Louise Hamilton Centre, James Paget University Hospital, Norfolk
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Louise Hamilton Centre, James Paget University Hospital, Norfolk

on

  • 3,839 views

Coverage of the Louise Hamilton Centre funded by the Palliative Care East appeal.

Coverage of the Louise Hamilton Centre funded by the Palliative Care East appeal.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,839
Views on SlideShare
3,828
Embed Views
11

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

6 Embeds 11

http://www.scoop.it 5
http://pinterest.com 2
http://www.facebook.com 1
https://m.facebook.com&_=1363553191720 HTTP 1
https://m.facebook.com&_=1363553241085 HTTP 1
http://www.pinterest.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Louise Hamilton Centre, James Paget University Hospital, Norfolk Louise Hamilton Centre, James Paget University Hospital, Norfolk Document Transcript

  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, January 13, 2012 35THE BARN WORKSat Caldecott HallLeisure FitnessSpa ClubLuxurious Manicures, Pedicures,Waxing, Tinting, Ear Candles &Spa Treatment Days~Swedish, Sports Therapy and IndianHead Massage, Aqua Aerobicsclasses, Dietary advice, TrainingProgrammes to suit individualsSPRING INTO FITNESS!SPECIAL OFFER20% Discounton membership when paid in fulluntil end of June 2012(On production of this advert.Terms and conditions apply.)10% Discounton treatments & massagesduring January & February(On production of this advert.Terms and conditions apply.)Beccles Road, FrittonGreat Yarmouth01493 488488www.caldecotthall.co.ukOffers not to be used in conjunction with any other discountsFor local news online: www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInBriefCall for localNI tax breakA GREAT Yarmouth businessmanhas called for an end to nationalinsurance tax break“discrimination”.James Wilhelmsen, joint owner ofRed Rocket Accident Repair Centre,which opened in October said he wasgetting little help from thegovernment.Currently an HM Revenue andCustoms (HMRC) scheme offersregional employers a deduction ofup to £5,000 per employee in the first12 months of employing its first 10employees, but this region missesout because it is deemed an“affluent” area.He and co-director Terry Burrellbought the business in October.Business boostDOZENS of firms from across theworld have expressed an interest indoing business in Great Yarmouthand Lowestoft on the back of plans tocreate an enterprise zone.Waveney and Great Yarmouthcouncils – which are part of theNorfolk and Suffolk Energy Alliance(NSEA)– said more than 60businesses had shown “substantive”interest in the area with inquiriescoming from China, Korea andGermany.www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor your local news andviews online log on to:www.loweFor youviews oBuilding work to start on£1.5m palliative centresamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLFAMILIES and friends whoknow the anguish of terminalillness have spent more thanhalf a decade fundraising fora £1.5m day care centre fortheir loved ones.And now Palliative Care East’sdream of a dedicated support centrein the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital is on the vergeof becoming a reality.The campaign has raised more than£1.35m to date, so the project has beenput out to tender and building workis due to begin next month.A building partner is expected to beannounced by the end of this month.While fundraisers say they mustcontinue their efforts for the final£150,000 push, they are delighted atthe rate of progress. Jenny Watson,appeal co-ordinator, said: “It’s suchan exciting time for all involvedand thanks to their hard work andcommitment they can now begin tosee the fruits of their labour.“For patients and families it’sstarting to become a reality and thiswill make a huge difference to themIt will be somewhere they can comethat will be calm, away from a busyhospital. They will have time andspace.”The Palliative Care East Appeal waslaunched in October 2006 with thevision of providing better supportand information to people whoselives are affected by cancer and otherlife threatening illnesses.More than £1m had been raised byFebruary 2010, and final plans fora state-of-the-art care centre weresubmitted in October last year.Borough councillors approved theplans last November, and now theproject is out to tender.“We need to keep the fundraisinggoing right to the end of the build,”added Mrs Watson. “We’re planningsome more big fundraising events.”The 525sqm building followsMacmillan Quality EnvironmentMark standards and will provideadvice and clinical support forpatients and relatives.There will be a meet and greetatmosphere at the entrance insteadof a formal reception. An innergarden is designed to be enjoyedrather than act as a show garden, andit is hoped it will become a wildlifehaven overnight.The building’s interior layout willconsist of a main lounge, seating,a children’s play area and bothcounselling and multi-function roomsfor therapy. The counselling roomswill offer privacy with screeneddoors.For details about the project, callJenny Watson on 01493 453348 www.palliative-care-east.org.ukFuneral of Cecilia (Celia) EbbageTHE funeral of Cecilia (Celia)Ebbage,whodiedonDecember,16 three days short of her95th birthday, was held in StAndrew’s Church, Gorleston,on January 5.Celia Ebbage, who waspossessed of a livelyintelligence and great acuityof intellect, expressing herviews on local and historicalmatters in many well-writtenletters to this newspaper, wasa highly respected and muchloved Gorleston resident aswas attested by the size of thecongregation at her funeral.Indeed, she has been describedas a Gorleston institution,although she was born just offthe Old Kent Road in London.The service was conductedby the Rev Albert Cadmorewho thanked everybody, onbehalf of the family andespecially Celia’s brotherStanley, for their support andmutual comfort.The Rev Cadmore paidmoving tribute to Celia andsaid that thanks should beoffered for her life.Churchwarden BrianHumphrey read Psalm 23 andRev Cadmore read from theGospel of St John.In his address, Rev Cadmorespoke of Celia’s pleasure inher maritime environmentwhen her father, who hadbeen a manager of LondonTransport, moved the familyto Gorleston.Celia was then aged about 11and her younger brother wasnot a year old.Later, she worked as asecretary and in an adjacentoffice met her husband, anaccountant and gifted birdand landscape painter, GeorgeEbbage, who she married in1951.Sadly, the blissfully happymarriage was cut short in 1967when George suddenly died.During 44 years ofwidowhood, Celia delightedin books, art, music andespecially ballet, beinginstrumental in setting upthe Kenneth MacMillan Fundfor Young Dancers, to helpaspiring young dancers.Celia, a member of Toc H,served voluntarily in thecanteen in Baker Street inabout 1941 and her parentshad Air Sea Rescue personnelbilleted upon them.It was largely throughCelia’s efforts that a memorialhas been placed, in the gardenof the Cliff Hotel, to the RAFofficers who occupied the hotelduring the war years.The vicar praised Celia’sfortitude and strength for herbrother had told him of theenormous support she hadalways been to all the family.Celia had drawn inspirationfrom the endurance of sirErnest Shackleton.The Vicar reflected that thefamily had worshipped at StAndrew’s for over 80 years.Celia loved the church and,in the ladies’ choir, formed in1939, had sung solo parts.The service included twohymns, Love Divine, andPraise my soul the King ofHeaven. The gifted organist,whose choice of introitsand valedictory music wasappreciated, was John Farmerof St Nicholas’ MinsterChurch, Great Yarmouth.The service was followed byinterment in Gorleston OldCemetery.CAROLINE BUDDERY
  • 18 Friday, January 13, 2012Grant boosts ceiling restorationTHE Lowestoft Civic Societyhas been awarded a £49,900grant to restore an historicplaster ceiling.TheHeritageLotteryfundingis a major step forward for therestoration of the 17th centuryceiling, rescued from a gradeII listed building in the villageof Stoven, but another £30,000is still needed for the work togo ahead.Originally part of afar mhouse that wasdemolished in 1978, the ceilingis linked to one at SutherlandHouse hotel and restaurant,in Southwold, which was theheadquarters of the Dukeof York when in 1672 hecommanded a Anglo-Frenchfleet in the Battle of SoleBay against the Dutch. TheStoven ceiling is in 12 door-sized pieces and was stored ina garage before being held intrust at the Lowestoft HeritageWorkshop Centre.Once the £80,000 is securedfor the restoration, theconservation work will be ledby Cliveden Conservation andwill involve Lowestoft Collegestaff and students.A team of volunteers willalso record and documentthe work and the public andschools can see the restorationprocess.It is hoped the work will becompleted by July and theceiling will go on permanentdisplay at the LowestoftHeritage Workshop Centre inthe High Street.Society chairman JohnStannard said: “It will enablethe people of Suffolk tocontribute directly to theconservation of a fantasticpiece of their local heritageand to get hands-on experienceof the restoration of thisceiling to its former glory. Thisis unique. There will never beanother time or chance to seethis taking place”.Anyone who wants tosupport the project shouldcall 01692 582632 or email stef.g@care4free.netAnyone interested inseeing the restoration inprogress should visit www.lowestoftheritage.org toarrange an appointment.Duo praisedfor ‘fantastic’fund-raisingWALKING TALL: Janet Ellis (second left) and Zoiyar Cole (second right) present a chequefor £6,500 raised at the 2011 Lowestoft Moonlight Walk to Jenny Watson, of Palliative CareEast (far right). Also pictured is Emma Forsdike, of the Hotel Victoria in Lowestoft, whichacted as host venue for the event.WHAT a fantastic effort!That was the verdict onthe latest contribution byPakefield fundraising duoJanet Ellis and Zoiyar Cole asthey handed over a cheque for£6,700 to the Palliative CareEast (PCE) appeal.The donation was theresult of the latest LowestoftMoonlight Walk in Octoberwhich saw nearly 140 people– many of them in fancy dress– joining the sponsored strollalong the seafront.For Janet and Zoiyar, whoorganised the event for thesecond year running, it wasthe latest charity effort inan 11-year fundraising drivewhich has so far seen themdonate an amazing £276,896 togood causes.Janet, of Grand Avenue,and Zoiyar, of Love Lane,decided to team up and startraising money after Zoiyar’sson Paul died from canceraged 35 in 1999. Since then,they have organised a host ofevents for charities includingPCE, Macmillan, MarieCurie, EACH and the SandraChapman Centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital.Jenny Watson, PCEfundraising co-ordinator,said the latest donation was“fantastic sum”.She praised Janet and Zoiyarfor their efforts and added:“Zoiyar and Janet and I wouldlike also to thank everyonewho took part in the MoonlightWalk and helped to raise thisamount. There are still a fewpeople whose sponsorshipmoney is outstanding andthis can still be paid to eitherZoiyar or myself.”Zoiyar can be contacted on01502 513573 and Jenny can becontacted on 01493 453348 or atPalliative Care East Appeal,James Paget UniversityHospital, Lowestoft Road,Gorleston, NR31 6LA.BEDROOMFURNITUREMASSIVE SAVINGS ONBEDS & BEDDINGDivans, Pine Beds, Bunk Beds,Metal Beds & Sofa BedsMattresses sold separatelyALL REDUCEDCURTAINS &CURTAIN FABRICSMaking-up serviceRemnantsDress FabricsSherbournerecliners andfurnitureplus10% OFF ALLSTOCKFOR FIRST 2 WEEKS OF SALE(Excluding Carpets, Vinyls & Blinds)NOW ON
  • 4 Friday, January 13, 2012 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.uk6,000 bladeshanded inMORE than 6,000 blades are to beshredded and recycled following ayear-long campaign in Suffolk. TheBin a Blade campaign was inspiredby anti-knife crime campaignerHolly Watson – the sister of 23-year-old murder victim Lewis, who waskilled in a knife attack in Sudbury in2009. The amnesty was launched inDecember 2010, with bins placedoutside main police stations acrossthe county, including Lowestoft,where 1,784 were handed in, Ipswich(2,084) and Bury St Edmunds (1,029knives). A fourth bin was then addedat Mildenhall police station whiletwo mobile bins toured Suffolk’ssmaller police stations and otherlocations, including KessinglandLibrary at Marram Green.InBriefHospital wards closedafter new bug outbreaklucy.wright@archant.co.ukBy LUCY WRIGHTTHREE wards at the JamesPaget University Hospitalhave been forced to close afteran outbreak of norovirus.The closures mean that patientscoming into A&E are facing longerwaiting times for assessment,and some patients being admittedto other wards are also beingdelayed.The hospital is urging anyonewho needs medical treatment forminor injury and illness not toautomatically go to A&E but considerother healthcare options.Three wards are closed as a resultof the bug – also known as the wintervomiting bug – and the number ofcases coming into the hospital hasincreased in recent days.A James Paget spokesman said:“The seasonal increase in norovirusand the closure of wards has addedto the pressures we are currentlyfacing.”Some patients visiting the hospitalfor elective surgery have also had tohave their treatment postponed.Visitors are being asked to washtheir hands thoroughly with soapand water when entering and leavinga ward; to visit only one ward; not tosit on the beds and not to eat or drinkwhile visiting a ward.Anyone with symptoms of sicknessand diarrhoea are asked not to visitthe hospital at all until their illnesshas passed.Carole Crocker, director of nursingat the James Paget, said: “It isregrettable that some routine electivesurgery has again been affectedand we sincerely apologise for theinconvenience this might cause forsome patients, especially those whohave had a previous cancellation.“A high level of illness within thelocal community has led to increaseddemand on the hospital and somepatients have conditions whichrequire them to stay in hospital forlonger. This has led to a fall in thenumber of discharges from the Trustand placed extra demand on ourresources. We do not take the decisionto cancel surgery lightly, but the levelof demand has unfortunately led usto take this step.”The James Paget is not the onlyhospital facing problems as a resultof norovirus. The Norfolk andNorwich University Hospital has hadfour wards closed to new admissions,and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital inKing’s Lynn has one ward closed andone bay shut on another.The West Suffolk Hospital in BurySt Edmunds had several wards shutearlier this month, but now has justone bay in one ward affected bynorovirus.If you feel you have to visit andyou have vomiting and diarrhoea,contact the infection control teamon 01493 452836 and they will takeappropriate measures. If you are illat home with these symptoms andrequire medical care, you shouldcontact your GP.Big response to share-your-experienceAN invitation to patients to sharetheir experiences and help shapethe future standards of care at theJames Paget University Hospitalhas prompted an overwhelmingresponse.An appeal went out earlier thismonth for people to attend aseries of ‘In Your Shoes’ meetingswhere patients will have theopportunity to meet nurses,doctors, managers and otherhealthcare staff and tell them faceto face about their ownexperiences at the hospital. Butthe sessions are now fully booked.The meetings are part of aninitiative that aims to improve thequality of patient care.Kirk Lower, the James Paget’sdirector of workforce and lead forthe project, said: “We are reallygrateful for the response frompatients to this programme. This isa genuine invitation to influencethe future of the care we provideand the public have really engagedwith this opportunity.“We sincerely hope people willenjoy these sessions as we needtheir help. We can only improveand offer services the people weserve want by listening andlearning to their views.”Anyone wishing to share theirexperiences can still have theirviews included in the final reportby writing by the January 22 to:Kirk Lower, Director of Workforce,James Paget University HospitalsNHS Foundation Trust, LowestoftRoad, Gorleston NR31 6LA.‘MEET AND GREET ATMOSPHERE’: A artist’s view of the interior of the new palliative care centre for people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.Work starts soon on palliative care centrePLANS to create a new £1.5mpalliative care centre for people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveneymoved a major step closer thisweek with news that building workis set to start next month.The Palliative Care East appealhas so far raised more than£1.35m towards its goal ofbuilding and equipping the newcentre in the grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital. Whencomplete, it will offer dedicatedday care support to people withterminal illness and for theirfamilies and loved ones.As efforts continue to raise theremaining £150,000 needed toreach the appeal’s target, theproject has been put out to tenderand the successful building partneris expected to be announced bythe end of this month.Jenny Watson, appeal co-ordinator,said: “It’s such an exciting timefor all involved and thanks to theirhard work and commitment theycan now begin to see the fruits oftheir labour.“For patients and families it’sstarting to become a reality andthis will make a huge difference tothem.“It will be somewhere they cancome that will be calm, away froma busy hospital.“They won’t feel like they’rerushed and they will have time andspace.”The Palliative Care East Appealwas launched in October 2006with the vision of providing bettersupport and information to peoplein Yarmouth and Waveney whoselives are affected by cancer andother life-threatening illnesses.By February 2010, more than £1mhad been raised, including tens ofthousands of pounds raised inWaveney.Final plans for the new centrewere submitted last October andapproved by borough councillors inNovember.But Mrs Watson said the fund-raising would continue until the£1.5m target was hit. “We need tokeep the fund-raising going right tothe end of the build,” she added.The 525 sq m centre will provideadvice and clinical support forpatients and relatives. It will havea “meet and greet” atmosphereat the entrance instead of aformal reception in an effort toremove barriers and make thecentre as homely and inviting aspossible.For further details about theproject, call Jenny Watson on01493 453348 www.palliative-care-east.org.ukPakefield pair boost appeal –page 18Laptop stolenCraft fairsShed blazeMan chargedA MAN has been charged withthreatening behaviour after anincident in Salisbury Road,Lowestoft, at about 6.30am on NewYear’s Day. Stephen Collier, 24, ofWalton Road, Lowestoft, is due toappear before town magistrates onTuesday, January 24.FIREFIGHTERS were called toWhite’s Lane, Kessingland, onWednesday to deal with a blaze in agarden shed. Crews from Wrenthamand Lowestoft South were called tothe fire at about 10.50am. Theybrought the blaze under controlshortly after 11am. The incident isnot being treated as suspicious.LOWESTOFT Mencap will beholding fortnightly craft fairs ortable-top sales at the Unity Centre inMilton Road East. People arewelcome to sell their crafts orsecond-hand items and spaces willinitially be free but stallholders willneed to bring their own table.Refreshments will be available. Forinformation or to book a table, ring01502 539810 or e-mail admin@lowestoftmencap.orgA LAPTOP and cash were stolen in aburglary at Adnams Brewery inSouthwold. Staff discovered thebreak-in when they came into workon Tuesday morning. It happenedbetween 6pm on Monday and 7am onTuesday and police believe accesswas gained to the building inVictoria Street via an open window.Anyone with information on theburglary should ring the crimeinvestigation bureau on 101.Books winnerTHE winner of The Journal’s sportsbooks competition was AngelaBarrett of Highland Way, OultonBroad.A 23-YEAR-OLD man has beenarrested after an attempted robberyat a shop in Norwich Road,Lowestoft. Police were alerted atabout 11pm last Thursday to reportsthat two men had entered the storein via the back of the premises andassaulted a member of staff. Theyhad fled empty-handed when theowner ran into the shop afterhearing the disturbance. Police saidthe suspect was arrested this weekand, after questioning, was releasedon bail until February 8, pendingfurther inquiries. The employee whowas assaulted in the incidentsuffered bruising to his face.Raid arrest
  • 22 www.eveningnews24.co.uk Norwich Evening News Wednesday, February 1, 2012Top honour forcaravan parkA North Walsham caravan parkhas been named as one of the topholiday sites in the country.Two Mills Touring Park scoopedan AA regional campsite of theyear award after impressinginspectors with its landscaping,hospitality and facilities.But the award came as acomplete surprise to ownersBarbara and Ray Barnes who arepreparing for their ninth season atthe 81-pitch park in YarmouthRoad.Mrs Barnes said: “We knew we’dmade five stars but we weren’texpecting the certificate.“Over the years we have beenimproving the park, at themoment we’re refurbishing the oldshower block, so it’s very nice tohave it recognised.”A cabaret show will be performed thisweekend in memory of a teenagerwho died in a motorbike accident.Tom Forman, 18, from Bluebell Close,Watton, died on July 8 last year whilehe was travelling towards Derehamon the A1075 at Ovington, nearWatton.Tom, pictured right, spent a short timeat Norwich City College before startingwork at his father’s business, PJCamping, in Daniels Road, Norwich.Tom’s younger sister Ellie is a memberof the Stardance Company, based inThetford RoadBusiness Park,Watton, which hasput together thecabaret evening.The family showwill take place atWaylandCommunity HighSchool, in Watton,this Saturday from 6.30pm.Emily Harper, 23, who lives offNewmarket Road, Norwich, runs theStardance Company.She said: “The show is aboutcelebrating Tom’s life.”Miss Harper added that the cabaretnight was Ellie’s idea and the showwould be performed in the week ofTom’s birthday.She said that proceeds from the eventwould go towards the Nelson’sJourney charity, which supportschildren and young people who haveexperienced a close bereavement.Tickets cost £10 for adults and £5for children and can be bought fromMike Harper Tax and AccountancyServices, in Watton High Street, or byringing Miss Harper on 07766406542.For information visit www.star-dance.co.ukThe picture shows AimeeLamberson, Lucy Heaven and AbbyHikes from the Stardance Company.PHOTO: IAN BURTCabaret show toremember teenagerBuilding work on the PalliativeCare East support centre andoutreach service at the JamesPaget University Hospital inGorleston is soon to begin thanksto the work of dedicatedfundraisers.Tenders for the building workclosed last week, a maincontractor will soon be appointed,and construction work on the £1.5million centre will get under wayduring March.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 andthe latest round of localfundraising has brought the totalto within just £100,000 of its £1.5million target.The new information andsupportive care centre at theJames Paget University Hospitalis expected to open by Christmas2012. It is estimated 10,000 peoplea year will use the centre.Peter Franzen, interimchairman of the James PagetUniversity Hospital, said: “We areindebted to all our donors and thenew service will play an importantrole in many people’s lives overthe years to come. We are lookingforward to working with all ourpartners to help provide a widerange of information and supportservices in a centre that will be fitfor the 21st century.”The service will offer patientsand carers a one-stop-shop servicefor information and supportiveservices.The centre will not have bedsbut will offer a “home from home”environment offering; access tospecialist palliative care supportand advice, counselling,bereavement services,complementary therapies, welfareadvice, and information about life-limiting illnesses.A campaign group in Hethersett isholding two fundraising eventsthis month.Hethersett Our Way, which hasbeen formed to oppose plans formore than 1,000 new homes in thevillage, has raised enough moneyfor a planning consultant’s report.However, the group is continuingto raise funds for representationat a future planning committeeand will be coordinating a door todoor collection on Saturday,February 18, followed by a quiz atthe village hall on Saturday,February 25 from 7.30pm.For more information, visit http://hethersett-ourway.org.ukParish council hitsout at homes planFears have been raised that avillage near Norwich will be“clobbered” with over-development under plans for 180new homes in Mulbarton.Parish councillors have raisedtheir concerns over the proposalsfor a greenfield site on the edge ofthe village, which they say willexacerbate traffic problems andoverstretch local health servicesand school places.A parish council meeting will beheld at Mulbarton Village Hallfrom 7pm on Monday to discussthe proposals for land at LongLane by Welbeck Strategic Land.And parish councillors say theyhave so far had 100pc support fromlocal residents to a petition thathas been formed in opposition tothe scheme. It comes as SouthNorfolk Council have extended thepublic consultation deadline onthe outline planning applicationuntil February 20.However, Peter Leigh, chairmanof Mulbarton Parish Council, saidthere was a feeling among somevillagers that the 180 homedevelopment was already a “donedeal” because of a need to fill aquota for thousands of new homesin the district as set by the GreaterNorwich DevelopmentPartnership’s Joint Core Strategy.“There are areas we haveidentified for small infilldevelopments and people ingeneral would be happy with that.“To plonk another developmentof this size is absolutelyridiculous. We have beenclobbered over the years andenough is enough. We have taken aresponsible attitude that we willtake some houses, but this istotally disproportionate,” he said.Objectors to the latest expansionplans for Mulbarton say that LongLane is too narrow toaccommodate 180 homes and thescheme is outside the developmentboundary.What do you think? Write toEvening News Letters, Prospect House,Rouen Road, Norwich, NR1 1RE, oremail eveningnewsletters@archant.co.ukAdam Grettonadam.gretton@archant.co.ukMore local properties than any other website24homes .co.ukyour local property portalTo find out whats on at local theatres,dont miss Going Out, free withthe Evening News every Friday.Work to beginsoon on newpalliative caresupport centreFundraisingfor campaignChallengingtimes aheadfor new MDGreat Yarmouth-based familybusiness Palmers is embarking ona new era. New managing directorDavid Howard, who officiallysucceeds Bruce Sturrock today,has spent all his working life withfamily-owned independent retailstores.And he is relishing thechallenge as it celebrates its 175thanniversary.Palmers, which employs 300people across five stores inYarmouth, Dereham, Lowestoftand Bury St Edmunds, has aturnover of about £15m a year. Itenjoyed a merry festive periodafter seeing a 50pc rise in itsmonthly sales figures afterlaunching a revamped website,being managed by Mr Sturrock’sdaughter Emma.“I like working for a family-owned business, rather than alarge high-street chain,” MrHoward said. “It’s much morerelaxed and more productive. Thestaff have more input and moreteam-working.”The 46-year-old joined Palmersin June to work on the handoverwith Mr Sturrock, who willremain chairman. He said plansincluded a refurbishment of thefirst-floor furniture, beds andlinen department at Yarmouthand a coffee shop facelift.At the helm: David Howard.
