Acoustics & Sonar Engineering
Radar, Missiles & Defense
Systems Engineering & Project Management
Engineering & Communicati...
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Applied Technology Institut...
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Table of Contents
Defense, ...
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Combat Systems Engineering
...
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Summary
This two-day course...
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June 25-28, 2012
Albuquerqu...
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Fundamentals of Rockets and...
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GPS and Other Radionavigati...
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Instructor
Patrick Pierson ...
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Who Should Attend
The cour...
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March 19-22, 2012
Columbia...
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Instructor
Stan Silberman ...
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Instructor
Jerry LeMieux, ...
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RADAR 201
Advances in Mode...
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Radar Systems Design & Eng...
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Space-Based Radar
March 5-...
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Strapdown & Integrated Nav...
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Synthetic Aperture Radar
W...
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Instructor
Timothy D. Cole...
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Instructor
Mark N. Lewelle...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 t...
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Catalog of ATI courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Missile, Defense & Systems Engineering with courses from January 2012 to June 2012

  1. 1. Acoustics & Sonar Engineering Radar, Missiles & Defense Systems Engineering & Project Management Engineering & Communications APPLIED TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE, LLC Training Rocket Scientists Since 1984 Volume 111 Valid through July 2012 Sign Up to Access Course Samplers TECHNICAL TRAINING PUBLIC & ONSITE SINCE 1984
  2. 2. 2 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Applied Technology Institute, LLC 349 Berkshire Drive Riva, Maryland 21140-1433 Tel 410-956-8805 • Fax 410-956-5785 Toll Free 1-888-501-2100 www.ATIcourses.com Technical and Training Professionals, Now is the time to think about bringing an ATI course to your site! If there are 8 or more people who are interested in a course, you save money if we bring the course to you. If you have 15 or more students, you save over 50% compared to a public course. This catalog includes upcoming open enrollment dates for many courses. We can teach any of them at your location. Our website, www.ATIcourses.com, lists over 50 additional courses that we offer. For 26 years, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has earned the TRUST of training departments nationwide. We have presented “on-site” training at all major DoD facilities and NASA centers, and for a large number of their contractors. Since 1984, we have emphasized the big picture systems engineering perspective in: - Defense Topics - Engineering & Data Analysis - Sonar & Acoustic Engineering - Space & Satellite Systems - Systems Engineering with instructors who love to teach! We are constantly adding new topics to our list of courses - please call if you have a scientific or engineering training requirement that is not listed. We would love to send you a quote for an onsite course! For “on-site” presentations, we can tailor the course, combine course topics for audience relevance, and develop new or specialized courses to meet your objectives. Regards, P.S. We can help you arrange “on-site” courses with your training department. Give us a call.
  3. 3. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 3 Table of Contents Defense, Missiles, & Radar Combat Systems Engineering UPDATED! Feb 28-Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Cyber Warfare - Theory & Fundamentals NEW! Apr 3-4, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Explosives Technology and Modeling Jun 25-28, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Fundamentals of Rockets & Missiles Jan 31-Feb 2, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mar 6-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 GPS and Other Radionavigation Satellites Jan 30-Feb 2, 2012 • Cape Canaveral, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Mar 12-15, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Apr 16-19, 2012 • Colorado Springs, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS - Intermediate / Joint Range Extension Apr 2-4, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Jun 25-27, 2012 • Chantilly, Virginia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Missile System Design Mar 26-28, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 May 1-3, 2012 • Laurel, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Modern Missile Analysis Mar 19-22, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Multi-Target Tracking & Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Jan 31 - Feb 2, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 May 29-31, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Network Centric Warfare - An Introduction NEW! Mar 6-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Radar 101 / Radar 201 Apr 16-17, 2012 • Laurel, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Radar Systems Design & Engineering Feb 28 - Mar 2, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Space-Based Radar Mar 5-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Strapdown & Integrated Navigation Systems Feb 27-Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Synthetic Aperture Radar - Fundamentals May 7-8, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Jun 4-5, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Synthetic Aperture Radar - Advanced May 9-10, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Tactical Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) NEW! Mar 19-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Overview Mar 19, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals NEW! Mar 20-22, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Engineering & Communications Antenna & Array Fundamentals Feb 28-Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Computational Electromagnetics NEW! May 16-18, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Designing Wireless Systems for EMC NEW! Mar 6-8, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Digital Signal Processing System Design May 21-24, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Fundamentals of Engineering Probability: Visualization NEW! Apr 9-12, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fundamentals of RF Technology Mar 20-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Grounding & Shielding for EMC Jan 31-Feb 2, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 May 1-3, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Instrumentation for Test & Measurement NEW! Mar 27-29, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Introduction to EMI/EMC Feb 28 - Mar 1, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Kalman, H-Infinity, & Nonlinear Estimation Jun 12-14, 2012 • Laurel, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Practical Design of Experiments Mar 20-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Signal & Image Processing & Analysis for Scientists & Eng May 22-24, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Wavelets: A Conceptual, Practical Approach Feb 28-Mar 1, 2012 • San Diego, California. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Jun 12-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Wireless Sensor Networking NEW! Jun 11-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Systems Engineering & Project Management Agile Boot Camp Practitioner's Real-World Solutions NEW! Feb - Jun 2012 • (Please See Page 36 For Available Dates) . . . . . . . 36 Agile Project Management Certification Workshop NEW! Feb - May 2012 • (Please See Page 37 For Available Dates) . . . . . . 37 Applied Systems Engineering Apr 16-19, 2012 • Orlando, Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Architecting with DODAF Mar 15-16, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Jun 4-5, 2012 • Denver, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Cost Estimating NEW! Feb 22-23, 2012 • Albuquerque, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Jul 17-18, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 CSEP Preparation Mar 20-21, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Apr 20-21, 2012 • Orlando, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Fundamentals of COTS-Based Systems Engineering NEW! May 8-10, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering Feb 14-15, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Jun 6-7, 2012 • Denver, Colorado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Model Based Systems Engineering NEW! May 22-24, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Principles of Test & Evaluation Mar 13-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Requirements Engineering with DEVSME NEW! Apr 24-26, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Technical CONOPS & Concepts Master's Course NEW! Mar 13-15, 2012 • Virginia Beach, Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Apr 3-5, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Apr 10-12, 2012 • Virginia Beach, Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 May 8-10, 2012 • Virginia Beach, Virginia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Acoustic & Sonar Engineering Acoustics Fundamentals, Measurements & Applications Apr 10-12, 2012 • Silver Spring, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Jul 17-19, 2012 • Bremmerton, Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Advanced Undersea Warfare May 1-3, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Applied Physical Oceanography Modeling and Acoustics Jun 5-7, 2012 • Slidell, Louisiana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Fundamentals of Passive & Active Sonar NEW! Jul 16-19, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Fundamentals of Random Vibration & Shock Testing Mar 20-22, 2012 • College Park, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 May 8-10, 2012 • Boxborough, Massachusetts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Jul 9-11, 2012 • Boulder, Colorado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Fundamentals of Sonar Transducers Design Apr 10-12, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Mechanics of Underwater Noise May 1-3 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Military Standard 810G Testing NEW! Mar 19-22, 2012 • Boxborough, Massachusetts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Apr 2-5, 2012 • Jupiter, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Jun 18-21, 2012 • Detroit, Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Ocean Optics: Fundamentals & Naval Applications NEW! Jun 12-13, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Sonar Principles & ASW Analysis Jun 11-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Sonar Signal Processing May 15-17, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Underwater Acoustics 201 Apr 24-25, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers NEW! Apr 17-19, 2012 • Silver Spring, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Underwater Acoustics, Modeling and Simulation Jun 11-14, 2012 • Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Vibration & Noise Control Apr 30 - May 3, 2012 • Newport, Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Jun 11-14, 2012 • Columbia, Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Topics for On-site Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Popular “On-site” Topics & Ways to Register. . . . . . . . . . 64
  4. 4. 4 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Combat Systems Engineering February 28 - March 1, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary The increasing level of combat system integration and communications requirements, coupled with shrinking defense budgets and shorter product life cycles, offers many challenges and opportunities in the design and acquisition of new combat systems. This three-day course teaches the systems engineering discipline that has built some of the modern military’s greatest combat and communications systems, using state-of-the-art systems engineering techniques. It details the decomposition and mapping of war-fighting requirements into combat system functional designs. A step-by-step description of the combat system design process is presented emphasizing the trades made necessary because of growing performance, operational, cost, constraints and ever increasing system complexities. Topics include the fire control loop and its closure by the combat system, human-system interfaces, command and communication systems architectures, autonomous and net-centric operation, induced information exchange requirements, role of communications systems, and multi-mission capabilities. Engineers, scientists, program managers, and graduate students will find the lessons learned in this course valuable for architecting, integration, and modeling of combat system. Emphasis is given to sound system engineering principles realized through the application of strict processes and controls, thereby avoiding common mistakes. Each attendee will receive a complete set of detailed notes for the class. Instructor Robert Fry works at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he is a member of the Principal Professional Staff.  Throughout his career he has been involved in the development of new combat weapon system concepts, development of system requirements, and balancing allocations within the fire control loop between sensing and weapon kinematic capabilities. He has worked on many aspects of the AEGIS combat system including AAW, BMD, AN/SPY- 1, and multi-mission requirements development. Missile system development experience includes SM- 2, SM-3, SM-6, Patriot, THAAD, HARPOON, AMRAAM, TOMAHAWK, and other missile systems. What You Will Learn • The trade-offs and issues for modern combat system design. • The role of subsystem in combat system operation. • How automation and technology impact combat system design. • Understanding requirements for joint warfare, net- centric warfare, and open architectures. • Lessons learned from AEGIS development. Course Outline 1. Combat System Overview. Combat system characteristics. Functional description for the combat system in terms of the sensor and weapons control, communications, and command and control. Anti-air Warfare. Anti- surface Warfare. Anti-submarine Warfare. 2. Combat System Functional Organization. Combat system layers and operation. 3. Sensors. Review of the variety of multi- warfare sensor systems, their capability, operation, management, and limitations. 4. Weaponry. Weapon system suites employed by the AEGIS combat system and their capability, operation, management, and limitations.  Basics of missile design and operation. 5. Fire Control Loops. What the fire control loop is and how it works, its vulnerabilities, limitations, and system battlespace. 6. Engagement Control. Weapon control, planning, and coordination. 7. Tactical Command and Contro. Human- in-the-loop, system latencies, and coordinated planning and response. 8. Communications. Current and future communications systems employed with combat systems and their relationship to combat system functions and interoperability. 9. Combat System Development. Overview of the combat system engineering and acquisition processes. 10. Current AEGIS Missions and Directions. Performance in low-intensity conflicts. Changing Navy missions, threat trends, shifts in the defense budget, and technology growth. 11. Network-Centric Operation and Warfare. Net-centric gain in warfare, network layers and coordination, and future directions. Updated! www.aticourses.com/combat_systems_engineering.html Video!
