation, distributed processing (middleware). Low-power. Mote design, field design, overall architecture regulation & distribution. 4. Reviewing Principles of The Radio Frequency Characterization & Propagation At/Near The Ground level. RF propagation, Multi- path, fading, Scattering & attenuation, Link calculations & Reliability. 5. Network Management Systems (NMS). Self- organizing capability. Multi-hop capabilities. Low- power media Access Communications, LPMAC. Middleware. 6. Mote Field Architecture. Mote field logistics & initialization. Relay definition and requirements. Backhaul data communications: Cellular, SATCOM, LP-SEIWG-005A. 7. Mission Analysis. Mission definition and needs. Mission planning. Interaction between mote fields and sophisticated sensors. Distribution of motes. 8. Deployment Mechanisms. Relay statistics, Exfiltration capabilities, Localization. Including Autonomous (iterative) solutions, direct GPS chipset, and/or referenced. 9. Situational Awareness. Common Operating Picture, COP. GUI displays. 10. Case Studies. DARPA’s ExANT experiment, The use of WSN for ISR, Application to IED, Application towards 1st Responders (firemen), Employment of WSN to work process control, Asset tracking. June 11-14, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. NEW!
  • 36. 36 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Agile Boot Camp Practitioner's Real-World Solutions Summary Planning, roadmap, backlog, estimating, user stories, and iteration execution. Bring your team together & jump start your Agile practice There’s more to Agile development than simply a different style of programming. That’s often the easy part. An effective Agile implementation changes your methods for: requirements gathering, project estimation and planning, team leadership, producing high-quality software, working with your stakeholders and customers and team development. While not a silver bullet, the Agile framework is quickly becoming the most practical way to create outstanding software. We’ll explore the leading approaches of today’s most successful Agile teams. You’ll learn the basic premises and techniques behind Agile so you can apply them to your projects. Hands-on team exercises follow every section of this class. Learn techniques and put them into practice before you get back to the office. NEW! $1695 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $20000 Each Off The Course Tuition. February 22-24, 2012 Omaha, NE March 7-9, 2012 Baltimore, MD March 19-21, 2012 Des Moines, IA March 28-30, 2012 Columbus, OH April 4-6, 2012 Denver, CO April 9-11, 2012 Minneapolis, MN April 18-20, 2012 Reston, VA April 23-25, 2012 Raleigh, NC May 2-4, 2012 San Diego, CA May 9-11, 2012 Philadelphia, PA May 14-16, 2012 Phoenix, AZ May 23-25, 2012 Houston, TX June 6-8, 2012 Cleveland, OH June 13-15, 2012 Chicago, IL June 18-20, 2012 Columbia, MD June 27-29, 2012 Kansas City, MO 1. Agile Introduction and Overview. • Why Agile? • Agile Benefits • Agile Basics - Understanding the lingo 2. Forming the Agile Team. • Team Roles • Process Expectations • Self-Organizing Teams • Communication - inside and out 3. Product Vision. • Five Levels of Planning in Agile • Importance of Product Vision • Creating and Communicating Vision 4. Focus on the Customer. • User Roles • Customer Personas and Participation 5. Creating a Product Backlog. • User Stories • Acceptance Tests • Story Writing Workshop 6. Product Roadmap. • Product Themes • Creating the Roadmap • Maintaining the Roadmap 7. Prioritizing the Product Backlog. • Methods for Prioritizing • Expectations for Prioritizing Stories 8. Estimating. • Actual vs. Relative Estimating • Planning Poker 9. Release Planning. • Utilizing Velocity • Continuous Integration • Regular Cadence 10. Story Review. • Getting to the Details • Keeping Cadence 11. Iteration Planning. • Task Breakdown • Time Estimates • Definition of “Done” 12. Iteration Execution. • Collaboration • Cadence 13. Measuring/Communicating Progress. • Actual Effort and Remaining Effort • Burndown Charts • Tools and Reporting • Your Company’s Specific Measures 14. Iteration Review and Demo. • Team Roles • Iteration Review • Demos - a change from the past 15. Retrospectives. • What We Did Well • What Did Not Go So Well • What Will We Improve 16. Bringing It All Together. • Process Overview • Transparency Course Outline
  • 37. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 37 Summary Prepare for your Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)? certification while learning to lead Agile software projects that adapt to change, drive innovation and deliver on-time business value in this Agile PM training course. Agile has made its way into the mainstream — it's no longer a grassroots movement to change software development. Today, more organizations and companies are adopting this approach over a more traditional waterfall methodology, and more are working every day to make the transition. To stay relevant in the competitive, changing world of project management, it's increasingly important that project management professionals can demonstrate true leadership ability on today's software projects. The Project Management Institute's Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP) certification clearly illustrates to colleagues, organizations or even potential employers that you're ready and able to lead in this new age of product development, management and delivery. This class not only prepares you to lead your next Agile project effort, but ensures that you're prepared to pass the PMI-ACP certification exam. Acquiring this certification now will make you one of the first software professionals to achieve this valuable industry designation from PMI. $1695 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $20000 Each Off The Course Tuition. April 16-18, 2012 Washington, DC April 18-20, 2012 St Louis, MO April 25-27, 2012 Seattle, WA May 2-4, 2012 Milwaukee, WI May 9-11, 2012 Tampa, FL May 14-16, 2012 Tallahassee, FL May 23-25, 2012 Columbia, MD LIVE VIRTUAL ONLINE January 23-26, 2012 February 21-24, 2012 March 27-30, 2012 April 16-18, 2012 February 15-17, 2012 Atlanta, GA February 27-29, 2012 Indianapolis, IN March 7-9, 2012 Reston, VA March 12-14, 2012 Detroit, MI March 21-23, 2012 San Francisco, CA March 26-28, 2012 Minneapolis, MN April 4-6, 2012 Phoenix, AZ April 9-11, 2012 Omaha, NE April 11-13, 2012 Portland, OR 1. Understanding Agile Project Management. • What is Agile? • Why Agile? • Agile Manifesto • Agile Principles and project management • Agile Benefits Class Exercise: How an iterative Agile approach provides results sooner & more effectively. 2. The Project Schedule. • Managing change while delivering the product • Project schedule and release plan • Identifying a team’s “velocity” • The Five Levels of Agile planning Class Exercise: Triple Constraints. 3. The Project Scope. • How to conquer Scope Creep • Consistently delivering • Understanding complex environments • Customer in charge of the project scope 4. The Project Budget. • Maximize ROI after delivery • Earned value delivery • Methods for partnering with your customer 5. The Product Quality. • Employing product demonstrations • Applying Agile testing techniques • How to write effective acceptance criteria • Code reviews, paired programming and test driven development Class Exercise: A customer-identified product over the course of three iterations. 6. The Project Team. • Collaboration essentials • Managing individual personalities • Understanding your coaching style • The Agile project team roles Class Exercise: Team dynamics. 7. Project Metrics. • Review of common Agile metrics • Taskboards as tactical metrics for the team • Effectively utilizing metrics 8. Continuous Improvement. • Continuous and Agile Project Management • Empowering continuous improvement • How to effectively use retrospectives • Why every team member should care 9. Project Leadership. • Project leadership • Command and control versus servant • Insulating the team from disruption • Matching needs to opportunities Class Exercise: How self-organization quickly yields impressive results. 10. Successfully Transitioning to Agile. • Project Management • Correlating challenges to possible solutions • How corporate culture affects team ability • Overcoming resistance to Agile • Navigating around popular Agile myths 11. A Full Day of Preparation for the Agile Certified Practitioner. • (PMI-ACP) Certification Exam Course Outline Agile Project Management Certification Workshop NEW!
  • 38. 38 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Applied Systems Engineering Summary Systems engineering is a simple flow of concepts, frequently neglected in the press of day-to-day work, that reduces risk step by step. In this workshop, you will learn the latest systems principles, processes, products, and methods. This is a practical course, in which students apply the methods to build real, interacting systems during the workshop. You can use the results now in your work. This workshop provides an in-depth look at the latest principles for systems engineering in context of standard development cycles, with realistic practice on how to apply them. The focus is on the underlying thought patterns, to help the participant understand why rather than just teach what to do. A 4-Day Practical Workshop Planned and Controlled Methods are Essential to Successful Systems. Participants in this course practice the skills by designing and building interoperating robots that solve a larger problem. Small groups build actual interoperating robots to solve a larger problem. Create these interesting and challenging robotic systems while practicing: • Requirements development from a stakeholder description. • System architecting, including quantified, stakeholder-oriented trade-offs. • Implementation in software and hardware • Systm integration, verification and validation Instructor Eric Honour, CSEP, international consultant and lecturer, has a 40-year career of complex systems development & operation. Founder and former President of INCOSE. He has led the development of 18 major systems, including the Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems and the Battle Group Passive Horizon Extension System. BSSE (Systems Engineering), US Naval Academy, MSEE, Naval Postgraduate School, and PhD candidate, University of South Australia. This course is designed for systems engineers, technical team leaders, program managers, project managers, logistic support leaders, design engineers, and others who participate in defining and developing complex systems. Who Should Attend • A leader or a key member of a complex system development team. • Concerned about the team’s technical success. • Interested in how to fit your system into its system environment. • Looking for practical methods to use in your team. April 16-19, 2012 Orlando, Florida $1890 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. How do We Work With Complexity? Basic definitions and concepts. Problem-solving approaches; system thinking; systems engineering overview; what systems engineering is NOT. 2. Systems Engineering Model. An underlying process model that ties together all the concepts and methods. Overview of the systems engineering model; technical aspects of systems engineering; management aspects of systems engineering. 3. A System Challenge Application. Practical application of the systems engineering model against an interesting and entertaining system development. Small groups build actual interoperating robots to solve a larger problem. Small group development of system requirements and design, with presentations for mutual learning. 4. Where Do Requirements Come From? Requirements as the primary method of measurement and control for systems development. How to translate an undefined need into requirements; how to measure a system; how to create, analyze, manage requirements; writing a specification. 5. Where Does a Solution Come From? Designing a system using the best methods known today. System architecting processes; alternate sources for solutions; how to allocate requirements to the system components; how to develop, analyze, and test alternatives; how to trade off results and make decisions. Getting from the system design to the system. 6. Ensuring System Quality. Building in quality during the development, and then checking it frequently. The relationship between systems engineering and systems testing. 7. Systems Engineering Management. How to successfully manage the technical aspects of the system development; virtual, collaborative teams; design reviews; technical performance measurement; technical baselines and configuration management.