  • From January to June 2011 The Advertiser, Gt Yarmouth/Gorleston edition, 40,480. www.advertiser24.co.ukTheAdvertiserGREAT YARMOUTH EDITION Advertiser24.co.uk60p where soldThursday, February 2, 2012Bulk Bags - Sand,Stone & Top SoilCall free now on0800 0556 750(Price dependent on size, location &waste type -- for a quote please call)www.eegreen.co.uk• MINI • MIDI • MAXI •LARGE •SKIPS FROM ONLY£30.00£30.0010% DISCOUNTON ALL SKIPSFor cash buyers only. Terms & conditions applyWE WILL BEAT ANY QUOTEDrafty Windows/Hinges Misted Units Window Handles & GasketsConservatory Repairs, leaking Affordables PricesSAME DAY SERVICELocksmiths UPVC Doors Dropped and CatchingNew Keys & Cylinder Loose Handles No Call Out ChargeD UBLE GLAZINGDOCTORTEL01502537847FREEWhen you buy any filled potato featuredon the menu, you will receive another oneup to the same value absolutely free.Please present Voucher at theBeginning of OrderNot in conjunction with any other offer.Photocopies not acceptable.114A Regent Road, Great YarmouthTel: 01493 843008SSPPUUDDGGOOOODDNNEESSSSIINNSSIIDDEE OOUUTTBuy oneget oneBaked Potatoes are really healthy and virtually fat freeValid only at Spud-U-LikeGreat Yarmouthuntil 17/2/12MEAL MADNESS IS BACK!!!YANKEE TRAVELLERDining in the American Tradition since 197336 King Street, Great Yarmouth Tel 01493 857065Valid Mon-Thurs 12pm-2pm & 5pm-10pm, Friday 12pm-2pm, Saturday 12pm-4pm.Open all day half term week. Vouchers valid Mon-Thurs 12pm-10pm, Fri 12pm-4pm.Purchase any Burger Meal and receive a Free Burger Meal of equal or lesser value.Minimum 2 persons per voucher, Maximum 3 vouchers per booking.Not valid for takeaways or lunch menu. Not valid Feb.14th after 5pmGET MORE VOUCHERS AT www.yankeetraveller.co.uk37yearsTHETHEVALID UNTIL 18th FEBRUARY 20122 FOR 1 BURGER MEAL VOUCHER37years37years37yearsPERFECTENGINEERINGHARFREYS ROAD, GREAT YARMOUTH,NORFOLK, NR31 0JLCall Now On01493 657131WWW.LGPERFECT.CO.UKMOT Testing Station -All ClassesCars, Vans, H.G.V. & P.S.V.Call Now for an MOT and Serviceor £95.00 Inc VATOpen6Days AWeekDiamondJubileeOfferFreeRetest onCars and LightVans(If Reqiured)Work on long-awaited £1.5mcentre set to start next monthBy Samuel Russellsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukis estimated 10,000 people a year will use thecentre.Back in 1998, Roberta Lovick, of PotterHeigham, lost her 28-year-old daughter Louiseto breast cancer and was inspired to start raisingmoney for a supportive care centre for people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.In 2000 she launched the Louise HamiltonCancer Help Centre Trust, working with DrPatrick Blossfeldt at the James Paget, with thegoal of improving care and treatment ofpatients, their carers and families whose livesare affected by incurable diseases.Roberta saw the latest plans for the new centrelast week.“It was just so emotional seeing the designsand realising it’s going to happen. It’s beenneeded for so long and I’d like to thank peoplefrom the bottom of my heart for donating andhelping make it happen,” she said.The new centre is being designed by Norwich-based LSI Architects who have designed thecentral space as a dramatic curving shaperesembling a boat, a reminder of the scheme’sseaside context and of the notion of an ‘ark’ asa place of refuge.The resource centre and outreach service is apartnership between NHS Norfolk and Waveney,local county councils and the voluntary sectorincluding funds from the Palliative Care Eastappeal.The service will offer patients and carers aone-stop-shop service for information andsupportive services.The centre will not have beds but will offer a“home from home” environment offering accessto specialist palliative care support and advice,counselling, bereavement services,complementary therapies, welfare advice andinformation about life-limiting illnesses.IMPRESSION: How part of the newPalliative Care East Centre may look.Families who have lost loved ones to terminalillness say the soon-to-be-built Palliative CareEast Centre will make a huge difference to theregion.Tenders for building work on the supportcentre closed last week, a main contractor willsoon be appointed and construction work on the£1.5m centre will get under way next month.The Palliative Care East (PCE) appeal waslaunched in 2006 and the latest round of localfundraising has brought the total to within just£100,000 of its £1.5 million target.The new information and supportive carecentre at the James Paget University Hospital isexpected to open by Christmas this year, and it
  • 26 Friday, February 3, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukQuality manufacturers of all purpose made joinery, windows, doors,staircases etc.Also PVCu window & door fabricators. We manufactureour own double glazed units with a 10 year warranty.Suppliers to domesticand trade customers.Installed or supplyonly.For local news online: www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInBriefMayor’sEngagementsOn Monday, January 30, the Mayorand Mayoress attended a charityevent celebrating Chinese New Yearat Riverside Norwich with the LordMayor of Norwich.On Tuesday, the Mayor spent theevening at a member trainingsession at the borough counciloffices.Today, (February 3) the Mayor andMayoress will officially open HerringHouse Trust on St Nicholas Road inGreat Yarmouth.On Sunday, February 5, the Mayorand Mayoress will attend theRededication Service of ThurneChurch.The Mayor will read a bible reading.Tree plantingVILLAGERS will be uniting inHaddiscoe this Saturday when theyplant hedges and trees on a newparish allotment.Haddiscoe Parish Council hasreceived a free 420 tree pack from theWoodland Trust for the planting atthe allotment, which is bordered bySt Mary’s Churchyard, Beccles Roadand Loddon Road. Villagers areinvited to be part of the tree plantingevent from 9.30am to 4pm.Eyesore hotelTHE owner of a derelict hotel in theheart of the Broads has been givenan ultimatum to put in a planningapplication by the end of the month.Jon Herbert, who has been accusedof making river-front Station Roadin Hoveton look like an inner-cityslum, has been given the deadline byNorth Norfolk District Council,which will issue an improvementnotice if no progress has been made.Broads grantsSUSTAINABLE development fundgrants have been given by the BroadsAuthority to projects across Norfolk.These include grants to the CountryTrust (£4,950) to bring inner citychildren to the country, a grant to theWindmill Project (£11,244) for schoolsprojects and a grant to RanworthVillage Hall (£15,000) for thatchingthe roof.www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor your local news andviews online log on to:www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukFor your local news andviews online log on to:...and cash continues to flow inPUPILS at Lynn Grove HighSchool held a raffle to raise£160 for the Palliative CareEast appeal.Jenny Watson, appeal co-ordinator, was presentedwith the cheque by Year 8students who had helpedraise the total. The ReppsRevellers have presentedthe Palliative Care Eastappeal with a cheque for£400. The cash was raisedat their Christmasproduction of Uncle Fester’sFestive Fiesta on December9 and 10 at Repps-with-Bastwick Village Hall.Theoriginal Repps Revellersbegan performing 50 yearswith the current groupcontinue to performpresenting The Pirates InMenzpantze in July.Christmas opening forpalliative care centreON IT’S WAY: An artistsimpression of the £1.5mpalliative care centre.FAMILIES who have lost lovedones to terminal illness saythe soon-to-be-built PalliativeCare East centre will make ahuge difference to the region.Tenders for building work on thesupport centre closed last week- a main contractor will soon beappointed, and construction work onthe £1.5m centre will get under waynext month.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 and thelatest round of local fundraisinghas brought the total to within just£100,000 of its £1.5 million target.The new information andsupportive care centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital is expectedto open by Christmas 2012, and it isestimated 10,000 people a year willuse the centre.Back in 1998 Roberta Lovick, ofPotter Heigham, lost her 28 year olddaughter Louise to breast cancer andwas inspired to start raising moneyfor a supportive care centre for peoplein Great Yarmouth and Waveney.In 2000 she launched the LouiseHamilton Cancer Help Centre Trust,working with Dr Patrick Blossfeldtat the James Paget, with the goalof improving care and treatment ofpatients, their carers and familieswhose lives are affected by incurablediseases.Roberta saw the latest plans for thenew centre last week and said: “It wasjust so emotional seeing the designsand realising it’s going to happen. It’sbeen needed for so long and I’d like tothank people from the bottom of myheart for donating and helping makeit happen.”Peter Franzen, interim chairman ofthe James Paget University Hospital,said:“Thelocalcommunityhasplayedsuch a big part in making the appeal asuccess. The fact that work will soonstart on the new information centreat the James Paget is a real testamentto the generosity of people acrossGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.“We are indebted to all our donorsand the new service will play animportant role in many people’slives over the years to come. We arelooking forward to working with allour partners to help provide a widerange of information and supportservices in a centre that will be fit forthe 21st century.”The new centre is being designed byNorwich-based LSI Architects whohave designed the central space as adramatic curving shape resemblinga boat - a reminder of the scheme’sseaside context and of the notion ofan ‘ark’ as a place of refuge.Flowing from the social space is aconcealed private garden. Extensiveglazing to the central area enables theinside and outside spaces to connectwith one other.The scheme also incorporates agreen roof with hot water heatingprovided by solar hot water panels.The resource centre and outreachservice is a partnership between NHSNorfolk and Waveney, local countycouncils and the voluntary sector;including funds from the PalliativeCare East appeal.The service will offer patientsand carers a one-stop-shop servicefor information and supportiveservices. The centre will not havebeds but will offer a “home fromhome” environment offering; accessto specialist palliative care supportand advice, counselling, bereavementservices, complementary therapies,welfare advice, and information aboutlife-limiting illnesses.
  • Friday, February 3, 2012 7The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukWork to start soon on£1.5m care centreFAMILIES who have lostloved ones to terminalillness say the soon-to-be-built Palliative CareEast centre will makea huge difference to thepeople of Yarmouth andWaveney.Tenders for building workon the support centre closedlast week – a main contractorwill soon be appointed andconstruction work on the£1.5m centre will start nextmonth.The Palliative Care East(PCE) appeal was launched in2006 and the latest round oflocal fund-raising has broughtthe total to within just £100,000of its £1.5 million target.The new information andsupportive care centre atthe James Paget UniversityHospital is expected to openby Christmas 2012, and anestimated 10,000 people a yearare likely to use the centre.Back in 1998 RobertaLovick, of Potter Heigham,lost her 28-year-old daughterLouise to breast cancer andwas inspired to start raisingmoney for a supportive carecentre for people in GreatYarmouth and Waveney.In 2000 she launched theLouise Hamilton CancerHelp Centre Trust, workingwith Dr Patrick Blossfeldtat the James Paget, with thegoal of improving care andtreatment of patients, theircarers and families whoselives are affected by incurablediseases.Roberta saw the latest plansfor the new centre last weekand said: “It was just soemotional seeing the designsand realising it’s going tohappen. It’s been needed forso long and I’d like to thankpeople from the bottom ofmy heart for donating andhelping make it happen.”Peter Franzen, interimchairman of the James PagetUniversityHospital,said:“Thelocal community has playedsuch a big part in makingthe appeal a success. The factthat work will soon start onthe new information centreat the James Paget is a realtestament to the generosity ofpeople across Great Yarmouthand Waveney.”The new centre is beingdesigned by Norwich-basedLSI Architects who havedesigned the central spaceas a dramatic curving shaperesemblingaboat–areminderof the scheme’s seasidecontext and of the notion ofan ‘ark’ as a place of refuge.Flowing from the socialspace is a concealed privategarden. Extensive glazing tothe central area enables theinside and outside spaces toconnect with one other.Theschemealsoincorporatesa green roof with hot waterheating provided by solar hotwater panels.The resource centreand outreach service is apartnership between NHSNorfolk and Waveney, localcounty councils and thevoluntary sector; includingfunds from the Palliative CareEast appeal.The service will offerpatients and carers a one-stop-shop service for informationand supportive services. Thecentre will not have bedsbut will offer a “home fromhome” environment offering;access to specialist palliativecare support and advice,counselling, bereavementservices, complementarytherapies, welfare advice,and information about life-limiting illnesses.Regal Rachel isMiss CharityA LOWESTOFT womanwas all smiles this weekafter scooping a top titlein a prestigious beautypageant.The Miss Universe Norfolk2012 final was held atDunston Hall Hotel lastSunday – and 20-year-oldRachel Davies, a formerBenjamin Britten Highschool pupil, beat 19other hopefuls to becrowned Miss Charity, forher work to raise fundsfor the StrongbonesChildren’s CharitableTrust through the HemrajGoyle Foundation.Sponsored by Lowestoft-based Customs Kitchens,Rachel said: “I’ve neverdone anything like thisbefore, but it has helpedme to gain confidenceand raise awareness ofthe charities.”She now joins the winnerof the public vote, andthe overall winner of MissUniverse Norfolk 2012, inprogressing to thenational Miss Universefinals in Birmingham inMay – and if successfulhere, victory could leadto a place in the MissUniverse finals inAmerica.A receptionist atWaterside Park in Corton,Rachel “loved” being partof the Lowestoft Playerscompany who recentlycompleted their annualpantomime.After holding numerousfund-raisers to reach thisstage, Rachel is nowaiming to raise funds forcharity ahead of the GBfinals.“If there’s anyonewilling to help me insome kind of way,please get in touch on01502 733266,” shesaid.A WINNER: Rachel Davies, who was named Miss Charity, with Lee-Gemma Crockford,representing the Strong Bones charity, and Avnish Goyal, from the Hemraj Goyle Foundation.InBriefShop’s stockset on fireSTOCK at the side of a shop inOulton Broad was set alight.Damage was caused in Bridge Roadabout 3.40am on Friday, January 20.“A delivery driver discovered the fireand extinguished it,” a policespokesman said. “Loaves of breadwere set alight and nine destroyed, Amale, described as white, wearing ablack jacket with hood, a lightcoloured scarf around his mouth andon a bike, was seen making off.”Information to PC 247 Wardrop atLowestoft police on 101.Tree namesA FEW names were inadvertentlymissed off the Tree Of Lifededications list which appeared inThe Journal last week.These names are: Maude and HoraceJenner, Gus and Joan De-block, KeithRichardson, Brian Peter Whall,Maureen Hood, Joan De-Block, GusDe-block, Pam Keylock, Eileen Page,Flora Page, Kenneth Cunningham,Mary Fairhead, Henry Beamish,Frances Beamish, Charles Beamish,Arthur Beamish, Frank Beamish,Ronald Beamish, Constance Scarll,Ernest Layton, Stephanie Cranswick,Alice Catchpole and Richard Hubble.Winners all!THE winners of the Corton PlayingField Lottery for January were: 1st –Mr and Mrs Davies (ticket 1460) £90;2nd – Mrs L Webb (ticket 1100) £54;3rd – Mr A Jennings (ticket 1010) £36.To take part in the lottery, contactthe organiser Mrs Shreeve on 01502730571.Appeal collection needs helpersVOLUNTEERS are needed tohelp an annual appeal.Collections are takingplace across Lowestoft inforthcoming weeks as partof Marie Curie Cancer Care’sGreat Daffodil Appeal.Volunteer collectors willbe calling on people to weara daffodil, in return for adonation, and support MarieCurie Nurses. The collectorsare required to support theteam of volunteers at Tescoin Leisure Way on Friday andSaturday, February 24/25; atASDA on Saturday, March10 and Lowestoft town onSaturday, March 10.If you can help call AngelaBussey on 01284 747385.
  • 6 Friday, February 10, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInBriefYarmouthhouse burgledPOLICE are appealing forinformation after burglars entered ahouse in Great Yarmouth while theowners were sleeping upstairs.It happened at a house in SalisburyRoad area of Great Yarmouthbetween 10.45pm on Monday,February 6 and 3am on Tuesday,February 7. The owners were awokenby noises around 3am and wentdown to find the back door of thehouse wide open. It’s thought thedoor may have accidentally been leftunlocked. Nothing appears to havebeen stolen.Officers would like to hear fromanyone with information. Call DCGillian Dawson at Great YarmouthCID on 101.Leap of faithAN Acle woman is to leap out of aplane to raise cash for a cancercharity.Janette Whittaker, 39, is going tocomplete a solo freefall sky dive onApril 28 to help the Big C Charity.She said: “I’ve never done anythinglike this before - but I had to dosomething outrageous as I turn 40this year.”She is funding all her training andthe dive so all monies raised will goto the charity.To sponsor Janette, visit www.justgiving.com/JANETTE-WHITTAKERSeminar ‘like’A FREE seminar in Hopton willprovide a topical overview of thepitfalls of social networking andemployment law for businesses inGreat Yarmouth and Lowestoft area.Leading regional law firm BirkettsLLP is hosting a free seminar onFebruary 28 at Potters LeisureResort at 8am.For more information or to registerfor the event contact Neil Kitson vianeil-kitson@birketts.co.uk or 01473406250 by February 21.www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor your local news andviews online log on to:InShortDays of funfor JubileeROLL out the bunting, theborough is getting ready tocelebrate the Queen’s DiamondJubilee.Festivity organisers are askingresidents to bring all the familyalong to St George’s Park onSaturday, June 2 and Sunday 3for a classic British fete and foodfestival.There will be sheep shearingdemos, welly wanging, eggand spoon races, classic rides,delicious food, space to picnic andplenty of fun for all the family.On the evening of Monday,June 4 head down to AnchorPlaza and Gardens for musicalentertainment, the Beaconlighting ceremony and a fantasticfireworks display courtesyof Greater Yarmouth TouristAuthority.The borough council has agreedto provide a fund of £5,000 whichwill be allocated for grant andproposes in respect of the Queen’sDiamond Jubilee Celebrations2012.Robin Hodds, the council’smember services manager, said:“The borough council recognisesthe great importance of theQueen’s Diamond Jubilee, andthe council hopes that a numberof events will be held across theborough over the Jubilee weekendin June.”The fund is open to any parishcouncil, organisation orindividual in the borough. Toapply for grant aid, write to MrHodds at the town hall eitherby letter or email at rh@great-yarmouth.gov.ukNorwich starhelps pupilsFORMER Norwich City starDarren Huckerby dropped by tosupport pupils as they bid to savethe world from a fuel apocalypseat the University of East Anglia.The Year 9 pupils GreatYarmouth High School, NorwichOpen Academy and Denes Highin Lowestoft were charged withfinding new energy sources topower a city deprived of fossilfuels – researching, buildingand testing their designs on aworking model in a single day onWednesday, February 8.They were given a surprise visitat lunchtime by the Canarieslegend, who spoke to theyoungsters about their designsand took part in a ball-jugglingactivity aimed at improvingteam-building skills.He said: “It’s the first time I’vedone something like this, but it’sfantastic to see the kids beingso enthusiastic in what they aredoing.“Events like these are aboutencouraging the kids and I hopethat I can give them a bit ofmotivation.”The event, entitled GenerationGenerators:24HourPowerPeople,aimed to show young people thereal-life application of STEMsubjects – science, technology,engineering and maths.An exclusive look atpalliative care plansEXCLUSIVE new architects imagesof the £1.5m Palliative Care EastCentre can be revealed by theMercury today.Families have spent more than half a decaderaising cash to build the day care centre, andit is set to open its doors by Christmas thisyear.And new images from Norwich-based LSIArchitects can give fundraisers a furthersamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLPEEK AT THEFUTURE:above, thelounge areainside the carecentre; and left,the sun-trapgarden, ahaven of peaceof calm.glimpse of the centre they havehelped to make a reality.Digital pictures show thelush green plant life that willsurround the centre, and invitingopen spaces within whichallow sunlight to pour into thebuilding.The central space will bea dramatic curving shaperesembling a boat, a reminder ofthe scheme’s seaside context andof the notion of an ark as a placeof refuge.Tenders for building work on thesupport centre have now closed,and a main contractor will soonbe appointed.Construction work is to getunder way next month.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006and the latest round of localfundraising has brought the totalto within just £100,000 of its £1.5million target.The new information andsupportive care centre at theJames Paget University Hospitalis expected to open by December,and it is estimated 10,000 people ayear will use the centre.The resource centre andoutreach service is a partnershipbetween NHS Norfolk andWaveney, local county councilsandthevoluntarysectorincludingfunds from the Palliative CareEast appeal.The service will offer patientsand carers a one-stop-shopservice for information andsupportive services. It will nothave beds but will offer a “homefrom home” environment offeringaccess to specialist palliative caresupport and advice, counselling,b e r e av e m e n t s e r v i c e s ,complementary therapies,welfare advice and informationabout life-limiting illnesses.For details about the project,call Jenny Watson on 01493 453348www.palliative-care-east.org.uk
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, February 24, 2012 13InBriefDid you knowabout StephenTHE Coroner’s Office is appealingfor anyone who may have knownStephen Betteridge, who was fromthe Great Yarmouth area, to comeforward.Mr Betteridge, 67, was found dead athis home address on February 7.There were no suspiciouscircumstances and a post mortemexamination has found the cause ofdeath as being natural causes.The Coroner’s Office would like tohear from anyone related to MrBetteridge or has knowledge ofhim.Call 01603 276493.Cable theftA QUANTITY of cable and twowheelie bins were stolen from theback garden of a home in St JohnsRoad in Belton between 9.15am and10.30am last Friday. Police say itappears the offenders took around£300 worth of scrap cable from theside of a shed, put it in the wheeliebins and then wheeled them aroundto the front of the property andthrough a hedge.Call PC David Punter on 101.www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor your local news andviews online log on to:lucy.wright@archant.co.ukby LUCY WRIGHTHelp name the newpalliative care centreLOCAL people are beingcalled on to suggest names forthe new Palliative Care Eastcentre building.The centre will have informationand supportive care services providedby a wide range of organisationsworking in partnership: from theNHS, to cancer charities, patientsupport groups, and bereavementgroups.Organisers are looking for a namethat will sum up what the centre isabout and will be easy to remember.Suggestions to date include TheArk, The Haven, The Butterfly Centre,and The Sanctuary.But what name do you think thecentre should have?A panel of nurses, doctors, patientrepresentatives, and the editor of theMercury, will select the winner froma shortlist.Public donations have raised almost£1.5m for the Palliative Care Eastcentre.Building works starts on a site atthe James Paget University Hospitalnext month and is expected to openby Christmas.It is estimated 10,000 people a yearwill use it.The Palliative Care East appeal waslaunched in 2006 and the centre willprovideGreatYarmouthandWaveneywith a stunning information andsupportive care centre that will helppeople with life-limiting illnessessuch as cancers, chest, neurological,and heart failure diseases.The closing date for suggestionsis Friday, March 23. To make asuggestion online, visit http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/V5CVNHL
  • 24 Friday, March 9, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukVALID planning applicationsreceived by Yarmouth BoroughCouncil for 28 days prior toMarch 2.Belton and Browston — Rearextension for kitchen spaceand study area at 4 The Cove,Belton, for Mr J Bowman.Bradwell N — Proposed frontand rear extensions at 43Blackbird Close, for Mr RBean.Proposed six residentialdwelling with garages at landto rear of 156 Burgh Road,new double garage at 156Burgh Road at 156 Burgh Road(land to rear of), Gorleston, forMr B Keenan.Bradwell S — Demolition ofgarage, side extension androof conversion at 32Hawthorn Crescent, for Mr NHargreaves.Caister-on-Sea — Proposedrear extension with first flooracc in loft space. Add, replace,detached garage/workshopand temp location of steelcontainer at 8 BelsteadAvenue, for Mr and MrsAdcock.Proposed extensions andalterations creating anadditional 8 bedrooms andancillary accommodation atClaremont Nursing Home,Yarmouth Road, for HealthcareHomes Limited.Continued use of land forgrazing and one stable block atThe Paddocks, Back Lane, forMr K Lawson.Continued use of land forgrazing and one stable block atThe Paddocks, Back Lane, forMs L Ireland.Extension to rear elevation at5 Scott Cottages, Beach Road,for Mr S Jones.Filby — Board mounted signoutside Bowling Green, MainRoad, for Mr S G Hewitt.Fleggburgh — Change of usefrom agriculture to private openspace at 6 Westfield Close, forMr L M Todd.Great Yarmouth and Gorleston— Proposed flat roof garagewith stairs and balustrading togarden roof at 5 High Street,Gorleston, for Mrs S Adaway.Retrospective application for asmoking shelter at Ferry BoatInn, 5 Ferry Hill, for Mr LBracey.Proposed change of use fromretail shop unit to residentialunit at Fredrick Road (formerFredrick Road Garage),Gorleston, for Oakville HomesLimited.Demolition of former publichouse and erect eight two-bedterraced houses, one three-bedhouse, six two-bed apartmentsand three one-bed apartmentsat The White Horse, 39 BurntLane, for Mr J Scott.Block of five beach hut chaletsat Lower Esplanade, LowerMarine Parade, for Mr CJohnson.Demolition of conservatory,extension to rear elevation toform family room at 322Beccles Road, for Mr J Corby.Removal of partition on firstfloor, refit door frame, doorand ironmongery in newposition at 245 SouthtownRoad, Victory House, for Mr PBonham.Change of use fromeducational building (D1) togeneral industrial (B2), atBoundary Road, The Ex RowanDrilling Prop, Southtown,Gorleston, for Mr C Jones.Proposed four storey sideextension to residential carehome at 29-32 St GeorgesRoad, Florence House, for MrP Christophi.Cut out existing internal walls600 X 100 X 215mm and castin-situ pad stones, fit steel Ibeam to support floor atMaritime House, MaritimeParade, for Mrs J Beck.Convert one room from retailshop to residential toincorporate into existing houseat 134A Northgate Street, forMr S Dionysiou.New sign board to identifycompanies which are based inthe building, to match theexisting sign of the catalyst atNovus Centre, The Conge, forEnterprise GY.Demolition of all existingbuildings and construction of98 dwellings, three officeblocks, associated works andopen space at Halls site,Riverside Road, for Mr and MrsTW and VJ Hall.Demolition of existing retailunits and construction of anew open A1 retail unit andassociated external works at176-177 High Street,Gorleston, for Binden EstatesLimited.Change of use from offices(B1) to a fitness studioaerobic/dance (D2) at 1stfloor, Anglia House, RiversideRoad, for Miss H Powsey.Alteration of main roof pitch to32 degrees from 271/2 setbuilding back 1500 fromoriginal position at 56 NorthDrive, for Mr M Cutajar.Martham — New bus sheltersat Hemsby Road, for MarthamParish Council.Mautby — Double garage,carport, outbuilding andgymnasium/studio at Keeper’sCottage, Lacons Corner, for MrR Flatman.Ormesby St Margaret —Construction of double garagewith cloakroom at Beechcroft,74 Station Road, for Mr DTroy.Continued use of outbuildingas a granny annexe at 14Station Road, Rossvilla, forMrs S Garwood.Ormesby St Michael — Internaland external alterations toManor at Manor Farm, StMichael’s Close, for Mr I andMrs E Peters.Construct a detached garage,construct a wall to incorporateentrance gates withtarmacaden being laid atentrance at Casa Nuestra MainRoad, for Mr S Leggett.Repps — Rebuilding of existingouthouse as residentialextension and infillconservatory at Reed Cottage,Ashby Road, for Mr and MrsWallace.West Caister — Alterations toexisting staircase up to roofspace and alterations toextend existing dormer windowfor Health and Safety reasonsat The Cannons, Front Road,for Dr and Mrs R and SJesudason.Repair and/or replacement ofsix windows at The Cannons,Front Road, for Dr and Mrs Rand S Jesudason.Planning applicationsCheque out thesesuper fundraiserssamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLHANDOVER: Lions president Denise Freeman presents a cheque to JohnHemming, chairman of the Palliative Care East Appeal.KIND-HEARTED fundraisers havebrought the Palliative Care Eastappeal another step closer to its£1.5m goal.Great Yarmouth Lions Club presentedJohn Hemming, chairman of thePalliative Care East Appeal, with a £3,200cheque at the Lion Club meeting held atthe Imperial Hotel.Lion president Denise Freeman saidthat hopefully there will be some morefundraising before her year as presidentfinishes in May.Meanwhile Bungay Inner Wheel Clubraised £450 at a Ploughman’s Lunch onDecember 1, boosting the fund to builda new care centre by the James PagetUniversity Hospital.And club members Jennie Cundy andPat Tyacke have since presented thecheque to palliative care locum consultantDr Bernadette Auger.The centre is due to be open by Decemberthis year, but the £1.5m target has notquite been reached.With a further £100,000 still needed, acharity coastal walk from Winterton toSouthwold has been arranged.The fundraiser on Saturday, May 5 willcover the coastal perimeter of the JPUH.It is being divided into three routes, butthe super fit can complete the whole 32miles.The three sections of the walkare Winterton to Great Yarmouth,Yarmouth to Lowestoft, and Lowestoft toSouthwold.People are asked to take part in eithera 10 mile stretch or for the very fit, thewhole 32 miles.Appeal organisers have thanked thegenerosity of the public for helping raise£1.4m so far.For more information, call PalliativeCare East on 01493 453348.INNERWHEEL:Bungay InnerWheelmemberspresent acheque topalliative carelocumconsultant DrBernadetteAuger.Public to suggest name for new centreLOCAL people are being called on tosuggest names for the new PalliativeCare East centre building.The centre will have information andsupportive care services provided by awide range of organisations working inpartnership: from the NHS, to cancercharities, patient support groups, andbereavement groups.Organisers are looking for a name thatwill sum up what the centre is about andwill be easy to remember.Suggestions to date include TheArk, The Haven, The Butterfly Centre,and The Sanctuary.But what name do you think the centreshould have?A panel of nurses, doctors, patientrepresentatives, and the editor of theMercury, will select the winner from ashortlist.Public donations have raised almost£1.5m for the Palliative Care East centre.Building works starts on a site atthe James Paget University Hospitalnext month and is expected to open byChristmas.It is estimated 10,000 people a year willuse it.The Palliative Care East appeal waslaunched in 2006 and the centre willprovide Great Yarmouth and Waveneywith a stunning information andsupportive care centre that will helppeople with life-limiting illnesses suchas cancers, chest, neurological, andheart failure diseases.The closing date for suggestions isFriday, March 23. To make a suggestiononline, visit http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/V5CVNHL
  • From July to December 2011 The Advertiser, Gt Yarmouth/Gorleston edition, 39,893. www.advertiser24.co.ukTheAdvertiserGREAT YARMOUTH EDITION Advertiser24.co.uk60p where soldWE WILL BEAT ANY QUOTEDrafty Windows/Hinges Misted Units Window Handles & GasketsConservatory Repairs, leaking Affordables PricesSAME DAY SERVICELocksmiths UPVC Doors Dropped and CatchingNew Keys & Cylinder Loose Handles No Call Out ChargeD UBLE GLAZINGDOCTORTEL01502537847Bulk Bags - Sand,Stone & Top SoilCall free now on0800 0556 750www.eegreen.co.uk• MINI • MIDI • MAXI •LARGE •SKIPS FROM ONLY£30.00£30.0010% DISCOUNTON ALL SKIPSFor cash buyers only. Terms & conditions apply(Price dependent on size, location &waste type -- for a quote please call)follow us onThursday, March 15, 2012Work starts on new centreBuilders are now on site to constructthe new £1.5m Palliative Care East inthe grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital.The contractor, Suffolk-based ISG,began preliminary work on site thisweek with the building due to becompleted in December 2012.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 with theaim of establishing an informationcentre that will help people withincurable illnesses such as cancer,respiratory, neurological, and cardiacdiseases.And that vision is moving closer toreality.Interim chairman of the JamesPaget University Hospital, PeterFranzen, said: “We’re delighted thatISG is starting work and this marksan exciting time for the appeal.“Local people have been so verygenerous and it’s great to see thatgenerosity and hard work payingdividends now.“This centre will make such adifference, not only to patients withincurable diseases but also to theirfriends and families.“Having access to information,help and support from the local NHSandlocalcharitieswillhelpthousandsof local people”.The new centre will host a range ofinformation and supportive careservices provided by a wide range oforg anisations working inpartnership.These include the NHS, localcancer charities, patient supportgroups, and bereavement groups.The centre will not providepalliative care beds, and will be aboutliving life.The Palliative Care East centre willprovide people with access to adviceand support and will also signpostthem to appropriate communityservices.By Samuel Russellsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukHOW IT MAY LOOK: An artist’s impression of how the new £1.5m Palliative Care East centre may look. Thecontractors are now on site and the building is due to be completed by December of this year.Friday 16th March 2012 and Saturday 14th April 2012HANDBAGS ANDGLADRAGS8PM TO MIDNIGHTMusic from the 70’s & 80’s. Featuring DJ Chris Speed.FREE ENTRY.Why not stay the night for just £75 per coupleCliffCliffT H EH O T E LGorleston NR DH | | reception@thecliffhotel.co.uk | www.thecliffhotel.co.ukAt