  5. 5. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 5 Summary This two-day course is intended for technical and programmatic staff involved in the development, analysis, or testing of Information Assurance, Network Warfare, Network-Centric, and NetOPs systems. The course will provide perspective on emerging policy, doctrine, strategy, and operational constraints affecting the development of cyber warfare systems. This knowledge will greatly enhance participants’ ability to develop operational systems and concepts that will produce integrated, controlled, and effective cyber effects at each warfare level. Instructor Al Kinney is a retired Naval Officer and holds a Masters Degree in electrical engineering. His professional experience includes more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. What You Will Learn • What are the relationships between cyber warfare, information assurance, information operations, and network-centric warfare? • How can a cyber warfare capability enable freedom of action in cyberspace? • What are legal constraints on cyber warfare? • How can cyber capabilities meet standards for weaponization? • How should cyber capabilities be integrated with military exercises? • How can military and civilian cyberspace organizations prepare and maintain their workforce to play effective roles in cyberspace? • What is the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI)? From this course you will obtain in-depth knowledge and awareness of the cyberspace domain, its functional characteristics, and its organizational inter-relationships enabling your organization to make meaningful contributions in the domain of cyber warfare through technical consultation, systems development, and operational test & evaluation. Course Outline 1. Cyberspace as a Warfare Domain. Domain terms of reference. Comparison of operational missions conducted through cyberspace. Operational history of cyber warfare. 2. Stack Positioning as a Maneuver Analog. Exploring the space where tangible cyber warfare maneuver really happens. Extend the network stack concept to other elements of cyberspace. Understand the advantage gained through proficient cyberscape navigation. 3. Organizational Constructs in Cyber Warfare. Inter-relationships between traditional and emerging warfare, intelligence, and systems policy authorities. 4. Cyberspace Doctrine and Strategy. National Military Strategy for Cyberspace Operations. Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI). Developing a framework for a full spectrum cyberspace capabilities. 5. Legal Considerations for Cyber Warfare. Overview of pertinent US Code for cyberspace. Adapting the international Law of Armed Conflict to cyber warfare. Decision frameworks and metaphors for making legal choices in uncharted territory. 6. Operational Theory of Cyber Warfare. Planning and achieving cyber effects. Understanding policy implications and operational risks in cyber warfare. Developing a cyber deterrence strategy. 7. Cyber Warfare Training and Exercise Requirements. Understanding of the depth of technical proficiency and operational savvy required to develop, maintain, and exercise integrated cyber warfare capabilities. 8. Cyber Weaponization. Cyber weapons taxonomy. Weapon-target interplay. Test and Evaluation Standards. Observable effects. 9. Command & Control for Cyber Warfare. Joint Command & Control principles. Joint Battlespace Awareness. Situational Awareness. Decision Support. 10. Survey of International Cyber Warfare Capabilities. Open source exploration of cyber warfare trends in India, Pakistan, Russia, and China. April 3-4, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1090 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Cyber Warfare – Theory & Fundamentals NEW!
  6. 6. 6 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 June 25-28, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico $1995 (8:30am - 4:30pm) 4 Day Course! Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This four-day course is designed for scientists, engineers and managers interested in the current state of explosive and propellant technology. After an introduction to shock waves, the current explosive technology is described.  Numerical  methods for evaluating explosive and propellant sensitivity to shock waves are described and applied to vulnerability problems such as projectile impact and  burning to detonation. Instructor Charles L. Mader, Ph.D.,is a retired Fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory and President of a consulting company. Dr. Mader authored the monograph Numerical Modeling of Detonation, and also wrote four dynamic material property data volumes published by the University of California Press. His book and CD-ROM entitled Numerical Modeling of Explosives and Propellants, Third Edition, published in 2008 by CRC Press will be the text for the course. He is the author of Numerical Modeling of Water Waves, Second Edition, published in 2004 by CRC Press. He is listed in Who's Who in America and Who's Who in the World. He has consulted and guest lectured for public and private organizations in several countries. Explosives Technology and Modeling Who Should Attend This course is suited for scientists, engineers, and managers interested in the current state of explosive and propellant technology, and in the use of numerical modeling to evaluate the performance and vulnerability of explosives and propellants. Course Materials Participants will receive a copy of Numerical Modeling of Explosives and Propellants, Third Edition by Dr. Charles Mader, 2008 CRC Press. In addition, participants will receive an updated CD-ROM. What You Will Learn • What are Shock Waves and Detonation Waves? • What makes an Explosive Hazardous? • Where Shock Wave and Explosive Data is available. • How to model Explosive and Propellant Performance. • How to model Explosive Hazards and Vulnerability. • How to use the furnished explosive performance and hydrodynamic computer codes. • The current state of explosive and propellant technology. From this course you will obtain the knowledge to evaluate explosive performance, hazards and understand the literature. Course Outline 1. Shock Waves. Fundamental Shock Wave Hydrodynamics, Shock Hugoniots, Phase Change, Oblique Shock Reflection, Regular and Mach Shock Reflection. 2. Shock Equation of State Data Bases. Shock Hugoniot Data, Shock Wave Profile Data., Radiographic Data, Explosive Performance Data, Aquarium Data,  Russian Shock and Explosive Data. 3. Performance of Explosives and Propellants. Steady-State Explosives. Non-Ideal Explosives – Ammonium Salt-Explosive Mixtures, Ammonium Nitrate-Fuel Oil (ANFO) Explosives, Metal Loaded Explosives.  Non-Steady State Detonations – Build- Up in Plane, Diverging and Converging Geometry, Chemistry of Build-Up of Detonation.  Propellant Performance. 4. Initiation of Detonation. Thermal Initiation, Explosive Hazard Calibration Tests.  Shock Initiation of Homogeneous Explosives.  Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives – Hydrodynamic Hot Spot Model, Shock Sensitivity and Effects on Shock Sensitivity of Composition, Particle Size and Temperature.  The FOREST FIRE MODEL – Failure Diameter, Corner Turning, Desensitization of Explosives by Preshocking, Projectile Initiation of Explosives, Burning to Detonation. 5. Modeling Hydodynamics on Personal Computers. Numerical Solution of One-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional Lagrangian Reactive Flow, Numerical Solution of Two-Dimensional and Three- Dimensional Eulerian Reactive Flow. 6. Design and Interpretation of Experiments. Plane-Wave Experiments, Explosions in Water, Plate Dent Experiments, Cylinder Test, Jet Penetration of Inerts and Explosives, Plane Wave Lens, Regular and Mach Reflection of Shock and Detonation Waves, Insensitive High Explosive Initiators, Colliding Detonations, Shaped Charge Jet Formation and Target Penetration. 7. NOBEL Code and Proton Radiography. AMR Reactive Hydrodynamic code with models of both Build-up TO and OF Detonation used to model oblique initiation of Insensitive High Explosives, explosive cavity formation in water, meteorite and nuclear explosion generated cavities, Munroe jets, Failure Cones, Hydrovolcanic explosions.