  • 39. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 39 Instructor Dr. Scott Workinger has led projects in Manufacturing, Eng. & Construction, and Info. Tech. for 30 years. His projects have made contributions ranging from increasing optical fiber bandwidth to creating new CAD technology. He currently teaches courses on management and engineering and consults on strategic issues in management and technology. He holds a Ph.D. in Engineering from Stanford. Summary This course provides knowledge and exercises at a practical level in the use of the DODAF. You will learn about architecting processes, methods and thought patterns. You will practice architecting by creating DODAF representations of a familiar, complex system-of-systems. By the end of this course, you will be able to use DODAF effectively in your work. This course is intended for systems engineers, technical team leaders, program or project managers, and others who participate in defining and developing complex systems. Practice architecting on a creative “Mars Rotor” complex system. Define the operations, technical structure, and migration for this future space program. The DOD Architecture Framework (DODAF) provides an underlying structure to work with complexity. Today’s systems do not stand alone; each system fits within an increasingly complex system-of-systems, a network of interconnection that virtually guarantees surprise behavior. Systems science recognizes this type of interconnectivity as one essence of complexity. It requires new tools, new methods, and new paradigms for effective system design. What You Will Learn • Three aspects of an architecture • Four primary architecting activities • Eight DoDAF 2.0 viewpoints • The entire set of DoDAF 2.0 views and how they relate to each other • A useful sequence to create views • Different “Fit-for-Purpose” versions of the views. • How to plan future changes. Course Outline 1. Introduction. The relationship between architecting and systems engineering. Course objectives and expectations.. 2. Architectures and Architecting. Fundamental concepts. Terms and definitions. Origin of the terms within systems development. Understanding of the components of an architecture. Architecting key activities. Foundations of modern architecting. 3. Architectural Tools. Architectural frameworks: DODAF, TOGAF, Zachman, FEAF. Why frameworks exist, and what they hope to provide. Design patterns and their origin. Using patterns to generate alternatives. Pattern language and the communication of patterns. System architecting patterns. Binding patterns into architectures. 4. DODAF Overview. Viewpoints within DoDAF (All, Capability, Data/Information, Operational, Project, Services, Standards, Systems). How Viewpoints support models. Diagram types (views) within each viewpoint. 5. DODAF Operational Definition. Describing an operational environment, and then modifying it to incorporate new capabilities. Sequences of creation. How to convert concepts into DODAF views. Practical exercises on each DODAF view, with review and critique. Teaching method includes three passes for each product: (a) describing the views, (b) instructor- led exercise, (c) group work to create views. 6. DODAF Technical Definition Processes. Converting the operational definition into service- oriented technical architecture. Matching the new architecture with legacy systems. Sequences of creation. Linkages between the technical viewpoints and the operational viewpoints. Practical exercises on each DODAF view, with review and critique, again using the three-pass method. 7. DODAF Migration Definition Processes. How to depict the migration of current systems into future systems while maintaining operability at each step. Practical exercises on migration planning. March 15-16, 2012 Columbia, Maryland June 4-5, 2012 Denver, Colorado $1150 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Architecting with DODAF Effectively Using The DOD Architecture Framework (DODAF)
  • 40. 40 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Cost Estimating Summary This two-day course covers the primary methods for cost estimation needed in systems development, including parametric estimation, activity-based costing, life cycle estimation, and probabilistic modeling. The estimation methods are placed in context of a Work Breakdown Structure and program schedules, while explaining the entire estimation process. Emphasis is also placed on using cost models to perform trade studies and calibrating cost models to improve their accuracy. Participants will learn how to use cost models through real-life case studies. Common pitfalls in cost estimation will be discussed including behavioral influences that can impact the quality of cost estimates. We conclude with a review of the state-of-the- art in cost estimation. February 22-23, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico July 17-18, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1150 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Cost estimation in context of system life cycles. Importance of cost estimation in project planning. How estimation fits into the proposal cycle. The link between cost estimation and scope control. History of parametric modeling. 2. Scope Definition. Creation of a technical work scope. Definition and format of the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) as a basis for accurate cost estimation. Pitfalls in WBS creation and how to avoid them. Task-level work definition. Class exercise in creating a WBS. 3. Cost Estimation Methods. Different ways to establish a cost basis, with explanation of each: parametric estimation, activity-based costing, analogy, case based reasoning, expert judgment, etc. Benefits and detriments of each. Industry- validated applications. Schedule estimation coupled with cost estimation. Comprehensive review of cost estimation tools. 4. Economic Principles. Concepts such as economies/diseconomies of scale, productivity, reuse, earned value, learning curves and prediction markets are used to illustrate additional methods that can improve cost estimates. 5. System Cost Estimation. Estimation in software, electronics, and mechanical engineering. Systems engineering estimation, including design tasks, test & evaluation, and technical management. Percentage-loaded level-of-effort tasks: project management, quality assurance, configuration management. Class exercise in creating cost estimates using a simple spreadsheet model and comparing against the WBS. 6. Risk Estimation. Handling uncertainties in the cost estimation process. Cost estimation and risk management. Probabilistic cost estimation and effective portrayal of the results. Cost estimation, risk levels, and pricing. Class exercise in probabilistic estimation. 7. Decision Making. Organizational adoption of cost models. Understanding the purpose of the estimate (proposal vs. rebaselining; ballpark vs. detailed breakdown). Human side of cost estimation (optimism, anchoring, customer expectations, etc.). Class exercise on calibrating decision makers. 8. Course Summary. Course summary and refresher on key points. Additional cost estimation resources. Principles for effective cost estimation. Instructor Ricardo Valerdi, is an Associate Professor of Systems & Industrial Engineering at the University of Arizona and a Research Affiliate at MIT. He developed the COSYSMO model for estimating systems engineering effort which has been used by BAE Systems, Boeing, General Dynamics, L-3 Communications, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, and SAIC. Dr. Valerdi is a Visiting Associate of the Center for Systems and Software Engineering at the University of Southern California where he earned his Ph.D. in Industrial & Systems Engineering. Previously, he worked at The Aerospace Corporation, Motorola and General Instrument. He served on the Board of Directors of INCOSE, is an Editorial Advisor of the Journal of Cost Analysis and Parametrics, and is the author of the book The Constructive Systems Engineering Cost Model (COSYSMO): Quantifying the Costs of Systems Engineering Effort in Complex Systems (VDM Verlag, 2008). What You Will Learn • What are the most important cost estimation methods? • How is a WBS used to define project scope? • What are the appropriate cost estimation methods for my situation? • How are cost models used to support decisions? • How accurate are cost models? How accurate do they need to be? • How are cost models calibrated? • How can cost models be integrated to develop estimates of the total system? • How can cost models be used for risk assessment? • What are the principles for effective cost estimation? From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to perform basic cost estimates, identify tradeoffs, use cost model results to support decisions, evaluate the goodness of an estimate, evaluate the goodness of a cost model, and understand the latest trends in cost estimation. NEW!
  • 41. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 41 Summary This two-day course walks through the CSEP requirements and the INCOSE Handbook Version 3.2.2 to cover all topics on the CSEP exam. Interactive work, study plans, and sample examination questions help you to prepare effectively for the exam. Participants leave the course with solid knowledge, a hard copy of the INCOSE Handbook, study plans, and three sample examinations. Attend the CSEP course to learn what you need. Follow the study plan to seal in the knowledge. Use the sample exam to test yourself and check your readiness. Contact our instructor for questions if needed. Then take the exam. If you do not pass, you can retake the course at no cost. What You Will Learn • How to pass the CSEP examination! • Details of the INCOSE Handbook, the source for the exam. • Your own strengths and weaknesses, to target your study. • The key processes and definitions in the INCOSE language of the exam. • How to tailor the INCOSE processes. • Five rules for test-taking. Course Outline 1. Introduction. What is the CSEP and what are the requirements to obtain it? Terms and definitions. Basis of the examination. Study plans and sample examination questions and how to use them. Plan for the course. Introduction to the INCOSE Handbook. Self-assessment quiz. Filling out the CSEP application. 2. Systems Engineering and Life Cycles. Definitions and origins of systems engineering, including the latest concepts of “systems of systems.” Hierarchy of system terms. Value of systems engineering. Life cycle characteristics and stages, and the relationship of systems engineering to life cycles. Development approaches. The INCOSE Handbook system development examples. 3. Technical Processes. The processes that take a system from concept in the eye to operation, maintenance and disposal. Stakeholder requirements and technical requirements, including concept of operations, requirements analysis, requirements definition, requirements management. Architectural design, including functional analysis and allocation, system architecture synthesis. Implementation, integration, verification, transition, validation, operation, maintenance and disposal of a system. 4. Project Processes. Technical management and the role of systems engineering in guiding a project. Project planning, including the Systems Engineering Plan (SEP), Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD), Integrated Product Teams (IPT), and tailoring methods. Project assessment, including Technical Performance Measurement (TPM). Project control. Decision-making and trade-offs. Risk and opportunity management, configuration management, information management. 5. Enterprise & Agreement Processes. How to define the need for a system, from the viewpoint of stakeholders and the enterprise. Acquisition and supply processes, including defining the need. Managing the environment, investment, and resources. Enterprise environment management. Investment management including life cycle cost analysis. Life cycle processes management standard processes, and process improvement. Resource management and quality management. 6. Specialty Engineering Activities. Unique technical disciplines used in the systems engineering processes: integrated logistics support, electromagnetic and environmental analysis, human systems integration, mass properties, modeling & simulation including the system modeling language (SysML), safety & hazards analysis, sustainment and training needs. 7. After-Class Plan. Study plans and methods. Using the self-assessment to personalize your study plan. Five rules for test-taking. How to use the sample examinations. How to reach us after class, and what to do when you succeed. The INCOSE Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) rating is a coveted milestone in the career of a systems engineer, demonstrating knowledge, education and experience that are of high value to systems organizations. This two-day course provides you with the detailed knowledge and practice that you need to pass the CSEP examination. March 20-21, 2012 Columbia, Maryland April 20-21, 2012 Orlando, Florida $1150 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Instructors Eric Honour, CSEP, international consultant and lecturer, has a 40-year career of complex systems development & operation. Founder and former President of INCOSE. Author of the “Value of SE” material in the INCOSE Handbook. He has led the development of 18 major systems, including the Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems and the Battle Group Passive Horizon Extension System. BSSE (Systems Engineering), US Naval Academy, MSEE, Naval Postgraduate School, and PhD candidate, University of South Australia. Michael C.  Jones completed a career as a Submarine Officer before becoming a member of the Senior Professional Staff at the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory. He has more than twenty years of experience in technical management and systems engineering of complex systems in nuclear power, submarine combat control, anti-submarine warfare, cyber warfare, and training & simulation. He co-authored the simulation track in the Systems Engineering Masters degree program in the Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals Program. Mikehas a BS in Computer Science from the US Naval Academy, an MS in Electronic Systems Engineering and an MBA in Defense Systems Acquisition, both from the Naval Postgraduate School, and is a PhD student in Modeling and Simulation at Old Dominion University. Certified Systems Engineering Professional - CSEP Preparation Guaranteed Training to Pass the CSEP Certification Exam www.aticourses.com/CSEP_preparation.htm Video!
  • 42. 42 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Fundamentals of COTS-Based Systems Engineering Leveraging Commercial Off-the-Shelf Technology for System Success May 8-10, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. COTS Concepts and Principles. Key COTS concepts. COTS-Based Systems Engineering (CBSE). Complexity inherent in COTS-based solutions. CBSE compared and contrasted with Traditional Systems Engineering (TSE). Key challenges and expected benefits of CBSE. COTS lessons learned. 2. COTS Influences on Requirements Development. Tailored and new approaches to requirements. Stakeholder requirements and measures of effectiveness (MOEs). System Requirements and measures of performance (MOPs). Flow down of requirements to COTS components. 3. COTS Influences on Architecture and Design. Architecting principles. Make vs. buy decisions. Architectural and design strategies for CBSE. Supporting the inherent independence of the leveraged COTS components. Dealing with the unique interdependencies of overlapping COTS and system lifecycles. Support for ongoing change and evolution of the COTS components. Architectural frameworks. Technical performance measures (TPMs). Readiness levels. Modeling and simulation. 4. COTS Life Cycle Considerations. Reliability, Maintainability, Availability (RMA). Supportability/Logistics, Usability/Human Factors. Training. System Safety. Security/Survivability. Producibility/ Manufacturability. Affordability. Disposability/Sustainability. Changeability (flexibility, adaptability, scalability, modifiability, variability, robustness, modularity). Commonality. 5. COTS Influences on Integration and V&V. Integration, verification, and validation approaches in a COTS environment. Strategies for dealing with the dynamic and independent nature of the COTS components. Evolutionary and incremental integration, verification, and validation. Acceptance of COTS components. 6. COTS Influences on Technical Management. Planning, monitoring, and control. Risk and decision management, Configuration and information management. Supplier identification and selection. Supplier agreements. Supplier oversight and control. Supplier technical reviews. COTS Integrator role. What You Will Learn • The key characteristics of COTS components. • How to effectively plan and manage a COTS development effort. • How using COTS affects your requirements and design. • How to effectively integrate COTS into your systems. • Effective verification and validation of COTS-based systems. • How to manage your COTS suppliers. • The latest lessons learned from over two decades of COTS developments. Who Should Attend • Prime and subcontractor engineers who procure COTS components. • Suppliers who produce and supply COTS components (hardware and software). • Technical team leaders whose responsibilities include COTS technologies. • Program and engineering managers that oversee COTS development efforts. • Government regulators, administrators, and sponsors of COTS procurement efforts. • Military professionals who work with COTS-based systems. Summary This three day course provides a systemic overview of how to use Systems Engineering to plan, manage, and execute projects that have significant Commercial-off-the- Shelf (COTS) content. Modern development programs are increasingly characterized by COTS solutions (both hardware and software) in both the military and commercial domains. This course focuses on the fundamentals of planning, execution, and follow-through that allow for the delivery of excellent and effective COTS-based systems to ensure the needs of all external and internal stakeholders are met. Participants will learn the necessary adjustments to the fundamental principles of Systems Engineering when dealing with COTS technologies. Numerous examples of COTS systems are presented. Practical information and tools are provided that will help the participants deal with issues that inevitably occur in the real word. Extensive in- class exercises are used to stimulate application of the course material. Each student will receive a complete set of lecture notes and an annotated bibliography. Instructor David D. Walden, ESEP, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of Systems Engineering. He has over 28 years of experience in leadership of systems development as well as in organizational process improvement and quality having worked at McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics before starting his own consultancy in 2006. He has a BS degree in Electrical Engineering (Valparaiso University) and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Washington University in St. Louis) and Management of Technology (University of Minnesota). Mr. Walden is a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and is an INCOSE Expert Systems Engineering (ESEP). He is also a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and Tau Beta Pi. He is the author or coauthor of over 50 technical reports and professional papers/presentations addressing all aspects of Systems Engineering. NEW!