  • Eastern Daily Press, Friday, March 16, 2012 www.EDP24.co.uk/news NEWS 45LOWESTOFTRoadworksmeeting to beheld in townBUNGAYConcerns over traffic levelswith new one-way systemCampaigners against a proposed one-way scheme in Bungay say trafficproblems will be made worse whenthe system is introduced.Craig Trickett, who owns butchersBairds Of Bungay, said there wereproblems this week when a lorry wasunable to pass a delivery truck andsaid this will become a more commonsight in the future.He said the queue of traffic thatformed in both directions in UpperOlland Street was 45 minutes longand felt that the situation wouldhappen three to four times a daywhen the new system wasintroduced.However, town mayor Terry Reeveresponded to further criticisms ofthe much debated scheme by sayingthat it was aimed at alleviating someof the problems currently faced onthe town’s roads, rather than makingthem worse.The proposed system will see trafficsent north along St Mary’s Street andLower Olland Street and south alongTrinity Street and Wharton Street.Last month, Suffolk County Councilbacked the scheme, which is part ofwider proposals to improve the townthat include creating new paths inLower Olland Street and wider onesin St Mary’s Street.It is likely to be introduced in Julyfor a trial period of at least six monthsafter an independent study iscompleted into the suitability ofTrinity Street to be used in the one-way system.Shop owners and businesses inLowestoft have been invited to meetwith bosses from Anglian Water todiscuss the controversial StationSquare roadworks.Waveney MP Peter Aldous has setup a meeting with the water companyat his constituency office in SurreyStreet on Friday, April 27.The meeting has been called afterthe town faced six weeks of trafficdisruption as Anglian Water blockedoff part of Station Square to carryout £130,000 of repairs to a brokensewer.In an email to businesses andbusiness representatives, Mr Aldous’soffice says: “You are welcome to comealong to talk to them (Anglian Water)about the recent traffic problemsexperienced.”Mr Aldous said: “I think we wouldlike to understand what went wrongand see if lessons can be learned fromit.”The roadworks which started onJanuary 23 were originally scheduledto last five weeks; they finally finishedon Friday, March 2. They finished latedue to a delay in installing a newsewer lining.Shop owners say the works caused aslump in trade as people were put offfrom coming into the town.There was also anger as AnglianWater did not inform WaveneyDistrict Council it would be carryingout the work.GORLESTONWork set to start on newcentre for a better lifeBy SAM RUSSELLBuilders are now on site to constructthe new £1.5m Palliative Care Eastin the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital.Contractor Suffolk-based ISG beganpreliminary work on site this weekwith the building due to be completedin December 2012.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 with theaim of establishing an informationcentre that will help people withincurable illnesses such as cancer,respiratory, neurological, and cardiacdiseases.And that vision is moving closer toreality.Peter Franzen, interim chairman ofthe James Paget University Hospital,said: “We’re delighted that ISG arestarting work and this marks anexciting time for the appeal.“Local people have been so verygenerous and it’s great to see thatgenerosity and hard work payingdividends now.“This centre will make such adifference, not only to patients withincurable diseases but also to theirfriends and families.“Having access to information, helpand support from the local NHS andlocal charities will help thousands oflocal people”.The new centre will host a range ofinformation and supportive careservices provided by a wide range oforg anisations working inpartnership.These include the NHS, local cancercharities, patient support groups, andbereavement groups.Bernard Clarke, managing directorof contractors ISG South East, added:“The start of this project is anextremely important moment foreveryone involved in this impressivefundraising effort. As a purpose-builtresource to focus patient support andadvice, the new centre willundoubtedly become an invaluableregional healthcare asset.”Thecentrewillnotprovidepalliativecare beds, but will be about livinglife.Many people need help to live as fulla life as possible when they have anincurable condition.The Palliative Care East centre willprovide them with access to adviceand support and will also signpostthem to appropriate communityservices.The new centre is being built on agreenfield site at the northern end ofthe JPH site.The architects are Norwich-basedLSI Architects.It is estimated 10,000 people a yearwill use the centre.samuel.russell@archant.co.ukPicture: NICK BUTCHERWORK BEGINS: Staff from the James Paget University Hospital celebrate the news that work will soon bestarting on the Palliative Care East Centre.PRIZESONLINETickets tosee BuddyHolly:A LegendRebornin King’sLynnwww.EDP24..co.uk/enterJSD Air & Acoustic (Sound) TestingThermal Imaging (Detection) BuildingsStop wasting heat and money!It takes one phone call and we do the restand you save £s...Tel: 01366 387354 enquiries@jsdaat.co.ukwww.jsdaat.co.ukNo huge outlay oryears to recover that outlay.Air Leakage Testing (heat loss) has been compulsoryon new housing since 2006.Research and Tests carried out on property withsimilar test results, confirm heat saving of between31 to 35% reduction in heat loss.Air Leakage Testing will define areas where heat isescaping through small areas but added togetherthese small leaks can be equivalent to the size of anopen window day and night, while your heatingsystem tries to compensate.Thermal Imaging will define areas of loss throughthe fabric of your property. Are your walls and loftinsulated adequately or is it poorly installed? Is yourdouble glazing doing what it should do, is thatpoorly installed?Air Leakage and Thermal Imaging Test packages with verbalreport start from £150 + VAT through to full written reportswith rectification advice and costs or full energy auditing.All tests can be carried out with no interruption to the occupier; you can be in theproperty while tests are completed. Do not be put off by thinking that rectifying theseproblems will cost thousands of pounds. In many cases, to bring older style properties inline with current legislation would take around 2 hours and minimal materials. All theabove would go undetected in a normal building survey. Discounts apply for group orders.Attention Plumbing andHeating Engineers!Save time finding under floorleaks. Thermal Imaging is a quickand effective way to find thoseproblems. We can take a thermalphotograph and quickly identifyleaks/escaping hot or cold water.1970’s house with anair test failure at 14.7Unit 1b, Sovereign Way, Trafalgar Industrial Estate, Downham Market, PE38 9SW
  • 4 Friday, March 16, 2012 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukSpate of oiltank raidsPEOPLE with oil-fired centralheating are being warned to securetheir storage tanks after a spate ofthefts in recent weeks. Oil worth anestimated £300 was stolen from atank outside Crossways Cottages inCorton between Thursday, February2 and Tuesday, March 6, and about500 litres of oil was stolen from atank in a back garden at Sands Lane,Oulton, between 8pm on Thursday,February 23 and 8am on Friday,February 24. Oil worth more than£800 was also stolen from anunsecured tank in a back garden atHigh Street, Kessingland, some timebetween Thursday, October 20 andSaturday, February 18.Anyone with information on any ofthe incidents, should contactLowestoft police on 101.Post office joyPEOPLE in Wangford are beinginvited to mark the launch of theirnew post office outreach service nextweek. After nearly a wait of nearlythree years, a determined campaignby Wangford and Henham ParishCouncil has ended in success. Thenewe outreach service will beoperated at the community centre inMillfields by the postmaster fromSaxmundham post office and willrun twice-weekly on Tuesdays from10am-noon and Thursdays from 1pm-3pm. People are being invited to thelaunch of the service at 1pm nextThursday, March 22.Rape chargeA LOWESTOFT man has beencharged with two counts of rape.Marcus Johnstone, 41, of DenmarkRoad, was arrested after an incidentat an address in central Lowestoft onMarch 5/6. After appearing beforeLowestoft magistrates, he wasremanded to appear at IpswichCrown Court yesterday.Strolling outWAVENEY Ramblers’ walk onSunday is 9.5 miles in the Dunwicharea, starting at 10.30am. For detailsring 01502 723886. On Wednesdaythere are two walks: the first is 11miles in the Trowse/Rockland StMary area, starting at 10am. Fordetails ring 01502 475188. The secondis five miles in the Barsham area,starting at 10.30am. For details ring01502 710792.InBrief£4m hospice will offertranquil, caring retreatsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLPLANS for a new £4m hospiceto provide better end-of-lifecare for people in Waveneyand Great Yarmouth havebeen officially lodged – withhopes high that approval willbe granted by May.The proposed 10-bedroom EastCoast Hospice (ECH) will stand infive acres of landscaped grounds atGorleston, offering a tranquil retreatfor people with cancer and other life-limiting illnesses.At present, Great Yarmouth andWaveney is one of just two areas inthe country without hospice beds.But when the cash is raised tobuild the new hospice, it will offer 10bedrooms, each with a private gardenand fold-out beds where peoplecan stay with loved ones and shareprecious final time together.Day care and respite support forcarers is also planned in the state-of-the-art building, which award-winning architect Henry Kelf hopeswill be “more like a hotel or countryhouse than a medical institution”.David Nettleship, chairman of theECH trustees, said the independentcharitable hospice – to be built onland off the A12 next to Beacon Park– was a response to the desperateneed to widen the choice in end-of-life care in the area. “There are toomany gaps,” he said. “The choicepeople have now is to die at home orin hospital.“Many people would choose todie at home and would never needa hospice but, for some, a hospicewould be their choice and it will bethere if people need it – if it gets toomuch to bear at home.”A specialist eight to 10-bed unit wasa recommendation for Waveney andYarmouthinMarieCurie’sDeliveringChoice report. And the challenge thecommunities now face is raising the£4m to build the hospice and to finda way of meeting its £1.8m-a- yearrunning costs.“It is difficult to get across to peoplehow different a hospice is to otherhealth care establishments,” said MrNettleship. “This hospice is basedon need. The urban areas of GreatYarmouth and Waveney are areas ofdeprivation which means the needfor a hospice is greater.”Hospice facilities will include a daycare area, quiet rooms, a hairdressingroom, lounges, a garden room, adomestic kitchen to show peopletechniquestomakelifeathomeeasier,a sanctuary for quiet contemplationand assisted spa baths.As well as conventionalmedicine and care, the hospice wouldprovide a full range of alternativetherapies.The red brick hospice with cedarcladding, topped with a curved darkgrey zinc roof, would also providerespite care and a 24-hour helpline.Full plans have been submitted toGreat Yarmouth Borough Counciland trustees hope to have planningpermission by May. They also hopethe detailed plans will encouragepeople to fund-raise and donate tothe hospice.To raise the money, the trusteesare investigating different fundingstreams, as well as local fund-raisingandtherevenuefromthecharity’sfiveshops in Lowestoft, Great Yarmouth,Gorleston, and Bungay.To help the East Coast Hospice,call Corinne at the charity’s officeon 01493 718707 or email office@eastcosthospice.co.ukPeople are being invited to a nightof music at the Seagull Theatre inPakefield which will raise funds forEast Coast Hospice. The concert,organised by Tessa Clarke on Sunday,March 25, will include music fromWest End shows and recent charthits. It starts at 7.30pm and ticketsare available from the box office on01502 589726.Work under way on palliative care baseCONSTRUCTION of the new £1.5mPalliative Care East centre isgetting under way.Suffolk-based contractor ISG beganpreliminary work in the grounds ofthe James Paget UniversityHospital this week and theconstruction project is due tofinish in December.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 withthe aim of establishing aninformation centre that will helppeople with incurable illnessessuch as cancer, respiratory,neurological and cardiacdiseases.And that vision is moving closer toreality.Interim chairman of the JamesPaget trust, Peter Franzen, said:“This marks an exciting time forthe appeal. Local people havebeen so very generous and it’sgreat to see that generosity andhard work paying dividends now.“This centre will make such adifference, not only to patientswith incurable diseases but also totheir friends and families. Havingaccess to information, help andsupport from the local NHS andlocal charities will help thousandsof local people”.The new centre will host a rangeof information and supportive careservices, provided by a variety oforganisations working inpartnership. These include theNHS, cancer charities, patientsupport groups, and bereavementgroups.Bernard Clarke, managing directorof ISG South East, said: “The startof this project is an extremelyimportant moment for everyoneinvolved in this impressive fund-raising effort. As a purpose-builtresource to focus patient supportand advice, the new centre willundoubtedly become an invaluableregional healthcare asset.”The centre will not providepalliative care beds, but will focuson helping people live life throughtheir illness. It will seek to provideaccess to advice and support andto direct them to appropriatecommunity services.The new centre is a stand-alonebuilding on a greenfield site at thenorthern end of the James Pagetcampus.Designed by Norwich-based LSIArchitects, it is expected to openby Christmas 2012.It is estimated 10,000 people ayear will use the centre when it isfully up and running.An event promoting bodyconfidence is set to help thePalliative Care East appealtowards its £1.5m goal. KatyCornish is organising the Love theSkin You’re In event in GreatYarmouth on Saturday,March 31, which will offer womenactivities and fun including healthand beauty, exercise classes, nailand hair treatments andmassages. There will also be freegoody bags, demonstrations,drinks and snacks. The event is atthe Bwell Gym, on Gapton HallIndustrial Estate from 3pm to6pm.PLANS: An outline of the 10-bed hospice plan for terminally ill people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney. Inset, the East Coast Hospice logo.WORK TO START: Staff from the James Paget University hospital celebrate the news that work will soon be starting onthe Palliative Care East Centre.First aid coursePEOPLE are being invited toimprove their first aid skills whileraising funds for charity by joining afour-hour course in Lowestofttomorrow. The Health-Start basicfirst aid course is being run bySuffolk Deaf Association at its baseat 50-52, Blackheath Road, Lowestoft,from 10am to 2pm. Those taking partare asked to make a £2 donation. Formore information, ring 01502 512073or email lowsda@btconnect.comShop opensA SEASIDE-inspired clothing andgift company is opening a shop inSouthwold this weekend. The GoneCrabbing store at 64, High Street isemploying a full-time manager andtwo part-time staff. Its product rangeincludes leisure-wear, postcards,aprons, mugs and other gifts. Theshop is the second opened bycompany founder and designer SusieMason whose other outlet is atBurnham Deepdale in Norfolk.www.lowestoftjournal24.co.uk
  • Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4MARGARET ROSENORMINGTONMarch 22nd, 2006To me you were so special,And I miss you more each day,The saddest day of my life,Was the day you passed away.Your memory is a keepsake,With which I will never part,God has you in his keeping,But I have you in my heart,Always and ForeverWith All my LovePaul x xPHYLLISRICHARDSONMarch 17th, 2006A lovely Mum andGrandmother,Always in our hearts andthoughts, forever near.Daughter Jean andTommy, grandsonMark, Debbie, Tanyaand Jayne x xTHOMPSONKATHLEEN3 years on,Still thinking ofyou every dayLove Jack andFamilyDOYAXLEY(Sprason)March 17thI do not need a special day tobring you to my mind,The days I do not think of youare very hard to find,Each morning when I awake Iknow you are gone,And no one knows theheartache as I try to carry on.My heart still acheswith sadness,And secret tears still flow,For what it meant to lose you,No one will ever know.My thoughts are alwayswith you,Your place no one can fill,In life we loved you dearly,In death we love you still.Love, Dean, Tanya,Sarah, Callum, Dylanand Brodyx x x x xDOYAXLEYTwo years have passed Do,and I miss you more than ever.The pain of losing youwill never go away.I will always love you, DoPatx x xYAXLEYDOIn our hearts you willalways stayloved and rememberedevery dayLove youalwaysClaire, Seanand KidsDOYAXLEYMarch 17th, 2010A special Mum and Nanny.In our hearts youllalways stay,Loved and rememberedevery dayDebbie, Aaron, Kelseyand Bryanx x x xAdvert ID:TIBIRMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:BIRMEMCustomer ID:BIRMEMColour:4JAMESHURRENA Star You AreThinking of You AlwaysWith All the Love onYour 30th BirthdayGod Bless SonMiss YouMumsy, Daniel,Thomas, Nanny,Shirly, Grandad RonxxxJAMESHURRENI had someone special inmy life, who left mewith a broken heart.That someone specialwas you.Luv you to the stars and backMiss you so muchNan JoannexAdvert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4Advert ID:206804CB32 mm by30.4 mmBooking Code:206804CBCustomer ID:DR POOLEColour:1First Appearance:16/03/12Last Appearance:16/03/12Advert ID:207320GH32 mm by49.5 mmBooking Code:207320GHCustomer ID:EVELYN JOYCEColour:1First Appearance:16/03/12Last Appearance:16/03/12Advert ID:206808GH32 mm by30.4 mmBooking Code:206808GHCustomer ID:SOLOMON OLIVEColour:1First Appearance:16/03/12Last Appearance:16/03/12Advert ID:207212GF32 mm by38.9 mmBooking Code:207212GFCustomer ID:STANTON VERNONColour:1First Appearance:16/03/12Last Appearance:16/03/12Advert ID:207312GH32 mm by32.5 mmBooking Code:207312GHCustomer ID:TENNANT HAROLDColour:1First Appearance:16/03/12Last Appearance:16/03/12Advert ID:207418CB32 mm by34.6 mmBooking Code:207418CBCustomer ID:WRIGHT BILLYColour:1First Appearance:16/03/12Last Appearance:16/03/1216 Friday, March 16, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukWork starting onnew care centreBUILDERS are now on siteto construct the new £1.5mPalliative Care East in thegrounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital.Suffolk-based ISG - the contractor- began preliminary work on sitethis week with the building due tobe completed in December 2012.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 with theaim of establishing an informationcentre that will help people withincurable illnesses such as cancer,respiratory, neurological, andcardiac diseases.And that vision is moving closer toreality.Interim chairman of the JamesPaget University Hospital, PeterFranzen, said: “We’re delightedthat ISG are starting work andthis marks an exciting time for theappeal.“Local people have been so verygenerous and it’s great to see thatgenerosity and hard work payingdividends now.“This centre will make such adifference, not only to patients withincurable diseases but also to theirfriends and families.“Having access to information,help and support from the localNHS and local charities will helpthousands of local people”.The new centre will host a rangeof information and supportivecare services provided by a widerange of organisations working inpartnership.These include the NHS, localcancer charities, patient supportgroups, and bereavement groups.Bernard Clarke, the managingdirector of contractors ISG SouthEast, added: “The start of thisproject is an extremely importantmoment for everyone involvedin this impressive fundraisingeffort.“As a purpose-built resource tofocus patient support and advice,the new centre will undoubtedlybecome an invaluable regionalhealthcare asset.”The centre will not providepalliative care beds, and will beabout living life.Many people need help to live asfull a life as possible when they havean incurable condition.The Palliative Care East centre willprovide them with access to adviceand support and will also signpostthem to appropriate communityservices.The new centre is a stand alonebuilding being built on a greenfieldsite at the northern end of theJames Paget University Hospitalsite.The architects are Norwich-basedLSI Architects.The new information andsupportive care centre at theJames Paget University Hospital isexpected to open by Christmas 2012.It is estimated 10,000 people a yearwill use the centre.samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLNurses again feel pride in their hospitalNURSES at the James PagetUniversity Hospital are feeling“pride” again in their work as theyhelp the site recover from a series ofcritical inspection governors havebeen told..The governors council have beengiven an update on how the hospitalwas addressing concerns raised bythe Care Quality Commission(CQC).The 30 governors heard lastFriday that the JPH’s medicinemanagement was an area of majorconcern for the CQC while itscare and welfare provision was ofmoderate concern and its use ofrecords and documentation was ofmodest concern.But the governors and seniorhospital bosses heard the CQC wasdue to report in the next month onimprovements it has seen in careand welfare provision and recordsand documentation thanks to a raftof measures introduced by the JPH.Measures, which are also tacklingthe medicine management, includeward risk assessments, a medicinemanagement group, a weekly trustwide review of documentation,new medicine charts and improvedtraining for staff who prescribemedicines and registered nurseswho administer it.The governors also heard threesenior nurses had been given thesole role of carrying out a wideranging audit involving the privacyand dignity of patients, their careand welfare, patient meals, medicinemanagement and staffing.As result of the work to overcomethe faults highlighted in the CQCinspections Julia Hunt, chiefmatron, said it had boosted moraleof nurses.She said: “The element of prideis returning. They are seeing theresults of the outcome of theirefforts.”The meeting also heard thatconcernsoverthequalityof patients’meals were being addressed withgovernor John Pope saying he wasvery impressed with the roles ofmeal time co-ordinators.Another measure being introducedwill see patients asked for theirviews on the JPH when they aredischarged.More than 80 patients took partwith more than 40pc of commentsbeing about positive experiences atthe JPH with the remainder focusingon negative experiences and areasof improvement. About 800 staffand governers also took part in theconsultation.A recent survey also showed theJPH receives 368 compliments aweek across the organisationalboard.DR POOLEBERNARDThe family would like tothank the many people whowrote to them and attendedhis funeral, especial the Rev’dBowles and all the friends whocontinued to give their helpand support. A total of £1234in donations has been sharedbetween the Norfolk WildLife Trust and The CamphillVillages Trust.EVELYNJOYCEGEEDonald and Family would liketo express their heartfeltthanks to all family, friendsand neighbours for the manyfloral tributes, cards anddonations to the G.P. Unit,Northgate Hospital. Specialthanks to all the staff for theexcellent care and attention,Pat Kane for a lovely service,brother Jack, brother-in-lawDavid, Bobby and Maureenfor all their help, Arthur Jary& Sons for excellent funeralarrangements, Michelle, SoloFlorist and the ConservativeClub for a warm welcome andrefreshments.SOLOMONOLIVEThe Family of the late Olivewould like to thank allrelatives and friends for theirkind messages of sympathy,floral tributes and donations.Special thanks to the Rev.Arthur Bowles, for acomforting service and staffat the Co-operative for thefuneral arrangements.STANTONVERNONThe Family would like tothank everyone for their kindmessages and their heartfeltcondolences and would like topass on their appreciation tothe following;To father Gordon from StMary’s Church, The Co-operative Funeral Services,Caister-on-Sea, TheClaremont staff and also tothe Green Gate Public Housebut most of all to those whocame to the funeral.Many thanks to all of you.TENNANTHAROLDMiriam and Family would liketo thank everybody whoattended the service forHarold and for all the cardsand donations for ProstateCancer. Special thanks to theMinister Rev. Chris Shreevefor the lovely service and toArthur Jary & Sons Ltd., forexcellent arrangements andfor all their help and kindness.WRIGHTJoan and family of the lateBILLY, wish to thank allrelatives, friends andneighbours for the kindmessages of sympathy anddonations received followingtheir sad loss. Special thanksto Rev’d John Stride for hiscomforting service and toMurrell Cork Funerals ofStalham for their funeralarrangements. Please acceptthis as the only, but mostsincere acknowledgment.PersonalAnnouncementsBirths, Marriages,Engagements, Deaths andIn MemoriamsCall in person to169 King Street, Gt. Yarmouthor fax (01493) 847977Personal announcementsthat can be placed bytelephone are Birthdays,Congratulations, Get Well,Good Luck, Anniversaries andSpecial Occasions.Call (01493) 847942E-mailfrontcounter@archant.co.uk
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, March 23, 2012 23InBriefJewellery takenin home raidBURGLARS stole a quantity ofjewellery after breaking into a housein Great Yarmouth.It happened sometime during theweekend of Saturday, March 10, andSunday, March 11, at a home inNorth Drive when burglars broke inthrough a window and searched theproperty. Anyone with informationshould call DC Mark Randall atGreat Yarmouth CID on 101 orCrimestoppers on 0800 555 111.www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukTurf-cutting ceremonyto mark centre’s startsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLT H E t u r f - c u t t i n gceremony whichheraldsthe start of constructionof the £1.5m PalliativeCare East centre, hasbeen announced.Suffolk-based ISG, thecontractor, began preliminarywork on site last week with thebuilding due to be completedin December 2012.And the turf cuttingceremony is to take place onWednesday, April 4, at aroundmidday.The Palliative Care East(PCE) appeal was launchedin 2006 with the aim ofestablishing an informationcentre that will help peoplewith incurable illnessessuch as cancer, respiratory,neurological, and cardiacdiseases.And Yarmouth’s MPBrandon Lewis has expressedhis excitement about theprogress being made.“The centre is a tribute tothe power of the people ofGreat Yarmouth,” he said.“By coming together ourcommunity has managed togenerate a huge amount ofmoney and support to createthis fantastic asset.“I am delighted that aftermany years the fund has beensuccessful and I am sure thatit will help support vulnerablepeople for years to come.”There is still work to bedone before the total £1.5mis raised, and fundraisersare continuing to put in thehours.Sophie Radcliffe, 21, raisedcash for the appeal at her21st birthday party instead ofreceiving gifts.Her mother Jill and otherfamily presented a chequefor £200 to the Palliative CareTeam.These monies were raisedat the celebrations of MrsRadcliffe’s daughter Sophie21st birthday party.And further events areplanned to help raise fundsfor the appeal.On Friday, March 30 therewill be a charity auctionsupporting local cancercharities.ItisbeingorganisedbyGreatYarmouth Soroptimists.On Saturday, March 31 awellbeing event called Lovethe Skin You’re In is to beheld at Bwell Gym in GreatYarmouth.It will run from 3pm to6pm.Guests are invited to thehealth and beauty day,which includes exerciseclasses, goody bags anddemonstrations.A sponsored coastal walkwill take place on Saturday,May 5.The women’s walk, underthe banner of Girls on theEdge, will see participantsput their best feet forward towalk the coastal perimeter ofthe James Paget Hospital.And Lowestoft CollegeCharity Dog Show is onSaturday, May 5.Hounds and their ownersare invited to Camps Heath inOulton Broad from 10am.There will be competitionsfor pedigree and funclasses.All dogs are welcome andyou can register on theday.BIRTHDAY CONTRIBUTION: Jill Radcliffe on the farleft with her father-in-law in the middle.LOOKING AHEAD: Staff from the James Paget Hospital.
  • 60pbbjournal24.co.ukAUCTION TODAYAntiques & Fine Art SaleAtPeddars Lane,Beccles01502 713490RESIDENTIALAGRICULTURALCOMMERCIALONSITEAUCTIONSPLANNING&DESIGNBUILDINGSURVEYINGAUCTIONROOMSHOLIDAYLETTINGSAbsolute£10 OAP TUESDAYS**On selected treatments -£10 set & style£10 nail & toe tidy£10 wash & blowdry1-5 Hungate, Beccles01502 714454Friday, March 30, 2012WIN!£2500 tospend inAldissSport Reliefday of fun8-page pull-outCentre pagesCARE BEDSON THE WAYrichard.wood@archant.co.ukBy RICHARD WOODTHE first palliative carehospice beds in Waveney willbe available from Sunday.The three beds will be at All HallowsHospital, Ditchingham, and will bemade available for patients living witha progressive illness such as heartfailure, kidney disease and cancer.The move follows an agreementbetween the hospital and the Ipswich-based St Elizabeth Hospice.It has been made possible after NHSNorfolk and Waveney and HealthEastCIC, the new clinical commissioninggroup for Great Yarmouth andWaveney, commissioned two of thehospital’s in-patient beds for two yearsas part of the Marie Curie DeliveringChoice programme.St Elizabeth Hospice, which mergedwith Waveney Hospice Care last year,is directly providing a third bed inconjunction with All Hallows Hospital,with the hospice investing £2.2m in theWaveney and Great Yarmouth area inthe next three years.This will allow the charity, whichalready provides day services atBeccles Hospital on a Thursday, toalso offer services at All Hallowson Mondays as well as servicesat Crossroads Care Waveney inLowestoft and at Cutlers Hill Surgeryin Halesworth. Further day servicesare planned for Great Yarmouth laterthis year.Palliative Care in the Waveney andGreat Yarmouth area is set to improvedramatically in the coming months.Last week work began on the new£1.5m Palliative Care East centrein the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital in Gorleston.The centre will provide a rangeof day care facilities, information,and supportive care provided by avariety of organisations working inpartnership with the NHS.It has been supported by an appealwhich saw many individuals andorganisations contribute since it waslaunched in 2006.The East Coast Hospice Appeal isworking to bring 10 hospice beds tothe area and hopes to have plans for a10-bed hospice in Gorleston approvedby May.See story on Page 5SUNSHINE FUN:Sisters Hannah, left, 5,and Zoe Payne, 4,enjoy the daffodils atthe Daffodil Craft andCountry Fayre, atLangley School, onSunday. See story andother pictures onPage 3.Picture: DENISE BRADLEY
  • Journal online: bbjournal24.co.uk Friday, March 30, 2012 5All Hallows hostscare bedsDITCHINGHAM will be hometo the first palliative carehospice beds in the Waveneyand Great Yarmouth areaafter a collaboration betweenAll Hallows Hospital and StElizabeth Hospice.There are to be three beds madeavailable for patients living with aprogressive illness, such as heartfailure, kidney disease and cancer,after the agreement between thehospital and charity.Waveney and Great Yarmouthwas one of the areas in the countrywithouthospicebeds,butonSundaythis will change as the beds aremade available for the first time.They have been made possibleafter NHS Norfolk and Waveneyand HealthEast CIC, the newclinical commissioning group forGreat Yarmouth and Waveney,commissioned two of the hospital’sinpatient beds for two years aspart of the Marie Curie DeliveringChoice programme.St Elizabeth Hospice, whichmerged with Waveney HospiceCare last year, is directly providinga third bed in conjunction with AllHallows Hospital, with the hospiceinvesting £2.2m in the Waveney andGreat Yarmouth area in the nextthree years.This will allow the charity, whichalready provides day services atBeccles Hospital on a Thursday, toalsoofferdayservicesatthehospitalon Mondays, as well as servicesat Crossroads Care Waveney, inLowestoft, on Tuesdays, and anoutpatient’s clinic at Cutlers Hillsurgery, Halesworth, on Fridays.Further day services are alsoplanned for Great Yarmouth inSeptember.St Elizabeth Hospice’s chiefexecutive Jane Petit said: “Weare delighted to announce theintroductionof StElizabethHospiceservices at these new locations.Our work is centred around anindividual’s needs and our aim is toprovide specialist support whereverit is required. There is a great needfor hospice services in this areaand patients and their familieswill be able to start benefitingimmediately.”Chief executive Clair Westwood-Deamer said: “We are delightedto be working with St Elizabeth’sHospice for the benefit of ourpatients, continuing to provideseamless healthcare services toBungay and surrounding areas.“Working with St Elizabeth’swill enable us to provide specialistpalliative care services inpartnership with this charity.”The beds will be provided in theGainsborough Suite, which wasrecently developed after moneyraised by the Friends of All HallowsHospital.John Randle, chairman ofAll Hallows Healthcare Trust,said: “The Trustees are verypleased to be able to extend therange of All Hallows services inconjunction with St Elizabeth’sand thus build upon our otherwork with the NHS towards acomprehensive role in palliativecare in the area.”The East Coast Hospice appealhas also been working to bringhospice beds to Waveney and GreatYarmouth. They hope to have theirplans to build a 10-bedroom hospicein Gorleston approved by May.St Elizabeth Hospice currentlyhas an 18-bed inpatient unit andday unit in Ipswich as well asoutpatients and Hospice at Homeservices.For more details about servicesprovided by St Elizabeth Hospice, torefer a patient or to find out aboutfundraising events or volunteeringopportunities in your area visitwww.stelizabethhospice.org.uk orcall 01493 690990.For more on All Hallows contactDonna Oakins on 01986 892728 orvisit www.all-hallows.org.ukHOSPICE BEDS: All HallowsHospital in Ditchingham.NEW LOOK: Future map of services from St Elizabeth Hospice.