  7. 7. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 7 Fundamentals of Rockets and Missiles January 31 - February 2, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico March 6-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary This three-day course provides an overview of rockets and missiles for government and industry officials with limited technical experience in rockets and missiles. The course provides a practical foundation of knowledge in rocket and missile issues and technologies. The seminar is designed for engineers, technical personnel, military specialist, decision makers and managers of current and future projects needing a more complete understanding of the complex issues of rocket and missile technology The seminar provides a solid foundation in the issues that must be decided in the use, operation and development of rocket systems of the future. You will learn a wide spectrum of problems, solutions and choices in the technology of rockets and missile used for military and civil purposes. Attendees will receive a complete set of printed notes. These notes will be an excellent future reference for current trends in the state-of-the-art in rocket and missile technology and decision making. Instructor Edward L. Keith is a multi-discipline Launch Vehicle System Engineer, specializing in integration of launch vehicle technology, design, modeling and business strategies. He is currently an independent consultant, writer and teacher of rocket system technology. He is experienced in launch vehicle operations, design, testing, business analysis, risk reduction, modeling, safety and reliability. He also has 13-years of government experience including five years working launch operations at Vandenberg AFB. Mr. Keith has written over 20 technical papers on various aspects of low cost space transportation over the last two decades. Course Outline 1. Introduction to Rockets and Missiles. The Classifications of guided, and unguided, missile systems is introduced. The practical uses of rocket systems as weapons of war, commerce and the peaceful exploration of space are examined. 2. Rocket Propulsion made Simple. How rocket motors and engines operate to achieve thrust. Including Nozzle Theory, are explained. The use of the rocket equation and related Mass Properties metrics are introduced. The flight environments and conditions of rocket vehicles are presented. Staging theory for rockets and missiles are explained. Non-traditional propulsion is addressed. 3. Introduction to Liquid Propellant Performance, Utility and Applications. Propellant performance issues of specific impulse, Bulk density and mixture ratio decisions are examined. Storable propellants for use in space are described. Other propellant Properties, like cryogenic properties, stability, toxicity, compatibility are explored. Mono-Propellants and single propellant systems are introduced. 4. Introducing Solid Rocket Motor Technology. The advantages and disadvantages of solid rocket motors are examined. Solid rocket motor materials, propellant grains and construction are described. Applications for solid rocket motors as weapons and as cost-effective space transportation systems are explored. Hybrid Rocket Systems are explored. 5. Liquid Rocket System Technology. Rocket Engines, from pressure fed to the three main pump-fed cycles, are examined. Engine cooling methods are explored. Other rocket engine and stage elements are described. Control of Liquid Rocket stage steering is presented. Propellant Tanks, Pressurization systems and Cryogenic propellant Management are explained. 6. Foreign vs. American Rocket Technology and Design. How the former Soviet aerospace system diverged from the American systems, where the Russians came out ahead, and what we can learn from the differences. Contrasts between the Russian and American Design philosophy are observed to provide lessons for future design. Foreign competition from the end of the Cold War to the foreseeable future is explored. 7. Rockets in Spacecraft Propulsion. The difference between launch vehicle booster systems, and that found on spacecraft, satellites and transfer stages, is examined The use of storable and hypergolic propellants in space vehicles is explained. Operation of rocket systems in micro-gravity is studied. 8. Rockets Launch Sites and Operations. Launch Locations in the USA and Russia are examined for the reason the locations have been chosen. The considerations taken in the selection of launch sites are explored. The operations of launch sites in a more efficient manner, is examined for future systems. 9. Rockets as Commercial Ventures. Launch Vehicles as American commercial ventures are examined, including the motivation for commercialization. The Commercial Launch Vehicle market is explored. 10. Useful Orbits and Trajectories Made Simple. The student is introduced to simplified and abbreviated orbital mechanics. Orbital changes using Delta-V to alter an orbit, and the use of transfer orbits, are explored. Special orbits like geostationary, sun synchronous and Molnya are presented. Ballistic Missile trajectories and re-entry penetration is examined. 11. Reliability and Safety of Rocket Systems. Introduction to the issues of safety and reliability of rocket and missile systems is presented. The hazards of rocket operations, and mitigation of the problems, are explored. The theories and realistic practices of understanding failures within rocket systems, and strategies to improve reliability, is discussed. 12. Expendable Launch Vehicle Theory, Performance and Uses. The theory of Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) dominance over alternative Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) is explored. The controversy over simplification of liquid systems as a cost effective strategy is addressed. 13. Reusable Launch Vehicle Theory and Performance. The student is provided with an appreciation and understanding of why Reusable Launch Vehicles have had difficulty replacing expendable launch vehicles. Classification of reusable launch vehicle stages is introduced. The extra elements required to bring stages safely back to the starting line is explored. Strategies to make better RLV systems are presented. 14. The Direction of Technology. A final open discussion regarding the direction of rocket technology, science, usage and regulations of rockets and missiles is conducted to close out the class study. Who Should Attend • Aerospace Industry Managers. • Government Regulators, Administrators and sponsors of rocket or missile projects. • Engineers of all disciplines supporting rocket and missile projects. • Contractors or investors involved in missile development. • Military Professionals. What You Will Learn • Fundamentals of rocket and missile systems. • The spectrum of rocket uses and technologies. • Differences in technology between foreign and domestic rocket systems. • Fundamentals and uses of solid and liquid rocket systems. • Differences between systems built as weapons and those built for commerce.
  8. 8. 8 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 GPS and Other Radionavigation Satellites International Navigation Solutions for Military, Civilian, and Aerospace Applications "The presenter was very energetic and truly passionate about the material" " Tom Logsdon is the best teacher I have ever had. His knowledge is excellent. He is a 10!" "Mr. Logsdon did a bang-up job explaining and deriving the theories of special/general relativity–and how they are associated with the GPS navigation solutions." "I loved his one-page mathematical deriva- tions and the important points they illus- trate." Summary If present plans materialize, 128 radionavigation satellites will soon be installed along the space frontier. They will be owned and operated by six different countries hoping to capitalize on the financial success of the GPS constellation. In this popular four-day short course Tom Logsdon describes in detail how these various radionavigation systems work and reviews the many practical benefits they are slated to provide to military and civilian users around the globe. Logsdon will explain how each radionavigation system works and how to use it in various practical situations. January 30 - February 2, 2012 Cape Canaveral, Florida March 12-15, 2012 Columbia, Maryland April 16-19, 2012 Colorado Springs, Colorado $1995 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Radionavigation Concepts. Active and passive radionavigation systems. Position and velocity solutions. Nanosecond timing accuracies. Today’s spaceborne atomic clocks. Websites and other sources of information. Building a flourishing $200 billion radionavigation empire in space. 2. The Three Major Segments of the GPS. Signal structure and pseudorandom codes. Modulation techniques. Practical performance-enhancements. Relativistic time dilations. Inverted navigation solutions. 3. Navigation Solutions and Kalman Filtering Techniques. Taylor series expansions. Numerical iteration. Doppler shift solutions. Kalman filtering algorithms. 4. Designing Effective GPS Receivers. The functions of a modern receiver. Antenna design techniques. Code tracking and carrier tracking loops. Commercial chipsets. Military receivers. Navigation solutions for orbiting satellites. 5. Military Applications. Military test ranges. Tactical and strategic applications. Autonomy and survivability enhancements. Smart bombs and artillery projectiles.. 6. Integrated Navigation Systems. Mechanical and strapdown implementations. Ring lasers and fiber-optic gyros. Integrated navigation systems. Military applications. 7. Differential Navigation and Pseudosatellites. Special committee 104’s data exchange protocols. Global data distribution. Wide-area differential navigation. Pseudosatellites. International geosynchronous overlay satellites. The American WAAS, the European EGNOS, and the Japanese QZSS.. 8. Carrier-Aided Solution Techniques. Attitude- determination receivers. Spaceborne navigation for NASA’s Twin Grace satellites. Dynamic and kinematic orbit determination. Motorola’s spaceborne monarch receiver. Relativistic time-dilation derivations. Relativistic effects due to orbital eccentricity. 9. The Navstar Satellites. Subsystem descriptions. On-orbit test results. Orbital perturbations and computer modeling techniques. Station-keeping maneuvers. Earth- shadowing characteristics. The European Galileo, the Chinese Biedou/Compass, the Indian IRNSS, and the Japanese QZSS. 10. Russia’s Glonass Constellation. Performance comparisons. Orbital mechanics considerations. The Glonass subsystems. Russia’s SL-12 Proton booster. Building dual-capability GPS/Glonass receivers. Glonass in the evening news. Instructor Tom Logsdon has worked on the GPS radionavigation satellites and their constellation for more than 20 years. He helped design the Transit Navigation System and the GPS and he acted as a consultant to the European Galileo Spaceborne Navigation System. His key assignment have included constellation selection trades, military and civilian applications, force multiplier effects, survivability enhancements and spacecraft autonomy studies. Over the past 30 years Logsdon has taught more than 300 short courses. He has also made two dozen television appearances, helped design an exhibit for the Smithsonian Institution, and written and published 1.7 million words, including 29 non fiction books. These include Understanding the Navstar, Orbital Mechanics, and The Navstar Global Positioning System. Each Student willreceive a free GPSreceiver with color mapdisplays! www.aticourses.com/gps_technology.htm Video!