  • 43. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 43 Instructors Dr. Scott Workinger has led innovative technology development efforts in complex, risk-laden environments for 30 years. He currently teaches courses on program management and engineering and consults on strategic management and technology issues. Scott has a B.S in Engineering Physics from Lehigh University, an M.S. in Systems Engineering from the University ofArizona, and a Ph.D. in Civil and Environment Engineering from Stanford University. Michael C.  Jones  completed a career as a Submarine Officer before becoming a member of the Senior Professional Staff at the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory. He has more than twenty years of experience in technical management and systems engineering of complex systems in nuclear power, submarine combat control, anti-submarine warfare, cyber warfare, and training & simulation. He co- authored the simulation track in the Systems Engineering Masters degree program in the Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals Program. Mikehas a BS in Computer Science from the US Naval Academy, an MS in Electronic Systems Engineering and an MBA in Defense Systems Acquisition, both from the Naval Postgraduate School, and is a PhD student in Modeling and Simulation at Old Dominion University. Summary Today's complex systems present difficult challenges to develop. From military systems to aircraft to environmental and electronic control systems, development teams must face the challenges with an arsenal of proven methods. Individual systems are more complex, and systems operate in much closer relationship, requiring a system-of-systems approach to the overall design. This two-day workshop presents the fundamentals of a systems engineering approach to solving complex problems. It covers the underlying attitudes as well as the process definitions that make up systems engineering. The model presented is a research-proven combination of the best existing standards. Participants in this workshop practice the processes on a realistic system development. Who Should Attend You Should Attend This Workshop If You Are: • Working in any sort of system development • Project leader or key member in a product development team • Looking for practical methods to use today This Course Is Aimed At: • Project leaders, • Technical team leaders, • Design engineers, and • Others participating in system development Course Outline 1. Systems Engineering Model. An underlying process model that ties together all the concepts and methods. System thinking attitudes. Overview of the systems engineering processes. Incremental, concurrent processes and process loops for iteration. Technical and management aspects. 2. Where Do Requirements Come From? Requirements as the primary method of measurement and control for systems development. Three steps to translate an undefined need into requirements; determining the system purpose/mission from an operational view; how to measure system quality, analyzing missions and environments; requirements types; defining functions and requirements. 3. Where Does a Solution Come From? Designing a system using the best methods known today. What is an architecture? System architecting processes; defining alternative concepts; alternate sources for solutions; how to allocate requirements to the system components; how to develop, analyze, and test alternatives; how to trade off results and make decisions. Establishing an allocated baseline, and getting from the system design to the system. Systems engineering during ongoing operation. 4. Ensuring System Quality. Building in quality during the development, and then checking it frequently. The relationship between systems engineering and systems testing. Technical analysis as a system tool. Verification at multiple levels: architecture, design, product. Validation at multiple levels; requirements, operations design, product. 5. Systems Engineering Management. How to successfully manage the technical aspects of the system development; planning the technical processes; assessing and controlling the technical processes, with corrective actions; use of risk management, configuration management, interface management to guide the technical development. 6. Systems Engineering Concepts of Leadership. How to guide and motivate technical teams; technical teamwork and leadership; virtual, collaborative teams; design reviews; technical performance measurement. 7. Summary. Review of the important points of the workshop. Interactive discussion of participant experiences that add to the material. Fundamentals of Systems Engineering February 14-15, 2012 Columbia, Maryland June 6-7, 2012 Denver, Colorado $1150 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  • 44. 44 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Model Based Systems Engineering with OMG SysML™ Productivity Through Model-Based Systems Engineering Principles & Practices Summary This three day course is intended for practicing systems engineers who want to learn how to apply model-driven systems engineering practices using the UML Profile for Systems Engineering (OMG SysML™). You will apply systems engineering principles in developing a comprehensive model of a solution to the class problem, using modern systems engineering development tools and a development methodology tailored to OMG SysML. The methodology begins with the presentation of a desired capability and leads you through the performance of activities and the creation of work products to support requirements definition, architecture description and system design. The methodology offers suggestions for how to transition to specialty engineering, with an emphasis on interfacing with software engineering activities. Use of a modeling tool is required. Each student will receive a lab manual describing how to create each diagram type in the selected tool, access to the Object-Oriented Systems Engineering Methodology (OOSEM) website and a complete set of lecture notes. Instructor J.D. Baker is a Software Systems Engineer with expertise in system design processes and methodologies that support Model-Based Systems Engineering. He has over 20 years of experience providing training and mentoring in software and system architecture, systems engineering, software development, iterative/agile development, object-oriented analysis and design, the Unified Modeling Language (UML), the UML Profile for Systems Engineering (SysML), use case driven requirements, and process improvement. He has participated in the development of UML, OMG SysML, and the UML Profile for DoDAF and MODAF. J.D. holds many industry certifications, including OMG Certified System Modeling Professional (OCSMP), OMG Certified UML Professional (OCUP), Sun Certified Java Programmer, and he holds certificates as an SEI Software Architecture Professional and ATAM Evaluator. May 22-24, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Model-Based Systems Engineering Overview. Introduction to OMG SysM, role of open standards and open architecture in systems engineering, what is a model, 4 modeling principles, 5 characteristics of a good model, 4 pillars of OMG SysML. 2. Getting started with OOSEM. Use case diagrams and descriptions, modeling functional requirements, validating use cases, domain modeling concepts and guidelines, OMG SysML language architecture. 3. OOSEM Activities and Work Products. Walk through the OOSEM top level activities, decomposing the Specify and Design System activity, relating use case and domain models to the system model, options for model organization, the package diagram. Compare and contrast Distiller and Hybrid SUV examples. 4. Requirements Analysis. Modeling Requirements in OMG SysML, functional analysis and allocation, the role of functional analysis in an object- oriented world using a modified SE V, OOSEM activity –"Analyze Stakeholder Needs”. Concept of Operations, Domain Models as analysis tools. Modeling non-functional requirements. Managing large requirement sets. Requirements in the Distiller sample model. 5. OMG SysML Structural Elements. Block Definition Diagrams (BDD), Internal Block Diagrams (IBD), Ports, Parts, Connectors and flows. Creating system context diagrams. Block definition and usage relationship. Delegation through ports. Operations and attributes. 6. OMG SysML Behavioral Elements. Activity diagrams, activity decomposition, State Machines, state execution semantics, Interactions, allocation of behavior. Call behavior actions. Relating activity behavior to operations, interactions, and state machines. 7. Parametric Analysis and Design Synthesis. Constraint Blocks, Tracing analysis tools to OMG SysML elements, Design Synthesis, Tracing requirements to design elements. Relating SysML requirements to text requirements in a requirements management tool. Analyzing the Hybrid SUV dynamics. 8. Model Verification. Tracing requirements to OMG SysM test cases, Systems Engineering Process Outputs, Preparing work products for specialty engineers, Exchanging model data using XMI, Technical Reviews and Audits, Inspecting OMG SysML and UML artifacts. 9. Extending OMG SysML. Stereotypes, tag values and model libraries, Trade Studies, Modeling and Simulation, Executable UML. 10. Deploying OMG SysML™ in your Organization. Lessons learned from MBSE initiatives, the future of SysML.OMG Certified System Modeling Professional resources and exams. What You Will Learn • Identify and describe the use of all nine OMG SysML™ diagrams. • Follow a formal methodology to produce a system model in a modeling tool. • Model system behavior using an activity diagram. • Model system behavior using a state diagram. • Model system behavior using a sequence diagram. • Model requirements using a requirements diagram. • Model requirements using a use case diagram. • Model structure using block diagrams. • Allocate behavior to structure in a model. • Recognize parametrics and constraints and describe their usage. NEW!
  • 45. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 45 Principles of Test & Evaluation Assuring Required Product Performance Summary This two day workshop is an overview of test and evaluation from product concept through operations. The purpose of the course is to give participants a solid grounding in practical testing methodology for assuring that a product performs as intended. The course is designed for Test Engineers, Design Engineers, Project Engineers, Systems Engineers, Technical Team Leaders, System Support Leaders Technical and Management Staff and Project Managers. The course work includes a case study in several parts for practicing testing techniques. Instructor Dr. Scott Workinger has led projects in Manufacturing, Eng. & Construction, and Info. Tech. for 30 years. His projects have made contributions ranging from increasing optical fiber bandwidth to creating new CAD technology. He currently teaches courses on management and engineering and consults on strategic issues in management and technology. He holds a Ph.D. in Engineering from Stanford. March 13-14, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1150 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. What is Test and Evaluation? Basic definitions and concepts. Test and evaluation overview; application to complex systems. A model of T&E that covers the activities needed (requirements, planning, testing, analysis & reporting). Roles of test and evaluation throughout product development, and the life cycle, test economics and risk and their impact on test planning. 2. Test Requirements. Requirements as the primary method for measurement and control of product development. Where requirements come from; evaluation of requirements for testability; deriving test requirements; the Requirements Verification Matrix (RVM); Qualification vs. Acceptance requirements; design proof vs. first article vs. production requirements, design for testability. 3. Test Planning. Evaluating the product concept to plan verification and validation by test. T&E strategy and the Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP); verification planning and the Verification Plan document; analyzing and evaluating alternatives; test resource planning; establishing a verification baseline; developing a verification schedule; test procedures and their format for success. 4. Integration Testing. How to successfully manage the intricate aspects of system integration testing; levels of integration planning; development test concepts; integration test planning (architecture-based integration versus build-based integration); preferred order of events; integration facilities; daily schedules; the importance of regression testing. 5. Formal Testing. How to perform a test; differences in testing for design proof, first article qualification, recurring production acceptance; rules for test conduct. Testing for different purposes, verification vs. validation; test procedures and test records; test readiness certification, test article configuration; troubleshooting and anomaly handling. 6. Data Collection, Analysis and Reporting. Statistical methods; test data collection methods and equipment, timeliness in data collection, accuracy, sampling; data analysis using statistical rigor, the importance of doing the analysis before the test;, sample size, design of experiments, Taguchi method, hypothesis testing, FRACAS, failure data analysis; report formats and records, use of data as recurring metrics, Cum Sum method. This course provides the knowledge and ability to plan and execute testing procedures in a rigorous, practical manner to assure that a product meets its requirements. What You Will Learn • Create effective test requirements. • Plan tests for complete coverage. • Manage testing during integration and verification. • Develop rigorous test conclusions with sound collection, analysis, and reporting methods.
  • 46. 46 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Requirements Engineering with DEVSME What You Will Learn • Overview of IEEE and CMMI approaches to requirements engineering. • Basic concepts of Discrete Event System Specification (DEVS) and how to apply them using DEVS Modeling Environment. • How to understand and develop requirements and then simulate them with both Discrete and Continuous temporal behaviors. • System of Systems Concepts, Interoperability, service orientation, and data-centricity within a modeling and simulation framework. • Integrated System Development and virtual testing with applications to service oriented and data-distribution architectures. From this course you will obtain the understanding of how to leverage collaborative modeling and simulation to develop requirements and analyze complex information-intensive systems engineering problems within an integrated requirements development and testing process. Instructors Bernard P. Zeigler is chief scientist for RTSync, Zeigler has been chief architect for simulation-based automated testing of net-centric IT systems with DoD’s Joint Interoperability Test Command as well as for automated model composition for the Department of Homeland Security. He is internationally known for his foundational text Theory of Modeling and Simulation, second edition (Academic Press, 2000), He was named Fellow of the IEEE in recognition of his contributions to the theory of discrete event simulation. Phillip Hammonds is a senior scientist for RTSync, He co-authored (with Professor Zeigler). the 2007 book, “Modeling & Simulation-Based Data Engineering: Introducing Pragmatics into Ontologies for Net-Centric Information Exchange”. Elsevier Press. He has worked as a technical director and program manager for several large DoD contractors where skilled requirements and data engineering were critical to project success. Course Outline 1. Introduction to the Requirements Engineering Process. 2. Introduction to Discrete Event System Specification. (DEVS)--System-Theory Basis and Concepts, Levels of System Specification, System Specifications: Continuous and Discrete. 3. Framework for Modeling and Simulation Based Requirements Engineering. DEVS Simulation Algorithms, DEVS Modeling and Simulation Environments. 4. DEVS Model Development. Constrained natural language DEVS-based model construction, System Entity Structure - coupling and hierarchical construction, Verification and Visualization. 5. DEVS Hybrid Discrete and Continuous Modeling and Simulation. Introduction to simulation with DEVSJava/ADEVS Hybrid software, Capturing stakeholder requirements for space systems communication and service architectures. 6. Interoperability and Reuse. System of Systems Concepts, Component-based systems, modularity, Levels of Interoperability (syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic). Service Oriented Architecture, Data Distribution Service standards. 7. Integrated System Requirements Development and Visualization/Testing. Using DEVS Modeling Environment (DEVSME) – Requirements capture in an unambiguous, interoperable language, structured in terms of input, output, timing and coupling to other requirements, Automated DEVS-based Test Case Generation, Net-Enabled System Testing – Measures of Performance/Effectiveness. 8. Cutting Edge Concepts and Tools. Model and Simulation-based data engineering for interest- based collection and distribution of massive data. Capturing requirements for IT systems implementing such concepts. Software/Hardware implementations based on DEVS-Chip hardware. April 24-26, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1490 (8:30am - 4:30pm) (8:30am- 12:30pm on last day) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This two and one half -day course is designed for engineers, managers and educators who wish to enhance their capabilities to capture needs and requirements in a standardized, interoperable format that allows immediate dynamic visualization of workflows and relationships. One of the most serious issues of modern systems engineering is capturing requirements in an unambiguous, interoperable language that is structured in terms of input, output, timing and coupling to other requirements. The DEVS Modeling Environment (DEVSME) uses a restricted natural language that is easy to use, but powerful enough to express complex mathematical, logical and process functions in such a way that other engineers and stakeholders will understand the intent as well as the behavior of the requirement. The course covers the basics of systems concepts and discrete event systems specification (DEVS), a computational basis for system theory. It demonstrates the application of DEVS to "virtual build and test" requirements engineering in complex information-intensive systems development. The DEVSME Requirements Engineering Environment leverages the power of the DEVS modeling and simulation methodology. A particular focus is the application of model-based data engineering in today’s data rich – and information challenged – system environments. NEW!