  • 4 Friday, April 6, 2012 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukWork begins at new centreemily.dennis@archant.co.ukBy EMILY DENNISSINGER Charlotte Bullenwas joined by MPs and civicdignitaries this week as sheperformed the turf-cuttingceremony to mark the officialstart of building work at the£1.5m Palliative Care Eastcentre.Charlotte, 20, from Belton,near Great Yarmouth, performedthe honour as construction getsunder way at the new support andpalliative care information centreat the James Paget UniversityHospital.Last year, she appeared on theBBC’s Tonight’s the Night show,hosted by John Barrowman, andsang Maybe This Time from the hitmusical Cabaret with Suffolk stagestar Ruthie Henshall.Charlotte, who recorded and soldCDs to raise funds for the PalliativeCare East (PCE), said she wasdelighted to have been asked tohelp with Wednesday’s event wherethe guests included Waveney MPPeter Aldous, his Great Yarmouthcounterpart Brandon Lewis andthe Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk,Richard Jewson.She said: “I did record and sellCDs to help raise money for thePalliative Care East appeal so I’mreally pleased to have been asked tocome along and help mark the startof building work.“It’s going to be fantastic place forlocal people to access informationand support”.The PCE appeal was launched in2006 and the latest round of localfundraising has brought the totalto within just £150,000 of its £1.5mtarget. The new information andsupportive care centre, which willnot have beds, is expected to open byChristmas 2012 – providing servicesto an estimated 10,000 people a year.Peter Franzen, interim chairmanof the James Paget UniversityHospital, said: “We are indebted toall our donors’ generosity and thenew service will play an importantrole in many people’s lives over theyears to come.“Wearelookingforwardtoworkingwith all our partners to help providea wide range of information andsupport services in a centre thatwill be fit for the 21st century.”The new centre is being built bySuffolk-based ISG and is designed byNorwich-based LSI Architects whohave designed the central space as adramatic curving shape resemblinga boat – a reminder of the scheme’sseaside context and of the notion ofan ‘ark’ as a place of refuge.The resource centre and outreachservice is a partnership betweenthe James Paget, NHS Norfolk andWaveney, HealthEast, local countycouncils and the voluntary sector.Local people are being asked tosuggestnamesforthePalliativeCareEast building. Appeal organiserslooking for a name that will helpsum about what the centre is aboutand will be easy to remember.A panel of nurses, doctors, andpatient representatives will selectthe winner from a shortlist. Tomake a suggestion, visit www.surveymonkey.com/s/PCEDIGGING IN:Charlotte Bullenofficially cuts thefirst turf in theconstruction of thenew Palliative CareEast centrePair arrestedover burglaryTown memoriesLIFE in the Beach Village inLowestoft will come under thespotlight at the next meeting of thetown’s Archaeological and LocalHistory Society. The meeting takesplace at 7.30pm on Thursday at theSouth Lowestoft Methodist Churchin Carlton Road and the speaker willbe local man Colin Dixon, who willtalk about growing up in the BeachVillage as a child. All are welcome.TWO people have been arrested aftera burglary at the home of a womanin her 80s in Southwell Road,Lowestoft. A 42-year-old man and a23-year-old woman were detained inthe town on Wednesday afternoon byofficers investigating the break-inwhich happened between 7pm and7.30pm on Tuesday. A Suffolk policespokesman said a purse, items ofjewellery and mobile phones werestolen from the property. Thesuspects were both taken intocustody at Great Yarmouth PoliceInvestigation Centre. At the time ofgoing to press, both were beinginterviewed by detectives.InBriefFight goes on for Suffolk schools fundingOFFICIALS from Suffolk CountyCouncil and MPs have pledged to keepup the pressure on the governmentto secure more money for Suffolk’sschools.The council, which is 132nd outof 151 local authorities in termsof spending per pupil, is trying topersuade ministers to increase theamount it pays for each pupil.But Whitehall bosses have warnedit that there is unlikely to be a changein the formula for schools funding forthe next five years.Suffolk’s county councillorsvoted overwhelmingly to lobby thegovernment, but cabinet memberwith responsibility for children,Graham Newman, warned therewas unlikely to be a rapid change ofheart.He said: “We have been told it isexpected to be several years beforethe formula is looked at again, andthat is a concern.“When you look at the results we aregetting in Suffolk and the results youget in, say, Hackney, and then look atthe amount of money that is spentper pupil in Hackney, then there is avery interesting correlation.”Each Suffolk pupil has, on average,£4,676 spent on them every year.“If there was £200 extra per pupilthat would put Suffolk in the top 100authorities. If there was an extra£500 the county would be in the top50,” said Mr Newman.Extra money could be spent onincreasing the amount of one-to-oneeducation given to pupils – which isvital as more and more children withspecial needs are being admitted tomainstream schools.Suffolk’s MPs have been asked tohelp lobby the government to improvethe formula.Suffolk Coastal MP Dr ThereseCoffey said she had raised the issuewith schools minister Nick Gibbduring a meeting in Westminster– but there was no significant changein the government’s position.She said: “There is some extramoney available because of the pupilpremium for more deprived areas,but that is not the whole reason forthe disparity and it is not clear whatthe funding is based on.“I raised the issue at a meeting theregion’s MPs had with the PrimeMinister and it is something wewill have to keep pressing on,” sheadded.Picture: NICKBUTCHERDawn chorusPEOPLE will have a chance to enjoythe sounds of the dawn chorusduring a guided walk at CarltonMarshes nature reserve later thismonth. The warden will be on handto identify the birds heard and thewalk will finish with a full Englishbreakfast at the Waveney RiverCentre, at Burgh St Peter (via the re-established ferry crossing). The walktakes place from 5.30am to 8.30am onSunday, April 29 and costs £10 perperson, including breakfast. Placesshould be pre-booked beforeThursday, April 26 on 01502 564250.Boy detainedA 17-YEAR-OLD boy has beencharged with three offences after hewas arrested in Lowestoft. Theteenager was spotted actingsuspiciously by police officers onanti-burglary patrols in WaveneyDrive on Tuesday, March 27. Afterspeaking to him, they detained andarrested him and he was latercharged with possessing a lock knifein a public place, possessing a loadedair weapon in a public place andhandling stolen goods. The teenager,who cannot be named because of hisage, is due to appear at LowestoftYouth Court on Wednesday.Huts opposedPLANS to install five beach huts inSouthwold are being opposed bytown councillors. Members ofSouthwold Town Council voted tooppose the proposal by WaveneyDistrict Council to install the fivehuts on the Promenade. The towncouncil is also opposing plans forfive huts at Ferry Road andsupporting a separate plan for sevenhuts in North Parade. A report inlast week’s Journal incorrectlystated that the town council wasbacking the application for thePromenade. A final decision on allthree proposals will be made byWaveney District Council.Youths bailedTWO 19-year-old men have beenarrested on suspicion of burglaryafter an incident Chaukers Crescentin Carlton Colville on Wednesday,March 28. They were arrested afterattempting to break into a homewhere damage was caused. The menhave both been bailed until May 14.
  • Lucas & WyllysHow can we help?Call us or call in to:-11 Queen Street, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2QW Telephone 01493 85555561/62 Bells Road, Gorleston NR31 6AQ 01493 663124FAMILY LAW SPECIALISTSDivorce & Relationship BreakdownsChildren Issues Financial DisputesFREE short initial interview on request atour Yarmouth and Gorleston offices.Telephone 01493 855555 (Yarmouth)or 01493 663124 (Gorleston)WILLS & PROBATE SPECIALISTSAdvice on preparation of Wills & Tax PlanningLasting Powers of AttorneyAdvice on Administration of Deceased’sEstate & Inheritance TaxTelephone 01493 855555 or 01493 663124PERSONAL INJURY LAWSPECIALISTSAdvice by Local Experienced Lawyers100% Compensation No Win - No FeeFreephone 0800 915186726 Friday, April 6, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInShortSmall fall incrime levelsCRIME across the GreatYarmouth Borough is down andthere have been significant falls inthe number of offences in severalkey categories according to end ofyear crime figures for the area.The figures, released at theend of the year from April 2011 –March 2012, show an overall crimereduction of 1pc with significantdecreases in the number of houseburglaries, criminal damage andvehicle crime in the area.Criminal damage incidents weredown from 1,516 in 2010/11 to 1,436in 2011/12.Domestic violence incidents fell3pc from 670 to 650 while theft frommotor vehicles dropped by 5pc.There was also a 25pc reductionin the theft of motor vehicles inthe borough.Bothdrugsoffencesandtheftfromshop offences have increased.Drugs offences are up by 2pc to303 crimes from 297 last year andtheft from shops have increased by14pc from 510 to 583 offences.Broads hirebookings upBROADS hire boat firms arecelebrating bumper Easterbookings as a reward for massiveinvestment over the winter.Sam Lowe, yard manager at BarnesBrinkcraft in Hoveton, said: “Weare fully booked on our holidayboats for the Easter weekend.“We had a really good start to theyear – even as early as February– and our day boat trade is up onlast year as well.” He added: “Thisyear we have installed a free wi-fi facility at the yard, available topeople in our 12 holiday homes, allour boating customers while theyare here as well as visitors to theyard.”First step towards newpalliative care centreA BELTON singer performedthe turf-cutting ceremonyheralding the start ofconstruction of the £1.5mPalliative Care East centre.Charlotte Bullen performed thehonour for the new support andpalliative care information centrebeing built at the James PagetUniversity Hospital.Last year Charlotte appeared onthe BBC’s Tonight’s the Night showhosted by John Barrowman. She sangMaybe This Time from the hit musicalCabaret with Ruthie Henshall.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 andthe latest round of local fundraisinghas brought the total to within just£150,000 of its £1.5m target.Charlotte, 20, who recorded and soldCDs to raise funds for the appeal wasdelighted to have been asked to helpwith the event on Wednesday.She said: “I did record and sell CDsto help raise money for the PalliativeCare East appeal so I’m really pleasedto have been asked to come alongand help mark the start of buildingwork. It’s going to be fantastic placefor local people to access informationand support”.Thenewinformationandsupportivecare centre, which will not have beds,is expected to open by Christmas2012. It is estimated 10,000 people ayear will use the centre.Peter Franzen, interim chairmanof the James Paget UniversityHospital, said: “We are indebted to allour donors’ generosity and the newservice will play an important rolein many people’s lives over the yearsto come. We are looking forward toworking with all our partners to helpprovide a wide range of informationand support services in a centre thatwill be fit for the 21st century.”The new centre is being built bySuffolk-based ISG and is designed byNorwich-based LSI Architects whohave designed the central space as adramatic curving shape resemblinga boat - a reminder of the scheme’sseaside context and of the notion ofan ‘ark’ as a place of refuge.Dr Jane Scott, GP lead for palliativecare in Great Yarmouth and Waveney,said: “it is vital that people who aregiven the diagnosis of a potentiallylife-limiting illness have access toinformation and supportive care thathelps them live their lives as fully aspossible.“This centre will be a vital hub forpatients and their families and willalso support a range of services inthe community as well.”The resource centre and outreachservice is a partnership betweenthe James Paget, NHS Norfolk andWaveney, HealthEast, local countycouncils and the voluntary sector.The service will offer patients andcarers a one-stop-shop service forinformation and supportive services.The centre will not have bedsbut will offer a “home from home”environment offering; access tospecialist palliative care support andadvice, counselling, bereavementservices, complementary therapies,welfare advice, and informationabout life-limiting illnesses.The organisations working togetheron improvements to palliative careand support in Great Yarmouth andWaveney are: Palliative Care East;James Paget University Hospital;NHS Norfolk and Waveney; GreatYarmouth and Waveney SpecialistPalliative Care Team; HealthEast; StElizabeth Hospice; Big C; MacmillanCancer Support; Cruse BereavementCare; Marie Curie Cancer Care;Crossroads Care; Norfolk CountyCouncil; Suffolk County Council.Business crippled by arson attackA FARMER has told how his businesswas crippled after a fire started by ateenager caused £60,000 of damage tohis barn.This week, a 13-year-old boyadmitted arson, but claimed he hadonly sprayed deodorant over a haybale which was then lit by a friend.He was given a 10-month referralorder.The blaze on Limes Road, Catfield,soon spread on November 26 last year,needing six fire crews working throughthe night to put out.In a statement to Norwich YouthCourt the farming business, J BGardiner Partnership, which has beenbuilt up over three generations, saidthat the fire was still affecting it fivemonths later.It said: “The loss and coming to termswith the situation has been enormous.It has caused immense difficulties.Many hours have been spent engagingwith the insurance company. It hasbeen a very difficult period of time.“It has left us feeling veryvulnerable.”The barn has had to be demolishedand a planning application willneed to be put in to the council for areplacement.The farmers lost 900 straw bales,making up 450 tonnes of bedding andfeed.Farm equipment and a diesel tankwere also destroyed, but the true valueof the loss is yet to be calculated.The barn was 12m away from a cattlepen with 250 cows and diesel shed, butthe wind was blowing in the oppositedirection, taking the fumes away fromtheir stock and the village.Damien Moore, mitigating, said thechild, who cannot be identified forlegal reasons, had been “exceptionallywell brought up”.He said the schoolboy was playingwith two other boys and he sprayeddeodorant on the bale to fit in withthem.They had been messing around thatafternoon by spraying deodorant ontrees and lighting them.Mr Moore said the boy had phonedthe fire service immediately.The boy told the court: “I feel so sorryfor him (the farmer) because I haveruined his whole life. I just wish I hadnever gone out that day.”
  • Advert ID:TIBIRMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:BIRMEMCustomer ID:BIRMEMColour:4JANICEROSINARIXTreasured memories of mydarling and most caringdaughter, on her birthday,April 12thwho was tragically killed onSeptember 1st, 1990Your smiling face andcaring ways,Will never leave my mind,Because my darling Janice,You were of a special kind.My broken heartwill never heal,Because you meant so muchto me,You gave so much joyand pleasure,For everyone to see.Put your arms around her,Lord,And keep her in your care,Make up for all she suffered,As all that seems unfair.You left a place no one can fill,I love you darling Janice andalways will.From yourvery broken-heartedDad(Winterton)x x xJANICERIXRemembeirng with love on herbirthday, April 12th and everyday, our Darling Janice.No special day is needed,For us to think of you,You were so very special,And loved a whole lot too.Time it changes many things,But not the heartache this daybrings,You left a place no one can fill,We miss you Darling andalways willGod bless you.Mum, Julie andNicola x x xAdvert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4Advert ID:209414GF32 mm by34.6 mmBooking Code:209414GFCustomer ID:CROFT DIANEColour:1First Appearance:06/04/12Last Appearance:06/04/12Advert ID:209509GH32 mm by49.5 mmBooking Code:209509GHCustomer ID:MILLER BRIANColour:1First Appearance:06/04/12Last Appearance:06/04/12Advert ID:209307GH32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:209307GHCustomer ID:THOMPSON JOYCEColour:1First Appearance:06/04/12Last Appearance:06/04/12To place aPersonalAnnouncementjust call01603 693880or e-mailannouncements@archant.co.uk16 Friday, April 6, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukIronman Jon stridesout for care appealAFTER a close friend lost hispartner to cancer, Jon O’Haradecided to put himself througha gruelling challenge to raiseas much cash as possible for thePalliative Care East appeal.The appeal was launched in 2006 withthe aim of establishing an informationcentre that will help people withincurable illnesses such as cancer,respiratory, neurological, and cardiacdiseases.And Jon, who works for Shell’s Amecoffice in Great Yarmouth, says he chosethe charity as his friend Tremaine Kentlost his partner to lung cancer.Carla Saunders passed away in August2009 at the age of 33.Jon has already raised more than£1,800 in sponsorship after agreeing tocomplete the brutal 2012 UK Ironmanchallenge - with a 1.2 mile swim, 56 milecycle and 13.1 mile run.With the help of Jon - and scores ofother fundraisers - the appeal is on trackto hit its £1.5m target.Suffolk-based ISG - the contractor - hasbegun preliminary work on the centre’ssite in the grounds of the James PagetHospital.And the building is due to be completedin December 2012.The 2012 UK Ironman 70.3 triathlonis on June 17 and is staged in Exmoor,and Jon, who lives in Beccles, startedtraining for it at the beginning of theyear.The race is considered to be thetoughest on the international calendar,with the cycle course rising by some5,900ft in 53 climbs over the 56 miles.Jon says he is aiming to complete thecourse in under six hours, and wouldbe very pleased if he can achieve one ofthe 50 world championship places up forgrabs.He is being supported in his trainingby Fitness 2000 in Great Yarmouth.To sponsor Jon, visit www.justgiving.com/jonohara-imsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLON COURSE: Jon O’Hara is backing the appeal for the palliative care centre in Gorleston.Perenco in £251m deal to clinchBP’s southern North Sea assetsGREAT Yarmouth firm Perencohas agreed a £251.7m deal withBP for a number of its SouthernNorth Sea assets.The British supermajor hasagreed to sell a number of mannedand unmanned platforms off thecoast of Yorkshire and a terminalat Dimlington to oil and gascompany Perenco for 400 millionUS dollars, as it looks to pay forthe Deepwater Horizon spill.This announcement follows thecompletion of other successfultransactions with BP, includingthe 2011 acquisition of its interestin Wytch Farm and, in 2003, thecompany’s interest in the BactonGas Terminal and a portfolio ofgas fields in the Southern NorthSea around the Indefatigableshelf.Eric Faillenet, general managerPerenco UK, which has itsUK operations base in GreatYarmouth, said: “We are verypleased to have reached thisagreement with BP.“It marks a natural extension ofour UK North Sea portfolio andplays to Perenco’s core strength ofmaximising the value of maturefields.”This week’s news comes shortlyafter the completion of theacquisition of Wytch Farm, alsofrom BP.The transaction remains subjectto certain regulatory and thirdparty approvals.BP said it still had ambitiousplans for the North Sea, and isbuilding four major projects inUK waters and two near Norwayas part of a £10bn investmentprogramme over the next fiveyears with other major players inthe industry. The projects, whichinclude the giant Clair field, westof the Shetland Islands, representits biggest ever annual investmentin the UK’s offshore industry.At their peak, it is expected thatthe projects will provide 3,000 UKoil and gas supply jobs and play apart in sustaining the more than3,000 jobs already existing in BP’sNorth Sea operations.BP said some 200 staff working atthe assets will transfer to Perencoon completion of the deal, whichis expected before the end of 2012.Trevor Garlick, regionalpresident for BP North Sea, said:“Together with our partners, BP iscurrently progressing projects inthe UK offshore that will involve atotal investment of £10bn over thenext five years – representing thehighest level of annual investmentBP has ever made into the UK’soffshore industry.“Actively managing ourportfolio allows us to concentrateour people, capabilities andinvestment on sustaining BP’sbusiness in the North Sea for thelong term.”The sale means BP has now sold$23bn worth of assets as part ofplans to raise $38bn between 2010and the end of 2013. BP last yearsold its Wytch Farm terminal,which is set in a designated areaof outstanding natural beauty inthe Dorset countryside, with threeneighbouring fields to Perenco for$610m (£384m).CROFTDIANEDavid, Paul, Sue and Molliethank all friends and relativesfor the many beautiful cardsand floral tributes sent onsuch a sad occasion.Many thanks also to theCelebrant, StephanieHeywood for such a movingeulogy and to Darren of J.Marshall Funeral Directors,Market Rasen, for all his helpat such a difficult time.MILLERBRIANThe Family of the late Brianwould like to thank allrelatives and friends for alltheir kind letters and wordsand for attending Brian’sCelebration of Life Service atGt Yarmouth Crematorium.Thanks also for thedonations, received in lieu offloral tributes, for AirAmbulance.Special thanks to SteveHaughton for his support anda wonderful service and toArthur Jary & Sons for alltheir help and excellentarrangements. Please acceptthis as the only, but mostsincere acknowledgment.THOMPSONJOYCE GLADYSThe family of the late Joycewould like to convey theirsincere thanks to relatives,friends and neighbours fortheir support, kind messagesof sympathy and for thebeautiful floral tributesreceived at her funeral.Thank you also to Messrs.Brundish & Son for thefuneral arrangements and tothe Rev. Pat Kane for thelovely service.PersonalAnnouncementsBirths, Marriages,Engagements, Deaths andIn MemoriamsCall in person to169 King Street, Gt. Yarmouthor fax (01493) 847977Personal announcementsthat can be placed bytelephone are Birthdays,Congratulations, Get Well,Good Luck, Anniversaries andSpecial Occasions.Call (01493) 847942E-mailfrontcounter@archant.co.uk
  • A SINGER has performedthe turf cutting ceremonyheralding the start ofconstruction of the £1.5mPalliative Care East centre.Charlotte Bullen, from Belton,near Great Yarmouth, performedthe honour for the new supportand palliative care informationcentre being built at the JamesPaget University Hospital.Last year Charlotte appearedon the BBC’s Tonight’s the Nightshow hosted by John Barrowman.She sang Maybe This Time fromthe hit musical Cabaret withRuthie Henshall.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006and the latest round of localfundraising has brought thetotal to within just £150,000 of its£1.5m target.Charlotte, 20, who recorded andsold CDs to raise funds for theappeal was delighted to have beenasked to help with the event onWednesday.She said: “I did record and sellCDs to help raise money for thePalliative Care East appeal so I’mreally pleased to have been askedto come along and help mark thestart of building work. It’s goingto be fantastic place for localpeople to access information andsupport”.The new information andsupportive care centre, which willnot have beds, is expected to openby Christmas 2012. It is estimated10,000 people a year will use thecentre.Peter Franzen, interim chairmanof the James Paget UniversityHospital, said: “We are indebted toall our donors’ generosity and thenew service will play an importantrole in many people’s lives overthe years to come. We are lookingforward to working with all ourpartners to help provide a widerange of information and supportservices in a centre that will be fitfor the 21st century.”The new centre is being built bySuffolk-based ISG and is designedby Norwich-based LSI Architectswho have designed the centralspace as a dramatic curving shaperesembling a boat - a reminder ofthe scheme’s seaside context andof the notion of an ‘ark’ as a placeof refuge.Dr Jane Scott, GP lead forpalliative care in Great Yarmouthand Waveney, said: “it is vital thatpeople who are given the diagnosisof a potentially life-limitingillness have access to informationand supportive care that helpsthem live their lives as fully aspossible.This centre will be a vital hub forpatients and their families and willalso support a range of services inthe community as well.”Theresourcecentreandoutreachservice is a partnership betweenthe James Paget, NHS Norfolkand Waveney, HealthEast, localcounty councils and the voluntarysector.The service will offer patientsand carers a one-stop-shop servicefor information and supportiveservices.The centre will not have bedsbut will offer a “home fromhome” environment offering;access to specialist palliative caresupport and advice, counselling,b e r e av e m e n t s e r v i c e s ,complementary therapies, welfareadvice, and information about life-limiting illnesses.The organisations workingtogether on improvements topalliative care and support in GtYarmouth and Waveney are:Palliative Care East; James PagetUniversity Hospital; NHS Norfolkand Waveney; Great Yarmouthand Waveney Specialist PalliativeCare Team; HealthEast; StElizabeth Hospice; Big C;Macmillan Cancer Support; CruseBereavement Care; Marie CurieCancer Care; Crossroads Care;Norfolk County Council; SuffolkCounty Council.Open Weekend 10am-4pm Friday, Saturday Sunday and MondayOrnamental & FruitTrees, Soft Fruit, Shrubs,Perennials, Herbs, Roses,Pond Plants, Pots,Planters, Tools,Garden SundriesHTA Gift VouchersFLIXTON ROAD, BUNGAY, NR55 1PDTel: 01986 893834FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY!DES OCONNORIn ConcertFriday 20th April at 7.30pmBOX OFFICE01502 533200www.marinatheatre.co.ukA trueshowbusinesslegendlive on stage!6 Friday, April 6, 2012 Journal online: bbjournal24.co.ukQuay centre opensTHE Beccles Quay Information Centre opened foranother season this week after further supportfrom the Beccles Business Association.There were fears the tourist information centrewas to close for good last year, until BecclesBusiness Association (BBA) and the town councilstepped in to help. It reopened with the help of 20volunteers and after welcoming 45,000 visitors lastyear, it has opened again for this season. BecclesBusiness Association has contributed a further£5,000 to help secure the position of full-timetourist information supervisor Claire Ross.Sue Bergin, chair of the information centreworking party, said: “We have been working veryclosely with Waveney District Council and the BBAthroughout the year to secure the re-opening of thecentre which is so valuable to the local economy.service continues for tourists to Beccles.”The centre will be open until October 31.Singer gets diggingHospice charity is appealing for more volunteersA CHARITY that is investing£2.2m in the Waveney and GreatYarmouth area is appealing forvolunteers to step forward to helpthem.St Elizabeth Hospice will beproviding services for patientswith progressive illnesses,with services in Beccles, Bungayand Halesworth.Now they are appealing forhelpers who can spare half a dayto support their day care serviceat Beccles Hospital.They are looking for hosts forpatients, helpers able to organiseactivities such as arts and crafts,a quiz or bingo as well asvolunteer drivers.A spokesman for the charity said:“All roles make a real differenceto the patients and are reallyrewarding.”There will be a roadshow atBeccles Library throughout Aprilto explain more about the charity’snew services in the region.Staff will be on hand to answerquestions from 10am-4pm onFriday, April 13, 10am-4pm onThursday, April 17, 10am-4pm onWednesday, April 25 and 1-4pm onMonday, April 30.For more details contact07713 287435 or volunteer@stelizabethhospice.org.ukFIRST CUT:SingerCharlotteBullenofficially cutsthe first turfin theconstructionof the newPalliativeCare EastBuilding atthe JamesPagetHospital.Picture:NICKBUTCHER
  • 16 Friday, May 11, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukDaughter’s tributeto‘gentle giant’ dadTHE daughter of a formerfootballer has paid tribute to her“gentle giant” father who passedaway in March.Former Millwall footballer BarryKitchener, known as Big Kitch,died aged 64 after a short battlewith oesophageal cancer.An now his daughter, Nikki, andher partner, Jodie, are planningto cycle more than 100 miles fromtheir home in Gorleston to Millwallfootball ground on the same day asthe first home game of the seas.Nikki, 29, said: “He was diagnosedwith secondary liver cancer onFebruary 29 and he passed away onMarch 30.“My mum had breast cancer lastyear and she got so much supportand help but with oesophagealcancer it was the other end ofthe spectrum - there’s very littleinformation available about thecancer. It’s the fourth biggestcancer in the UK and there’s just a5pc chance of survival“The symptoms are oftenconfused with other things such asindigestion.”The pair are raising money forlocal cancer charity, The Big C andOchre, a national charity whichpromotes awareness and fundsresearch into oesophageal cancer.Ten days before Mr Kitchenerdied, doctors told him that theycould not save him.“It completely crushed him,”Nikki said. “He found it mentallydifficult.”Mr Kitchener, who has threedaughters, Joanne, 40, Donna,38, and Nikki, 29 and fourgranddaughters, Danielle, 19,Kristie, 14, Neve, 12 and Halle, nine,started playing football as a schoolboy in Dagenham and he signed forMillwall when he was 16-years-old.He played at left-back in the youthand reserve teams before makingthe transition to the first team in1967.He met his wife, Hazel, in Ilfordand they married in Harold Park,Essex, in 1970.HiscareersawhimmovetoTampaBay in Florida for a season in 1979while he was on loan. The familymoved to Caister in 1983 whereMr and Mrs Kitchener bought ashop in Branford Road, which soldfood, drinks and holiday essentials.After 20 years they sold the shopand moved to Gorleston to retire.Paying tribute to her husband, MrKitchener’s wife of 41 years, Hazel,said: “He was so humble. He lovedliving in Norfolk and he absolutelyloved Gorleston beach.”Nikki, who works as a costsengineer, said: “He was a gentlegiant. He was a real family man whojust loved playing football, it washis passion. Apart from Millwallhe didn’t support a team. He hadso much passion for the club.”Mr Kitchener, who is still a recordholder at Millwall Football Club,made 602 appearances and scored29 goals during his career.*The couple are appealing forbicycle firms to donate kit andequipment. To help please emailbigkitchappeal@hotmail.co.uk*For more information please seewww.bigkitchappealVillage clubroom’srevamp for jubileeHALVERGATE volunteerswill be helping refurbishtheir playing field clubroomalongside skilled tradespeoplein time for the Queen’s Jubileeand this year’s weddingseason.The clubroom serves a recreationground created from farmland 36years ago by the Halvergate PlayingField Association.During those years the space hasbeen transformed with playingpitches, a multi-use games area andchildren’s playground.Now the well-used clubroom needsa major refurbishment.Carol Hannant, secretary to theassociation,said:“It’sreallywellused.That’s why it needs refurbishing.“All the fundraising and manycommunity events take place there aswell as indoor sports like the bowls,darts and keep-fit.“The clubhouse is also used by thecricketers and footballers for aftermatch socialising and it’s also hiredout for private events.“Any income we get is ploughed backinto looking after the playing fieldsso the more weddings and parties wecan attract with the smart new look,the better for everyone.”The association has raised £12,540in grants to pay for the morespecialist work; £10,000 from the BigLottery’s Awards for All Fund anda £2,540 Broadland District Councilcommunity grant.Volunteers will take on thedecorating and preparation tasks forthe professionals.Leader of the council, AndrewProctor, said: “The Playing FieldAssociation in Halvergate hasachieved a great deal and showntremendous commitment over manyyears.“We are delighted to help themcontinue the good work.“The refurbishment should allowthem to earn more from lettings andcontinue to support themselves asthey have done since they started.”The playing field was granted QueenElizabeth II status as part of a schemeto protect 2,012 open spaces fromfuture development in celebration ofthe Queen’s Jubilee and the Olympicand Paralympic Games.This will be celebrated with otherJubilee events on June 3 whenthe improved clubroom should beofficially open.emily.dennis@archant.co.ukBy EMILY DENNISA GAGGLE of girls, many dressedin pink tutus, trekked along thecoastline to push the PalliativeCare East appeal toward its £1.5mgoal.The Girls on the Edge sponsoredwalk saw dozens of the fairer sexembark on a 32 mile journey fromWinterton to Southwold Pier.And the 70 women who took part -accompanied by the odd guy -raised more than £450 throughtheir efforts on Saturday.They started from Winterton,through to Furzedown Hotel inGreat Yarmouth, continuing on toHotel Victoria in Lowestoft andfinally Southwold Pier.Organisers say both hotels andSouthwold Pier were brilliant intheir support, accommodating thewalkers with water and rest.And Southwold Pier donated thesum of £450 towards the appeal -a final amount raised throughsponsorship has yet to be counted.The walk - which took in theperimeter of the James PagetHospital – was completed in full bymany, with others opting to walksections.Fundraising for the appeal iscontinuing, and organisers are alsolooking for people who may wishto give some time voluntarily tohelp within the centre or as part ofthe outreach services.For details, call 01493 453348 orsee www.palliative-care-east.org.uk/TRIBUTE: Barry Kitchener.Girls on the Edge help appeal
  • Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4Advert ID:213605GF32 mm by108.7 mmBooking Code:213605GFCustomer ID:SURPLICE FREDColour:1First Appearance:18/05/12Last Appearance:18/05/12JACKSYMONDied May 15th, 2008.Dearly loved husband of Clara,father of John, father-in-law toAngela, grandfather toAndrew and Sara andgreat-grandad to Ben.By the old rugged cross, you sitwith a smile,Waiting for those you have leftfor a while,And those you have left withtheir grief and their loss,Will meet you again at the oldrugged cross.Love and miss you so much,Clara x x xAdvert ID:213702GG32 mm by21.9 mmBooking Code:213702GGCustomer ID:TAYLOR ALBERTColour:1First Appearance:18/05/12Last Appearance:18/05/12Advert ID:213202GF32 mm by28.3 mmBooking Code:213202GFCustomer ID:WHEELER JOANYColour:1First Appearance:18/05/12Last Appearance:18/05/12WOOLBRIGHTFREDDYOur dear brother,May 16th, 1995.Still missed so much, Freddy.Always in ourthoughts.Sister Pearl, Johnnyand Brianx x xWOOLBRIGHTFREDDY STEVENLoving memoriesof my dear brother,taken from usMay 16th, 1995Years may pass,but memories stay,Loved and rememberedevery daySister Tricia,Frankand Families(Vacaville,California, USA)Advert ID:TIBIRMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:BIRMEMCustomer ID:BIRMEMColour:4PAUL ST CLAIR17-05-51 - 20-05-07For my Darling Paul,Daddy and Grandadon what would have beenyour 61st birthday.Five long years have passed,since you were so cruellytaken from usWe love you, Sweetheart.Your loving wife Sallie,Children and Grandchildrenx x x xAdvert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4Advert ID:213104GF32 mm by28.3 mmBooking Code:213104GFCustomer ID:CRANE MICHAELColour:1First Appearance:18/05/12Last Appearance:18/05/12Advert ID:213545CE32 mm by47.3 mmBooking Code:213545CECustomer ID:MOORE THOMASColour:1First Appearance:18/05/12Last Appearance:18/05/12Advert ID:213101GF32 mm by38.9 mmBooking Code:213101GFCustomer ID:SKIPPEN LILIANColour:1First Appearance:18/05/12Last Appearance:18/05/12To place aPersonalAnnouncementjust call01603 693880or e-mailannouncements@archant.co.uk16 Friday, May 18, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukNew support centrebegins to take shapeBUILDING work on thenew Palliative Care Eastinformation and supportivecarecentreiswellunderwayand patients and visitors tothe James Paget UniversityHospital can now see thecentre’s steelwork framerapidly taking shape.Suffolk-based ISG is buildingthe £1.5 million Palliative CareEast information and supportivecare centre at the James PagetUniversity Hospital.ISG started preliminary work onsite on Wednesday, May 15, withthe building due to be completedin December this year. Thearchitects are Norwich-based LSIArchitects.The Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched in 2006 andthe aim of the appeal is to provideGreat Yarmouth and Waveneywith a stunning informationcentre that will help people withincurable illnesses such as cancer,respiratory, neurological, andcardiac diseases.The new centre will host a rangeof information and supportivecare services provided by a widerange of organisations working inpartnership from the NHS, to localcancer charities, patient supportgroups, and bereavement groups.The centre will not providepalliative care beds.The centre will be about livinglife and the Palliative Care Eastcentre will provide people withaccess to advice and supportand will also signpost them toappropriate community services.BUILDINGSITE: Workbegins onthePalliativecare centre.GREAT Yarmouth Lions Clubrecently welcomed their twinclub of Rambouillet to Norfolkfor the weekend.Six members of the Frenchclub arrived on Friday and onSaturday they enjoyed a guidedwalking tour of Norwich with aFrench tour guide. The Yarmouthmembers were able to puttheir knowledge of the Frenchlanguage to the test and pickedup on some words and sentences.Following a leisurely lunchin Norwich, they went to GreatYarmouth Town Hall for areception by the Mayor, whichwas being held to commemoratethe visiting of Dutch Sailors onthe Balder Centennial Cruise.A banquet was held in theevening at the Imperial Hotelwhere members celebrated 35years of twinning.Members of the French clubwere given a celebration Queen’sJubilee and Olympic 2012 mugwhich had both club namesprinted on it.The two clubs visit each otherfor cultural and ceremonialweekends twice a year.Lion President Hubert Coulonreciprocated with a stunningmodel of Chateaux Rambouilletmade of chocolate.Great Yarmouth PresidentDenise Freeman welcomed,congratulated and wished theFrench visitors a safe journeythe following day through atranslator.For more information aboutGreat Yarmouth Lions clubplease contact president DeniseFreeman on 01493 601299 or clubsecretary Graham Gibbins on01502 730923Concert willmark twinningTHE 55th anniversary of the twinningof Great Yarmouth with the Frenchtown of Rambouillet will be markedon Sunday, May 27, with a free choralconcert for residents of the borough toenjoy.The Minster Church of St Nicholaswill host the concert – which will see thechoir from St Nicholas joined by Frenchchoral counterparts from Rambouillet.Before the concert gets underway at6pm, residents are invited to witness there-signing of the twinning charter – onceagain confirming the relationship thathas been built between the two towns.Also taking place in the Minister, thesigning will begin at 5.30pm.The agreement between the two townsis one of the longest running in the UK,with Great Yarmouth and Rambouillethaving become twin towns in 1956.With the aim that the people andchildren of the two towns get to knowand understand one another better,the Great Yarmouth and RambouilletTwinning Association has worked hardtofosterlinksbetweenlocalschools,localresidents, and community organisationsand groups.Colleen Walker, Great Yarmouth’smayor, said: “The visit from civicrepresentatives, members of the choir,and other residents from Rambouilletwill be one of the first events of my yearin office and I’m very much lookingforward to marking the relationship thathas been built between the two towns.“The twinning arrangement has beenrunning for 55 years – leading to bothyoung and old visiting one another onan annual basis and providing enjoyablecultural and educational learning aboutthe respective locations.“The re-signing of the agreement willfurther ensure that the relationshipcontinues for many years to come.”GREETINGS: Great Yarmouth Lions Club welcome their twinclub of Rambouillet to Yarmouth.Club welcomes its French twinSURPLICEFREDPrecious memories of a dearhusband, May 22nd, 2011.One lonely year without you,The saddest we have known,What it meant to lose you,No one will ever know.Till we meet again. God bless.Loving wife Jane x x xSee you soon, “Old Son”Grandson Paul, Debbie andFamily x x x.Dad, what we’d give if wecould say hello in the same oldway. To hear your voice or seeyou smile,To sit with you and chat for awhile.Our arms can’t reach to hugyou,As you watch from up above,But Dad, you know we aresending you,Our very deepest love.So if you have a father,Cherish him with love andcare,For you never know theheartache,Until we see his vacant chair.We love and miss you somuch, Dad.Your loving daughter Traceyand son-in-law Jeff x x x.Dad, to the world you werebut one, to us you were ourworld. Missing you always,loving you forever.Heartbroken daughter Jo andJohn x x x.To Grandad round the corner,we love and miss you lots.Grandchildren Hollie, Laurenand Lewis x x x.TAYLORALBERT and LILIANDad and MumMay 21stAlways remembered.Loving Daughter Trudy,Grandsons Paul, Russ andFamiliesWHEELERJOANY(nee Hudson)Much-loved mum andgrandmother, died May 14th,1989. Loved and missed everyday. Joined September 18th,2010, by her loving daughterJackie.Hamhead and Cathy, Sandraand Hub, Ken and Ian.CRANEMICHAELElvina would like to thankrelatives, friends andneighbours for the messagesof sympathy and floraltributes, on the sad loss ofMichael, also the James PagetHospital, Caister Church andArthur Jary & Sons for thefuneral arrangements.MOOREThe Family of the lateTHOMAS (Tommy), wish tothank all relatives, friends andneighbours for the kindmessages of sympathy anddonations received for theEast Anglian Air AmbulanceTrust, which amounted to£235.00 following their sadloss. Special thanks to thestaff of the Norfolk andNorwich University Hospitalfor all their care; also toReverend John Stride for hiscomforting service and toMurrell Cork Funeral ofStalham for their funeralarrangements. Please acceptthis as the only, but mostsincere acknowledgmentSKIPPENLILIAN MAYGarry, Doris and Kevin wouldlike to say a big thank you forthe lovely cards, flowers,messages and donations.Thanks also to the Rev. AlbertCadmore for a beautifulservice and Brundish & Sonfor the excellent funeralarrangements.Garry wishes to thank DorisKevin, Mark and Carole fortheir comfort and support inhis saddest days.
  • www.palmerstores.comwww.palmerstores.com37-39 Market Place, Great Yarmouth Tel: 01493 844291OpeningHours:OpeningHours:9am - 5.30pmMonday to SaturdayPALMERS CAR PARKFREE AFTER 4PM1837 - 2012CelebratingY E A R SMID SEASONOFFERSMID SEASONOFFERSTHEPERFECTGIFTViyellaLuxurious, refined,yet practical this Viyellashirt has been made outof the finest quality cottonand given a special finishfor ease in ironing.£59.99 BUY ONEGET ONE FREEAssorted designs availableFriday, May 25, 2012 yarmouthmercury24.co.uk 65pTWO GREAT COMPETITIONS INSIDEWIN! £200Trolley Dashat new -lookBradwellCo-op storeWIN! Jubileecelebrationtreat atYarmouthRacecourseBrowstonHall2 FOR £10.95carveryat the Browston Hall CarveryRestaurant - Now available untilend of May 2012Booking is advisable but not essentialBrowston Green, Browston NR31 9DW | 01493 667591| www.browstonhall.com | infobrowstonhall@aol.comMonday - SaturdayLunchtime & Evenings12pm - 2.30pm & 5.30pm - 8.30pmWe also serve carvery all day on SundaySunday Carvery £12.95Carvery and DessertSKIP HIREFROM £30Free Phone0800 0556 750Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft Areaswww.eegreen.co.ukLegacy of LouiseTHE new Palliative Care EastCentre will be named afterGorleston woman LouiseHamilton, who tragically diedaged 28 after a battle withbreast cancer, the Mercury cantoday reveal.A public consultation asking forsuitable names for the new centre,currently being built at the JamesPaget University Hospital, revealedthe popular choice.Louise was born in Gorleston in 1969and was a pupil at Wroughton andLynn Grove schools before she went toBristol University and graduated witha degree in languages.At the age of just 26, Louise foundshe had breast cancer. She sadlypassed away aged 28.While Louise was living with hercancer she had found the help offeredto her by the Bristol Cancer HelpCentre to be enormously beneficial.Her mother, Roberta Lovick, ofPotter Heigham, was inspired byLouise’s experience of a supportivecare and information centre in Bristolto start fundraising for a similarcentre for people in Great Yarmouthand Waveney.And Roberta’s experience with herdaughter Louise helped inspire thelaunch of the Palliative Care Eastappeal back in 2006.The new Palliative Care East funded-centre will be called the LouiseHamilton Centre and will open inDecember this year. It is expected tobe used by 10,000 people a year.Roberta said: “It was just so emot-ional finding out the centre would benamed after Louise. I’m very touchedthat so many people put her nameforward. It was my dream to have thiskind of service locally and now it’salmost hard to believe it’s actuallyhappening.“This type of centre has been neededfor so long and I’d like to thankpeople from the bottom of my heartemily.dennis@archant.co.ukBy EMILY DENNISBREASTCANCERVICTIM:LouiseHamilton wasjust 26 whenshe discoveredshe had breastcancer. Shedied two yearslater and hermother hassince workedtirelessly tofund-raise forthe East CoastPalliative CareCentre appeal.Palliative Care Centreto be named afteryoung cancer victimBENEFITS bosses have left a severelydisabled man isolated after confiscatinghis specially adapted car and slashinghis disability allowance.Former offshore worker Jamie Frenchremains paralysed down the right handside of his body after a major stroke inFebruary 2010, and his doctor says “heis only able to walk 30 yards”.But a month ago the father-of-tworeceived a letter from the Disability andCarers Service telling him: “You canwalk about 200 metres slowly.”See full story on Page 4Stroke man shockContinued on Page 2
  • Half PriceBottle of Winewhen you spend £20 onfood in the restaurantHalf PriceBottle of Winewhen you spend £20 onfood in the restaurant1 Starter &1 Main Courseonly £9.99Conditions apply1 Starter &1 Main Courseonly £9.99Conditions applyalways something temptingfor everyone...We aim to serve you combining simplicity withinnovation and plenty of family favourites includingexciting Pizzas and Pastas, big salads, fresh fish andsteaks, Mussaka, fresh Kebabs and Grills.Your meal will be memorable through its qualityingredients and service.Greek Nights!Why not try an exceptional night out. Allour dishes are made by our Cypriot Chefsin an original Greek Taverna atmosphere.You can even experience plate breakingand music til late.www.italianjobs.co.ukWATTON 01953 8841412 - 4 CHASTON PLACE,HIGH STREET, IP25 6XEDEREHAM 01362 696668UNIT 3 GLENCO COURT,MARKET PLACE, NR19 2AXRestaurant& TakeawayBRING THIS VOUCHER TO CLAIM YOUR SPECIAL OFFERS!Eastern Daily Press, Friday, May 25, 2012 www.EDP24.co.uk/news NEWS 27Dance and musicat 1950s eventGRESSENHALL: Gressenhall Farmand Workhouse will be going backto the 1950s to mark the Queen’sDiamond Jubilee. The history fairwill take place on Sunday, June 3from 10am to 5pm. Images ofNorfolk from the air in the 1950swill be shown at the event as wellas music and dance lessons,among other attractions.For details ring 01362 860563 orvisit www.museums.norfolk.gov.ukPedestrian taken tohospital after crashSHERINGHAM: A pedestrian wastaken to hospital after beinginvolved in a collision with a car.The elderly woman suffered a headwound in the incident on ChurchStreet at 11.30am yesterday andwas taken to the Norfolk andNorwich University Hospital.TRIBUTE: Louise Hamilton who died aged 28 from breast cancer.Care centre’s name chosenGORLESTONBy EMILY DENNISThe new Palliative Care East Centrewill be named after Gorleston womanLouise Hamilton, who tragically diedaged 28 after a battle with breastcancer.A public consultation asking forsuitable names for the new centre,currently being built at the JamesPaget University Hospital, revealedthe popular choice.Louise was born in Gorleston in 1969and was a pupil at Wroughton andLynn Grove schools before she went toBristol University and graduated witha degree in languages.At the age of just 26, Louise foundshe had breast cancer. She sadlypassed away aged 28.While Louise was living with hercancer, she had found the help offeredto her by the Bristol Cancer HelpCentre to be enormously beneficial.Her mother, Roberta Lovick, ofPotter Heigham, was inspired byLouise’s experience of a supportivecare and information centre in Bristolto start fundraising for a similarcentre for people in Great Yarmouthand Waveney.And Mrs Lovick’s experience withher daughter Louise helped inspirethe launch of the Palliative Care Eastappeal back in 2006.The new Palliative Care East funded-centre will be called the LouiseHamilton Centre and will open inDecember this year.It is expected to be used by 10,000people a year.Mrs Lovick said: “It was just soemotional finding out the centrewould be named after Louise. I’mvery touched that so many people puther name forward. It was my dreamto have this kind of service locallyand now it’s almost hard to believeit’s actually happening.“This type of centre has beenneeded for so long and I’d like tothank people from the bottom of myheart for donating and helping makeit happen. We still need donations tomake it all happen and keep itrunning.”The Palliative Care East appeal waslaunched in 2006 and the latest roundof local fundraising has brought thetotal to within just £100,000 of its £1.5million target.The Palliative Care East-fundedLouise Hamilton Centre is beingdesigned by Norwich-based LSIArchitects who have designed thecentral space as a dramatic curvingshape resembling an upturned boat –a reminder of the scheme’s seasidecontext and of the notion of an “ark”as a place of refuge.The centre and outreach service is apartnership between NHS Norfolkand Waveney, local county councilsand the voluntary sector; includingfunds from the Palliative Care Eastappeal.It will bring together a wide rangeof organisationsthatcanhelpsupportpatients who are living with a life-limiting illness and also help theirloved ones.emily.dennis@archant.co.ukServices disrupted bysignalling problemsREGION: Trains officials wereforced to apologise to passengerslast night after signalling problemscaused several services to becancelled. Greater Anglia’s servicesbetween Norwich and London weredisrupted, with the 9pm return trainfrom the capital among thosecancelled. The 8.05pm and 8.30pmtrains from London Liverpool Streetto Norwich were able to completetheir journeys, but were delayeddue to the earlier signallingproblems.Signalling problems hadbeen encountered in Essex.
  • TheAdvertiserWAVENEY EDITION Advertiser24.co.uk60p where soldFrom July to December 2011 The Advertiser, Waveney edition 44,297. www.advertiser24.co.ukOPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK01502 516781www.karpetkingdom.co.ukKarpet Kingdom, Whapload RdLowestoft, Suffolk NR32 1URPRICE PROMISE GUARANTEEWe Guarantee to Beat any Like for Like Price on ourfull range of Carpets, Beds , Sofas & Furniture**Please ask instore for full detailsCARPETS BEDS SOFAS RUGSWOOD LAMINATE FLOORINGDINING ROOM SUITESLIVING ROOM FURNITUREAND MUCH MOREReliable & Flexible LOCAL Trade WasteCollection and Recycling ServiceFor fast, friendly, flexibleservice callTRADE WASTECOLLECTIONWheelie Bins and R.E.L. Bins - Regular CollectionNOWAVAILABLECrushedConcreteCrushedBrickGradedTopsoilsSoilImproversAll sizes from 2 yard to 12 yard skipsOTHERSERVICESTipper HireGraded TopsoilFree tip forPaper & CardPublic weighbridgeopen Mon-Fri 7.30-4.30Cash paid for MetalsOUR AWARDWINNING SERVICEIS BETTER THANEVER Please follow us onTwitter and FacebookCHEAP BRICK RUBBLEAVAILABLE NOWWe give you more,ask us for price match plus dealsEllough Road, Beccles, Suffolk, NR34 7TQGary Bennent Driving School - 07880 957871 working withBulk Bags - Sand,Stone & Top SoilCall free now on0800 0556 750(Price dependent on size, location &waste type -- for a quote please call)www.eegreen.co.uk• MINI • MIDI • MAXI •LARGE •SKIPS FROM ONLY£30.00£30.0010% DISCOUNTON ALL SKIPSFor cash buyers only. Terms & conditions applyFriday, May 25, 2012Care centre namedTHE new Palliative Care Eastcentre will be named afterGorlestonwomanLouiseHamiltonwho tragically died aged 28 after abattle with breast cancer.A public consultation askingfor suitable names for the newcentre, being built at the JamesPaget University Hospital,revealed the popular choice.Louise was born in Gorlestonin 1969 and was a pupil atWroughton and Lynn Groveschools before she went to BristolUniversity and graduated with adegree in languages.At the age of just 26 Louisefound she had breast cancer anddied aged 28.While Louise was living withher cancer she had found the helpoffered to her by the BristolCancer Help Centre to beenormously beneficial.Louise’s mum, Roberta Lovick,of Potter Heigham, was inspiredby Louise’s experience of asupportive care and informationcentre in Bristol to start fund-raising for a similar centre forpeople in Great Yarmouth andWaveney. Roberta’s experiencewith her daughter Louise helpedinspire the launch of the PalliativeCare East appeal back in 2006.The new Palliative Care East-funded centre will be called theLouise Hamilton Centre. It willopen in December this year and isexpected to be used by 10,000people a year.Roberta said: “It was just soemotional finding out the centrewould be named after Louise. I’mvery touched that so many peopleput her name forward. It was mydream to have this kind of servicelocally and now it’s almost hard tobelieve it’s actually happening.The Palliative Care East appealwas launched in 2006 and thelatest round of local fund-raisinghas brought the total to withinjust £100,000 of its £1.5 milliontarget.The Palliative Care East-fundedLouise Hamilton Centre is beingdesigned by Norwich-based LSIArchitects who have designed thecentral space as a dramaticcurving shape resembling anupturned boat – a reminder of thescheme’s seaside context and ofthe notion of an ‘ark’ as a place ofrefuge.The new centre and outreachservice will bring together a widerange of organisations that canhelp support patients who areliving with a life-limiting illnessand also help their loved ones. Itwill offer patients and carers aone-stop-shop service forinformation and supportiveservices.The centre will not have bedsbut will offer a “home from home”environment offering access tospecialist palliative care advice,counselling, bereavementservices, complementarytherapies, welfare advice,information and about life-limiting illnesses.The organisations workingtogether on improvements topalliative care and support locallyare: James Paget UniversityHospital; NHS Norfolk andWaveney; HealthEast; St ElizabethHospice; Big C; Macmillan CancerSupport; Cruse BereavementCare; Marie Curie Cancer Care;Crossroads Care; Norfolk CountyCouncil; Suffolk County Council.LASTING MEMORIAL: Louise Hamiltonwho died in May 1998 from breast cancer.The Palliative Care East cente is named inher honour.By Emily Dennisemily.dennis@archant.co.uk
  • 2 Friday, May 25, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukWho’s Who . . .EditorialManaging director, Archant NorfolkJohnny Hustler 01603 772829E-mail: johnny.hustler@archant.co.ukEditor: Anne Edwards 01493 847958E-mail: anne.edwards@archant.co.ukDeputy community editor: Emily Dennis01493 847954E-mail: emily.dennis@archant.co.ukMercury reporters: 847956/847959Mercury newslines: 847940Editorial faxline: 847979Address: 169 King Street, GreatYarmouth, NR30 2PAAdvertisingGeneral manager:Shaun Coomer 01493 335000Advertising sales & Inquiries: 01493335000Personal announcements: 847942or e-mail: frontcounter@archant.co.ukor fax 01493 847977Postal subscriptions: 01603 7727381st Floor, 36 North Quay, GreatYarmouth, NR30 1JEABC figure July-December 201017,166.If you have any problem with anyadvertisements in this newspaper,please contact Shaun Coomer,general manager, 01493 335000or e-mail shaun.coomer@archant.co.ukRegulars . . .Cases in Court 4Through the Porthole 8Pet of the Week 10Your Letters 10/11/12Citizens Advice column11Family announcements14/15/16Find Me a Home 38Young Ones 30/35Children’s Birthday Club35Village Life 39-44Club Life 45Town Life 46Church Services 46Viewpoint 46What’s On Guide starts 47Puzzle page 638 pages sportstart Page 56Harbour TrafficOn the web, go toyarmouthmercury24.co.ukand place the cursor overNEWS; there you will find“Track Boats” and you willbe able to see the shippingtraffic coming in and outof our port - and aroundthe world.InShortVolleyballtournamentGREAT Yarmouth is to launch theannual Volleyball England BeachTour (VEBT) this weekend.The tour aims to give touristsand locals the chance to watchthe best volleyball players in thecountry battle it out to becomethe National Beach VolleyballChampions of 2012.The beach tour will come toYarmouth tomorrow and Sunday,with a free grandstand availablefor spectators to watch the actionand if you’re feeling inspired toget involved, Volleyball England’s‘Go Spike’ come-and-try beachcourts will be available to practiceyour skills for free.It will be located at the seafront.The tour will go on to visit theseaside resorts of Weston-Super-Mare, Skegness and Margatebefore the finals take place inBournemouth in August.Valerie Pettit, the council’senvironment portfolio holder,said: “Just because you may havemissed out in the Olympic ticketlottery doesn’t mean you alsohave to miss out on watching thisvery exciting sport in person asGreat Yarmouth Borough Councilbrings it to your doorstep onceagain this summer.“No tickets are necessaryto watch the Great YarmouthClassic, just turn up and take aseat.”Lisa Wainwright, ChiefExecutive of Volleyball England,said: “We’re hoping the event willinspire more people to try theirhand at this fast paced game.”For details, visit www.gospike.net.Park permitsto be savedPLANS to save the residentspermit parking scheme by theseafront were outlined by thecouncil’s new ruling group thisweek.The Labour administrationhas pledged to act decisivelyto ensure the retention of theZone A scheme, and to initiateimprovements to it from April2013.Aformalrecommendationtothiseffect will go before the council’snext cabinet meeting on June 20,after it was agreed at Tuesday’ssteering group meeting.It was agreed that a small five-person task and finish group beformed.The group - formed of twoLabour representatives, oneConservative, one from theresidents association and onefrom the tourist authority - willbe charged with bringing forwardproposals for improvements tothe current scheme.A permit price rise is onthe cards, as have remainedunchanged over the past six years,and the level will be agreed by thetask and finish group.A package of measures thatcommands the support of bothresidents and businesses is to beagreed.The next meeting of the steeringgroup will be on Tuesday, July 24.Countdown to theQueen’s Jubilee funGET ready to party! Theborough is getting ready forthe biggest royal celebrationfor a generation.Final preparations are being madefor the Queen’s Diamond Jubileecelebrations next weekend withbunting and flags already adorningstreets, shops and homes.A number of roads will be closedfor street parties with fun-filledevents being held in and around thetown and surrounding villages.Next Saturday and Sunday, red,white and blue bunting and Unionflags will decorate St George’s Parkin Yarmouth for a quintessentiallyBritish village fete and food fair,with lots of activities.Donkey rides, traditional maypoledancing, Punch and Judy, and aspecial sheep shearing show, alongwith face painting and balloonmodellingareallconfirmedactivitiesso far. A number of traditional stallswill also be run with the assistanceof Great Yarmouth Lions.The time-honoured tradition ofseaside brass band performanceswill be marked with musicalentertainment from Great YarmouthBrass on the Saturday and WrenthamBrass Band on the Sunday.Children can make kites and flagsin the colours of Commonwealthnations in a special craft marqueehosted by SeaChange Arts.Visitors will also be able to enjoya mini-food festival featuring localfood producers from the boroughand the immediate area includingNorfolk Sausage, Hemsby Herring,The Little Fudge Stall, BradwellButchery, Blackfriar’s Brewery,Norfolk Preserves, Mojo Sauce, CoastCafé, Dabs ‘n’ crabs and Ronaldo’sice cream.The fete will be open from 10.30amuntil 4pm on Saturday and SundayandisbeingrunbyGreaterYarmouthTourist Authority on behalf of theborough council. Admission is free,but visitors are encouraged to give a£1 donation to the Mayor’s charities.Anchor Gardens on the seafrontwill host bank holiday Monday’sfestivities with the lighting of thebeacon and a special Jubilee fireworkshow courtesy of Greater YarmouthTourist Authority.There will be a radio show onsite at Anchor Plaza overlookingthe gardens from 8pm withentertainment, bands and music. Aparade led by Winterton TS FearlessMarine Cadets marching bandwill leave Maritime House TouristInformation Centre at 9.30pm andwill process along the slow lanetowards Anchor Gardens beforeMayor Colleen Walker lights thebeacon at 10.15pm, followed by thefirework display.On June 5, a special civic servicewill take place in Yarmouth Minsterat2pmtowhicheveryoneisinvited.Aparade led by Winterton TS FearlessMarine Cadets marching band willleave the Town Hall at 1.40pm andprocess to the church.Today there is a Jubilee gardenparty at Yarmouth Library, 3pm to5pm with African drumming, plantstall, sow a seed activity, children’scrafts and crowns and tiaras makingat the Tolhouse Museum - free entry.For a guide to events around theborough to celebrate the Jubilee,see next week’s Mercury.emily.dennis@archant.co.ukBy EMILY DENNISARE YOU READY?: Residents of Artillery Square in Great Yarmouth are set up for their big event of theyear, their no-holds-barred Jubilee street party! Picture: JAMES BASSContinued from page 1Name chosen for care centrefor donating and helping make ithappen. We still need donationsto make it all happen and keep itrunning.”The Palliative Care East appeal waslaunched in 2006 and the latest roundof local fundraising has brought thetotal to within just £100,000 of its£1.5 million target.The Palliative Care East-fundedLouise Hamilton Centre is beingdesigned by Norwich-based LSIArchitects who have designed thecentral space as a dramatic curvingshape resembling an upturned boat- a reminder of the scheme’s seasidecontext and of the notion of an “ark”as a place of refuge.The centre and outreach service isa partnership between NHS Norfolkand Waveney, local county councilsand the voluntary sector; includingfunds from the Palliative Care Eastappeal.The new centre and outreachservice will be based at the JamesPagetUniversityHospital,Gorleston,and will bring together a wide rangeof organisations that can helpsupport patients who are living witha life-limiting illness and also helptheir loved ones.The service will offer patientsand carers a one-stop-shop servicefor information and supportiveservices.The centre will not have bedsbut will offer a “home from home”environment offering access tospecialist palliative care advice,counselling, bereavement services,complementary therapies, welfareadvice, information and about life-limiting illnesses.The organisations workingtogether on improvements topalliative care and support locallyare: James Paget UniversityHospital; NHS Norfolk and Waveney;HealthEast; St Elizabeth Hospice;Big C; Macmillan Cancer Support;Cruse Bereavement Care; MarieCurie Cancer Care; Crossroads Care;Norfolk County Council; SuffolkCounty Council.