  9. 9. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 9 Instructor Patrick Pierson is president of a training, consulting, and software development company with offices in the U.S. and U.K. Patrick has more than 23 years of operational experience, and is internationally recognized as a Tactical Data Link subject matter expert. Patrick has designed more than 30 Tactical Data Link training courses and personally trains hundreds of students around the globe every year. What You Will Learn • The course is designed to enable the student to be able to speak confidently and with authority about all of the subject matter on the right. The course is suitable for: • Operators • Engineers • Consultants • Sales staff • Software Developers • Business Development Managers • Project / Program Managers Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS - Intermediate April 2-3, 2012 Columbia, Maryland June 25-26, 2012 Chantilly, Virginia $1750 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol April 4, 2012 Columbia, Maryland June 27, 2012 Chantilly, Virginia $500 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Intermediate (L16 / F Level-3) Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol (JRE / A Level-1) Summary The Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Intermediate Course is a two-day training course that covers the most important topics effecting Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS.  The course includes 22 instructional modules and is one of our most popular courses.  This course is instructional in nature and does not involve hands-on training. Summary The Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol (JREAP) Introduction course is a one-day training course being offered to students that complete the JTIDS / MIDS Intermediate course.  The course explains the JREAP technology, message components, JREAP protocols, operational procedures, as well as operational support and planning requirements. Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS is a prerequisite. Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS - Intermediate / Joint Range Extension Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Course Outline Day 1 Introduction to Link 16 Link 16 / JTIDS / MIDS Documentation Link 16 Enhancements System Characteristics Time Division Multiple Access Network Participation Groups J-Series Messages JTIDS / MIDS Pulse Development JTIDS / MIDS Time Slot Components JTIDS / MIDS Message Packing and Pulses JTIDS / MIDS Networks / Nets Day 2 Access Modes JTIDS / MIDS Terminal Synchronization JTIDS / MIDS Network Time JTIDS / MIDS Network Roles JTIDS / MIDS Terminal Navigation JTIDS / MIDS Relays Communications Security JTIDS / MIDS Pulse Deconfliction JTIDS / MIDS Terminal Restrictions Time Slot Duty Factor JTIDS / MIDS Terminals Course Outline Day 3 Joint Range Extension Applications Protocol Topics Include: JREAP History JREAP Documentation JREAP Introduction Common Message Elements JREAP Full Stack Transmission Block Headers Message Group Headers JREAP Application Block JREAP Receipt Compliance JREAP Management Messages MIL-STD 3011 Appendix-B MIL-STD 3011 Appendix-C General Forwarding Requirements JREAP Planning Considerations
  10. 10. 10 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Who Should Attend The course is oriented toward the needs of missile engineers, systems engineers, analysts, marketing personnel, program managers, university professors, and others working in the area of missile systems and technology development. Attendees will gain an understanding of missile design, missile technologies, launch platform integration, missile system measures of merit, and the missile system development process. What You Will Learn • Key drivers in the missile design and system engineering process. • Critical tradeoffs, methods and technologies in subsystems, aerodynamic, propulsion, and structure sizing. • Launch platform-missile integration. • Robustness, lethality, guidance navigation & control, accuracy, observables, survivability, reliability, and cost considerations. • Missile sizing examples. • Missile development process. Instructor Eugene L. Fleeman has 47 years of government, industry, academia, and consulting experience in missile system and technology development. Formerly a manager of missile programs at Air Force Research Laboratory, Rockwell International, Boeing, and Georgia Tech, he is an international lecturer on missiles and the author of over 100 publications, including the AIAA textbook, Tactical Missile Design. 2nd Ed. Summary This three-day short course covers the fundamentals of missile design, development, and system engineering. The course provides a system-level, integrated method for missile aerodynamic configuration/propulsion design and analysis. It addresses the broad range of alternatives in meeting cost, performance and risk requirements. The methods presented are generally simple closed-form analytical expressions that are physics-based, to provide insight into the primary driving parameters. Configuration sizing examples are presented for rocket- powered, ramjet-powered, and turbo-jet powered baseline missiles. Typical values of missile parameters and the characteristics of current operational missiles are discussed as well as the enabling subsystems and technologies for missiles and the current/projected state-of-the-art. Sixty-six videos illustrate missile development activities and missile performance. Daily roundtable discussion. Attendees will vote on the relative emphasis of the material to be presented. Attendees receive course notes as well as the textbook, Tactical Missile Design, 2nd edition. Course Outline 1. Introduction/Key Drivers in the Missile Design and System Engineering Process: Overview of missile design process. Examples of system-of-systems integration. Unique characteristics of missiles. Key aerodynamic configuration sizing parameters. Missile conceptual design synthesis process. Examples of processes to establish mission requirements. Projected capability in command, control, communication, computers, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (C4ISR). Example of Pareto analysis. Attendees vote on course emphasis. 2. Aerodynamic Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: Optimizing missile aerodynamics. Shapes for low observables. Missile configuration layout (body, wing, tail) options. Selecting flight control alternatives. Wing and tail sizing. Predicting normal force, drag, pitching moment, stability, control effectiveness, lift-to-drag ratio, and hinge moment. Maneuver law alternatives. 3. Propulsion Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: Turbojet, ramjet, scramjet, ducted rocket, and rocket propulsion comparisons. Turbojet engine design considerations, prediction and sizing. Selecting ramjet engine, booster, and inlet alternatives. Ramjet performance prediction and sizing. High density fuels. Solid propellant alternatives. Propellant grain cross section trade-offs. Effective thrust magnitude control. Reducing propellant observables. Rocket motor performance prediction and sizing. Motor case and nozzle materials. 4. Weight Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: How to size subsystems to meet flight performance requirements. Structural design criteria factor of safety. Structure concepts and manufacturing processes. Selecting airframe materials. Loads prediction. Weight prediction. Airframe and motor case design. Aerodynamic heating prediction and insulation trades. Dome material alternatives and sizing. Power supply and actuator alternatives and sizing. 5. Flight Performance Considerations in Missile Design and System Engineering: Flight envelope limitations. Aerodynamic sizing-equations of motion. Accuracy of simplified equations of motion. Maximizing flight performance. Benefits of flight trajectory shaping. Flight performance prediction of boost, climb, cruise, coast, steady descent, ballistic, maneuvering, and homing flight. 6. Measures of Merit and Launch Platform Integration / System Engineering: Achieving robustness in adverse weather. Seeker, navigation, data link, and sensor alternatives. Seeker range prediction. Counter-countermeasures. Warhead alternatives and lethality prediction. Approaches to minimize collateral damage. Fusing alternatives and requirements for fuze angle and time delay. Alternative guidance laws. Proportional guidance accuracy prediction. Time constant contributors and prediction. Maneuverability design criteria. Radar cross section and infrared signature prediction. Survivability considerations. Insensitive munitions. Enhanced reliability. Cost drivers of schedule, weight, learning curve, and parts count. EMD and production cost prediction. Designing within launch platform constraints. Internal vs. external carriage. Shipping, storage, carriage, launch, and separation environment considerations. Launch platform interfaces. Cold and solar environment temperature prediction. 7. Sizing Examples and Sizing Tools: Trade-offs for extended range rocket. Sizing for enhanced maneuverability. Developing a harmonized missile. Lofted range prediction. Ramjet missile sizing for range robustness. Ramjet fuel alternatives. Ramjet velocity control. Correction of turbojet thrust and specific impulse. Turbojet missile sizing for maximum range. Turbojet engine rotational speed. Computer aided sizing tools for conceptual design. Soda straw rocket design-build-fly competition. House of quality process. Design of experiment process. 8. Missile Development Process: Design validation/technology development process. Developing a technology roadmap. History of transformational technologies. Funding emphasis. Alternative proposal win strategies. New missile follow-on projections. Examples of development tests and facilities. Example of technology demonstration flight envelope. Examples of technology development. New technologies for missiles. 9. Summary and Lessons Learned. March 26-28, 2012 Columbia, Maryland May 1-3, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $1795 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Missile System Design www.aticourses.com/tactical_missile_design.htm Video!
  11. 11. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 11 March 19-22, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Instructor Dr. Walter R. Dyer is a graduate of UCLA, with a Ph.D. degree in Control Systems Engineering and Applied Mathematics. He has over thirty years of industry, government and academic experience in the analysis and design of tactical and strategic missiles. His experience includes Standard Missile, Stinger, AMRAAM, HARM, MX, Small ICBM, and ballistic missile defense. He is currently a Senior Staff Member at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and was formerly the Chief Technologist at the Missile Defense Agency in Washington, DC. He has authored numerous industry and government reports and published prominent papers on missile technology. He has also taught university courses in engineering at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. What You Will Learn You will gain an understanding of the design and analysis of homing missiles and the integrated performance of their subsystems. • Missile propulsion and control in the atmosphere and in space. • Clear explanation of homing guidance. • Types of missile seekers and how they work. • Missile testing and simulation. • Latest developments and future trends. Summary This four-day course presents a broad introduction to major missile subsystems and their integrated performance, explained in practical terms, but including relevant analytical methods. While emphasis is on today’s homing missiles and future trends, the course includes a historical perspective of relevant older missiles. Both endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missiles (missiles that operate in the atmosphere and in space) are addressed. Missile propulsion, guidance, control, and seekers are covered, and their roles and interactions in integrated missile operation are explained. The types and applications of missile simulation and testing are presented. Comparisons of autopilot designs, guidance approaches, seeker alternatives, and instrumentation for various purposes are presented. The course is recommended for analysts, engineers, and technical managers who want to broaden their understanding of modern missiles and missile systems.  The analytical descriptions require some technical background, but practical explanations can be appreciated by all students. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Brief history of Missiles. Types of guided missiles. Introduction to ballistic missile defense.- Endoatmospheric and exoatmospheric missile operation. Missile basing. Missile subsystems overview. Warheads, lethality and hit-to-kill. Power and power conditioning. 2. Missile Propulsion. The rocket equation. Solid and liquid propulsion. Single stage and multistage boosters. Ramjets and scramjets. Axial propulsion. Divert and attitude control systems. Effects of gravity and atmospheric drag. 3. Missile Airframes, Autopilots And Control. Phases of missile flight. Purpose and functions of autopilots. Missile control configurations. Autopilot design. Open-loop autopilots. Inertial instruments and feedback. Autopilot response, stability, and agility. Body modes and rate saturation. Roll control and induced roll in high performance missiles. Radomes and their effects on missile control. Adaptive autopilots. Rolling airframe missiles. 4. Exoatmospheric Missiles For Ballistic Missile Defense. Exoatmospheric missile autopilots, propulsion and attitude control. Pulse width modulation. Exo- atmospheric missile autopilots. Limit cycles. 5. Missile Guidance. Seeker types and operation for endo- and exo-atmospheric missiles. Passive, active and semi active missile guidance. Radar basics and radar seekers. Passive sensing basics and passive seekers. Scanning seekers and focal plane arrays. Seeker comparisons and tradeoffs for different missions. Signal processing and noise reduction 6. Missile Seekers. Boost and midcourse guidance. Zero effort miss. Proportional navigation and augmented proportional navigation. Biased proportional navigation. Predictive guidance. Optimum homing guidance. Guidance filters. Homing guidance examples and simulation results. Miss distance comparisons with different homing guidance laws. Sources of miss and miss reduction. Beam rider, pure pursuit, and deviated pursuit guidance. 7. Simulation And Its Applications. Current simulation capabilities and future trends. Hardware in the loop. Types of missile testing and their uses, advantages and disadvantages of testing alternatives. Modern Missile Analysis Propulsion, Guidance, Control, Seekers, and Technology www.aticourses.com/missile_systems_analysis.htm Video!