  • 47. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 47 Technical CONOPS & Concepts Master's Course A hands on, how-to course in building Concepts of Operations, Operating Concepts, Concepts of Employment and Operational Concept Documents What You Will Learn • What are CONOPS and how do they differ from CONEMPS, OPCONS and OCDs? How are they related to the DODAF and JCIDS in the US DOD? • What makes a “good” CONOPS? • What are the two types and five levels of CONOPS and when is each used? • How do you get users’ active, vocal support in your CONOPS? After this course you will be able to build and update OpCons and CONOPS using a robust CONOPS team, determine the appropriate type and level for a CONOPS effort, work closely with end users of your products and systems and elicit solid, actionable, user-driven requirements. Instructors Mack McKinney, president and founder of a consulting company, has worked in the defense industry since 1975, first as an Air Force officer for 8 years, then with Westinghouse Defense and Northrop Grumman for 16 years, then with a SIGINT company in NY for 6 years. He now teaches, consults and writes Concepts of Operations for Boeing, Sikorsky, Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, Raytheon Missile Systems, Joint Forces Command, MITRE, Booz Allen Hamilton, all the uniformed services and the IC. He has US patents in radar processing and hyperspectral sensing. John Venable, Col., USAF, ret is a former Thunderbirds lead, wrote concepts for the Air Staff and is a certified CONOPS instructor. Summary This three-day course is designed for engineers, scientists, project managers and other professionals who design, build, test or sell complex systems. Each topic is illustrated by real- world case studies discussed by experienced CONOPS and requirements professionals. Key topics are reinforced with small-team exercises. Over 200 pages of sample CONOPS (six) and templates are provided. Students outline CONOPS and build OpCons in class. Each student gets instructor’s slides; college-level textbook; ~250 pages of case studies, templates, checklists, technical writing tips, good and bad CONOPS; Hi-Resolution personalized Certificate of CONOPS Competency and class photo, opportunity to join US/Coalition CONOPS Community of Interest. Course Outline 1. How to build CONOPS. Operating Concepts (OpCons) and Concepts of Employment (ConEmps). Five levels of CONOPS & two CONOPS templates, when to use each. 2. The elegantly simple Operating Concept and the mathematics behind it (X2-X)/2 3. What Scientists, Engineers and Project Managers need to know when working with operational end users. Proven, time-tested techniques for understanding the end user’s perspective – a primer for non-users. Rules for visiting an operational unit/site and working with difficult users and operators. 4. Modeling and Simulation. Detailed cross-walk for CONOPS and Modeling and Simulation (determining the scenarios, deciding on the level of fidelity needed, modeling operational utility, etc.) 5. Clear technical writing in English. (1 hour crash course). Getting non-technical people to embrace scientific methods and principles for requirements to drive solid CONOPS. 6. Survey of major weapons and sensor systems in trouble and lessons learned. Getting better collaboration among engineers, scientists, managers and users to build more effective systems and powerful CONOPS. Special challenges when updating existing CONOPS. 7. Forming the CONOPS team. Collaborating with people from other professions. Working With Non-Technical People: Forces that drive Program Managers, Requirements Writers, Acquisition/Contracts Professionals. What motivates them, how work with them. 8. Concepts, CONOPS, JCIDS and DODAF. How does it all tie together? 9. All users are not operators. (Where to find the good ones and how to gain access to them). Getting actionable information from operational users without getting thrown out of the office. The two questions you must ALWAYS ask, one of which may get you bounced. 10. Relationship of CONOPS to requirements & contracts. Legal minefields in CONOPS. 11. OpCons, ConEmps & CONOPS for systems. Reorganizations & exercises – how to build them. OpCons and CONOPS for IT-intensive systems (benefits and special risks). 12. R&D and CONOPS. Using CONOPS to increase the Transition Rate (getting R&D projects from the lab to adopted, fielded systems). People Mover and Robotic Medic team exercises reinforce lecture points, provide skills practice. Checklist to achieve team consensus on types of R&D needed for CONOPS (effects-driven, blue sky, capability-driven, new spectra, observed phenomenon, product/process improvement, basic science). Unclassified R&D Case Histories: $$$ millions invested - - - what went wrong & key lessons learned: (Software for automated imagery analysis; low cost, lightweight, hyperspectral sensor; non-traditional ISR; innovative ATC aircraft tracking system; full motion video for bandwidth- disadvantaged users in combat - - - Getting it Right!). 13. Critical thinking. creative thinking, empathic thinking, counterintuitive thinking and when engineers and scientists use each type in developing concepts and CONOPS. 14. Operations Researchers. and Operations Analysts when quantification is needed. 15. Lessons Learned From No/Poor CONOPS. Real world problems with fighters, attack helicopters, C3I systems, DHS border security project, humanitarian relief effort, DIVAD, air defense radar, E/O imager, civil aircraft ATC tracking systems and more. 16. Beyond the CONOPS: Configuring a program for success and the critical attributes and crucial considerations that can be program-killers; case histories and lessons-learned. March 13-15, 2012 Virginia Beach, Virginia April 3-5, 2012 Columbia, Maryland April 10-12, 2012 Virginia Beach, Virginia May 8-10, 2012 Virginia Beach, Virginia $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. www.aticourses.com/Technical_CONOPS_Concepts.htm Video! NEW!
  • 48. 48 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Acoustics Fundamentals, Measurements, and Applications April 10-12, 2012 Silver Spring, Maryland July 17-19, 2012 Bremmerton, Washington $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This three-day course is intended for engineers and other technical personnel and managers who have a work-related need to understand basic acoustics concepts and how to measure and analyze sound. This is an introductory course and participants need not have any prior knowledge of sound or vibration. Each topic is illustrated by appropriate applications, in-class demonstrations, and worked-out numerical examples. Each student will receive a copy of the textbook, Acoustics: An Introduction by Heinrich Kuttruff. Instructor Dr. Alan D. Stuart, Associate Professor Emeritus of Acoustics, Penn State, has over forty years experience in the field of sound and vibration. He has degrees in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and engineering acoustics. For over thirty years he has taught courses on the Fundamentals of Acoustics, Structural Acoustics, Applied Acoustics, Noise Control Engineering, and Sonar Engineering on both the graduate and undergraduate levels as well as at government and industrial organizations throughout the country. Course Outline 1. Introductory Concepts. Sound in fluids and solids. Sound as particle vibrations. Waveforms and frequency. Sound energy and power consideration. 2. Acoustic Waves. Air-borne sound. Plane and spherical acoustic waves. Sound pressure, intensity, and power. Decibel (dB) log power scale. Sound reflection and transmission at surfaces. Sound absorption. 3. Acoustic and Vibration Sensors. Human ear characteristics. Capacitor and piezoelectric microphone designs and response characteristics. Intensity probe design and operational limitations. Accelerometers design and frequency response. 4. Sound Measurements. Sound level meters. Time weighting (fast, slow, linear). Decibel scales (Linear and A-and C-weightings). Octave band analyzers. Narrow band spectrum analyzers. Critical bands of human hearing. Detecting tones in noise. Microphone calibration techniques. 5. Sound Radiation. Human speech mechanism. Loudspeaker design and response characteristics. Directivity patterns of simple and multi-pole sources: monopole, dipole and quadri-pole sources. Acoustic arrays and beamforming. Sound radiation from vibrating machines and structures. Radiation efficiency. 6. Low Frequency Components and Systems. Helmholtz resonator. Sound waves in ducts. Mufflers and their design. Horns and loudspeaker enclosures. 7. Applications. Representative topics include: Outdoor sound propagation (temperature and wind effects). Environmental acoustics (e.g. community noise response and criteria). Auditorium and room acoustics (e.g. reverberation criteria and sound absorption). Structural acoustics (e.g. sound transmission loss through panels). Noise and vibration control (e.g. source-path-receiver model). What You Will Learn • How to make proper sound level measurements. • How to analyze and report acoustic data. • The basis of decibels (dB) and the A-weighting scale. • How intensity probes work and allow near-field sound measurements. • How to measure radiated sound power and sound transmission loss. • How to use third-octave bands and narrow- band spectrum analyzers. • How the source-path-receiver approach is used in noise control engineering. • How sound builds up in enclosures like vehicle interiors and rooms. Recent attendee comments ... “Great instructor made the course in- teresting and informative. Helped clear-up many misconceptions I had about sound and its measurement.” “Enjoyed the in-class demonstrations; they help explain the concepts. In- structor helped me with a problem I was having at work, worth the price of the course!”