  • 10 Friday, May 25, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukOpinionTHE new Palliative Care East centrewill be named after Gorleston womanLouise Hamilton who tragically diedaged 28 after a two-year battle withbreast cancer, the Mercury revealstoday. How appropriate and fitting,and the news must be bringing somuch joy, and sadness of course,to Louise’s parents. Mum RobertaLovick’s experience with dealing withher daughter’s illness helped inspirethe launch of the Palliative Care EastAppeal back in 2006.In December the new Louise HamiltonCentre will be open and is expected tobe used by 10,000 people a year.It will provide the expertise thoseneeding palliative care require, but isnot a hospice. Sometimes all suffererswant is a friendly cup of tea and a chatwith someone who can reassure - andnot treat them as a patient.We wholeheartedly welcome the newname for the centre and sincerely thankall those who have raised so muchmoney to allow this dream to become areality.Pet of the WeekVolunteersName: JessieAge: 10 monthsLikes: Getting up tomischief, football,bus tripsDislikes: VacuumcleanersOwners: Jackie andFayeIF you would likeyour pet featured inthis column, send ajpeg picture and thedetails to anne.edwards@archant.co.uk or post/drop ina photo and thedetails at our 160King Street, GreatYarmouth office.RSPCA East Norfolk Branch - Requirevolunteers for fundraising events and otherroles. Even if you only have a few hoursspare we’d still love to hear from you.Contact Freda 01692 651695 or Hollie athollie.mayhew@hotmail.co.ukAGE CONCERN GREAT YARMOUTH - Thegroup is looking for both male and femalebefriending volunteers in all areas of GreatYarmouth. To spend an hour or two a weekvisiting someone for a coffee and a chat ormaybe take them along to one of our lunchclubs. An hour or two a week can make areal difference to an older person’s life.GREAT YARMOUTH GATEWAY CLUB -Drivers are need on a Friday evening to driveour minibus (CRB check will be made). Moredetails please ring Ray on 07599 274208.DIAL - The charity is looking for volunteersto help support its busy office and charityshop in Yarmouth. Contact Jo Howes on01493 856900 for more details.GREAT YARMOUTH STROKE CLUB - Jointhe volunteer team, meeting every Thursday,2pm to 4pm. To find out more, contact Rob07515 597162 or Sue Casey 07528 518132.EAST COAST HOSPICE - The local end oflife care charity, always needs good qualitydonated stock for its shops in the HighStreet, Gorleston and Market Row, Yarmouthas well as volunteers to help run them. Call01493 718707 or email office@eastcoasthospice.co.ukOfsted is ruledby politicsPARDON me criticising Ofstedagain (my previous letter waspublished May 18) but I felt I had towrite concerning the very negativecomments made in inspectionreports following Ofsted’s visits tolocal schools.Whatever the schools’ failingsmay or may not be, the reports areoverwhelmingly critical, focusingon specific areas. I searched forpositive comments but they weredifficult to find. No recognition ofgood work in other areas. I find ithard to believe that almost no goodteaching happens in these schoolsand am very concerned aboutthe effect this will have on hardworking teachers who have beentold they are failing. In the absenceof any praise, the inspectors aresuggesting that all areas of theschools are failing, which I findhard to believe. Could they reallynot find anything positive to say?It is very clear that Ofsted hasbecome a fault finding exercise andis supporting the Government’sdenigration of state schools. Thewhole exercise must have beenvery demoralising for the staff,but when Wilshaw himself (headof Ofsted) says that if staff aredemoralised headteachers aregetting it right, what chance dothey stand?Do parents really want theirchildren taught by demoralisedstaff? Do not be surprised if thereis increased staff absence due toillness. This is the body’s naturalreaction to stress.I hope parents realise that Ofstedis not independent but is ruledby politics and the goalposts aremoving constantly.If the schools jump throughMichael Gove’s hoop of becomingacademies, which is the intention,nodoubttheywillmakemiraculousimprovements and all will be well.CERI WALFORDVictoria Road,GorlestonI missed Ifield:Wisdomofyouth!LAST week’s article by Peggottyabout showbusiness stars visitingGreat Yarmouth in the past,reminded me of a time in the early1960’s when my mum and sistertried to persuade me to accompanythem to the Regal in order to seeNorman Wisdom. Not being a fanof his I declined.Imagine how I felt when ontheir return from the theatrethey informed me that NormanWisdom didn’t appear, instead thelatest singing sensation FrankIfield, who was at number one inthe charts with I Remember Youthat very week, was drafted in toreplace him. I was gutted!However a few years later, afterbooking to see Freddie Starr, againat the Regal, we turned up onlyto be told he was not appearingand in his place was, guess who?Norman Wisdom! So adding insultto injury, I had to sit through hisperformance after all.PAULINE LYNCHBradwellChange trafficlights sequenceIT would be nice if the highwaysdepartment could look at thedelays on the traffic lights atBritannia Pier which whilst okayfor most of the day, in summeryou get large hold-ups stretchingback to St Peters Road at night.They give far too much priority topedestrians over traffic. Whilst onthe subject of traffic the bends onQueens Road from the seafront toSouth Denes Road have a centreline offset to the south whichleaves little room when cars areparked both sides of the road.People driving towards the beachuse all their side and leave little onthe other side due to the misplacedcentre white linesCHRIS ASHDOWNemailPublic want thepledged successI AM sure that many of yourreaders, like me, turn first to theMercury correspondence columns.We do not have to agree with all oreven any of the views expressedbut there is always somethinginteresting and relevant to eventsin the borough and a great deal ofcommon sense.Last week, for example, ChrisWright’s letter provided muchfood for thought. May we hope thepowers that be will be encouragedto act on at least some of hissuggestions.Everyone will surely agree withJohn Grimmer’s remarks andsupport his hopes for our troubledOuter Harbour. It is clear fromall the letters you have publishedover the years that the public wantit to be the huge success we werepromised.NICK POWNALLemailParking schemeis not clearCLEAR as mud. Regarding thecouncil’s new scheme of offeringtwo hours free car parking on themarket car park on Wednesday- great idea and if it helps boosttrading in the town superb.However the signs displayingpayment/hourly rates etc are asclear as mud. Have a look, see ifyou can work it out.I wanted to park for five hours,with two of those for free, asoffered. My understanding then isyou pay for three hours at 70p perhour so I make it you should pay£2.10p for the other three hours.This is what I did and displayedboth tickets. Start time 8.45am.JAMES WILSONemailLet’s hope villageis in safe handsRE last week’s Mercury: quote ofthe week from Leonard Gent, newchairman of Hopton-on-Sea ParishCouncil following the outcome ofStandards Board Enquiry: “Hoptonis now in Safe Hands”.I wonder if the majority ofresidents of Hopton know thatthe ill-fated failed compulsorypurchase order instigated bythe council landed them with abill of over £28,000. Ignoring therights and wrongs of this actionwhat was disturbing was thefact they hid beneath a cloak of“confidentiality” - residents wereprecluded from meetings whilstthis was discussed. Fourteenmonths ago, this subject was raisedby a resident who wanted to knowthe costs involved but this wasrefused due to “confidentiality”. InMarch 2012, a resident asked thisquestion, again the “confidential”answer.It took a Freedom of Informationinquiry to confirm this matterwas not “confidential” and theamount of £28,000 was includedin the answer. As a result of thisFoI the council had no option butto confirm at the following parishcouncil meeting the cost was atleast £28,000.The fact there was anunprecedented 23 candidates in therecent election should have rung afew alarm bells that all is not wellin Hopton. “Safe Hands” Mr Gent...we will see?Name and Address suppliedWhere are localtorch holdersA SEARCH of the official London2012 website will reveal that manyof the Olympic Torch bearersselected to carry the flame throughNorfolk,haveinfact,noassociationwith Norfolk whatsoever. Thereare many examples, including onewho actually lives in Suffolk!It is a gross insult to the people ofNorfolkthat“foreigners”havebeenselected to carry the torch throughour county. Were there not enougheligible citizens in Norfolk? As amatter of some urgency, I believeyou should publish the fact that sixof the 11 Olympic Torch bearerswho will carry the flame throughGreat Yarmouth on July 5, are notfrom Great Yarmouth and four ofthe 11 are not even from Norfolk!It is for this reason I willpersonally boycott the torch as itpasses through Great Yarmouthand I urge all true Norfolk peopleto do the same.S COLMANemailMost drivers outto show off carsIN reply to Mr S Payne’s letter inlast Friday’s Mercury: The letterabout the boy racers was a tadsurprising, given that people arewell aware of all the work that hasbeen done over the past few yearsto sort the issues with the carenthusiasts.While I do agree they can beat times very anti-social, for themost part things are very muchimproved from two years ago. Wedo seem to have a new influx ofSunday night cars again at themoment, but again this is beingaddressed. I beg to differ about thepolice too; they are out there everySunday and without fail move thecars on after 11pm, even thoughstrictly speaking parked cars areno longer their jurisdiction. Justbecause you cannot physicaly see apolice car means people should notassume they are not out there.Speaking for myself, I am outthere with two other residentsmost Sunday’s monitoring thenoise and generally easing thesituation alongside the police andother agencies. Finally you mustaccept that the boy racers have asmuch right to be on the seafrontas you or I, it really is just a fewidiots out there who are spoilingit for the rest of them. Most ofthe enthusiasts are just out for asocial, to show off their cars andhave a yarn, it’s all about give andtake. We must accept them andthey must consider us residents.SHEENA McBAINemailResidents facinga large billIN his statement to the Mercury,May 18, “Hopton councillorscleared of misconduct”, parishcouncil chairman Lennie Gentassures the residents of Hoptonthat the council remains in “safehands”. Would this be the samecouncillor Gent who was a memberof Hopton council when it saddledthe residents with an £8,400 bill foran abortive compulsory purchaseorder, and a potential liability fora further £20,000?GRAHAM MILLSWatsons Close,Hopton on SeaWhy no news onpier car parkingTHE former leader of the boroughcouncil, Steve Ames, gaveresidents hope at the Pavilionmeeting that the pier car parkwould be available again becausea Gorleston businessman was innegotiations backed by GYBC withEastport. Was this for real or wasit to hijack the meeting? This hecertainly achieved but chickensgenerally come home to roost.It is now half a year since thisannouncement and like the outerharbour itself nothing seems tohave changed yet only that we arebeing given words we want to hear.LettersA NAME and address is onlywithheld at a correspondent’srequest IF the publication ofpersonal details might lead tointimidation or targeting ORthe correspondent is employedin a position where theirview contradicts that of theiremployer, or would place themin an embarrassing position.Anonymous letters, submittedwithout a name and address,are NEVER published.FEEDBACK is YOUR page — it’s the Great Yarmouth area’s most important forum for public debate on the issues of the week. We welcome yourviews, which can be sent to the Editor in the form of:A LETTER, addressed to: Great Yarmouth Mercury, 169 King Street, Yarmouth, NR30 2PA; A FAX, to Great Yarmouth 847979; orAN E-MAIL, with your name and address, to anne.edwards@archant.co.ukThe editor welcomes contributions but reserves the right to amend and edit as necessary. Please endeavour to keep letters to a maximum 250words. Material accepted for publication in the Mercury may also be published on the internet and World Wide Web version of our service.
  • Friday, May 25, 2012 9The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukCare centre tobe named forbrave LouiseTHE new PalliativeCare East centre will benamed after Gorlestonwoman Louise Hamiltonwho tragically died aged28 after a battle withbreast cancer.A public consultationasking for suitable names forthe new centre, being built atthe James Paget UniversityHospital, revealed the popularchoice.Louise was born inGorleston in 1969 and was apupil at Wroughton and LynnGrove schools before she wentto Bristol University andgraduated with a degree inlanguages.At the age of just 26 Louisefound she had breast cancerand died aged 28.While Louise was livingwith her cancer she hadfound the help offered to herby the Bristol Cancer HelpCentre to be enormouslybeneficial.Louise’s mum, RobertaLovick, of Potter Heigham,was inspired by Louise’sexperience of a supportivecare and information centrein Bristol to start fund-raising for a similar centrefor people in Great Yarmouthand Waveney. Roberta’sexperience with her daughterLouise helped inspire thelaunch of the Palliative CareEast appeal back in 2006.ThenewPalliativeCareEast-funded centre will be calledthe Louise Hamilton Centre.It will open in December thisyear and is expected to be usedby 10,000 people a year.Roberta said: “It was justso emotional finding out thecentre would be named afterLouise. I’m very touched thatso many people put her nameforward. It was my dreamto have this kind of servicelocally and now it’s almosthard to believe it’s actuallyhappening.The Palliative Care Eastappeal was launched in 2006and the latest round of localfund-raising has brought thetotal to within just £100,000 ofits £1.5 million target.The Palliative Care East-funded Louise HamiltonCentre is being designed byNorwich-based LSI Architectswho have designed thecentral space as a dramaticcurving shape resembling anupturned boat – a reminder ofthe scheme’s seaside contextand of the notion of an ‘ark’as a place of refuge.The new centre and outreachservice will bring together awide range of organisationsthat can help support patientswho are living with a life-limiting illness and also helptheir loved ones. It will offerpatients and carers a one-stop-shop service for informationand supportive services.TRIBUTE:LouiseHamilton.DAWN BEAUTY: We get somewinners featuring local scenesand others from other, somewould say more exotic, parts ofthe world.This week’s Picture of the Weekwinner definitely falls into thelatter category and was takenby Mary Berry of Covehithewhile on a camping holiday inTanzania.The sun was rising on LakeManyara and the flamingoes onthe water were silhouettedagainst the golden backdrop.Mary, who with her husbandoften heads for warmer climes inthe winter, has always beenkeen on wildlife and wasdelighted to win our prize thisweek.She wins a 12in x 10in framedversion of the winning photo,mounted and inscribed, andworth more than £60, fromPicture Studios, of London RoadNorth, Lowestoft. By progressingto our next six-monthly winners’final, she is also in with a shoutof winning the top prize: a 12inx 18in photo block, worth £130.We are now accepting entriesfor next week. They can be ofany subject, but must be byamateur photographers and weprefer digital images. We acceptprints, but we cannot guaranteetheir return.Please email your pictures,along with your name, address,and phone number to: lowestoft.journal@archant.co.uk, puttingPicture of the Week in thesubject box.Send prints to: Picture of theWeek, The Journal, 147 LondonRoad North, Lowestoft, NR321NB.www.picturestudios.net
  • 12 Nights / 14 DaysSri Lanka East Coast Tour• From £1698pp Sharing Twin/Double14 Nights / 16 DaysSri Lanka + Maldives +Dubai Holidays• From £1890pp Sharing Twin/Double10 Nights / 12 DaysMaldives + Dubai Holiday• From £1398pp Sharing Twin/Double14 Nights / 16 DaysKerala + Maldives Beach Holiday - ALL INCLUSIVE• From £1675pp Sharing Twin/Double13 Nights / 15 DaysLuxury North India• From £2776pp Sharing Twin/Double13 Nights / 15 DaysLuxury Rajastan - India• From £2274pp Sharing Twin/Double7 Nights / 8 DaysCape Town & Garden Route -South Africa• From £1880pp Sharing Twin/DoubleFor reservations & more informationPlease call 0845 676 9011For more offers visit:www.sensesholidays.co.ukwww.specialholidayoffers.co.ukEmail: info@sensesholidays.co.ukSri Lanka, India, Maldives, Dubai and South AfricaSpecial Offers£1398ppPACKAGESFROMSpecial offer:Special Worldwide Flight Ticket OnlyDeals. Please contact us for details.Valid for travel till 31st Oct 2012Offer includes:• Return Air tickets• Accommodation 4/5 star hotels• The service of English speakingchauffeur guide• Private transfers• Per person sharing double/twin• Terms & conditions apply6638Journal online: bbjournal24.co.uk Friday, May 25, 2012 3New mayors take uptheir chains of officerichard.wood@archant.co.ukBy RICHARD WOODMAYORS have been appointedfor the coming year inBeccles and Bungay, with thecouncil chairman elected inHalesworth.In Beccles former deputy mayorGraham Catchpole has taken thestep up, while in Bungay Terry Reevebegins a full term as mayor, havingtaken on the role following the deathof Angela Brook in December.Mr Catchpole said he was lookingforward to starting his year withthe Queen’s Diamond Jubileecelebrations, and called upon peoplein the town to attend the civic serviceon Sunday, June 3, and parade thefollowing day.He said: “I think that the Queen’sDiamond Jubilee year is a goodyear for the town council to take alook at itself and see how it shouldadjust to the 21st century, improveits communications with the peopleof Beccles, and prepare itself forchanges of government legislation.“Also, it is vital for the youth of ourtown to know that they are importantand the town council want to heartheir views.”Mr Catchpole will also be focusingon the youth of the town with hismayoral appeal, which will be abursary style fund to help talentedjunior members of the town’s sportsclubs.Caroline Topping, who is also akeen supporter of youth events, hasbeen appointed deputy mayor.In Bungay, Terry Reeve will have afull term as mayor, with Judy Clokecontinuing her role as deputy.Both took on the positions at thebeginning of the year, followingthe death of former mayor AngelaBrook.Mr Reeve said: “It is an honour tohave the role of mayor of the townwhere I was born.“I now look forward to a full yearin the role after taking over in sadcircumstances following the deathof Angela Brook, and look forwardto talking Bungay up rather thantalking the town down.“I want to promote Bungay and itsmany assets as a whole, but not buryour heads in the sand, as Bungay hasits problems, the same as any town ofits size.”Mr Reeve, who is a former townreeve, is still waiting to choose hischarity for the year. In Halesworth,James Wagner will continue ascouncil chairman, with Ezra Leverettas vice-chairman.PROUD HONOUR: Bungay MayorTerry Reeve.Walking tours reveal Waveney’s historyAUDIO tours that reveal the storiesand history behind the WaveneyValley’s seven market towns have beenlaunched.The free audio walks have beendeveloped by the Waveney ValleyTowns Group to give an insight intoLoddon, Bungay, Beccles, Halesworth,Harleston, Diss and Eye.The hope is that the walks canincrease the tourist appeal of all ofthe towns.The group, who received fundingfrom the Waveney Valley Local AreaGroup,approachedradioproducerNeilJenkins to create the audio walks, andhe interviewed around 150 people ashe tried to combine history, memoriesand gossip to capture the atmosphereof each town.He said: “The concept was to deviseinterestingwalksthattakesyouaroundparts of the towns you perhaps wouldnot have gone to, with various items tointerest you rather than bombard youwith historical figures.”For each town historical experts,councillors and long-standingresidents were involved to provide thisdifferent level of interest in the walksthat last for an hour.One of those interviewed was DavidWoodward, of Beccles.He said: “I never dreamed I would beinvolved in such a marvellous set ofwalks around these towns.“I am so grateful for having thechance to talk about the area that Ilove so much.“The Waveney does not divideNorfolk and Suffolk, it is what bringsthem together.”Also speaking at the launch inHomersfield, was Pat Holtom, chair ofthe Waveney Valley Local Area Group,who said that the £42,500 invested inthe programme comprised £10,000from the Awards for All scheme and£32,500 from the Rural DevelopmentProgramme for England.This in turn came from a total potof £3.3 million that the group has tospend across the region between 2010and 2013.Other projects that have benefittedfrom the funding include Clinks CareFarm, in Toft Monks near Beccles.Norman Hart, chairman of theWaveney Valley Market Towns Group,added that the aim of the groups isto encourage the towns, which coversouth Norfolk, Waveney and midSuffolk areas, to work together.“It is fantastic to have seven markettowns, many that have been quiterivalled, all working together,” hesaid.The walks can be downloaded insections as mp3s and mobile phoneapps, borrowed on an mp3 player orpicked up in a leaflet from each town’sinformation centre.Waste site travellers facecourt order to move onTHE new Palliative Care East centrewill be named after Gorleston womanLouise Hamilton who tragically diedaged 28 after a battle with breastcancer.A public consultation asking forsuitable names for the new centre,currently being built at the JamesPaget University Hospital, revealedthe popular choice.Louise was born in Gorleston in 1969and was a pupil at Wroughton andLynn Grove schools before she wentto Bristol University and graduatedwith a degree in languages.At the age of just 26 Louise found shehad breast cancer. She sadly passedaway aged 28. The Louise HamiltonCentre at JPUH will operate as a hubfor information and support serviceswith services also provided on anoutreach basis.A GROUP of travellers who weretemporarily allowed to stay on a former tiphave been given a court order demandingthey move today.The travellers set up camp on the oldBeccles household waste recycling site inthe middle of January but are still there,despite initially agreeing to leave by Friday,April 27.Suffolk county councillor Chris Puntsaid the council had now turned to legalproceedings after being disappointed thetravellers did not leave on the agreed date.The council did try to evict the travellersunder section 77 of the 1994 CriminalJustice and Public Order Act, but after thatwas challenged, they have issued anotherone.Mr Punt said: “There were issued asection 77 at 6.10pm on Wednesday nightand have got until today to go, and if theydon’t there will be a court hearing nextweek.”He added: “If we get to court next week itwill be a criminal offence and then policewill be used to get them off.”FOCUS ONYOUTH: NewBeccles mayorGrahamCatchpole withhisgranddaughterAbigail after hisinduction in thetown councilchambersRSPCA shopTHE RSPCA is set to open the doorsof a new shop in Bungay which willhelp to raise much needed funds foranimals in need in the Suffolk area.The store is due to open on Mondayat 20, St Mary’s Street, and will sella wide selection of items includingbooks, ornaments, clothes andbric-a-brac.Simon Phillips, treasurer at theRSPCA Suffolk East Coast branch,which has 40 animals in its care, saidthe extra revenue generated by thenew charity shop will make a hugedifference in helping animals in needlocally.He said: “Sadly there are alwaysa large number of abandonedor neglected animals in the areadesperately in need of our help.”For information about the workof the branch and the animals visitwww.rspca-suffolkeastcoast.org.ukTHE winner of ourLesley Garrettcompetition is JaniceBoggis of HulverStreet, Hulver, whowins a pair of ticketsfor Lesley’s concert atthe Marina Theatre,Lowestoft, with theRoyal PhilharmonicOrchestra tomorrowevening.Centre nameMarinatreat
  • 22 www.eveningnews24.co.uk Norwich Evening News Wednesday, June 13, 2012Father’s charity skydiveA father of four is throwing himself out of a plane tohelp raise money for a Great Yarmouth charity whichhelps children with additional needs.John Rimmer, who lives at Walpole Road, GreatYarmouth, with his partner, Danni and their fourchildren, will jump 15,000ft at Beccles airfield on July8. The self-employed decorator is raising money forGreat Yarmouth based charity Shine.John, who will celebrate his 31st birthday on July 2,said: “My partner bought the skydive for me as abirthday present.“We have a two-year-old son, Harrison, who isbehind on his speech. I went to see the people atShine and they were really helpful and gave us a lotof information.”To donate, please visit www.justgiving.com/john-rimmer1New Alzheimer’s cafeA new cafe for dementia sufferers and their carersis set to launch in Acle next week.The cafe, which is organised by Alzheimer’sSociety, is holding its celebration launch onThursday, June 21 from 1.30pm to 3.30pm at theAcle Methodist Church in Bridewell Lane.Alex Ivey, locality manager for the Alzheimer’sSociety in Norfolk, said: “The new Acle cafe will bea great way for people with dementia and theircarers to meet others in a similar situation andtake part in fun activities.”It will be run by Alzheimer’s Society staff andvolunteers. There will also be useful talks fromprofessionals.The cafe will be held at the same time and placeon the third Thursday of the month.Rights advice for tenantsTenants facing eviction from Earlham House inNorwich have been advised they can speak to councilofficials to learn about their housing rights.Forty people have been told they will have to leavethe Earlham Road complex within two months of theirnext rent date.They were informed their tenancies were due to beterminated in a letter sent on behalf of BellgoldProperties Ltd, who own the freehold to the site.A Norwich City Council spokesman: “We would askresidents who are in any doubt as to their rights, orwho wish to discuss housing options available tothem, to speak to our housing advisors either on adrop-in basis at City Hall from 9am to 2.30pmweekdays (1pm to 3.30pm Wednesdays) or over thephone by calling 0344 980 3333.”We’ll be a tower ofstrength for patientsMedical consultants say theregion’s new palliative carecentre will be a pillar ofsupport for families devastatedby terminal illness.Palliative Care East says the£1.5m target is within £80,000of being reached.It is urging people not toforget the charity when theLouise Hamilton Centre opensin the grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital(JPH), Gorleston, in December,as donations will help top upgrants to cover running costs.Doctors and nurses say thecentre will make care forterminally ill patients betterthan ever before.Dr Bernadette Auger, apalliative care consultant with32 years’ experience as adoctor, said she had seen aphenomenal improvement intreatments during her career,and the Louise HamiltonCentre will help supportservices to catch up withtreatments.“People had nowhere to gobefore and this will improvethings,” she said. “We will havea really good environment tomeet patients and talk withfamilies. At the moment it’sjust in the corridor at the JPH,and that is totally wrong.“With the new centre, peoplewill have privacy and theconfidence to talk openly.”Dr Auger, who has been aconsultant for 18 years andworked at the JPH for a decade,said she would be able to offera better quality of care.Julie Broom, a specialistpalliative care nurse, said thecentre could offer emotionalsupport for those affected bythe trauma of terminal illness.“Treatments mean people areliving longer, but still haveproblems and need moreadvice,” she said. “This ismuch-needed – having thingstogether means patients feelthey belong.“It will, hopefully, preventcare having a disjointedfeeling.”Ms Broom – a nurse for adecade and at the JPH for thelast five years – will seepatients at the centre where anestimated 10,000 people willreceive help each year.She and Dr Auger will offeradvice, information andsupport. Fundraising co-ordinator Jenny Watsonhighlighted her gratitude tofundraisers, and is urgingpeople who have lost loved onesto terminal illness to get intouch with the centre when itis open – as they may be able touse their experience to helpothers.The centre will be namedafter Gorleston woman LouiseHamilton, who died, aged 28,after a battle with cancer.Fundraising began in 2006and building work on thecentre – which is beingdesigned by Norwich-based LSIArchitects – has begun.The centre and outreachservice is a partnershipbetween NHS Norfolk andWaveney, county councils andthe voluntary sector; includingfunds from the Palliative CareEast appeal.Have you got a health story? CallKim Briscoe on 01603 772419 oremail kim.briscoe@archant.co.ukPillar of support: Anartist’s impression ofhow Gorleston’s newpalliative care centrewill lookSam Russellsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukKey staff: From left, James Paget Hospital’s locum palliative careconsultant Bernadette Auger, fundraising co-ordinator Jenny Watsonand specialist palliative care nurse Julie Broom. PHOTO: JAMES BASSiwitness24.co.ukShare your news & picturesHave you got a health story?Contact Kim Briscoe on 01603 772419or email kim.briscoe@archant.co.ukFor the next two weeks, your Norwich EveningNews is hitting the streets in a slightly differentway. . . editor Tim Williams, writer Derek James,and our shopping and lifestyle expert EmmaHarrowing will be in the city centre to meetreaders and chat about your local paper.The three of them will be taking up residencein Chapelfield mall, The Forum and the Mallwhere you can join them to talk about some ofthe issues that matter to you about Norwich andhow your paper covers your city.You can also chat to Derek about his populardiary page and the how he has been writing inthe Norwich Evening News for the past 20 yearsabout the lives of people across Norwich. Or youcan talk to Emma about how you can getinvolved in our street fashion and weeklymakeover sections. And you can find out moreabout our websites – eveningnews24.co.uk andpinkun.com – and learn all about our new localpicture and video-sharing website, iwitness24.co.uk. The Norwich Evening News has served thecity for more than 100 years, and we’d love theopportunity to talk to you about how we shouldbest continue to reflect the lives, ambitions andachievements of our fine city and its residents.So, make a note in your diary, and if you canpop down to chat to Tim, Emma and Derek, we’dlove to see you and find out how we canimprove your local newspaper for you.This is where you can find them:At Chapelfield tomorrow, on the upper ground flooropposite the Sunglass Hut stall, from noon until 2pmAt the Forum, beside the main door, onWednesday, June 20, from noon until 2pmAt the Castle Mall on Thursday, June 21, fromnoon until 2pmAt the Castle Mall, on Tuesday, June 26, from noonuntil 2pmMeet your NorwichEvening News team
  • Covering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonCovering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonYOUR MUSTREAD FREENEWSPAPERWednesday, June 13, 2012EXPERT medical consultantshave described how the region’snew palliative care centre will be apillar of support for families dev-astated by terminal illness.Palliative Care East bosses say the£1.5m target is within £80,000 of beingreached, and say they are grateful to thegenerosity of people in the borough.They are now urging people not to for-get the charity when the Louise Hamil-ton Centre opens its doors in December,as donations will help top-up the grantmoney covering running costs.And doctors and nurses say the centre- in the grounds of the James Paget Uni-versity Hospital (JPH) - will make carefor terminally ill patients better thanever before.Dr Bernadette Auger, a locum pal-liative care consultant with 32 yearsexperience as a doctor, says she has seenphenomenal improvement in treatmentsduring her career. And she says the Lou-ise Hamilton Centre will help supportservices catch up with treatments.“People had nowhere to go before andthis will definitely improve things,” shesaid. “With the new centre, people willhave privacy and can have the confi-dence to talk more openly.”Dr Auger has been a consultant for 18years and worked at the JPH for a dec-ade, and says she will be able to offer abetter quality of care in the new centre.Julie Broom, a specialist palliativecare nurse, says the centre can offeremotional support for all those affectedby the trauma of terminal illness.“All the treatments mean people areliving longer but still have problemsand need more advice,” she said. “Thisis much needed - having everythingtogether means patients feel as if theybelong.”.”Ms Broom - a nurse for a decade and atthe JPH for five years - will see patientsat the centre where an estimated 10,000people will receive help each year. Sheand Dr Auger will offer medical advice,information and support.Fundraising co-ordinator JennyWatson highlighted her gratitude to fun-draisers, and is urging people who havelost loved ones to terminal illness to getin touch with the centre when it is open- as they may be able to use their experi-ence to help others. The centre will benamed after Gorleston woman LouiseHamilton, who tragically died aged 28after a battle with breast cancer.Centrewill bepillar ofsupportfor ourfamilieswords in here and wordsin here and wordsVillage home with a spacious enclosedrear garden - see PROPERTY INSIDEWE WILL BEAT ANY QUOTEMisted Units Drafty Windows/Hinges Window Handles & GasketsConservatory Repairs, leaking Affordables PricesSAME DAY SERVICELocksmiths UPVC Doors Dropped and CatchingNew Keys & Cylinder Loose Handles No Call Out ChargeD UBLE GLAZINGDOCTOR0150253784701493202101
  • 22 NEWS www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, June 13, 2012Delight as work begins on centreGORLESTONBy SAM RUSSELLMedical consultants have describedhow the region’s new palliative carecentre will be a pillar of supportfor families devastated by terminalillness.Palliative Care East bosses say the£1.5m target is within £80,000 of beingreached. They are now urging peoplenot to forget the charity when theLouise Hamilton Centre opens itsdoors in the grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital (JPH),Gorleston, in December, as donationswill help top up the grant money usedfor covering running costs.Doctors and nurses say the centrewill make care for terminally illpatients better than ever before.Dr Bernadette Auger, a locumpalliative care consultant with 32years’ experience as a doctor, said shehad seen phenomenal improvementin treatments during her career, andthe Louise Hamilton Centre will helpsupport services to catch up withtreatments.“People had nowhere to go beforeand this will definitely improvethings,” she said. “We will have areally good environment to meetpatients and talk with families.“At the moment it’s just in thecorridor at the JPH, and that is totallywrong.“With the new centre, people willhave privacy and can have theconfidence to talk more openly.”Dr Auger, who has been a consultantfor 18 years and worked at the JPH fora decade, said she would be able tooffer a better quality of care in thenew centre.Julie Broom, a specialist palliativecare nurse, said the centre could offeremotional support for all thoseaffected by the trauma of terminalillness.MUCH-NEEDEDSUPPORT: Stafffrom the JamesPaget Universityhospital aredelighted that thePalliative CareEast appeal isjust £80,000 shortof reaching its£1.5m target.Left, an artist’simpression ofhow the centre,to be named theLouise HamiltonCentre, will look.Picture: NICKBUTCHER“All the treatments mean people areliving longer, but still have problemsand need more advice,” she said.“This is much-needed – havingeverything together means patientsfeel as if they belong.“It will, hopefully, prevent carehaving that disjointed feeling. A lotof people who have lost familymembers can see how this centre isgoing to help.”Ms Broom – a nurse for a decadeand at the JPH for the last five years– will see patients at the centre wherean estimated 10,000 people will receivehelp each year.She and Dr Auger will offer medicaladvice, information and support.Fundraising co-ordinator JennyWatson highlighted her gratitude tofundraisers, and is urging people whohave lost loved ones to terminalillness to get in touch with the centrewhen it is open – as they may be ableto use their experience to helpothers.The centre will be named afterGorleston woman Louise Hamilton,who died, aged 28, after a battle withbreast cancer.Fundraising began in 2006 andbuilding work on the centre – whichis being designed by Norwich-basedLSI Architects – has begun.The centre and outreach service is apartnership between NHS Norfolkand Waveney, local county councilsand the voluntary sector; includingfunds from the Palliative Care Eastappeal. It will bring together a widerange of organisations that can helpsupport patients who are living witha life-limiting illness, and also helptheir loved ones.COMMENT – Page 24samuel.russell@archant.co.ukMAKING IT WORK: From left, locum palliative care consultant BernadetteAuger, fundraising co-ordinator Jenny Watson and specialist palliativecare nurse Julie Broom.Picture: JAMES BASSMATTISHALLRetrospective planning permissionfor a static home, two caravans and aseries of buildings has been grantedfor a site in Mattishall.The proposal, for land off Mill Road,sought to keep the caravans, laundryroom, two sheds and fences, alreadyon the site. Speaking at Monday’smeeting of Breckland PlanningCommittee, Two Rivers wardcouncillor Paul Claussen said: “Ifthere’s one topic that’s going topolarise opinion it’s going to be gypsysites,” he said.“This is a sensitive site and theofficers know that so what gets me isthat the members have had notraining on what they’re asked tomake a fair and balanced decision on.For me, the information before thecommittee is selective. I do think theonly thing I can tell you for certain isthat because of the lack ofengagement this process has driven awedge between the community andthat’s not good for the settled or thetraveller community.”Other councillors argued a “fulland frank” discussion had been hadwhen the issue first came before thecommittee on May 14. The applicationwas approved.Permission for caravans to stayThousandsof carsfor saleDrive24on www.EDP24.co.ukLOOKINGFORA NEWCAR?