  12. 12. 12 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Stan Silberman is a member of the Senior Technical Staff at the Johns Hopkins Univeristy Applied Physics Laboratory. He has over 30 years of experience in tracking, sensor fusion, and radar systems analysis and design for the Navy,Marine Corps, Air Force, and FAA. Recent work has included the integration of a new radar into an existing multisensor system and in the integration, using a multiple hypothesis approach, of shipboard radar and ESM sensors. Previous experience has included analysis and design of multiradar fusion systems, integration of shipboard sensors including radar, IR and ESM, integration of radar, IFF, and time-difference-of- arrival sensors with GPS data sources. Revised With Newly Added Topics Summary The objective of this course is to introduce engineers, scientists, managers and military operations personnel to the fields of target tracking and data fusion, and to the key technologies which are available today for application to this field. The course is designed to be rigorous where appropriate, while remaining accessible to students without a specific scientific background in this field. The course will start from the fundamentals and move to more advanced concepts. This course will identify and characterize the principle components of typical tracking systems. A variety of techniques for addressing different aspects of the data fusion problem will be described. Real world examples will be used to emphasize the applicability of some of the algorithms. Specific illustrative examples will be used to show the tradeoffs and systems issues between the application of different techniques. What You Will Learn • State Estimation Techniques – Kalman Filter, constant-gain filters. • Non-linear filtering – When is it needed? Extended Kalman Filter. • Techniques for angle-only tracking. • Tracking algorithms, their advantages and limitations, including: - Nearest Neighbor - Probabilistic Data Association - Multiple Hypothesis Tracking - Interactive Multiple Model (IMM) • How to handle maneuvering targets. • Track initiation – recursive and batch approaches. • Architectures for sensor fusion. • Sensor alignment – Why do we need it and how do we do it? • Attribute Fusion, including Bayesian methods, Dempster-Shafer, Fuzzy Logic. Multi-Target Tracking and Multi-Sensor Data Fusion January 31 - February 2, 2012 Columbia, Maryland May 29-31, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. 2. The Kalman Filter. 3. Other Linear Filters. 4. Non-Linear Filters. 5. Angle-Only Tracking. 6. Maneuvering Targets: Adaptive Techniques. 7. Maneuvering Targets: Multiple Model Approaches. 8. Single Target Correlation & Association. 9. Track Initiation, Confirmation & Deletion. 10. Using Measured Range Rate (Doppler). 11. Multitarget Correlation & Association. 12. Probabilistic Data Association. 13. Multiple Hypothesis Approaches. 14. Coordinate Conversions. 15. Multiple Sensors. 16. Data Fusion Architectures. 17. Fusion of Data From Multiple Radars. 18. Fusion of Data From Multiple Angle-Only Sensors. 19. Fusion of Data From Radar and Angle-Only Sensor. 20. Sensor Alignment. 21. Fusion of Target Type and Attribute Data. 22. Performance Metrics. www.aticourses.com/radar_tracking_kalman.htm Video!
  13. 13. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 13 Instructor Jerry LeMieux, PhD is a pilot and engineer with over 40 years and 10,000 hours of aviation experience. He has over 30 years of experience in operations, program management, systems engineering, R&D and test and evaluation for AEW, fighter and tactical data link acquisition programs. He led 1,300 personnel and managed 100 network and data link acquisition programs with a five year portfolio valued at more than $22 billion. He served at the numbered Air Force Level, responsible for the development, acquisition and sustainment of over 300 information superiority, combat ops and combat support programs that assure integrated battlespace dominance for the Air Force, DoD, US agencies and Allied forces. In civilian life he has consulted on numerous airspace issues for the US Federal Aviation Administration, Air Force, Army, Navy, NASA and DARPA . He holds a PhD in electrical engineering and is a graduate of Air War College and Defense Acquisition University. Summary This 3 day course will cover a variety of Network Centric Warfare (NCW) related topics. You will learn the concepts, theories and principles of how networking sensors, shooters and decision makers can improve warfighting capabilities. The various elements and enabling technologies for NCW are discussed. You will learn how sensors, precision weapons, data links and command and control systems are connected together to provide the right information to the right warfighter at the right time. Additionally, you will learn how to develop models to simulate the performance of a network centric architecture. You will learn about the metrics, MOPs, MOEs, KPPs, KIPS and the network centric checklist that are all used for test and evaluation. You will view examples of various NCW systems for the US Army (Warrior Information Network) and the US Navy (FORCEnet). Finally, case studies will be presented on Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below Blue Force Tracking, Air Combat w & without Link 16, Close Air Support & US/UK Coalition Operations during OIF. Network Centric Warfare – An Introduction Compressing the Kill Chain March 6-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Definition, concept, tenants & principles, benefits, platform vs. network, origins, theories, domains of conflict, common operational picture example, net centricity, network centric operations. 2. Networking the Kill Chain Target characteristics. Targeting process, deliberate targeting, dynamic targeting, time sensitive targets, the find, fix, target, track, engage, and assess (F2T2EA) cycle, NCW kill chain. 3. Sensors & Precision Weapons. Sensors: Optical, thermal, SAR, AMTI, GMTI. Weapons: JDAM, LGB, JSOW and GAM precision weapons. 4. Networks and Data Links. Global information grid & mobile ad-hoc networking, TADIL A, C & J, common data link, improved data modem, Army Tactical Data Link 1, Patriot Digital Information Link, Tactical Information Broadcast System, EPLRS/SADL, Joint Tactical Radios. 5. Networked Command and Control. Joint Battle Management Command and Control, definition, core warfighting capabilities, operational concept, mission threads, integrated architecture, Australia Boeing NC3S. 6. NCW Enabling Technologies. Key issues, sensors, precision weapons & information processing technologies, ultra-wideband optical communications, software and programmable radios, RF beam forming, IP networking, upgraded embedded computers & displays, FPGA, Ethernet switch boards, distributed processing, reconfigurable networking, distributed resource management, transformational satellite communications, GIG bandwidth expansion. 7. Network Centric Frameworks Zachman framework. Dept of Defense Architecture Framework, The Open Group Architecture Framework, IEEE 1471 Standard & conceptual frameworks. 8. Network Centric Architectures client server architecture. Two & three tier client server, thin client, thick client, distributed objects architecture, Common Objects Request Broker Architecture (COBRA), peer to peer architecture, service oriented architecture, Network Centric Enterprise Services and Network Centric Service Oriented Enterprise. 9. NCW Modeling and Simulation. Complexity theory, nonlinear interaction, decentralized control, self organization, nonequilibrium order, adaptation, collective dynamics, entropy based modeling, OSI Model, Amdahl?s Law, and agent based modeling & simulation. 10. NCW Test and Evaluation. Reason metrics, physical metrics, measures of performance, measures of effectiveness, net ready KPP, key interface profiles (KIPs), information assurance, net centric checklist. 11. NCW Implementation. Key elements, horizontal fusion, sense and respond logistics, cultural change and education, Standing Joint Force Headquarters, collaborative information environment, distributive common ground/surface system, dynamic Joint ISR concept, Joint Interagency Coordination Group, Army Warrior Information Network, Navy FORCEnet, Air Force: parallel warfare, effect based operations, command and control constellation, network centric collaborative targeting. Allied implementations: Australia, Canada, New Zealand & UK. 12. Case Studies. Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below Blue Force Tracking, Air Combat with and without Link 16, Close Air Support, US/UK Coalition Operations during Operation Iraqi Freedom. What You Will Learn • Concepts, NCW Principles, Network Centric Operations. • How NCW can Compress the Kill Chain. • Sensors & Precision Weapons as Network Elements. • Data Links used for NCW Communications. • Networked Command & Control, Australia Boeing NC3S. • Network Centric Enabling Technologies. • NCW Frameworks & Architectures. • NCW Modeling & Simulation and Test & Evaluation. • NCW Implementation Including Army WIN & Navy FORCEnet. • Case Studies from Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, Air Combat, Army Force Tracking and US/UK Coalition Operations. NEW!