  • 49. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 49 May 1-3, 2012 Newport, Rhode Island $1790 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary Advanced Undersea Warfare (USW) covers the latest information about submarine employment in future conflicts. The course is taught by a leading innovator in submarine tactics. The roles, capabilities and future developments of submarines in littoral warfare are emphasized. The technology and tactics of modern nuclear and diesel submarines are discussed. The importance of stealth, mobility, and firepower for submarine missions are illustrated by historical and projected roles of submarines. Differences between nuclear and diesel submarines are reviewed. Submarine sensors (sonar, ELINT, visual) and weapons (torpedoes, missiles, mines, special forces) are presented. Advanced USW gives you a wealth of practical knowledge about the latest issues and tactics in submarine warfare. The course provides the necessary background to understand the employment of submarines in the current world environment. Advanced USW is valuable to engineers and scientists who are working in R&D, or in testing of submarine systems. It provides the knowledge and perspective to understand advanced USW in shallow water and regional conflicts. Course Outline 1. Mechanics and Physics of Submarines. Stealth, mobility, firepower, and endurance. The hull - tradeoffs between speed, depth, and payload. The "Operating Envelope". The "Guts" - energy, electricity, air, and hydraulics. 2. Submarine Sensors. Passive sonar. Active sonar. Radio frequency sensors. Visual sensors. Communications and connectivity considerations. Tactical considerations of employment. 3. Submarine Weapons and Off-Board Devices. Torpedoes. Missiles. Mines. Countermeasures. Tactical considerations of employment. Special Forces. 4. Historical Employment of Submarines. Coastal defense. Fleet scouts. Commerce raiders. Intelligence and warning. Reconnaissance and surveillance. Tactical considerations of employment. 5. Cold War Employment of Submarines. The maritime strategy. Forward offense. Strategic anti- submarine warfare. Tactical considerations of employment. 6. Submarine Employment in Littoral Warfare. Overt and covert "presence". Battle group and joint operations support. Covert mine detection, localization and neutralization. Injection and recovery of Special Forces. Targeting and bomb damage assessment. Tactical considerations of employment. Results of recent out-year wargaming. 7. Littoral Warfare “Threats”. Types and fuzing options of mines. Vulnerability of submarines compared to surface ships. The diesel-electric or air- independent propulsion submarine "threat". The "Brown-water" acoustic environment. Sensor and weapon performance. Non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare. Tactical considerations of employment. 8. Advanced Sensor, Weapon & Operational Concepts. Strike, anti-air, and anti-theater Ballistic Missile weapons. Autonomous underwater vehicles and deployed off-board systems. Improved C-cubed. The blue-green laser and other enabling technology. Some unsolved issues of jointness. Instructors Capt. James Patton (USN ret.) is President of Submarine Tactics and Technology, Inc. and is considered a leading innovator of pro- and anti-submarine warfare and naval tactical doctrine. His 30 years of experience includes actively consulting on submarine weapons, advanced combat systems, and other stealth warfare related issues to over 30 industrial and government entities. While at OPNAV, Capt. Patton actively participated in submarine weapon and sensor research and development, and was instrumental in the development of the towed array. As Chief Staff Officer at Submarine Development Squadron Twelve (SUB-DEVRON 12), and as Head of the Advanced Tactics Department at the Naval Submarine School, he was instrumental in the development of much of the current tactical doctrine. Commodore Bhim Uppal, former Director of Submarines for the Indian Navy, is now a consultant with American Systems Corporation. He will discuss the performance and tactics of diesel submarines in littoral waters. He has direct experience onboard FOXTROT, KILO, and Type 1500 diesel electric submarines. He has over 25 years of experience in diesel submarines with the Indian Navy and can provide a unique insight into the thinking, strategies, and tactics of foreign submarines. He helped purchase and evaluate Type 1500 and KILO diesel submarines. What You Will Learn • Changing doctrinal "truths" of Undersea Warfare in Littoral Warfare. • Traditional and emergent tactical concepts of Undersea Warfare. • The forcing functions for required developments in platforms, sensors, weapons, and C-cubed capabilities. • The roles, missions, and counters to "Rest of the World" (ROW) mines and non-nuclear submarines. • Current thinking in support of optimizing the U.S. submarine for coordinated and joint operations under tactical control of the Joint Task Force Commander or CINC.N Advanced Undersea Warfare Submarines in Shallow Water and Regional Conflicts
  • 50. 50 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructors Dr. David L. Porter is a Principal Senior Oceanographer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL). Dr. Porter has been at JHUAPL for twenty-two years and before that he was an oceanographer for ten years at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dr. Porter's specialties are oceanographic remote sensing using space borne altimeters and in situ observations. He has authored scores of publications in the field of ocean remote sensing, tidal observations, and internal waves as well as a book on oceanography. Dr. Porter holds a BS in physics from University of MD, a MS in physical oceanography from MIT and a PhD in geophysical fluid dynamics from the Catholic University of America. Dr. Juan I. Arvelo is a Principal Senior Acoustician at JHUAPL. He earned a PhD degree in physics from the Catholic University of America. He served nine years at the Naval Surface Warfare Center and five years at Alliant Techsystems, Inc. He has 27 years of theoretical and practical experience in government, industry, and academic institutions on acoustic sensor design and sonar performance evaluation, experimental design and conduct, acoustic signal processing, data analysis and interpretation. Dr. Arvelo is an active member of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) where he holds various positions including associate editor of the Proceedings On Meetings in Acoustics (POMA) and technical chair of the 159th joint ASA/INCE conference in Baltimore. What You Will Learn • The physical structure of the ocean and its major currents. • The controlling physics of waves, including internal waves. • How space borne altimeters work and their contribution to ocean modeling. • How ocean parameters influence acoustics. • Models and databases for predicting sonar performance. Course Outline 1. Importance of Oceanography. Review oceanography's history, naval applications, and impact on climate. 2. Physics of The Ocean. Develop physical understanding of the Navier-Stokes equations and their application for understanding and measuring the ocean. 3. Energetics Of The Ocean and Climate Change. The source of all energy is the sun. We trace the incoming energy through the atmosphere and ocean and discuss its effect on the climate. 4. Wind patterns, El Niño and La Niña. The major wind patterns of earth define not only the vegetation on land, but drive the major currents of the ocean. Perturbations to their normal circulation, such as an El Niño event, can have global impacts. 5. Satellite Observations, Altimetry, Earth's Geoid and Ocean Modeling. The role of satellite observations are discussed with a special emphasis on altimetric measurements. 6. Inertial Currents, Ekman Transport, Western Boundaries. Observed ocean dynamics are explained. Analytical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations are discussed. 7. Ocean Currents, Modeling and Observation. Observations of the major ocean currents are compared to model results of those currents.  The ocean models are driven by satellite altimetric observations. 8. Mixing, Salt Fingers, Ocean Tracers and Langmuir Circulation. Small scale processes in the ocean have a large effect on the ocean's structure and the dispersal of important chemicals, such as CO2. 9. Wind Generated Waves, Ocean Swell and Their Prediction. Ocean waves, their physics and analysis by directional wave spectra are discussed along with present modeling of the global wave field employing Wave Watch III. 10. Tsunami Waves. The generation and propagation of tsunami waves are discussed with a description of the present monitoring system. 11. Internal Waves and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Sensing of Internal Waves. The density stratification in the ocean allows the generation of internal waves.  The physics of the waves and their manifestation at the surface by SAR is discussed. 12. Tides, Observations, Predictions and Quality Control. Tidal observations play a critical role in commerce and warfare.  The history of tidal observations, their role in commerce, the physics of tides and their prediction are discussed. 13. Bays, Estuaries and Inland Seas. The inland waters of the continents present dynamics that are controlled not only by the physics of the flow, but also by the bathymetry and the shape of the coastlines. 14. The Future of Oceanography. Applications to global climate assessment, new technologies and modeling are discussed. 15. Underwater Acoustics. Review of ocean effects on sound propagation & scattering. 16. Naval Applications. Description of the latest sensor, transducer, array and sonar technologies for applications from target detection, localization and classification to acoustic communications and environmental surveys. 17. Models and Databases. Description of key worldwide environmental databases, sound propagation models, and sonar simulation tools. June 5-7, 2012 Slidell, Louisiana $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This three-day course is designed for engineers, physicists, acousticians, climate scientists, and managers who wish to enhance their understanding of this discipline or become familiar with how the ocean environment can affect their individual applications. Examples of remote sensing of the ocean, in situ ocean observing systems and actual examples from recent oceanographic cruises are given. Applied Physical Oceanography Modeling and Acoustics: Controlling Physics, Observations, Models and Naval Applications
  • 51. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 109 – 51Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 51 Instructors Dr. Harold "Bud" Vincent,  Research Associate Professor of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island is a U.S. Naval officer qualified in submarine warfare and salvage diving. He has over twenty years of undersea systems experience working in industry, academia, and government (military and civilian). He served on active duty on fast attack and ballistic missile submarines, worked at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, and conducted advanced R&D in the defense industry. Dr. Vincent received the M.S. and Ph.D. in Ocean Engineering (Underwater Acoustics) from the University of Rhode Island. His teaching and research encompasses underwater acoustic systems, communications, signal processing, ocean instrumentation, and navigation. He has been awarded four patents for undersea systems and algorithms. Dr. Duncan Sheldon has over twenty-five years’ experience in the field of active sonar signal processing. At Navy Undersea Warfare laboratories (New London, CT, and Newport, RI) he directed a multiyear research program and developed new active sonar waveforms and receivers for ASW and mine warfare. This work included collaboration with U.S. and international sea tests. His experience includes real-time direction at sea of surface sonar assets during ’free-play’ NATO ASW exercises. He was a Principal Scientist at the NATO Undersea Research Centre at La Spezia, Italy. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in 1969 and has published articles on waveform and receiver design in the U.S. Navy Journal of Underwater Acoustics. July 16-19, 2012 Newport, Rhode Island $1890 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This four-day course is designed for SONAR systems engineers, combat systems engineers, undersea warfare professionals, and managers who wish to enhance their understanding of passive and active SONAR or become familiar with the "big picture" if they work outside of either discipline. Each topic is presented by instructors with substantial experience at sea. Presentations are illustrated by worked numerical examples using simulated or experimental data describing actual undersea acoustic situations and geometries. Visualization of transmitted waveforms, target interactions, and detector responses is emphasized. Fundamentals of Passive & Active Sonar What You Will Learn • The differences between various types of SONAR used on Naval platforms today. • The fundamental principles governing these systems’ operation. • How these systems’ data are used to conduct passive and active operations. • Signal acquisition and target motion analysis for passive systems. • Waveform and receiver design for active systems. • The major cost drivers for undersea acoustic systems. Course Outline 1. Sound and the Ocean Environment: Conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD), sound velocity profiles, refraction, decibels, transmission loss, and attenuation. Source reference levels in air and water. 2. SONAR System Fundamentals. Major system components in a SONAR system (transducers, signal conditioning, digitization, signal processing, displays and controls). Various SONAR systems (hull, towed, side scan, multibeam, communications, navigation, etc.). Calculation of source level (dB) as a function of acoustic power output (watts) and source directivity index. Measurement of target strength at sea, echo energy splitting. 3. Array Gain and Beampatterns. Calculation of beam patterns for line arrays, directional steering, shading for sidelobe control. Directivity index of an array and array grating lobes. 4. SONAR Equations. Passive and active SONAR equations. Probabilities of detection and false alarm. Relationship between energy, intensity, and spectrum height. Alternative active SONAR equations when working against noise or reverberation. Limitations of these equations in deep and shallow water. 5. Target Motion Analysis (TMA). What it is, why it is done, how SONAR is used to support it, what other sensors are required to determine the motion of passive targets. 6. Time-Bearing Analysis. How relative target motion affects bearing rate, ship maneuvers to compute passive range estimates (Ekelund Range). Use of time- bearing information to assess passive target motion. NEW!
  • 52. 52 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 March 20-22, 2012 College Park, Maryland May 8-10, 2012 Boxborough, Massachusetts July 9-11, 2012 Boulder, Colorado $2895 (8:00am - 4:00pm) “Also Available As A Distance Learning Course” (Call for Info) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Minimal math review of basics of vibration, commencing with uniaxial and torsional SDoF systems. Resonance. Vibration control. 2. Instrumentation. How to select and correctly use displacement, velocity and especially acceleration and force sensors and microphones. Minimizing mechanical and electrical errors. Sensor and system dynamic calibration. 3. Extension of SDoF. to understand multi-resonant continuous systems encountered in land, sea, air and space vehicle structures and cargo, as well as in electronic products. 4. Types of shakers. Tradeoffs between mechanical, electrohydraulic (servohydraulic), electrodynamic (electromagnetic) and piezoelectric shakers and systems. Limitations. Diagnostics. 5. Sinusoidal one-frequency-at-a-time vibration testing. Interpreting sine test standards. Conducting tests. 6. Random Vibration Testing. Broad-spectrum all- frequencies-at-once vibration testing. Interpreting random vibration test standards. 7. Simultaneous multi-axis testing. Gradually replacing practice of reorienting device under test (DUT) on single-axis shakers. 8. Environmental stress screening. (ESS) of electronics production. Extensions to highly accelerated stress screening (HASS) and to highly accelerated life testing (HALT). 9. Assisting designers. To improve their designs by (a) substituting materials of greater damping or (b) adding damping or (c) avoiding "stacking" of resonances. 10. Understanding automotive. Buzz, squeak and rattle (BSR). Assisting designers to solve BSR problems. Conducting BSR tests. 11. Intense noise. (acoustic) testing of launch vehicles and spacecraft. 12. Shock testing. Transportation testing. Pyroshock testing. Misuse of classical shock pulses on shock test machines and on shakers. More realistic oscillatory shock testing on shakers. 13. Shock response spectrum. (SRS) for understanding effects of shock on hardware. Use of SRS in evaluating shock test methods, in specifying and in conducting shock tests. 14. Attaching DUT via vibration and shock test fixtures. Large DUTs may require head expanders and/or slip plates. 15. Modal testing. Assisting designers. Summary This three-day course is primarily designed for test personnel who conduct, supervise or "contract out" vibration and shock tests. It also benefits design, quality and reliability specialists who interface with vibration and shock test activities. Each student receives the instructor's, minimal-mathematics, minimal-theory hardbound text Random Vibration & Shock Testing, Measurement, Analysis & Calibration. This 444 page, 4-color book also includes a CD-ROM with video clips and animations. Instructor Wayne Tustin is the President of an engineering school and consultancy. His BSEE degree is from the University of Washington, Seattle. He is a licensed Professional Engineer - Quality in the State of California. Wayne's first encounter with vibration was at Boeing/Seattle, performing what later came to be called modal tests, on the XB-52 prototype of that highly reliable platform. Subsequently he headed field service and technical training for a manufacturer of electrodynamic shakers, before establishing another specialized school on which he left his name. Wayne has written several books and hundreds of articles dealing with practical aspects of vibration and shock measurement and testing. What You Will Learn • How to plan, conduct and evaluate vibration and shock tests and screens. • How to attack vibration and noise problems. • How to make vibration isolation, damping and absorbers work for vibration and noise control. • How noise is generated and radiated, and how it can be reduced. From this course you will gain the ability to understand and communicate meaningfully with test personnel, perform basic engineering calculations, and evaluate tradeoffs between test equipment and procedures. Fundamentals of Random Vibration & Shock Testing for Land, Sea, Air, Space Vehicles & Electronics Manufacture
  • 53. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 53 April 10-12, 2012 Newport, Rhode Island $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Fundamentals of Sonar Transducer Design What You Will Learn • Acoustic parameters that affect transducer designs: Aperture design Radiation impedance Beam patterns and directivity • Fundamentals of acoustic wave transmission in solids including the basics of piezoelectricity Modeling concepts for transducer design. • Transducer performance parameters that affect radiated power, frequency of operation, and bandwidth. • Sonar projector design parameters Sonar hydrophone design parameters. From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to perform sonar transducer systems engineering calculations, identify tradeoffs, interact meaningfully with colleagues, evaluate systems, understand current literature, and how transducer design fits into greater sonar system design. Instructor Mr. John C. Cochran is a Sr. Engineering Fellow with Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems., a leading provider of integrated solutions for the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security. Mr. Cochran has 25 years of experience in the design of sonar transducer systems. His experience includes high frequency mine hunting sonar systems, hull mounted search sonar systems, undersea targets and decoys, high power projectors, and surveillance sonar systems. Mr. Cochran holds a BS degree from the University of California, Berkeley, a MS degree from Purdue University, and a MS EE degree from University of California, Santa Barbara. He holds a certificate in Acoustics Engineering from Pennsylvania State University and Mr. Cochran has taught as a visiting lecturer for the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. Summary This three-day course is designed for sonar system design engineers, managers, and system engineers who wish to enhance their understanding of sonar transducer design and how the sonar transducer fits into and dictates the greater sonar system design. Topics will be illustrated by worked numerical examples and practical case studies. Course Outline 1. Overview. Review of how transducer and performance fits into overall sonar system design. 2. Waves in Fluid Media. Background on how the transducer creates sound energy and how this energy propagates in fluid media. The basics of sound propagation in fluid media: • Plane Waves • Radiation from Spheres • Linear Apertures Beam Patterns • Planar Apertures Beam Patterns • Directivity and Directivity Index • Scattering and Diffraction • Radiation Impedance • Transmission Phenomena • Absorption and Attenuation of Sound 3. Equivalent Circuits. Transducers equivalent electrical circuits. The relationship between transducer parameters and performance. Analysis of transducer designs: • Mechanical Equivalent Circuits • Acoustical Equivalent Circuits • Combining Mechanical and Acoustical Equivalent Circuits 4. Waves in Solid Media: A transducer is constructed of solid structural elements. Background in how sound waves propagate through solid media. This section builds on the previous section and develops equivalent circuit models for various transducer elements. Piezoelectricity is introduced. • Waves in Homogeneous, Elastic Solid Media • Piezoelectricity • The electro-mechanical coupling coefficient • Waves in Piezoelectric, Elastic Solid Media. 5. Sonar Projectors. This section combines the concepts of the previous sections and developes the basic concepts of sonar projector design. Basic concepts for modeling and analyzing sonar projector performance will be presented. Examples of sonar projectors will be presented and will include spherical projectors, cylindrical projectors, half wave-length projectors, tonpilz projectors, and flexural projectors. Limitation on performance of sonar projectors will be discussed. 6. Sonar Hydrophones. The basic concepts of sonar hydrophone design will be reviewed. Analysis of hydrophone noise and extraneous circuit noise that may interfere with hydrophone performance. • Elements of Sonar Hydrophone Design • Analysis of Noise in Hydrophone and Preamplifier Systems • Specific Application in Sonar Hydronpone Design • Hydrostatic hydrophones • Spherical hydrophones • Cylindrical hydrophones • The affect of a fill fluid on hydrophone performance.