  • 24 OPINION www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, June 13, 2012SUMMER SIGHT: A swallowtail butterfly at Strumpshaw Fen. If you would like to submit a picture for this feature, visit www.iwitness24.co.ukELISE MITCHELLNo 43,902OPINION&COMMENTA cunning ruse to reduce the budget deficitApropos something I was writing about theother week, when British Telecom teamedup with my cable-chewing Golden RetrieverpupDisGracetodeprivemeof broadbandfora fortnight, I’d like to expand on the themeof The Modern Culture of Unaccountabilityand Diminishing Customer Service.This story begins three weeks ago whenmy drive-on lawnmower emitted a huff anda phut of grey smoke and decided it didn’twant to play any more. This was annoying,as it had only just been serviced. I phonedand had it collected.Meanwhile, I was looking to buy atreadmill. I kept logging on to John Lewis’swebsite and humming and hahhing over aparticular model but decided that a) Ineeded to engage with the product and b) Ilike shopping in stores as it keeps retailworkers employed. So I went into whatsome still refer to as Bonds and, lo andbehold, there was the exact model I waslooking at online – except this was a displaymodel, sold as seen, at half price. Result! Ibought it, and with the money saved, got arowing machine. Both items were scheduledto be delivered.Two days later I phoned the gardenmachinery people. I won’t name them butthey’re in Hempnall and they’re aLawnmower Centre. I asked how my ailingimplement was faring and was told, “It’s awork in progress”. Looking outside Irealised the grass was as high as theSerengeti savanna and my two dogs werestalking pheasants, like lions after impala.In the meantime, I got a letter from theInland Revenue saying I owed them two anda half thousand pounds which they wouldclaim in the next tax year. I suspected thiswould leave my 2013 finances perilouslyclose to that of Greece, but shrugged myshoulders, because that’s what we do.Keeping up?I was getting worried about the mower. Itdidn’t write, it didn’t phone, it didn’t text. Inow knew what it felt like to be an emptynester mother with inconsiderate children.At least John Lewis dropped off thetreadmill when they said they would. Andthen took it away again when it wouldn’t fitthrough the door.“Can’t you take it apart by undoing thosescrews?”“That’s not our job,” said the lead deliveryman. “We’ll have to take it back, have it flat-packed and a new delivery date made.”“Fine. At least I’ve got the rower,” Isighed.“Ah. Problem there. It wasn’t in stock.”Oh. Shame nobody phoned to tell me.I’m now expecting a ransom note, letterscut from various newspapers and pastedonto a folded piece of A4: “Tell us if GrantHolt is leaving Norwich City, or you won’tsee your mower again.”To waste 40 minutes, I phoned the InlandRevenue. That was how long I was keptwaiting for a sentient being.“Can I just check this tax bill, please?”I was put on hold and a little less than 40minutes later: “Yes, we’ve double countedyour allowances.”“So I owe you nothing?”“No.”“No, I owe you nothing, or no, I still oweyou something?”“You owe us nothing.”No apology, you notice. Piqued, I askedwhat would happen if I hadn’t endured 40minutes of round-the-houses automatedquestions and elevator music that had asimilar affect on my nerves to chewingscrunched tin foil.“Er… you’d be paying us the money.”So,thereyougo,that’showthegovernmentis reducing the budget deficit – by taxing uscash we don’t owe.As I write, no news from Hempnall. Thegrass is so long DisGrace emerged the otherday riding Shergar, and the other dog,Phoebe, came out with her paws up,escorted by three Japanese ImperialGuards, missing since Iwo Jima.I’m now concerned my drive-on hasdevelopedStockholmSyndromeandprefersbeing lightly oiled every day by a greasemonkey in a warm workshop to being leftin the open by the compost bins.Perhaps I should ask for visiting rights.READER’S PICTURE OF THE DAYWORDS FOR LIFEHis own iniquities shall ensnare thewicked man and he shall be held withthe cords of his sin.Proverbs 5:22PETEWATERSParty spiritFor most of the UK, the Queen’s Diamond Jubileecelebrations effectively ended on Tuesday last week. InNorfolk, we are fortunate that the celebrations have beenextended – and in some style.The Queen’s garden party at Sandringham was awonderful event that once again reminded us ofher affection for the people of this nation – and, inparticular, of Norfolk, which she clearly loves to callhome. It was a great gesture to give something back to4,000 people who contribute so much to community lifein this county and in Suffolk.The only disappointment was that the Duke ofEdinburgh was unable to attend the event. We wish himall the very best as he continues to recover from hisbladder infection.Page EightCritical careAs people live longer, the number diagnosed with alife-limiting illness naturally increases. But it neverbecomes less shocking and harrowing.Being told that you are dying is a hugely traumatic eventthat has so many implications. And it is essential thatthe best possible support, advice and care is in place forthe aftermath of that dreadful news.The turf-cutting ceremony that heralds the start ofconstruction of the £1.5m Palliative Care East centre atGorleston is a landmark moment for such services.Once completed, it promises a significant improvementin the support that will be available to people withlife-limiting illnesses, and their families, in the GreatYarmouth and Waveney area.What makes this centre even better is that it is the resultof six years of determined fund-raising in the local area,which demonstrates how much such a facility means topeople.It is a centre for the community, funded by thecommunity. And the benefits to that community will befar reaching.Page 22Falklands poll isthe right courseThree decades after Margaret Thatcher sent troopsto liberate the Falklands, Argentina’s own iron ladyCristina Kirchner has managed to raise awareness ofher country’s claim to the islands.She has realised that diplomacy is her best weapon andhas been lobbying hard at the United Nations and incapitals across the world to push Britain to negotiate theislands’ future.Argentine ports have boycotted British ships.Meanwhile, other South American states began refusingships flying the Falklands flag in support of MsKirchner’s stance.Such had been her success that even US secretaryof state, Hillary Clinton, encouraged talks over theissue. But Ms Kirchner appears to have forgotten thatwhere politicking one’s way to international success isconcerned, the British created the game.The Foreign Office demonstrated its aptitude yesterdaywhen the government announced Falkland Islanderswould hold a referendum on their future. Theycould break from British sovereignty and if they didParliament would respect the decision.It is clear however that such a referendum wouldprobably produce a result overwhelmingly supportingthe retention of British sovereignty.If so then the government can easily argue that theislands must remain British to uphold the UN charter,which enshrines the right to people’s self-determination.The UN will find it very hard to sanction talks whichmay see sovereignty of the Falklands handed toArgentina, when such a move contradicts its owncharter; clever.The government’s correct stance is that as long thepeople of the Falklands wish to remain British, it willsupport them. Long may it remain so.Page Seven
  • WaveneyAdvertiserJune 22, 2012 3Palliative care centre‘a pillar of support’Expert medical consultantshave described how theregion’s new palliative carecentre will be a pillar ofsupportforfamiliesdevastatedby terminal illness.Palliative Care East bossessay the £1.5m target is within£80,000 of being reached, andsay they are grateful to thegenerosity of people in theborough.They are now urging peoplenot to forget the charity whenthe Louise Hamilton Centreopens its doors in December,as donations will help top-upthe grant money coveringrunning costs.And doctors and nurses saythe centre – in the grounds ofthe James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH) – will makecare for terminally ill patientsbetter than ever before.Dr Bernadette Auger, alocum palliative careconsultant with 32 yearsexperience as a doctor, saysshe has seen phenomenalimprovement in treatmentsduring her career.And she says the LouiseHamilton Centre will helpsupport services catch up withtreatments.“People had nowhere to gobefore and this will definitelyimprove things,” she said. “Wewill have a really goodenvironment to meet patientsand talk with families.“At the moment it’s just inthe corridor at the JPH and istotally wrong.“With the new centre, peoplewill have privacy and can havethe confidence to talk moreopenly.”Dr Auger has been aconsultant for 18 years andworked at the JPH for a decade,and says she will be able tooffer a better quality of carein the new centre.Julie Broom, a specialistpalliative care nurse, says thecentre can offer emotionalsupport for all those affectedby the trauma of terminalillness.“All the treatments meanpeople are living longer butstill have problems and needmore advice,” she said. “Thisis much needed – havingeverything together meanspatients feel as if they belong.“It will hopefully preventthat disjointed feeling of care,and a lot of people who havelost family members can seehow this centre is going tohelp.”Ms Broom – a nurse for adecade and at the JPH for thelast five years – will seepatients at the centre wherean estimated 10,000 people willreceive help each year.She and Dr Auger will offermedical advice, informationand support.Fund-raising co-ordinatorJenny Watson highlighted hergratitude to fund-raisers, andis urging people who have lostloved ones to terminal illnessto get in touch with the centrewhen it is open – as they maybe able to use their experienceto help others.The centre will be namedafter Gorleston woman LouiseHamilton, who tragically diedaged 28 after a battle withbreast cancer.Fund-raising began in 2006and building work on thecentre – being designed byNorwich-based LSI Architects– has begun.The centre and outreachservice is a partnershipbetween NHS Norfolk andWaveney, local county councilsand the voluntary sector;including funds from thePalliative Care East appeal.It will bring together a widerange of organisations thatcan help support patients whoare living with a life-limitingillness and also help theirloved ones.CARETEAM:Palliative carecentre at theJames PagetHospital.BernadetteAuger, JennyWatson andJulie Broom.PICTURE:JAMES BASSDancers tohelp celebrateSuffolkDancers of all ages and abilities areinvited to feature in the climactic finaleof a film project celebrating Suffolk’saquatic landscapes.In November, the Community CreativeArts Projects Association won BBCPerforming Arts funding to set up adance and film project, entitledWaterborne.More than 30 people, aged betweeneight and 86, have been involved sinceApril, exploring the county’s meres,rivers, broads, saltmarshes and seasidethrough the rhythm of dance andmovement.The project culminates in the BigDance by the Sea at Dunwich beach,near Southwold, on July 14 and the film’sproducers want to make it a foot-stomping finish.Mel Horwood, director, choreographerand film-maker, is working with localmusicians and singers to also create ascore.She said: “I am really enjoying thisproject. The funding has enabled us tobring in two internationally- renowneddance practitioners to lead workshopsfor us, so the participants are getting arich dance experience as well as havingfun outside.“In my last film about places, I had avery committed and wonderful group ofwomen who came and danced inSouthwold lighthouse, at SotterleyChapel and on the platform at Becclesrailway station. Many of them are backfor this project and we have expanded toinclude hip-hoppers from Lowestoft.”To join the dance send an e-mail tomeljhorwood@yahoo.co.uk.By Sam Russellsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukWaveneyAdvertiser24more news onlineFully Air Conditioned • Early Booking Appreciated01502 562121 • 01502 569998 • Mobile 07874 247362www.redrose-lowestoft.co.uk | email: info@redrose-lowestoft.co.uk85-86 High Street, Lowestoft NR32 1XNOpening Hours:Monday to Sunday (Friday Lunch Closed) 12noon to 2.30pm & 5.30pm to 11.30pmIncluding Bank Holidays20% off your food billon Mondays on production of voucherfrom www.redrose-lowestoft.co.ukAll offers apply to Restaurant Only.Meal Deal every Wednesdaybetween 5.30 pm and 11pm (dining in only)£10.50 per personAny starterAny main dishAny side dishRice or NanCoffeeAdditional £3 payable forsea food, Red Rose special,tandori dishes, Balti Specialand Appetiser for two10% Discount on Collection Orders over £20FREE HOME DELIVERYORDER OVER £10 (Within a 4 mile radius)FREE BOTTLE OF LAGER(275ml) with every order over £20 home delivery
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 7Norwich Evening News Friday, May 25, 2012Biographer in cityRobust performanceSoft drink group Britvic yesterday saw a“robust” performance despite operating in adrinks market adversely affected by thebad weather in April and early May.Revenues across the company, whichhas a factory in the Carrow Works inNorwich, grew by 1.7pc in the 28 weeks toApril 15 to £641.1m, including growth of2.4pc in its home market taking GB revenueto £430.9m.But the group pre-tax profits were 10.5pcdown on last year’s first half, at £24.8magainst £27.7m, with the fall largelyreflecting increased costs of sales, but netdebt was reduced by 3.9pc, to £534.4m, andthe board is proposing a 3.9pc increase inthe interim dividend to 5.3p per share. Thegroup’s France and International divisionsalso saw strong growth but the BritvicIreland operation continued to struggle in adeclining market.Biographer Anne Sebba will be signingcopies of her new book at Norwich’sJarrold department store next month.The writer will be at the LondonStreet store from 6.30pm on Tuesday,June 19 to discuss and sign copies of hernew book, That Woman: The Life ofWallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor.She will only sign copies of booksthat are purchased at the event oraccompanied by a valid Jarrold receipt.Tickets are £5 and are available fromthe Jarrold customer services desk, on thesecond floor, by calling 01603 660661 orgoing to www.jarrold.co.ukCouncil confirms launchof email investigationAn independent investigation has started into thealleged sending of an email by a political assistantat Norfolk County Council, which seemed to be anattempt to undermine the leader of another council.But council bosses will not name the investigator.Kevin Vaughan, political assistant to theConservative group at County Hall, had beensuspended over an email about West NorfolkCouncil leader Nick Daubney.The county council confirmed that aninvestigator has been appointed, but said theiridentity must be kept secret to protect their“complete independence”.An email was allegedly sent by Mr Vaughan toBBC Radio Norfolk to tip off the broadcaster thatWest Norfolk Council leader Mr Daubney wasfacing a leadership challenge.Care centreto be namedafter LouiseThe new Palliative Care EastCentre will be named afterGorleston woman LouiseHamilton, who tragically diedaged 28 after a battle with breastcancer.A public consultation asking forsuitable names for the new centre,currently being built at the JamesPaget University Hospital,revealed the popular choice.Louise was born in Gorleston in1969 and was a pupil atWroughton and Lynn Groveschools before she went to BristolUniversity and graduated with adegree in languages. At the age ofjust 26, Louise found she hadbreast cancer and she sadlypassed away aged 28.While Louise was living withher cancer, she had found the helpoffered to her by the BristolCancer Help Centre to beenormously beneficial.Her mother, Roberta Lovick, ofPotter Heigham, was inspired byLouise’s experience of asupportive care and informationcentre in Bristol to startfundraising for a similar centrefor people in Great Yarmouth andWaveney.And Mrs Lovick’s experiencewith her daughter Louise helpedinspire the launch of thePalliative Care East appeal backin 2006.The new Palliative Care Eastfunded-centre will be called theLouise Hamilton Centre and willopen in December this year. It isexpected to be used by 10,000people a year.Mrs Lovick said: “It was just soemotional finding out the centrewould be named after Louise.“I’m very touched that so manypeople put her name forward.”Mental healthmerger updateThe merger of Norfolk andSuffolk’s mental health trusts hasso far led to savings that over thecourse of a year will add up to£4m, a meeting has heard.More than 100 redundancieshave been made by bringingtogether Norfolk and WaveneyMental Health NHS FoundationTrust and the Suffolk MentalHealth Partnership NHS Trust inJanuary this year.At a meeting of the NorfolkHealth Overview and ScrutinyCommittee, the boss of the neworganisation, Norfolk and SuffolkNHS Foundation Trust, told hownone of the 104 posts maderedundant were clinical roles andthree quarters of redundancieswere voluntary.Eyesore pub looksset for demolitionAn eyesore Earlham pubwhich has been emptyfor years finally looksset to be bulldozed, tothe delight of localschoolchildren who havepressed for action.The Shoemaker pub,in Earlham West Centre.closed in 2005 and hasbecome a magnet forvandals.Bert Bremner, Labourcouncillor forUniversity, hascampaigned for actionand year six youngstersfrom nearby WestEarlham Junior Schooljoined the fight.They wrote letters toMr Bremner andNorwich South MPSimon Wright callingfor something to be doneabout the eyesore.Norwich City Councilhas served a notice onthe owners under theBuilding Act 1984because it is “ruinousand dilapidated”.The owners now have120 days to do it up ordemolish it, or the citycouncil will do the workand charge them.It appears the threathas done the trick, asdemolition signs havegone up.Jon Biddle, a teacherat West Earlham JuniorSchool, said thechildren, who sent theletters as part of theirliteracy work, weredelighted with the resultand were keen tocampaign on otherissues.Mr Bremner said hewas pleased action wasbeing taken and praisedthe schoolchildren forshowing they caredabout the area aroundtheir school.Are you fighting to getaction over an eyesore inNorwich? Call EveningNews reporter DanGrimmer on 01603 772375or email dan.grimmer@archant.co.ukdan.grimmer@archant.co.ukDan GrimmerDelighted: Pupils with replies to their letters about the pub. They are Hallem Norman,11, front, with from left, Rhianna Davey, 11; Megan Walker, 11; Dylan Tempelaars, 11;Ryan Fuller, 10; and Lauren Heuer-Bates, 10. PHOTO: DENISE BRADLEYiwitness24.co.ukShare your news & picturesFor reviews of restaurants, pubs and bars inthe Norwich area, dont miss the Weekend sectionof your Norwich Evening News every Saturday.