  14. 14. 14 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 RADAR 201 Advances in Modern Radar April 17, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $650 (8:30am - 4:00pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $5000 each Off The Course Tuition." RADAR 101 Fundamentals of Radar April 16, 2012 Laurel, Maryland $650 (8:30am - 4:00pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $5000 each Off The Course Tuition." Summary This concise one-day course is intended for those with only modest or no radar experience. It provides an overview with understanding of the physics behind radar, tools used in describing radar, the technology of radar at the subsystem level and concludes with a brief survey of recent accomplish-ments in various applications. ATTEND EITHER OR BOTH RADAR COURSES! Summary This one-day course is a supplement to the basic course Radar 101, and probes deliberately deeper into selected topics, notably in signal processing to achieve (generally) finer and finer resolution (in several dimensions, imaging included) and in antennas wherein the versatility of the phased array has made such an impact. Finally, advances in radar's own data processing - auto-detection, more refined association processes, and improved auto-tracking - and system wide fusion processes are briefly discussed. Radar 101/201 Course Outline 1. Introduction. The general nature of radar: composition, block diagrams, photos, types and functions of radar, typical characteristics. 2. The Physics of Radar. Electromagnetic waves and their vector representation. The spectrum bands used in radar. Radar waveforms. Scattering. Target and clutter behavior representations. Propagation: refractivity, attenuation, and the effects of the Earth surface. 3. The Radar Range Equation. Development from basic principles. The concepts of peak and average power, signal and noise bandwidth and the matched filter concept, antenna aperture and gain, system noise temperature, and signal detectability. 4. Thermal Noise and Detection in Thermal Noise. Formation of thermal noise in a receiver. System noise temperature (Ts) and noise figure (NF). The role of a low- noise amplifier (LNA). Signal and noise statistics. False alarm probability. Detection thresholds. Detection probability. Coherent and non-coherent multi-pulse integration. 5. The sub-systems of Radar. Transmitter (pulse oscillator vs. MOPA, tube vs. solid state, bottled vs. distributed architecture), antenna (pattern, gain, sidelobes, bandwidth), receiver (homodyne vs. super heterodyne), signal processor (functions, front and back- end), and system controller/tracker. Types, issues, architectures, tradeoff considerations. 5. Current Accomplishments and Concluding Discussion. Course Outline 1. Introduction. Radar’s development, the metamorphosis of the last few decades: analog and digital technology evolution, theory and algorithms, increased digitization: multi-functionality, adaptivity to the environment, higher detection sensitivity, higher resolution, increased performance in clutter. 2. Modern Signal Processing. Clutter and the Doppler principle. MTI and Pulse Doppler filtering. Adaptive cancellation and STAP. Pulse editing. Pulse Compression processing. Adaptive thresholding and detection. Ambiguity resolution. Measurement and reporting. 3. Electronic Steering Arrays (ESA): Principles of Operation. Advantages and cost elements. Behavior with scan angle. Phase shifters, true time delays (TTL) and array bandwidth. Other issues. 4. Solid State Active Array (SSAA) Antennas (AESA). Architecture. Technology. Motivation. Advantages. Increased array digitization and compatibility with adaptive pattern applications. Need for in-place auto-calibration and compensation. 5. Modern Advances in Waveforms. Pulse compression principles. Performance measures. Some legacy codes. State-of-the-art optimal codes. Spectral compliance. Temporal controls. Orthogonal codes. Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) radar. 6. Data Processing Functions. The conventional functions of report to track correlation, track initiation, update, and maintenance. The new added responsibilities of managing a multi-function array: prioritization, timing, resource management. The Multiple Hypothesis tracker. 7. Concluding Discussion. Today’s concern of mission and theatre uncertainties. Increasing requirements at constrained size, weight, and cost. Needs for growth potential. System of systems with data fusion and multiple communication links. Dr. Menachem Levitas received his BS, maxima cum laude, from the University of Portland and his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 1975, both in physics. He has forty one years experience in science and engineering, thirty three of which in radar systems analysis, design, development, and testing for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and FAA. His experience encompasses many ground based, shipboard, and airborne radar systems. He has been technical lead on many radar efforts including Government source selection teams. He is the author of multiple radar based innovations and is a recipient of the Aegis Excellence Award for his contribution toward the AN/SPY-1 high range resolution (HRR) development.  For many years, prior to his retirement in 2011, he had been the chief scientist of Technology Service Corporation / Washington. He continues to provide radar technical support under consulting agreements. Instructor
  15. 15. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 15 Radar Systems Design & Engineering Radar Performance Calculations What You Will Learn • What are radar subsystems. • How to calculate radar performance. • Key functions, issues, and requirements. • How different requirements make radars different. • Operating in different modes & environments. • Issues unique to multifunction, phased array, radars. • How airborne radars differ from surface radars. • Today's requirements, technologies & designs. Instructors Dr. Menachem Levitas is the Chief Scientist of Technology Service Corporation (TSC) / Washington. He has thirty-eight years of experience, thirty of which include radar systems analysis and design for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and FAA. He holds the degree of Ph.D. in physics from the University of Virginia, and a B.S. degree from the University of Portland. Stan Silberman is a member of the Senior Technical Staff of Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He has over thirtyyears of experience in radar systems analysis and design for the Navy, Air Force, and FAA. His areas of specialization include automatic detection and tracking systems, sensor data fusion, simulation, and system evaluation. Summary This four-day course covers the fundamental principles of radar functionality, architecture, and performance. Diverse issues such as transmitter stability, antenna pattern, clutter, jamming, propagation, target cross section, dynamic range, receiver noise, receiver architecture, waveforms, processing, and target detection, are treated in detail within the unifying context of the radar range equation, and examined within the contexts of surface and airborne radar platforms. The fundamentals of radar multi-target tracking principles are covered, and detailed examples of surface and airborne radars are presented. This course is designed for engineers and engineering managers who wish to understand how surface and airborne radar systems work, and to familiarize themselves with pertinent design issues and with the current technological frontiers. Course Outline 1. Radar Range Equation. Radar ranging principles, frequencies, architecture, measurements, displays, and parameters. Radar range equation; radar waveforms; antenna patterns types, and parameters. 2. Noise in Receiving Systems and Detection Principles. Noise sources; statistical properties; noise in a receiving chain; noise figure and noise temperature; false alarm and detection probability; pulse integration; target models; detection of steady and fluctuating targets. 3. Propagation of Radio Waves in the Troposphere. Propagation of Radio Waves in the Troposphere. The pattern propagation factor; interference (multipath) and diffraction; refraction; standard and anomalous refractivity; littoral propagation; propagation modeling; low altitude propagation; atmospheric attenuation. 4. CW Radar, Doppler, and Receiver Architecture. Basic properties; CW and high PRF relationships; the Doppler principle; dynamic range, stability; isolation requirements; homodynes and superheterodyne receivers; in-phase and quadrature; signal spectrum; matched filtering; CW ranging; and measurement accuracy. 5. Radar Clutter and Clutter Filtering Principles. Surface and volumetric clutter; reflectivity; stochastic properties; sea, land, rain, chaff, birds, and urban clutter; Pulse Doppler and MTI; transmitter stability; blind speeds and ranges,; Staggered PRFs; filter weighting; performance measures. 6. Airborne Radar. Platform motion; iso-ranges and iso- Dopplers; mainbeam and sidelobe clutter; the three PRF regimes; ambiguities; real beam Doppler sharpening; synthetic aperture ground mapping modes; GMTI. 7. High Range Resolution Principles: Pulse Compression. The Time-bandwidth product; the pulse compression process; discrete and continuous pulse compression codes; performance measures; mismatched filtering. 8. High Range Resolution Principles: Synthetic Wideband. Motivation; alternative techniques; cross-band calibration. 9. Electronically Scanned Radar Systems. Beam formation; beam steering techniques; grating lobes; phase shifters; multiple beams; array bandwidth; true time delays; ultralow sidelobes and array errors; beam scheduling. 10. Active Phased Array Radar Systems. Active vs. passive arrays; architectural and technological properties; the T/R module; dynamic range; average power; stability; pertinent issues; cost; frequency dependence. 11. Auto-Calibration and Auto-Compensation Techniques in Active Phased. Arrays. Motivation; calibration approaches; description of the mutual coupling approach; an auto-compensation approach. 12. Sidelobe Blanking. Motivation; principle; implementation issues. 13. Adaptive Cancellation. The adaptive space cancellation principle; broad pattern cancellers; high gain cancellers; tap delay lines; the effects of clutter; number of jammers, jammer geometries, and bandwidths on canceller performance; channel matching requirements; sample matrix inverse method. 14. Multiple Target Tracking. Definition of Basic terms. Track Initiation, State Estimation & Filtering, Adaptive and Multiple Model Processing, Data Correlation & Association, Tracker Performance Evaluation. February 28 - March 2, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition.