  • 54. 54 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructors David Feit retired from his position as Senior Research Scientist for Structural Acoustics at the Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWCCD) where he had worked since 1973. At NSWCCD, he was responsible for conducting research into the complex problems related to the reduction of ship vulnerability to acoustic detection.  These involved theoretical and applied research on the causes, mechanisms, and means of reduction of submarine hull vibration and radiation, and echo reduction. Before that he worked at Cambridge Acoustical Associates where he and Miguel Junger co-authored the standard reference book on theoretical structural acoustics, Sound, Structures, and their Interaction. Paul Arveson served as a civilian employee of the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Carderock Division. With a BS degree in Physics, he led teams in ship acoustic signature measurement and analysis, facility calibration, and characterization projects. He designed and constructed specialized analog and digital electronic measurement systems and their sensors and interfaces, including the system used to calibrate all the US Navy's ship noise measurement facilities. He managed development of the Target Strength Predictive Model for the Navy. He conducted experimental and theoretical studies of acoustic and oceanographic phenomena for the Office of Naval Research. He has published numerous technical reports and papers in these fields. In 1999 Arveson received a Master's degree in Computer Systems Management. He established the Balanced Scorecard Institute, as an effort to promote the use of this management concept among governmental and nonprofit organizations. He is active in various technical organizations, and is a Fellow in the Washington Academy of Sciences. Summary The course describes the essential mechanisms of underwater noise as it relates to ship/submarine silencing applications. The fundamental principles of noise sources, water-borne and structure-borne noise propagation, and noise control methodologies are explained. Illustrative examples will be presented. The course will be geared to those desiring a basic understanding of underwater noise and ship/submarine silencing with necessary mathematics presented as gently as possible. A full set of notes will be given to participants as well as a copy of the text, Mechanics of Underwater Noise, by Donald Ross. Course Outline 1. Fundamentals. Definitions, units, sources, spectral and temporal properties, wave equation, radiation and propagation, reflection, absorption and scattering, structure-borne noise, interaction of sound and structures. 2. Noise Sources in Marine Applications. Rotating and reciprocating machinery, pumps and fans, gears, piping systems. 3. Noise Models for Design and Prediction. Source-path-receiver models, source characterization, structural response and vibration transmission, deterministic (FE) and statistical (SEA) analyses. 4. Noise Control. Principles of machinery quieting, vibration isolation, structural damping, structural transmission loss, acoustic absorption, acoustic mufflers. 5. Fluid Mechanics and Flow Induced Noise. Turbulent boundary layers, wakes, vortex shedding, cavity resonance, fluid-structure interactions, propeller noise mechanisms, cavitation noise. 6. Hull Vibration and Radiation. Flexural and membrane modes of vibration, hull structure resonances, resonance avoidance, ribbed-plates, thin shells, anti-radiation coatings, bubble screens. 7. Sonar Self Noise and Reduction. On board and towed arrays, noise models, noise control for habitability, sonar domes. 8. Ship/Submarine Scattering. Rigid body and elastic scattering mechanisms, target strength of structural components, false targets, methods for echo reduction, anechoic coatings. May 1-3, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Mechanics of Underwater Noise Fundamentals and Advances in Acoustic Quieting
  • 55. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 55 Instructor Steve Brenner has worked in environmental simulation and reliability testing for over 30 years, always involved with the latest techniques for verifying equipment integrity through testing. He has independently consulted in reliability testing since 1996. His client base includes American and European companies with mechanical and electronic products in almost every industry. Steve's experience includes the entire range of climatic and dynamic testing, including ESS, HALT, HASS and long term reliability testing. March 19-22, 2012 Boxborough, Massachusetts April 2-5, 2012 Jupiter, Florida June 18-21, 2012 Detroit, Michigan $3295 (8:00am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This four-day class provides understanding of the purpose of each test, the equipment required to perform each test, and the methodology to correctly apply the specified test environments. Vibration and Shock methods will be covered together with instrumentation, equipment, control systems and fixture design. Climatic tests will be discussed individually: requirements, origination, equipment required, test methodology, understanding of results. The course emphasizes topics you will use immediately.  Suppliers to the military services protectively install commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment in our flight and land vehicles and in shipboard locations where vibration and shock can be severe. We laboratory test the protected equipment (1) to assure twenty years equipment survival and possible combat, also (2) to meet commercial test standards, IEC documents, military standards such as STANAG or MIL-STD-810G, etc. Few, if any, engineering schools cover the essentials about such protection or such testing. What You Will Learn When you visit an environmental test laboratory, perhaps to witness a test, or plan or review a test program, you will have a good understanding of the requirements and execution of the 810G dynamics and climatics tests. You will be able to ask meaningful questions and understand the responses of test laboratory personnel. Course Outline 1. Introduction to Military Standard testing - Dynamics. • Introduction to classical sinusoidal vibration. • Resonance effects • Acceleration and force measurement • Electrohydraulic shaker systems • Electrodynamic shaker systems • Sine vibration testing • Random vibration testing • Attaching test articles to shakers (fixture design, fabrication and usage) • Shock testing 2. Climatics. • Temperature testing • Temperature shock • Humidity • Altitude • Rapid decompression/explosives • Combined environments • Solar radiation • Salt fog • Sand & Dust • Rain • Immersion • Explosive atmosphere • Icing • Fungus • Acceleration • Freeze/thaw (new in 810G) 3. Climatics and Dynamics Labs demonstrations. 4. Reporting On And Certifying Test Results. Military Standard 810G Testing Understanding, Planning and Performing Climatic and Dynamic Tests NEW!
  • 56. 56 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Course Outline 1. Naval Applications of Ocean Optics. Mine Warfare, SPECOPS, Laser Comms, Port Security, Anti-Submarine Warfare. 2. Common Terminology. Definitions and descriptions of key Inherent and Apparent Optical Properties such as absorption, “beam c,” diffuse attenuation (K), optical scattering ("b") & optical backscatter (“bb”). 3. Typical Values for Optical Properties. In deep, open ocean waters, in continental shelf waters, and in turbid estuaries Tampa Bay. 4. Chesapeake Bay, Yellow Sea, etc. Relationships Among Optical Properties. Estimating “K” from chlorophyll, beam attenuation from diffuse attenuation, and wavelength dependence of K, c, etc. 5. Measurement Systems & Associated Data Artifacts. Overview of COTS bio-optical sensors and warnings about their various “issues” & artifacts. 6. In Situ & Satellite Imagery Data Archives/Repositories. How to use the ONR/JHUAPL, NODC, & NASA on-line databases & satellite imagery websites. 7. Software to Display, Process, & Analyze Optical Data. How to display customized subsets of NASA’s world-wide images of optical properties. Learn about GUI tools such as “ProfileViewer,” (Java program to display hundreds or even thousands of profiles at once, but to select individual ones to map, edit, or delete; “Hyperspec” ( powerful Matlab editor capable of handling ~ 100 wavelengths of WETLabs ACs data), and “S2editor” (Matlab GUI allowing simultaneous screening/editing of up & down casts, or two different parameters). Instructor Jeffrey H. Smart is a member of the Principal Professional Staff at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he has spent the past 33 years specializing in ocean optics and environmental assessments. He has published numerous papers on empirical ocean optical properties and he is the Project Manager and Principal Investigator of the World-wide Ocean Optics Database project. (see http://wood.jhuapl.edu). What You Will Learn • Naval applications of ocean optics (mine warfare, port security, anti-submarine warfare, etc.) • Common terminology & wavelength dependencies of key optical properties. • Traps to avoid in using raw optical data. • Typical values for various bio-optical properties & empirical relationships among optical properties. • Methods and equipment used to make measurements of optical parameters. From this course you will obtain the knowledge and ability to extract and analyze bio-optical data from NASA, ONR, & NODC databases, files, & websites, converse meaningfully with colleagues about bio-optical parameters, and estimate detectability of submerged objects from in situ data &/or satellite imagery. Summary This 2-day course is designed for scientists, engineers, and managers who wish to learn the fundamentals of ocean optics and how they are used to predict detectability of submerged objects such as swimmers or submarines. Examples will be provided on how much optical conditions vary by depth, by geographic location and season, and by wavelength. Examples from the in situ online databases and from satellite climatologies will be provided. June 12-13, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1150 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Ocean Optics Fundamentals & Naval Applications NEW!