  16. 16. 16 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Space-Based Radar March 5-8, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1990 (8:30am - 4:00pm) (Last Day 8:30am - 12:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most versatile remote sensor. It is an all-weather sensor that can penetrate cloud cover and operate day or night from space-based or airborne systems. This 4.5-day course provides a survey of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) applications and how they influence and are constrained by instrument, platform (satellite) and image signal processing and extraction technologies/design. The course will introduce advanced systems design and associated signal processing concepts and implementation details. The course covers the fundamental concepts and principles for SAR, the key design parameters and system features, space-based systems used for collecting SAR data, signal processing techniques, and many applications of SAR data. Instructors Bart Huxtable has a Ph.D. in Physics from the California Institute of Technology, and a B.Sc. degree in Physics and Math from the University of Delaware. Dr. Huxtable is President of User Systems, Inc. He has over twenty years experience in signal processing and numerical algorithm design and implementation emphasizing application-specific data processing and analysis for remote sensor systems including radars, sonars, and lidars. He integrates his broad experience in physics, mathematics, numerical algorithms, and statistical detection and estimation theory to develop processing algorithms and performance simulations for many of the modern remote sensing applications using radars, sonars, and lidars. Dr. Keith Raney has a Ph.D. in Computer, Information and Control Engineering from the University of Michigan, an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, and a B.S. degree from Harvard University. He works for the Space Department of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, with responsibilities for earth observation systems development, and radar system analysis. He holds United States and international patents on the Delay/Doppler Radar Altimeter. He was on NASA’s Europa Orbiter Radar Sounder instrument design team, and on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter instrument definition team. Dr. Raney has an extensive background in imaging radar theory, and in interdisciplinary applications using sensing systems. Course Outline 1. Radar Basics. Nature of EM waves, Vector representation of waves, Scattering and Propagation. 2. Tools and Conventions. Radar sensitivity and accuracy performance. 3. Subsystems and Critical Radar Components. Transmitter, Antenna, Receiver and Signal Processor, Control and Interface Apparatus, Comparison to Commsats. 4. Fundamentals of Aperture Synthesis. Motivation for SAR, SAR image formation. 5. Fourier Imaging. Bragg resonance condition, Born approximation. 6. Signal Processing. Pulse compression: range resolution and signal bandwidth, Overview of Strip- Map Algorithms including Range-Doppler algorithm, Range migration algorithm, Chirp scaling algorithm, Overview of Spotlight Algorithms including Polar format algorithm, Motion Compensation, Autofocusing using the Map-Drift and PGA algorithms. 7. Radar Phenomenology and Image Interpretation. Radar and target interaction including radar cross-section, attenuation & penetration (atmosphere, foliage), and frequency dependence, Imagery examples. 8. Visual Presentation of SAR Imagery. Non- linear remapping, Apodization, Super resolution, Speckle reduction (Multi-look). 9. Interferometry. Topographic mapping, Differential topography (crustal deformation & subsidence), Change detection. 10. Polarimetry. Terrain classification, Scatterer characterization. 11. Miscellaneous SAR Applications. Mapping, Forestry, Oceanographic, etc. 12. Ground Moving Target Indication (GMTI). Theory and Applications. 13. Image Quality Parameters. Peak-to-sidelobe ratio, Integrated sidelobe ratio, Multiplicative noise ratio and major contributors. 14. Radar Equation for SAR. Key radar equation parameters, Signal-to-Noise ratio, Clutter-to-Noise ratio, Noise equivalent backscatter, Electronic counter measures and electronic counter counter measures. 15. Ambiguity Constraints for SAR. Range ambiguities, Azimuth ambiguities, Minimum antenna area, Maximum area coverage rate, ScanSAR. 16. SAR Specification. System specification overview, Design drivers. 17. Orbit Selection. LEO, MEO, GEO, Access area, Formation flying (e.g., cartwheel). 18. Example SAR Systems. History, Airborne, Space-Based, Future. What You Will Learn • Basic concepts and principles of SAR and its applications. • What are the key system parameters. • How is performance calculated. • Design implementation and tradeoffs. • How to design and build high performance signal processors. • Current state-of-the-art systems. • SAR image interpretation.
  17. 17. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 17 Strapdown & Integrated Navigation Systems Guidance, Navigation & Control Engineering What You Will Learn • What are the key differences between gimballing and strapdown Intertial Navigation Systems? • How are transfer alignment operations being carried out on modern battlefields? • How sensitive are today’s solid state accelerometers and how are they currently being designed? • What is a covariance matrix and how can it be used in evaluating the performance capabilities of Integrated GPS/INS Navigation Systems? • How do the Paveway IV smart bombs differ from their predecessors? • How are MEMS devices manufactured and what practical functions do they perform? • What is the deep space network and how does it handle its demanding missions? February 27 - March 1, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1890 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Summary In this highly structured 4-day short course – specifically tailored to the needs of busy engineers, scientists, managers, and aerospace professionals – Thomas S. Logsdon will provide you with new insights into the modern guidance, navigation, and control techniques now being perfected at key research centers around the globe. The various topics are illustrated with powerful analogies, full-color sketches, block diagrams, simple one-page derivations highlighting their salient features, and numerical examples that employ inputs from today’s battlefield rockets, orbiting satellites, and deep- space missions. These lessons are carefully laid out to help you design and implement practical performance- optimal missions and test procedures. Instructor Thomas S. Logsdon has accumulated more than 30 years experience with the Naval Ordinance Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas, Lockheed Martin, Boeing Aerospace, and Rockwell International. His research projects and consulting assignments have included the Tartar and Talos shipboard missiles, Project Skylab, and various deep space interplanetary probes and missions. Mr. Logsdon has also worked extensively on the Navstar GPS, including military applications, constellation design and coverage studies. He has taught and lectured in 31 different countries on six continents and he has written and published 1.7 million words, including 29 technical books. His textbooks include Striking It Rich in Space, Understanding the Navstar, Mobile Communication Satellites, and Orbital Mechanics: Theory and Applications. Course Outline 1. Inertial Navigation Systems. Fundamental Concepts. Schuller pendulum errors. Strapdown implementations. Ring laser gyros. The Sagnac effect. Monolithic ring laser gyros. Fiber optic gyros. Advanced strapdown implementations. 2. Radionavigation’s Precise Position-Fixing Techniques. Active and passive radionavigation systems. Pseudoranging solutions. Nanosecond timing accuracies. The quantum-mechanical principles of cesium and rubidium atomic clocks. Solving for the user’s position. 3. Integrated Navigation Systems. Intertial navigation. Gimballing and strapdown navigation. Open- loop and closed-loop implementations. Transfer alignment techniques. Kalman filters and their state variable selections. Test results. 4. Hardware Units for Inertial Navigation. Solid-state accelerometers. Initializing today’s strapdown inertial navigation systems. Coordinate rotations and direction cosine matrices. "MEMS devices." and "The beautiful marriage between MEMS technology and the GPS." Spaceborne inertial navigation systems. 5. Military Applications of Integrated Navigation. Translator implementations at military test ranges. Military performance specifications. Military test results. Tactical applications. The Trident Accuracy Improvement Program. Tomahawk cruise missiles. 6. Navigation Solutions and Kalman Filtering Techniques. Ultra precise navigation solutions. Solving for the user’s velocity. Evaluating the geometrical dilution of precision. Kalman filtering techniques. The covariance matrices and their physical interpretations. Typical state variable selections. Monte Carlo simulations. 7. Smart bombs, Guided Missiles, and Artillery Projectiles. Beam-riders and their destructive potential. Smart bombs and their demonstrated accuracies. Smart and rugged artillery projectiles. The Paveway IV smart bombs. 8. Spaceborne Applications of Integrated Navigation Systems. On-orbit position-fixing on early satellites. The Twin Grace satellites. Guiding tomorrow’s booster rockets. Attitude determinations for the International Space Station. Cesium fountain clocks in space. Relativistic corrections for radionavigation satellites. 9. Today’s Guidance and Control for Deep Space Missions. Putting ICBM’s through their paces. Guiding tomorrow’s highly demanding missions from the Earth to Mars. JPL’s awesome new interplanetary pinball machines. JPL’s deep space network. Autonomous robots swarming along the space frontier. Driving along tomorrow’s unpaved freeways in the sky.
  18. 18. 18 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Synthetic Aperture Radar What You Will Learn • Basic concepts and principles of SAR. • What are the key system parameters. • Design and implementation tradeoffs. • Current system performance. Emerging systems. What You Will Learn • How to process data from SAR systems for high resolution, wide area coverage, interferometric and/or polarimetric applications. • How to design and build high performance SAR processors. • Perform SAR data calibration. • Ground moving target indication (GMTI) in a SAR context. • Current state-of-the-art. Fundamentals May 7-8, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico June 4-5, 2012 Columbia, Maryland Instructor: Dr. Keith Raney $1090 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Advanced May 9-10, 2012 Albuquerque, New Mexico Instructor: Bart Huxtable $1090 (8:30am - 4:00pm) Course Outline 1. SAR Imagery: Mechanisms and Effects. Backscatter. SAR, from backscatter through the radar and processor to imagery. Side- (and down-) looking geometry. Slant-range to ground-range conversion. The microwave spectrum. Frequency and wavelength. Effects of wavelength. Specular (forward and backward), discrete, and diffuse scattering. Shadowing. Cardinal effect. Bragg scattering. Speckle; its cause and mitigation. The Washington Monument. 2. Applications Overview. SAR milestones and pivotal contributions. Typical SAR designs and modes, ranging from pioneering classic, single channel, strip mapping systems to more advanced wide-swath, polarimetric, spotlight, and interferometric designs. A survey of important applications and how they influence the SAR system. Examples will be drawn from SeaSat, Radarsat-1/2, ERS-1/2, Magellan (at Venus), and TerraSAR-X, among others. 3. System Design Principles. Part I, Engineering Perspective: System design of an orbital SAR depends on classical electromagnetic and related physical principles, which will be concisely reviewed. The SAR radar equation. Sampling, which leads to the dominant SAR design constraint (the range-Doppler ambiguity trade-off) impacts fundamental parameters including resolution, swath width, signal-to- (additive) noise ratio, signal-to-speckle (a multiplicative noise) ratio, and ambiguity ratios. Part II, User Perspective: Complex vs real (power or square-root power) imagery. Noise-equivalent sigma-zero. The SAR Greed Factor. The six Axioms that describe top-level SAR properties from the user’s perspective. The SAR Image Quality parameter (the fundamental resolution-multi-look metric of interest to the user) will be described, and its influence will be reviewed on system design and image utility.. 4. SAR Polarimetry. Electromagnetic polarimetric basics. A review of the polarimetric combinations available for SAR architecture, including single-polarization, dual polarization, compact polarimetry, and full (or quadrature) polarimetry. Benefits and disadvantages of polarimetric SARs. Hybrid-polarimetric radars. Examples of typical applications. “Free” applications and analysis tools. Future outlook. 5. SAR Interferometry. Electromagnetic polarimetric basics. A review of the polarimetric combinations available for SAR architecture, including single-polarization, dual polarization, compact polarimetry, and full (or quadrature) polarimetry. Benefits and disadvantages of polarimetric SARs. Hybrid-polarimetric radars. Examples of typical applications. “Free” applications and analysis tools. Future outlook. 6. Current Orbital SARs. These include Europe’s ENVISAT, Canada’s Radarsat-2, Germany’s TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X. With requests from students in advance, any (unclassified) orbital SAR may be presented as a case study. 7. Future Orbital SARs. Important examples include ALOS-2 (Japan), RISAT-1 (India), SAOCOM (Argentina), and the Radarsat Constellation Mission (Canada). With advance notice from prospective students, any known forthcoming mission could be presented as a case study. 8. Open Questions and Discussion. Overview of the best professional SAR conferences. Topics raised by participants will be discussed, as interest and curiosity indicate. Course Outline 1. SAR Review Origins. Theory, Design, Engineering, Modes, Applications, System. 2. Processing Basics. Traditional strip map processing steps, theoretical justification, processing systems designs, typical processing systems. 3. Advanced SAR Processing. Processing complexities arising from uncompensated motion and low frequency (e.g., foliage penetrating) SAR processing. 4. Interferometric SAR. Description of the state- of-the-art IFSAR processing techniques: complex SAR image registration, interferogram and correlogram generation, phase unwrapping, and digital terrain elevation data (DTED) extraction. 5. Spotlight Mode SAR. Theory and implementation of high resolution imaging. Differences from strip map SAR imaging. 6. Polarimetric SAR. Description of the image information provided by polarimetry and how this can be exploited for terrain classification, soil moisture, ATR, etc. 7. High Performance Computing Hardware. Parallel implementations, supercomputers, compact DSP systems, hybrid opto-electronic system. 8. SAR Data Calibration. Internal (e.g., cal- tones) and external calibrations, Doppler centroid aliasing, geolocation, polarimetric calibration, ionospheric effects. 9. Example Systems and Applications. Space- based: SIR-C, RADARSAT, ENVISAT, TerraSAR, Cosmo-Skymed, PalSAR. Airborne: AirSAR and other current systems. Mapping, change detection, polarimetry, interferometry.