  • 57. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 57 Sonar Principles & ASW Analysis June 11-14, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1995 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This course provides an excellent introduction to underwater sound and highlights how sonar principles are employed in ASW analyses. The course provides a solid understanding of the sonar equation and discusses in- depth propagation loss, target strength, reverberation, arrays, array gain, and detection of signals. Physical insight and typical results are provided to help understand each term of the sonar equation. The instructors then show how the sonar equation can be used to perform ASW analysis and predict the performance of passive and active sonar systems. The course also reviews the rationale behind current weapons and sensor systems and discusses directions for research in response to the quieting of submarine signatures. The course is valuable to engineers and scientists who are entering the field or as a review for employees who want a system level overview. The lectures provide the knowledge and perspective needed to understand recent developments in underwater acoustics and in ASW. A comprehensive set of notes and the textbook Principles of Underwater Sound will be provided to all attendees. Instructors Dr. Nicholas Nicholas received a B. S. degree from Carnegie-Mellon University, an M. S. degree from Drexel University, and a PhD degree in physics from the Catholic University of America. His dissertation was on the propagation of sound in the deep ocean. He has been teaching underwater acoustics courses since 1977 and has been visiting lecturer at the U.S. Naval War College and several universities. Dr. Nicholas has more than 25 years experience in underwater acoustics and submarine related work. He is working for Penn State’s Applied Research Laboratory (ARL). Dr. Robert Jennette received a PhD degree in Physics from New York University in 1971. He has worked in sonar system design with particular emphasis on long- range passive systems, especially their interaction with ambient noise. He held the NAVSEA Chair in Underwater Acoustics at the US Naval Academy where he initiated a radiated noise measurement program. Currently Dr. Jennette is a consultant specializing in radiated noise and the use of acoustic monitoring. Course Outline 1. Sonar Equation & Signal Detection. Sonar concepts and units. The sonar equation. Typical active and passive sonar parameters. Signal detection, probability of detection/false alarm. ROC curves and detection threshold. 2. Propagation of Sound in the Sea. Oceanographic basis of propagation, convergence zones, surface ducts, sound channels, surface and bottom losses. 3. Target Strength and Reverberation. Scattering phenomena and submarine strength. Bottom, surface, and volume reverberation mechanisms. Methods for modeling reverberations. 4. Elements of ASW Analysis. Fundamentals of ASW analysis. Sonar principles and ASW analysis, illustrative sonobuoy barrier model. The use of operations research to improve ASW. 5. Arrays and Beamforming. Directivity and array gain; sidelobe control, array patterns and beamforming for passive bottom, hull mounted, and sonobuoy sensors; calculation of array gain in directional noise. 6. Passive Sonar. Illustrations of passive sonars including sonobuoys, towed array systems, and submarine sonar. Considerations for passive sonar systems, including radiated source level, sources of background noise, and self noise. 7. Active Sonar. Design factors for active sonar systems including transducer, waveform selection, and optimum frequency; examples include ASW sonar, sidescan sonar, and torpedo sonar. 8. Theory and Applications of Current Weapons and Sensor Systems. An unclassified exposition of the rationale behind the design of current Navy acoustic systems. How the choice of particular parameter values in the sonar equation produces sensor designs optimized to particular military requirements. Generic sonars examined vary from short-range active mine hunting sonars to long-range passive systems. What You Will Learn • Sonar parameters and their utility in ASW Analysis. • Sonar equation as it applies to active and passive systems. • Fundamentals of array configurations, beamforming, and signal detectability. • Rationale behind the design of passive and active sonar systems. • Theory and applications of current weapons and sensors, plus future directions. • The implications and counters to the quieting of the target’s signature.
  • 58. 58 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Sonar Signal Processing Instructors James W. Jenkins joined the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in 1970 and has worked in ASW and sonar systems analysis. He has worked with system studies and at-sea testing with passive and active systems. He is currently a senior physicist investigating improved signal processing systems, APB, own- ship monitoring, and SSBN sonar. He has taught sonar and continuing education courses since 1977 and is the Director of the Applied Technology Institute (ATI). G. Scott Peacock is the Assistant Group Supervisor of the Systems Group at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL). Mr. Peacock received both his B.S. in Mathematics and an M.S. in Statistics from the University of Utah. He currently manages several research and development projects that focus on automated passive sonar algorithms for both organic and off-board sensors. Prior to joining JHU/APL Mr. Peacock was lead engineer on several large-scale Navy development tasks including an active sonar adjunct processor for the SQS-53C, a fast-time sonobuoy acoustic processor and a full scale P-3 trainer. Summary This intensive short course provides an overview of sonar signal processing. Processing techniques applicable to bottom-mounted, hull- mounted, towed and sonobuoy systems will be discussed. Spectrum analysis, detection, classification, and tracking algorithms for passive and active systems will be examined and related to design factors. Advanced techniques such as high-resolution array-processing and matched field array processing, advanced signal processing techniques, and sonar automation will be covered. The course is valuable for engineers and scientists engaged in the design, testing, or evaluation of sonars. Physical insight and realistic performance expectations will be stressed. A comprehensive set of notes will be supplied to all attendees. What You Will Learn • Fundamental algorithms for signal processing. • Techniques for beam forming. • Trade-offs among active waveform designs. • Ocean medium effects. • Optimal and adaptive processing. Course Outline 1. Introduction to Sonar Signal Processing. Introduction to sonar detection systems and types of signal processing performed in sonar. Correlation processing, Fournier analysis, windowing, and ambiguity functions. Evaluation of probability of detection and false alarm rate for FFT and broadband signal processors. 2. Beamforming and Array Processing. Beam patterns for sonar arrays, shading techniques for sidelobe control, beamformer implementation. Calculation of DI and array gain in directional noise fields. 3. Passive Sonar Signal Processing. Review of signal characteristics, ambient noise, and platform noise. Passive system configurations and implementations. Spectral analysis and integration. 4. Active Sonar Signal Processing. Waveform selection and ambiguity functions. Projector configurations. Reverberation and multipath effects. Receiver design. 5. Passive and Active Designs and Implementations. Design specifications and trade-off examples will be worked, and actual sonar system implementations will be examined. 6. Advanced Signal Processing Techniques. Advanced techniques for beamforming, detection, estimation, and classification will be explored. Optimal array processing. Data adaptive methods, super resolution spectral techniques, time-frequency representations and active/passive automated classification are among the advanced techniques that will be covered. May 15-17, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  • 59. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 59 What You Will Learn • Principles of underwater sound and the sonar equation. • How to solve sonar equations and simulate sonar performance. • What models are available to support sonar engineering and oceanographic research. • How to select the most appropriate models based on user requirements. • Models available at APL. Instructor Paul C. Etter has worked in the fields of ocean- atmosphere physics and environmental acoustics for the past thirty-five years supporting federal and state agencies, academia and private industry. He received his BS degree in Physics and his MS degree in Oceanography at Texas A&M University. Mr. Etter served on active duty in the U.S. Navy as an Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Officer aboard frigates. He is the author or co-author of more than 180 technical reports and professional papers addressing environmental measurement technology, underwater acoustics and physical oceanography. Mr. Etter is the author of the textbook Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation (3rd edition). Summary This two-day course explains how to translate our physical understanding of sound in the sea into mathematical formulas solvable by computers. It provides a comprehensive treatment of all types of underwater acoustic models including environmental, propagation, noise, reverberation and sonar performance models. Specific examples of each type of model are discussed to illustrate model formulations, assumptions and algorithm efficiency. Guidelines for selecting and using available propagation, noise and reverberation models are highlighted. Demonstrations illustrate the proper execution and interpretation of PC-based sonar models. Each student will receive a copy of Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation by Paul C. Etter, in addition to a complete set of lecture notes. Underwater Acoustics 201 April 24-25, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1225 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Nature of acoustical measurements and prediction. Modern developments in physical and mathematical modeling. Diagnostic versus prognostic applications. Latest developments in inverse- acoustic sensing of the oceans. 2. The Ocean as an Acoustic Medium. Distribution of physical and chemical properties in the oceans. Sound-speed calculation, measurement and distribution. Surface and bottom boundary conditions. Effects of circulation patterns, fronts, eddies and fine-scale features on acoustics. Biological effects. 3. Propagation. Basic concepts, boundary interactions, attenuation and absorption. Ducting phenomena including surface ducts, sound channels, convergence zones, shallow-water ducts and Arctic half-channels. Theoretical basis for propagation modeling. Frequency-domain wave equation formulations including ray theory, normal mode, multipath expansion, fast field (wavenumber integration) and parabolic approximation techniques. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Specific examples. 4. Noise. Noise sources and spectra. Depth dependence and directionality. Slope-conversion effects. Theoretical basis for noise modeling. Ambient noise and beam-noise statistics models. Pathological features arising from inappropriate assumptions. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Specific examples. 5. Reverberation. Volume and boundary scattering. Shallow-water and under-ice reverberation features. Theoretical basis for reverberation modeling. Cell scattering and point scattering techniques. Bistatic reverberation formulations and operational restrictions. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Specific examples. 6. Sonar Performance Models. Sonar equations. Monostatic and bistatic geometries. Model operating systems. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Sources of oceanographic and acoustic data. Specific examples. 7. Simulation. Review of simulation theory including advanced methodologies and infrastructure tools. 8. Demonstrations. Guided demonstrations illustrate proper execution and interpretation of PC- based monostatic and bistatic sonar models.
  • 60. 60 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers A comprehensive tutorial designed for environmental professionals Instructor Dr. Adam S. Frankel is a senior scientist with Marine Acoustics, Inc., Arlington, VA and vice- president of the Hawai‘i Marine Mammal Consortium. For the past 25 years, his primary research has focused on the role of natural sounds in marine mammals and the effects of anthropogenic sounds on the marine environment, especially the impact on marine mammals. A graduate of the College of William and Mary, Dr. Frankel received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, where he studied and recorded the sounds of humpback whales. Post-doctoral work was with Cornell University’s Bioacoustics Research Program. Published research includes a recent paper on melon-headed whale vocalizations. Both scientist and educator, Frankel combines his Hawai‘i - based research and acoustics expertise with teaching for Cornell University and other schools. He has advised numerous graduate students, all of whom make him proud. Frankel is a member of both the Society for the Biology of Marine Mammals and the Acoustical Society of America. What You Will Learn • The fundamentals of sound and how to properly describe its characteristics. • Modern acoustic analysis techniques. • What are the key characteristics of man-made sound sources and usage of correct metrics. • How to evaluate the resultant sound field from impulsive, coherent and continuous sources. • What animal characteristics are important for assessing both impact and requirements for monitoring/and mitigation. • Capabilities of passive and active monitoring and mitigation systems. Summary This three-day course is designed for biologists, and conservation managers, who wish to enhance their understanding of the underlying principles of underwater and engineering acoustics needed to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine life. This course provides a framework for making objective assessments of the impact of various types of sound sources. Critical topics are introduced through clear and readily understandable heuristic models and graphics. Course Outline Understanding and Measuring Sound The Language of Physics and the Study of Motion. This quick review of physics basics is designed to introduce acoustics to the neophyte. 1. What Is Sound and How to Measure Its Level. This includes a quick review of physics basics is designed to introduce acoustics to the neophyte. The properties of sound are described, including the challenging task of properly measuring and reporting its level. 2. Digital Representation of Sound. Today almost all sound is recorded and analyzed digitally. This section focuses on the process by which analog sound is digitized, stored and analyzed. 3. Spectral Analysis: A Qualitative Introduction. The fundamental process for analyzing sound is spectral analysis. This section will introduce spectral analysis and illustrate its application in creating frequency spectra and spectrograms.. 4. Basics of Underwater Propagation and Use of Acoustic Propagation Models. The fundamental principles of geometric spreading, refraction, boundary effects and absorption will be introduced and illustrated using propagation models. Ocean acidification. The Acoustic Environment and its Inhabitants. 5. The Ambient Acoustic Environment. The first topic will be a discussion of the sources and characteristics of natural ambient noise. 6. Basic Characteristics of Anthropogenic Sound Sources. Implosive (airguns, pile drivers, explosives). Coherent (sonars, acoustic models, depth sounder, profilers,) continuous (shipping, offshore industrial activities). 7. Review of Hearing Anatomy and Physiology: Marine Mammals, Fish and Turtles. Review of hearing in marine mammals. 8. Marine Wildlife of interest and their characteristics. MM, turtles fish, inverts. Bioacoustics, hearing threshold, vocalization behavior; supporting databases on seasonal density and movement. Effects of Sound on Animals. 9. Review and History of ocean anthropogenic noise issue. Current state of knowledge and key references. 10. Assessment of the impact of anthropogenic sound. Source-TL- receiver approach, level of sound as received by wildlife, injury, behavioral response, TTS, PTS, masking, modeling techniques, field measurements, assessment methods. 11. Monitoring and mitigation techniques. Passive devise (fixed and towed systems). Active Detections, matching device capabilities to environmental requirements 9examples of passive and active localization, long-term monitoring, fish exposure testing). 12. Overview of Current Research Efforts. April 17-19, 2012 Silver Spring, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. NEW!
  • 61. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 61 Course Outline 1. Introduction. Nature of acoustical measurements and prediction. Modern developments in physical and mathematical modeling. Diagnostic versus prognostic applications. Latest developments in acoustic sensing of the oceans. 2. The Ocean as an Acoustic Medium. Distribution of physical and chemical properties in the oceans. Sound-speed calculation, measurement and distribution. Surface and bottom boundary conditions. Effects of circulation patterns, fronts, eddies and fine-scale features on acoustics. Biological effects. 3. Propagation. Observations and Physical Models. Basic concepts, boundary interactions, attenuation and absorption. Shear-wave effects in the sea floor and ice cover. Ducting phenomena including surface ducts, sound channels, convergence zones, shallow-water ducts and Arctic half-channels. Spatial and temporal coherence. Mathematical Models. Theoretical basis for propagation modeling. Frequency-domain wave equation formulations including ray theory, normal mode, multipath expansion, fast field and parabolic approximation techniques. New developments in shallow-water and under-ice models. Domains of applicability. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Specific examples (PE and RAYMODE). References. Demonstrations. 4. Noise. Observations and Physical Models. Noise sources and spectra. Depth dependence and directionality. Slope-conversion effects. Mathematical Models. Theoretical basis for noise modeling. Ambient noise and beam-noise statistics models. Pathological features arising from inappropriate assumptions. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Specific example (RANDI-III). References. 5. Reverberation. Observations and Physical Models. Volume and boundary scattering. Shallow- water and under-ice reverberation features. Mathematical Models. Theoretical basis for reverberation modeling. Cell scattering and point scattering techniques. Bistatic reverberation formulations and operational restrictions. Data support requirements. Specific examples (REVMOD and Bistatic Acoustic Model). References. 6. Sonar Performance Models. Sonar equations. Model operating systems. Model summary tables. Data support requirements. Sources of oceanographic and acoustic data. Specific examples (NISSM and Generic Sonar Model). References. 7. Modeling and Simulation. Review of simulation theory including advanced methodologies and infrastructure tools. Overview of engineering, engagement, mission and theater level models. Discussion of applications in concept evaluation, training and resource allocation. 8. Modern Applications in Shallow Water and Inverse Acoustic Sensing. Stochastic modeling, broadband and time-domain modeling techniques, matched field processing, acoustic tomography, coupled ocean-acoustic modeling, 3D modeling, and chaotic metrics. 9. Model Evaluation. Guidelines for model evaluation and documentation. Analytical benchmark solutions. Theoretical and operational limitations. Verification, validation and accreditation. Examples. 10. Demonstrations and Problem Sessions. Demonstration of PC-based propagation and active sonar models. Hands-on problem sessions and discussion of results. Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation Summary The subject of underwater acoustic modeling deals with the translation of our physical understanding of sound in the sea into mathematical formulas solvable by computers. This course provides a comprehensive treatment of all types of underwater acoustic models including environmental, propagation, noise, reverberation and sonar performance models. Specific examples of each type of model are discussed to illustrate model formulations, assumptions and algorithm efficiency. Guidelines for selecting and using available propagation, noise and reverberation models are highlighted. Problem sessions allow students to exercise PC- based propagation and active sonar models. Each student will receive a copy of Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation by Paul C. Etter (a $250 value) in addition to a complete set of lecture notes. Instructor Paul C. Etter has worked in the fields of ocean- atmosphere physics and environmental acoustics for the past thirty years supporting federal and state agencies, academia and private industry. He received his BS degree in Physics and his MS degree in Oceanography at Texas A&M University. Mr. Etter served on active duty in the U.S. Navy as an Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Officer aboard frigates. He is the author or co-author of more than 140 technical reports and professional papers addressing environmental measurement technology, underwater acoustics and physical oceanography. Mr. Etter is the author of the textbook Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation. What You Will Learn • What models are available to support sonar engineering and oceanographic research. • How to select the most appropriate models based on user requirements. • Where to obtain the latest models and databases. • How to operate models and generate reliable results. • How to evaluate model accuracy. • How to solve sonar equations and simulate sonar performance. • Where the most promising international research is being performed. June 11-14, 2012 Bay St. Louis, Mississippi $1995 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  • 62. 62 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 What You Will Learn • How to attack vibration and noise problems. • What means are available for vibration and noise control. • How to make vibration isolation, damping, and absorbers work. • How noise is generated and radiated, and how it can be reduced. Instructors Dr. Eric Ungar has specialized in research and consulting in vibration and noise for more than 40 years, published over 200 technical papers, and translated and revised Structure-Borne Sound. He has led short courses at the Pennsylvania State University for over 25 years and has presented numerous seminars worldwide. Dr. Ungar has served as President of the Acoustical Society of America, as President of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering, and as Chairman of the Design Engineering Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. ASA honored him with it’s Trent-Crede Medal in Shock and Vibration. ASME awarded him the Per Bruel Gold Medal for Noise Control and Acoustics for his work on vibrations of complex structures, structural damping, and isolation. Dr. James Moore has, for the past twenty years, concentrated on the transmission of noise and vibration in complex structures, on improvements of noise and vibration control methods, and on the enhancement of sound quality. He has developed Statistical Energy Analysis models for the investigation of vibration and noise in complex structures such as submarines, helicopters, and automobiles. He has been instrumental in the acquisition of corresponding data bases. He has participated in the development of active noise control systems, noise reduction coating and signal conditioning means, as well as in the presentation of numerous short courses and industrial training programs. Summary This course is intended for engineers and scientists concerned with the vibration reduction and quieting of vehicles, devices, and equipment. It will emphasize understanding of the relevant phenomena and concepts in order to enable the participants to address a wide range of practical problems insightfully. The instructors will draw on their extensive experience to illustrate the subject matter with examples related to the participant’s specific areas of interest. Although the course will begin with a review and will include some demonstrations, participants ideally should have some prior acquaintance with vibration or noise fields. Each participant will receive a complete set of course notes and the text Noise and Vibration Control Engineering, a $210 value. Course Outline 1. Review of Vibration Fundamentals from a Practical Perspective. The roles of energy and force balances. When to add mass, stiffeners, and damping. General strategy for attacking practical problems. Comprehensive checklist of vibration control means. 2. Structural Damping Demystified. Where damping can and cannot help. How damping is measured. Overview of important damping mechanisms. Application principles. Dynamic behavior of plastic and elastomeric materials. Design of treatments employing viscoelastic materials. 3. Expanded Understanding of Vibration Isolation. Where transmissibility is and is not useful. Some common misconceptions regarding inertia bases, damping, and machine speed. Accounting for support and machine frame flexibility, isolator mass and wave effects, source reaction. Benefits and pitfalls of two-stage isolation. The role of active isolation systems. 4. The Power of Vibration Absorbers. How tuned dampers work. Effects of tuning, mass, damping. Optimization. How waveguide energy absorbers work. 5. Structure-borne Sound and High Frequency Vibration. Where modal and finite-element analyses cannot work. Simple response estimation. What is Statistical Energy Analysis and how does it work? How waves propagate along structures and radiate sound. 6. No-Nonsense Basics of Noise and its Control. Review of levels, decibels, sound pressure, power, intensity, directivity. Frequency bands, filters, and measures of noisiness. Radiation efficiency. Overview of common noise sources. Noise control strategies and means. 7. Intelligent Measurement and Analysis. Diagnostic strategy. Selecting the right transducers; how and where to place them. The power of spectrum analyzers. Identifying and characterizing sources and paths. 8. Coping with Noise in Rooms. Where sound absorption can and cannot help. Practical sound absorbers and absorptive materials. Effects of full and partial enclosures. Sound transmission to adjacent areas. Designing enclosures, wrappings, and barriers. 9. Ducts and Mufflers. Sound propagation in ducts. Duct linings. Reactive mufflers and side-branch resonators. Introduction to current developments in active attenuation. April 30 -May 3, 2012 Newport, Rhode Island June 11-14, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1995 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Vibration and Noise Control New Insights and Developments
  • 63. Spacecraft & Aerospace Engineering Advanced Satellite Communications Systems Attitude Determination & Control Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications Design & Analysis of Bolted Joints Effective Design Reviews for Aerospace Programs GIS, GPS & Remote Sensing (Geomatics) GPS Technology Ground System Design & Operation Hyperspectral & Multispectral Imaging Introduction To Space IP Networking Over Satellite Launch Vehicle Selection, Performance & Use New Directions in Space Remote Sensing Orbital Mechanics: Ideas & Insights Payload Integration & Processing Remote Sensing for Earth Applications Risk Assessment for Space Flight Satellite Communication Introduction Satellite Communication Systems Engineering Satellite Design & Technology Satellite Laser Communications Satellite RF Comm & Onboard Processing Space-Based Laser Systems Space Based Radar Space Environment Space Hardware Instrumentation Space Mission Structures Space Systems Intermediate Design Space Systems Subsystems Design Space Systems Fundamentals Spacecraft Power Systems Spacecraft QA, Integration & Testing Spacecraft Structural Design Spacecraft Systems Design & Engineering Spacecraft Thermal Control Engineering & Data Analysis Aerospace Simulations in C++ Advanced Topics in Digital Signal Processing Antenna & Array Fundamentals Applied Measurement Engineering Digital Processing Systems Design Exploring Data: Visualization Fiber Optics Systems Engineering Fundamentals of Statistics with Excel Examples Grounding & Shielding for EMC Introduction To Control Systems Introduction to EMI/EMC Practical EMI Fixes Kalman Filtering with Applications Optimization, Modeling & Simulation Practical Signal Processing Using MATLAB Practical Design of Experiments Self-Organizing Wireless Networks Wavelets: A Conceptual, Practical Approach Sonar & Acoustic Engineering Acoustics, Fundamentals, Measurements and Applications Advanced Undersea Warfare Applied Physical Oceanography AUV & ROV Technology Design & Use of Sonar Transducers Developments In Mine Warfare Fundamentals of Sonar Transducers Mechanics of Underwater Noise Sonar Principles & ASW Analysis Sonar Signal Processing Submarines & Combat Systems Underwater Acoustic Modeling Underwater Acoustic Systems Vibration & Noise Control Vibration & Shock Measurement & Testing Radar/Missile/Defense Advanced Developments in Radar Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Combat Systems Engineering C4ISR Requirements & Systems Electronic Warfare Overview Explosives Technology and Modeling Fundamentals of Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Fundamentals of Radar Fundamentals of Rockets & Missiles GPS Technology Integrated Navigation Systems Kalman, H-Infinity, & Nonlinear Estimation Missile Autopilots Modern Infrared Sensor Technology Modern Missile Analysis Propagation Effects for Radar & Comm Radar Signal Processing. Radar System Design & Engineering Multi-Target Tracking & Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Space-Based Radar Synthetic Aperture Radar Tactical Missile Design & Engineering Systems Engineering and Project Management Certified Systems Engineer Professional Exam Preparation Fundamentals of Systems Engineering Principles Of Test & Evaluation Project Management Fundamentals Project Management Series Systems Of Systems Kalman Filtering with Applications Test Design And Analysis Total Systems Engineering Development Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 63 TOPICS for ON-SITE courses ATI offers these courses AT YOUR LOCATION...customized for you! Other Topics Call us to discuss your requirements and objectives. Our experts can tailor leading-edge cost-effective courses to your specifications. OUTLINES & INSTRUCTOR BIOS at www.ATIcourses.com
  • 64. 64 – Vol. 98 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 PRESORTED STANDARD U.S.POSTAGE PAID BLOOMSBURG,PA PERMITNO.6 5 EASY WAYS TO REGISTER ATIcourses,llc 349BerkshireDrive Riva,Maryland21140-1433 www.ATIcourses.com TechnicalTrainingsince1984 OnsiteTrainingalwaysanoption. Boost Your Skills with ATI On-site Training Any Course Can Be Taught Economically For 8 or More All ATI courses can easily be tailored to your specific applications and technologies. “On-site” training represents a cost-effective, timely and flexible training solution with leading experts at your facility. Save an average of 40% with an onsite (based on the cost of a public course). Onsite Training Benefits • Customized to your facility’s specific applications • 40 to 60 % discounts per/person • Tailored course manuals for each stu- dent • Industry expert instructors • Confidential environment • No obligation or risk until two weeks before the event • Multi-course program discounts • New courses can be developed to meet your specific requirements Call and we will explain in detail what we can do for you, what it will cost, and what you can expect in results and future capabilities. 888.501.2100 How It Works • Call or e-mail us with your course interest(s). • Discuss your training objectives and audience. • Identify which courses will meet your goals. • ATI will prepare and send you a quote to review with sample course material to present to your supervisor. • Schedule the presentation at your convenience. • Conference with the instructor prior to the event. • ATI prepares and presents all materials and de- livers measurable results. FAX paperwork to 410-956-5785 Phone 1-888-501-2100 or 410-956-8805 Via the Internet using the on-line registration paperwork at www.ATIcourses.com Email ATI@ATIcourses.com Mail paperwork to ATI COURSES, LLC 349 Berkshire Drive Riva, MD 21140-1433 o I prefer to be mailed a paper copy of the brochure. o I no longer want to receive this brochure. o I prefer to receive both paper and email copies of the brochure. o Please correct my mailing address as noted. o I prefer to receive only an email copy of the brochure (provide email). o Email for electronic copies. email Fax or Email address updates and your mail code. Fax to 410-956-5785 or email ati@aticourses.com Please provide the Priority Code from the brochure with any changes. Send Me Future Information:

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