  19. 19. Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Vol. 111 – 19 Instructor Timothy D. Cole is president of a consulting firm. Mr. Cole has developed sensor & data exfiltration  solutions employing EO/IR sensors with augmentation using low-cost wireless sensor nets. He has worked several sensor system programs that addressed ISR including military-based cuing of sensors, intelligence gathering, first responders, and border protection. Mr. Cole holds multiple degrees in Electrical Engineering as well as in Technical Management. He has been awarded the NASA Achievement Award and was a Technical Fellow at Northrop Grumman. He has authored over 25 papers associated with ISR sensors, signal processing, and modeling. Summary This three-day course addresses System Engineering aspects associated with Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) programs and. Application to security, target acquisition and tracking, terminal guidance for weapon systems, and seamless integration of distributed sensor heterogeneous systems with intuitive situational display is provided. The course is designed for the lead engineers; systems engineers, researchers, program managers, and government directors who desire a framework to solve the competing objectives relating to ISR & security missions relating to regional force protection, asset monitoring, and/or targeting. The course presents an overview of tactical scale ISR systems (and missions), requirements definition and tracking, and provides technical descriptions relating to underlying sensor technologies, ISR platform integration (e.g., UAV- based sensor systems), and measures of system performance with emphasis on system integration & test issues. Examples are given throughout the conduct of the course to allow for knowledgeable assessment of sensor systems, ISR platform integration, data exfiltration and network connectivity, along with discussion of the emerging integration of sensors with situational analyses (including sensor web enablement), application of open geospatial standards (OGC), and attendant enabling capabilities (consideration of sensor modalities, adaptive processing of data, and system “impact” considerations). Strategic and classified ISR aspects are not presented within this unclassified course. Tactical Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) System Engineering Overview of leading-edge, ISR system-of-systems March 19-21, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $1690 (8:30am - 4:30pm) Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 Each Off The Course Tuition. Course Outline 1. Overview of ISR Systems. including definitions, approaches, and review of existing unclassified systems. 2. Requirement Development, Tracking, and Responsive Design Implementation(s). 3. Real-time Data Processing Functionality. 4. Data Communication Systems for Tactical ISR. 5. ISR Functionality. Target acquisition and tracking, including ATR. Target classification. Targeting systems (e.g., laser-guided ordnance). 6. Tactical ISR Asset Platforms. Air-based (includes UAVs). Ground-based. Vehicle-based. 7. Sensor Technologies, Capabilities, Evaluation Criteria, and Modeling Approach. Electro-optical imagers (EO/IR). Radar (including ultrawideband, UWB). Laser radar. Biochemical sensing. Acoustic monitoring. Ad hoc wireless sensor nodes (WSN). Application of sensor modalities to ISR. Tagging, tracking & Locating targets of interest (TTL). Non-cooperative target identification (NCID). 8. Concurrent Operation and Cross-correlation of ISR Sensor Data Products to Form Comprehensive Evaluation of Current Status. 9. Test & Evaluation Approach. 10. Human Systems Integration and Human Factors Test & Evaluation. 11. Modeling & Simulation of ISR System Performance. 12. Service Oriented Architectures and IP Convergence. Sensor web enablement. Use of metadata. Sensor harmonization. Re-use and cooperative integration of ISR assets. 13. Situational Analysis and Display. Standardization. Heuristic manipulation of ISR system operation and dataflow/processing. 14. Case Studies: Tactical ISR System Implementation and Evaluation. What You Will Learn • How to analyze and implement ISR & security concerns and requirements with a comprehensive, state-of-the- art ISR system response. • Understanding limitations and major issues associated with ISR systems. • ISR & security requirement development and tracking pertaining to tactical ISR systems, how to audit top-level requirements to system element implementations. • Sensor technologies and evaluation techniques for sensor modalities including: imagers (EO/IR), radar, laser radar, and other sensor modalities associated with tactical ISR missions. • Data communications architecture and networks; how to manage the distributed ISR assets and exfiltrate the vital data and data. • ISR system design objectives and key performance parameters. • Situational analyses and associated common operating display approaches; how best to interact with human decision makers. • Integration of multi-modal data to form comprehensive situational awareness. • Emerging standards associated with sensor integration and harmonization afforded via sensor web enablement technology. • Examples of effective tactical ISR systems. • Tools to support evaluation of ISR components, systems, requirements verification (and validation), and effective deployment and maintenance. • Modeling & simulation approaches to ISR requirements definition and responsive ISR system design(s); how to evaluate aspects of an ISR system prior to deployment and even prior to element development – how to find the ISR “gaps”. NEW!
  20. 20. 20 – Vol. 111 Register online at www.ATIcourses.com or call ATI at 888.501.2100 or 410.956.8805 Instructor Mark N. Lewellen has nearly 25 years of experience with a wide variety of space, satellite and aviation related projects, including the Predator/Shadow/Warrior/Global Hawk UAVs, Orbcomm, Iridium, Sky Station, and aeronautical mobile telemetry systems. More recently he has been working in the exciting field of UAS. He is currently the Vice Chairman of a UAS Sub-group under Working Party 5B which is leading the US preparations to find new radio spectrum for UAS operations for the next World Radiocommunication Conference in 2011 under Agenda Item 1.3. He is also a technical advisor to the US State Department and a member of the National Committee which reviews and comments on all US submissions to international telecommunication groups, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). What You Will Learn • Categories of current UAS and their aeronautical capabilities. • Major manufactures of UAS. • The latest developments and major components of a UAS. • What type of sensor data can UAS provide. • Regulatory and spectrum issues associated with UAS? • National Airspace System including the different classes of airspace. • How will UAS gain access to the National Airspace System (NAS). Unmanned Aircraft Systems Overview Engineering, Spectrum, and Regulatory Issues Associated with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Summary This one-day course is designed for engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS. The course provides the "big picture" for those who work outside of the discipline. Each topic addresses real systems (Predator, Shadow, Warrior and others) and real-world problems and issues concerning the use and expansion of their applications. Course Outline 1. Historic Development of UAS Post 1960’s. 2. Components and latest developments of a UAS. Ground Control Station, Radio Links (LOS and BLOS), UAV, Payloads. 3. UAS Manufacturers. Domestic, International. 4. Classes, Characteristics and Comparisons of UAS. 5. Operational Scenarios for UAS. Phases of Flight, Federal Government Use of UAS, State and Local government use of UAS. Civil and commercial use of UAS. 6. ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) of UAS. Optical, Infrared, Radar. 7. Comparative Study of the Safety of UAS. In the Air and On the ground. 8. UAS Access to the National Airspace System (NAS). Overview of the NAS, Classes of Airspace, Requirements for Access to the NAS, Issues Being Addressed, Issues Needing to be Addressed. 9. Bandwidth and Spectrum Issues. Band- width of single UAV, Aggregate bandwidth of UAS population. 10. International UAS Issues. WRC Process, Agenda Item 1.3 and Resolution 421. 11. UAS Centers of Excellence. North Dakota, Las Cruses, NM, DoD. 12. Worked Examples of Channeling Plans and Link/Interference Budgets. Shadow, Preda- tor/Warrior. 13. UAS Interactive Deployment Scenarios. March 19, 2012 Columbia, Maryland $700 (8:30am - 4:30pm) "Register 3 or More & Receive $10000 each Off The Course Tuition." www.aticourses.com/unmanned_aircraft_systems.html Video!

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