  • Covering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonCovering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonYOUR MUSTREAD FREENEWSPAPERWednesday, June 27, 2012Centre taking shape asfundraising continuessamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy Sam RussellDELIGHTED charity bosses haverevealed that work on the Louise Ham-ilton Centre at the James Paget Hospitalis on schedule. And pictures show thebuilding is starting to take shape as itmoves towards its December completiondate.Norwich architects LSI designed thePalliative Care East-funded centre tohave a central space as a dramatic curv-ing shape resembling an upturned boat- a reminder of the scheme’s seaside con-text and the idea of an ‘ark’ as a placeof refuge.Flowing from the social space in theLouise Hamilton Centre will be a con-cealed private garden.Extensive glazing to the central areawill enable the inside and outside spacesto connect with one other.The scheme also incorporates a greenroof with hot water heating provided bysolar hot water panels.As contractors ISG get on with theconstruction work the centre almostlooks like the hull of a boat being built.The project has been made possiblebecause of dedicated fundraisers - whoare on track to raising the £1.5m total -and charity efforts are continuing.Yarmouth offshore worker JonO’Hara has raised nearly £2,500 for theappeal by completing the gruelling UKIronman challenge.The 70.3 mile feat included a swim,cycle and marathon run and he says heis pleased with his finish time of 6hrs54mins 16secs.“This was slightly more than I’dplanned,” revealed Jon. “But as soon asthe bike leg started I knew it was goingto be a long day.”Martin Pennell was supported by thePalliative Care East team after he losthis partner last year.He has just completed a sponsoredskydive and has raised almost £1,000 forthe appeal to say thank you to the team.“I wanted to do a sky dive to raisemoney for Palliative Care East as my latepartner sadly passed away in November2011 after a long illness,” said Martin. “Iknow that if this new centre was up andrunning while he was alive, this wouldhave helped him and myself greatly.“I want to help to raise the funds tohelp people who are needing end oflife care and are needing more support.“Hopefully in the future this will makea real difference.”The centre has been named after Gor-leston woman Louise Hamilton, whotragically died aged 28 after a battlewith breast cancer.A public consultation asking for suit-able names for the new centre revealedthe popular choice.Louise was born in Gorleston in 1969and at the age of just 26, found she hadbreast cancer. She sadly passed awayaged 28.Her mother, Roberta Lovick, of PotterHeigham, was inspired by Louise’s expe-rience of a supportive care and informa-tion centre in Bristol to start fundraisingfor a similar centre for people in GreatYarmouth and Waveney.And Mrs Lovick’s experience withher daughter Louise helped inspire thelaunch of the Palliative Care East appealback in 2006.The new Palliative Care East funded-centre will be called the Louise Hamil-ton Centre and will open in Decemberthis year.It is expected to be used by 10,000people a year.Place ofrefuge: Work isprogressing atPalliative CareEast’s LouiseHamilton Centre,in the groundsof the JamesPaget UniversityHospital.Local artists enjoycity successWarmer welcome atVauxhall stationA beautiful two bedroom bungalowin Bradwell: See PROPERTY INSIDE1 High Mill Link, off Gapton Hall Road, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk NR31 0DL • info@docwras.com • www.docwras.comGreat Yarmouth’s Largest Vehicle Dismantler & Scrap Metal MerchantsDVLA Authorised Treatment Facility Fully Licensed by the Environment AgencyMIKE DOCWRA & SONLOOKING TO SCRAP YOUR CAR?££££ BEST PRICES PAID LOCALLY ££££1000s OF SECOND HAND CAR PARTS IN STOCKCall the professionals for the best price and peace of mind01493658504
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 9“It was fortunate everyone actedquickly to get the passengers off.”He said officers could see thesmoke from several miles away.A UEA spokesman said: “Duringthe summer vacation period, theuniversity’s en suite studentaccommodation is available forgroup bookings.“The group affected by thisincident are staying on campusunder such an arrangement.Do you have a story for the EveningNews? Call reporter Peter Walsh on01603 772436 or email as below.NORFOLK PLUMBINGAlan CooperTele: 01603 734253 / 07950 471139ac.norfolkplumbing@googlemail.com(East Anglia) LtdDomestic Installation & RepairsEmergency calls welcomeBathrooms & KitchensBasins Toilets BathsShowers TilingHeatingRadiators PowerflushPumps CylindersRepairsBlocked drains/JettingCCTV Surveys Leaks and more...Norwich Evening News Monday, July 16, 2012Garden centre surgeryVisitors to a Norwich garden centre willbe able to have a chat with their localpolice officer this weekend.The Norwich South SaferNeighbourhood Team (SNT) will beholding a surgery at Notcutts, DanielsRoad, from 3pm to 4pm on Sunday.Theft alert for driversPolice in Great Yarmouth are renewing theirappeals to motorists to protect their carsfrom thieves after several vehicles werebroken into across the borough.Since the beginning of July, offendershave targeted cars in Great Yarmouth,Gorleston, Caister, Hopton, Ormesbyand Hemsby stealing items includingCDs, sunglasses, sat nav systems, clothingand binoculars.Ball for cat charityA charity masquerade ball is to be heldin Norwich this weekend to help fundsfor a new vehicle for the Norwich Branchof Cats Protection.Dereham Cats Protection will beholding a treat ball from 7pm onSaturday at the Mercure Hotel,Boundary Road, for a new vehicle.Tickets are now on salepriced £35 per person or £300 per table(10 people).For more information call Dereham CatsProtection on 01362 687919.Centre is on courseBosses say a £1.5m palliative care centre inGorleston is on target to be completed inDecember as brick walls go up on site.The Louise Hamilton Centre at JamesPaget University Hospital is taking shapemore than five years after fund-raisersbegan their campaign.Norwich architects LSI designed thePalliative Care East-funded centre to have acentral space as a dramatic curving shaperesembling an upturned boat, and the arkwas put in place in June.The project has been made possible bygenerous donations,iwitness24.co.ukShare your news & picturesNorwich City: History as it Happened– a new hardback book with reports fromour archives. Call 01603 772174 to order.Fifty are led to safety inA47 coach blaze dramaFifty pensioners were taken off acoach on one of Norfolk’s busieststretches of road last night justminutes before it burst intoflames.The holidaymakers fromSomerset were staying at the UEA,in Norwich, and had been on a daytrip when the drama happened onthe A47 at Honingham, nearDereham, at about 6pm.They had stopped at the junctionof Wood Lane and two passers-byran to the coach to tell the driverflames were coming from the back.The passengers were removed tosafety from the coach but the firequickly spread and the vehiclewas burnt out within a fewminutes. No-one was hurt but onepassenger was treated at the scenefor shock.Billowing smoke could be seenfrom several miles away.The A47 was shut in bothdirections for about an hourand closed again later in theevening for a recovery lorry toremove the burnt-out coach.Motorists faced long delays anddiversions.The road re-opened by 9pm.Fire crews from Earlham andDereham put out the blaze.Tim Johnson, from Dereham, acoach driver, was heading backfrom Norwich and got caught inthe delays. He saw the drama.He said: “The coach had pulledover at the junction which is theturn off to Honingham and Iassume he realised there wassomething wrong.“Two passers-by ran to thecoach to tell the driver to get thepassengers off as they could seeflames coming out of the back.“It was really fortunate as three-four minutes later the coach was aball of flames.”Mr Johnson offered to take thepassengers back to the UEA, butan Eastern Counties doubledecker was sent to the scene.PC Chris Tremlin, of Norfolkpolice, said an engine faultappeared to have caused the fire.Peter Walsh and Ian Clarkepeter.walsh@archant.co.ukConfirmation expected on £25m rail cashA Norwich MP has spoken of theimportance of work to tackle a railbottleneck ahead of theannouncement of majorgovernment projects today.Ministers are today expected toinclude work to dual the Ely NorthJunction, at a cost of £25m, as partof a £9bn package of investmentin Britain’s railways.The improvements at ElyNorth would allow increasejourneys on the Norwich-Cambridge line, as well asfrom King’s Lynn toLondon.The project is widelyexpected to be included intoday’s announcement.Norwich North MP ChloeSmith said: “The Ely Northinvestment is a crucial earlyelement of the East Anglianrail improvementswhich we need for the next 20years. It opens up many linesincluding for business investment,freight and leisure passengers.”South West Norfolk MPElizabeth Truss, who has led thecampaign for improvements at ElyNorth alongside Mid Norfolk MPGeorge Freeman, said: “This isincredibly positive. The exactdetails are still to bepresented but theinformation I amreceiving from theDepartment forTransport is that theupgrade of the ElyNorth Junction willtake place.”Over the weekend,further details of the£9bn investmentpackage emerged,whichministers hope will breathe newlife into the economy. Billed as thebiggest programme of investmentin the railways since the Victorianera, the plan includes theelectrification of the MidlandMain Line – and the funding tocomplete the Thameslink andcross-London Crossrail schemes.Lines from London to Bristoland Cardiff could also beelectrified, along with those fromManchester to Liverpool,Blackpool and Leeds.An east-west link from Oxfordand Aylesbury to Milton Keynescould also be restored.See www.eveningnews24.co.uk forthe latest on the announcement.What do you think? Write toEvening News letters at ProspectHouse, Rouen Road, Norwich, NR11RE, or email eveningnewsletters@archant.co.ukScene: Theblazing coach onthe A47 last night.PICTURE: VERONICA HILL
  • 6 Midweek Mercury, Wednesday, July 18, 2012Palliative centre is well on targetBOSSES say the region’s £1.5m pallia-tive care centre is on target to be com-pleted in December, as brick walls go upon site.The Louise Hamilton Centre at theJames Paget Hospital is taking shapemore than half a decade after dedicatedfundraisers began their campaign.Norwich architects LSI designed thePalliative Care East-funded centre tohave a central space as a dramatic curv-ing shape resembling an upturned boat,and the ark was put in place in June.As contractors ISG get on with theconstruction work - and as seen in thepicture - the centre almost looks like thehull of a boat being built.The project has been made possible bygenerous donations to fundraisers - whoare on track to raising the £1.5m total -and charity efforts are continuing.Yarmouth offshore worker Jon O’Harahas raised nearly £2,500 for the appealby completing the gruelling UK Ironmanchallenge. The 70.3 mile feat included aswim, cycle and marathon run and hesays he is pleased with his finish time of6 hours 54 minutes 16 seconds.“The swim went well and I feltvery comfortable,” said Mr O’Hara.“Although the start kept getting delayed,which doesn’t help the anxiety, and thewater temperature was a mildly chilly 16degrees!“However, within 10 minutes of thecycle start I realised that the hillinesswas no joke and I was more on for a longcycle.“As soon as I got this in my head thenI dug deep and got on with it.”He said his family were looking foran ambulance when he took much longerthan his planned time, but he managedto last the distance - even with a kneeinjury playing up.“The final 100 metres of the run Isprinted like I’ve never sprinted before,”he revealed. “All told, the day was superb.I am now waiting for the 2013 full UKIronman for my next challenge.”samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy sam russellTAKING SHAPE: The new Louise Hamilton Centre is beginning to take shape at the James Paget Hospital.IRONMAN: Great Yarmouthoffshore worker Jon O’Harahas raised nearly £2,500 forthe appeal by completeing thegruelling UK ironman challenge.Digital Print Shop andPORTRAIT STUDIOBarkers Photographic4 Lowestoft Road, Gorleston,Great Yarmouth, NR31 6LYwww.barkersphotographic.co.uk
  • WaveneyAdvertiser12 August 3, 2012The remarkable achievementsof two of Waveney’s hardestworking fund-raisers are to berecognised with a special tributeat the area’s new palliative carecentre.Pakefield pair Zoiyar Cole andJanet Ellis have together raisedmore than £280,000 for cancercharities over the past decade,including the Palliative CareEast appeal (PCE) and the SandraChapman Ward at the JamesPaget University Hospital.Now, in recognition of theirefforts, two of the rooms at theLouise Hamilton Centre at theJames Paget University Hospitalare to be named in their honour.One will become the Paul Coleroom in memory of Zoiyar’s son,and the other will be known asthe Jazos room after their formercharity shop in south Lowestoft.Since the Paul Cole CancerFund was set up in memory ofZoiyar’s son, who died from livercancer in 1999 aged just 35, thetwo friends have raised £282,025for charity.Over the years, they haveorganised countless events andalso opened Jazos in LondonRoad South which has nowpassed to East Anglia Children’sHospices (EACH).Their fund-raising eventsincluded three Lowestoft toe-dips (2008, 2009 and 2010) thatraised £4,981, £3,222 and £2,189;the annual Lowestoft MoonliteWalk in 2010 and 2011 whichraised £1,804 and £3,647, andmost recently the 2012 SolarStroll in Pakefield that raised£4,692.50.The money they collected hasbeen donated to the SandraChapman Ward, PCE, MarieCurie Cancer Care, MacmillanNurses, East Anglia’s Children’sHospices(EACH)andQuidenhamHospice.Mrs Cole said: “We got excitedwhen we got up to £100,000 – wejust wanted to pay back MarieCurie and the Sandra Chapmanward.”At the Solar Stroll, 65 peoplewalked from Pakefield toLowestoft along the seafrontcarrying solar lights tocelebrate the Queen’s DiamondJubilee, before returning toPakefield for the lighting of thebeacon.“The walk was lovely and theatmosphere was fantastic,” MrsCole added.The Louise Hamilton Centreis being built in the grounds ofthe James Paget with moneyraised by PCE. It will provide amuch-needed base and source ofinformation and advice forpatients and their families inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.Mrs Cole and Mrs Ellis, whoare both former winners of TheLowestoft Journal’s Pride in theCommunity awards, said theywere honoured to be receivingreco gnition for theirfund-raising.“We’re really proud. We’ve gottwo rooms at the Palliative CareEast Centre (Louise HamiltonCentre) and only one otherperson has got that.“We would like to thankeverybody that has supported usover the years and donatedmonies to the Paul Cole CancerFund–andalltheladyvolunteerswho helped us having Jazos. Abig ‘thank-you’ to them.”A room at the Louise HamiltonCentre is also to be named afterLowestoft Charities Board and alounge is to be named afterPotters Leisure Resort inHoptonPROUD: Zoiyar Cole and Janet Ellis who have raised more than £280,000for cancer charities over the past decade.Centre rooms tomark work offund-raising duoKINGSWOODLOW ON PRICE...HIGH ON QUALITYFamily run business, established 13 yearsWe have installed over £20m worth of goods90% of our business comes from recommendationsNo high pressure Salesmen10 year guaranteeVALUE FOR MONEYLOWESTOFT 01502 515657Registered Company6 ‘A’ RatedWindowsfrom £1595SPECIAL OFFER3m X 2.4mEdwardian Conservatory(inc. basework) £9800NOW ONLY £5999Doorsfrom just £4953m X 3m Lean To(inc. basework)FROM ONLY £4800
  • 4 Midweek Mercury, Wednesday, August 8, 2012New Palliative Care Centreroom sponsors revealedFAMILIES who know the anguish ofterminal illness have thrown their sup-port behind a centre to help others goingthrough the same pain.Great Yarmouth and Waveney’snew palliative information and sup-portive care centre at the James PagetUniversity Hospital will be complete inDecember.And families have helped reach the£1.5m total needed to make the LouiseHamilton Centre a reality by sponsor-ing rooms in memory of loved ones.Fundraising co-ordinator JennyWatson said: “We couldn’t have gothere without a real community spiritand without local people really takingthis appeal to their hearts.“We are truly grateful to each andevery person who has donated.”Mrs Watson said: “The appeal willkeep going to support the Louise Ham-ilton Centre when we open and themany people who will benefit from itsservices.”The Louise Hamilton Centre, fundedby the Palliative Care East Appeal, willgive local people access to information,advice and support about life-limitingillnesses.The centre is being named after Gor-leston woman Louise, who died aged 28of breast cancer.Advice about clinical information,complementary therapies and moneymatters will be provided in a calm andcomforting centre.The rooms and communal spaces inthe Louise Hamilton Centre have alsobeen generously sponsored and a listof names has been announced - manyin memory of loved ones who lost theirlives to terminal illness.The rooms will be named as follows:Maggie Watson – in memory of TomWatsonBob and Joan Ship/SnowdropLouise Hamilton TrustGeorge Darling/Gardline – in memoryof George DarlingZoiyar Cole and Janet Ellis – inmemory of Paul ColeJazos – in memory of Paul ColeJulia Bolch – in memory of RichardBolchThe Buzz Team; Lowestoft CharitiesBoard.Communal spaces have been supportedby the following:Garden – Tremaine Kent – in memoryof Carla SaundersLounge - Potters Leisure ResortKitchen - Friends Charity Shop.The centre will also have a beautifulbutterfly artwork wall that was fundedby generous donations.For more information on the LouiseHamilton Centre visit www.palliative-care-east.org.uksamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLTRIBUTE:LouiseHamilton,who diedaged 28,of breastcancer.VISION: An artist’s impression of how the new care centre will look.Designer Specs - Factory PricesFully Qualified Dispensing OpticiansJust Bring Your Prescription & We’ll Do The RestCall 01493 604509 or visit: www.i-ware-house.co.ukMonday - Friday 10am - 5pm Saturday 10am - 4pmMorton Peto Rd, Gapton Hall Industrial Estate, Great Yarmouth, NR31 0LT(Next to Inkbox & Jesters Diner)• DesignerFrames• BudgetFrames• Sunglasses• Kids Spes• 3D Specs......and manymore, ALL atFactory Prices!• Fully qualified Dispensing Opticians• Over 700 Frames on Display• Comprehensive Lens Choices• Free Specs with NHS Voucher• Large Kids Range• On-Site Glazing Facility
  • YarmouthAdvertiser4 August 9, 2012Palliative Care Centre’sroom sponsors revealedFAMILIES who know the anguish ofterminal illness have thrown theirsupport behind a centre to help othersgoing through the same pain.Great Yarmouth and Waveney’snew palliative information andsupportive care centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital will becomplete in December.And families have helped reach the£1.5m total needed to make the LouiseHamilton Centre a reality bysponsoring rooms in memory ofloved ones.Fundraising co-ordinator JennyWatson said: “We couldn’t have gothere without a real community spiritand without local people really takingthis appeal to their hearts.“We are truly grateful to each andevery person who has donated.”Mrs Watson said: “The appeal willkeep going to support the LouiseHamilton Centre when we open andthe many people who will benefitfrom its services.”The Louise Hamilton Centre,funded by the Palliative Care EastAppeal, will give local people accessto information, advice and supportabout life-limiting illnesses.The centre is being named afterGorleston woman Louise, who diedaged 28 of breast cancer.Advice about clinical information,complementary therapies and moneymatters will be provided in a calmand comforting centre.The rooms and communal spacesin the Louise Hamilton Centre havealso been generously sponsored and alist of names has been announced -many in memory of loved ones wholost their lives to terminal illness.The rooms will be named asfollows:Maggie Watson – in memory of TomWatsonBob and Joan Ship/SnowdropLouise Hamilton TrustGeorge Darling/Gardline – inmemory of George DarlingZoiyar Cole and Janet Ellis – inmemory of Paul ColeJazos – in memory of Paul ColeJulia Bolch – in memory of RichardBolchThe Buzz Team; Lowestoft CharitiesBoard.Communal spaces have beensupported by the following:Garden – Tremaine Kent – inmemory of Carla SaundersLounge - Potters Leisure ResortKitchen - Friends Charity Shop.The centre will also have a beautifulbutterfly artwork wall that wasfunded by generous donations.For more information on the LouiseHamilton Centre visit www.palliative-care-east.org.ukTRIBUTE:LouiseHamilton,who diedaged 28,of breastcancer.VISION: An artist’s impression of how the new care centre will look.Help to rescue centreARAFT of events are beingstaged to help a Hemsbywildlife rescue centre tostay open and carry on caringfor the tide of orphaned orinjured animals that flowsthrough its doors. Foxy Lodgecurrently has 90 animalsincluding a crop of babyhedgehogs but is struggling tomeet the £5,000 annualrunning costs. Now JoanNaylor and her sister Ann havestepped in with a three monthfundraising campaign to raisethe money that will allow theowners to get on with the life-saving work they do best.Joan said: “They are reallystruggling for cash at presentas they have over 90 beastiesin needing round the clockcare. We desperately don’twant to lose them from ourvillage as they are the onlypeople locally who takewildlife.”Events are as follows:Prize bingo, Hemsby VillageHall, Friday, August 10, doorsopen 6.30pm eyes down7.30pm. Prizes, raffle,tombola, refreshments, cakestall, bar open.Family barbecue and fun nightat The Sunningdale Club,Newport Road, Hemsby,Saturday, August 11 4pmonwards with barbecue,tombola, raffle, auction,children’s and adult’s games,entertainment.Quiz night, Hemsby VillageHall, Friday, August 24, £10for a team of four includingnibbles. Bar, raffle, auction.Tables must be booked inadvance.Ladies pamper evening,Hemsby Village Hall, 7.30pm,Thursday, September 13.Tickets £2 in advance. Minitreatments including facials,manicures, tarot cardreadings, hair dressing,massages, jewellery, cakesand more.For more information aboutany of the events or to donatecall Joan on 01493 732041 orAnn via 01493 733188. Allproceeds to Foxy LodgeWildlife Rescue.FUNDINGALERT:Tonia andJohnGarner aregettingsome helpraisingmoney fortheirwildlifehospital.By Sam Russellsamuel.russell@archant.co.uk
  • allthingsgreenerECO SHOP01379 854840www.allthingsgreener.co.uk7 Union Street, Harleston,Norfolk IP20 9BDFair Trade GiftsWooden jigsaws, boardgames and skipping ropes.Jewellery, bags and stationery.We stock anextensive range ofEcover products inour shop. You canalso bring in yourempty bottles for arefill to save moneyand energy.ANDFAIR TRADEFOOD TOO!!S J & L Marjoram LtdDomestic and Commercial Electrical ServicesSolar PV installer01379 8548408 Friday, August 17, 2012 Journal online: bbjournal24.co.ukMarathon cycleride for charitysamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLTWO friends pedalled from themost westerly point of Walesto the most easterly point ofEngland to help Palliative CareEast (PCE) to its £1.5m goal.Dan Baker and Ben Driver rackedup more than 400 miles in the saddlefrom St David’s Head, Pembrokeshireto Ness Point in Lowestoft.And they have already raised morethan £1,000 for PCE’s new LouiseHamilton Centre in the grounds of theJames Paget University Hospital (JPH)and the East Anglian Air Ambulancecharity.Dan, 25, said the coast to coast ridewas a “success” but was a real test ofendurance.“The hardest part was Wales becauseof the very steep hills,” explained theprimary school teacher, who lives inLowestoft. “They were so steep thatwe had to keep getting off our bikes towalk up them.“This put us back a bit and meantwe had to do some night cycling oncountry roads.“I am glad we brought our lightsthat’s for sure, and amazingly, we onlygot one puncture!”He and his friend Ben, 21 of Beccles,completed the 440 miles in five days- weaving through Brecon, Worcester,Coventry, Kettering, Ely and Thetford.They arrived back in Lowestoft at4.30pm last Friday.And they are delighted to have raisedso much money for charity.“I chose the PCE appeal as I’m astrong believer in its cause - to supportpeople suffering with life-limitingdiseases through a first-class specialistcare centre,” said Dan. “I have a goodfriend who lost his wife to cancer at ayoung age and I understand the needto offer people decent quality care andsupport when their lives are affectedby such dreadful illnesses.”He added that Ben chose the EastAnglian Air Ambulance because agood friend was once helped by thelife-saving service.To sponsor the pair, visit www.justgiving.com/teams/west2eastThey also have a Facebook pagewhich is ‘Coast to Coast Charity BikeRide 2012’.The Louise Hamilton Centre is setto open in December this year and isexpected to be used by 10,000 people ayear.It is being designed by Norwich-basedLSI Architects who have designed thecentral space as a dramatic curvingshape resembling an upturned boat–a reminder of the scheme’s seasidecontext and of the notion of an “ark”as a place of refuge.The PCE appeal was launched in2006 and is now within £100,000 of its£1.5m target.The centre and outreach service is apartnership between NHS Norfolk andWaveney, local county councils andthe voluntary sector; including fundsfrom the PCE appeal.It will bring together a wide rangeof organisations that can help supportpatients who are living with a life-limiting illness and also help theirloved ones.JOURNEY’SEND: DanBaker and BenDriver pedalled400 miles fromWales toLowestoft toraise cash forthe PalliativeCare Eastappeal and theEast Anglian AirAmbulance.Have your say on how to regenerate townsSHOPPERS are being invited to havetheir say to help regenerate the towncentresof Beccles,Bungay,Halesworthand Lowestoft.The Waveney Business Forum iscalling on shoppers to give theiropinions on issues relating to a rangeof topics in an effort to uncover waysthat the towns can be improved.Local business groups had theirsay to identify issues they think areimportant, and now the survey hasbeen created to gain the thoughts ofthose that shop in the towns.Rebecca Ellis, of Digital EraResearch, said: “This survey is beingundertaken in the context of concernsabout the future prospects of ourhigh streets and town centres, whichare faced with a number of factorswhich have stimulated unprecedentedchange. The survey will providevital details about shifting shoppingpatterns.”Part of the inspiration of the studywas to build on the momentum gainedfrom Lowestoft and Halesworth’s bidsto be a part of the Mary Portas PilotScheme, which proved successful forLowestoft.Bruce Provan, Waveney DistrictCouncil’s cabinet member for leisure,tourism and economic development,said: “The Portas bids have beengreat in acting as a fresh catalyst tobring local shops and others togetherto work in partnership to see howthey can improve trade in their towncentres.“However,themostimportantpartnerin all of this is the local shopper andthis survey will give them the chanceto say what they think about what iscurrently on offer and how it can beimproved.”He added: “This survey wants tocollect the views of consumers inWaveney to try and get an accuratepicture of what people think about theshopping experience on offer in ourmarket towns and town centres.“Ultimately, the project aims to givethe Waveney towns a boost by bringingin changes that would improve thatexperience, which might be differentopening hours, or more town events toattract visitors.”There will be a draw of those whohave taken part in the survey with £250of vouchers given to the first person,and five other prizes worth £50.SurveyscanpickedupinBecclesfromBeccles Books, Library and Saxons. InBungay they can be collected from TheChocolate Box, Tutti Fruity, BungayPet Stores, Crocks and Earsham StreetDelicatessen.In Halesworth they are at HalesworthStationers, Library and Merlin Shoes,from Lowestoft they are in the BrittenShopping Centre Management Office,Ganaden Properties and the KirkleyCentre.To take part online visit http://tiny.cc/waveneyshoppersurvey
  • Eastern Daily Press, Saturday, September 22, 2012 www.EDP24.co.uk/news NEWS 25Husband’srace challengefor ill wifeA hypnotherapist and life coach,whose wife is terminally ill with arare cancer, is preparing to run threehalf-marathons in three months toraise money for research.Vicky Cornish, from Billingford,near Dereham, was diagnosed withadenoid cystic carcinoma, a cancerin her adrenal gland, in 2010, butafter having the tumour removed wastold a relapse last year was terminal.The 28-year-old found no researchinto the disease is carried out in theUK, so husband Fynn decided to enterthe 13-mile races in Ipswich,Peterborough and Norwich to raisefunds for studies in America.Mr Cornish, 28, said: “The last raceI ran was when I was in high school,which was a few years ago. It’ssomething I thought would grabpeople’s attention, and people willsay, ‘This guy is doing something thatwill challenge himself and raisemoney and awareness’. I have beentraining for two months, and I have aslight problem with my knee, but Ihave got a stubborn character and Iwill complete the courses even if Ihave to hobble around.”The Ipswich half-marathon istomorrow, the Great Eastern Run onOctober 14, and the Norwich half-marathon on November 25.The couple will celebrate their firstwedding anniversary shortly beforehis last race.See www.imagineit.org.uk tosponsor Mr Cornish.BILLINGFORDREFUGE: A visitor in what will be the centre’s main space, looking out towards the enclosed garden area£1.5m centre takes shapePicture: JAMES BASSGORLESTONBy LUCY CLAPHAMSupporters of a long-runningcampaign to provide a much-neededcare centre for people suffering fromincurable illnesses were given asneak peek around the state of theart facility they have been tirelesslyfundraising for.Campaigners and patrons gatheredat the Louise Hamilton Centreyesterdaytolookinsidethedistinctiveyellow building as it continues totake shape within the grounds of theJames Paget Hospital in Gorleston.Work on the £1.5m building beganin March and is expected to becompleted by Christmas, with thecentre opening to patients in the newyear. Funding has been raisedthrough the Palliative Care Eastappeal, which launched in 2006.Groups, individuals, schools andclubs from across the area havedonated towards the centre and theimpending opening is creating a buzzamongst campaigners.Among those to get an early view ofits unique surroundings was RobertaLovick who helped spearhead theproject from the beginning.The centre is named after herdaughter who died aged 28 afterbattling breast cancer. While livingwith her cancer, she received greatsupport from a centre in Bristol.Inspired by this Mrs Lovick, 60,began the appeal to build a similarcentre for people in Great Yarmouthand Waveney, and after lookingaround the building this week saidcampaigners’ collective dream had“come to fruition”.“The building itself is amazing, it’sdone Louise proud,” she added. “Theexcitement for me will be when thedoor opens for patients and carers.“It’s been made possible by thepeople and I think it’s a centre for thepeople where they can feel safe.”Onceopenedthefacilitywillprovideinformation, advice and support forpeople suffering from cancer andincurable illnesses – and their carers– from the point of diagnosis, rightup to end of life care.It will also offer complementarytherapies, bereavement support,family counselling and welfare adviceamongst other services, and signpostpeople to other groups if they needmore specific help. Visitors will alsobe able to enjoy a large shelteredgarden.Rooms inside the centre have beennamed after sponsors and a butterflymosaic will feature the names ofindividuals and groups that raisedmore than £2,000 for the appeal.lucy.clapham@archant.co.uk
  • 16 Friday, September 28, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukJames Bondfilm to boostcentre appealJAMES Bond’s latest offering willbe shown before the release datein a special charity preview in aidof the palliative care centre at theJames Paget University Hospital inGorleston.The suave spy will be an agent forthe palliative care centre’s appeal, asa charity preview of the 23rd Bondflick is shown at Great Yarmouth’sHollywood Cinema on Thursday,October 25, at 7pm, the evening beforethe general release in cinemas acrossthe country.There will also be a charity auctionwith items donated by HollywoodCinema’s Trevor Wicks, including aframed poster of the film, a life-sizecardboard cut-out of Daniel Craigand a year’s admission to the cinema.Also on offer from the HippodromeCircus will be a family ticket for theChristmas Circus while Blue SkyLeisure is providing a winter breakat Kelling Heath Holiday Park.Tickets to this special previewof Skyfall, which marks the 50thanniversary of Bond’s screen debutin Dr No, are on sale now from theHollywood Cinema during normalopening times, priced at £20 and £15.Palliative Care East appeal patronand event organiser Tony Mallionsaid: “People are, as always, invitedto dress up if they wish.“It’s a premiere, so no one will lookout of place in a Bond syle dinnerjacket.“There’s always keen anticipationabout every Bond film, even afterhalf a century, and most of us can’twait, so it is good to be able to see iteven a day in advance.“But when we held the firstpremiere with Casino Royale, it wasin the very early days of the appeal.Now the centre is fast taking shape atthe James Paget Hospital.“It is there for all to see and shouldbe opening its doors very soon.“While we will continue to raisefunds for its day-to-day running thisis such an important milestone.“We hope that we will attract a fullhouse, although seats are limited, forwhat will be a real night of excitementand celebration.”Work on the palliative care centre- now officially named the LouiseHamilton Centre in memory of a localwoman who died of breast cancer - ismaking rapid progress.It is hoped to be completed by theend of the year.Tickets can be booked in person atthe Hollywood Cinema or by phoning01493 852600.Campaigners proud tosee vision take shapelucy.clapham@archant.co.ukBy LUCY CLAPHAMSUPPORTERS of a longrunning campaign to providea much-needed care centrefor people suffering fromincurable illnesses were givena sneak peek around the state-of-the-art facility for whichthey have been tirelesslyfundraising.Campaigners and patrons gatheredat the Louise Hamilton Centre to lookinside the distinctive yellow buildingas it continues to take shape withinthe grounds of the James PagetHospital.Work on the £1.5m building beganin March and is expected to becompleted by Christmas, with thecentre opening to patients in the newyear.Funding has been raised throughthe Palliative Care East appeal,championed by the Mercury, whichwas launched in 2006.Groups, individuals, schools andclubs from across the area havedonated towards the centre and theimpending opening is creating a buzzamong campaigners.Among those to get an early view ofits unique surroundings last Fridaywas Roberta Lovick who helpedspearhead the project from thebeginning. The centre is named afterher daughter who died aged 28 afterbattling breast cancer.While Louise was living with hercancer, she received great supportfrom a cancer help centre in Bristol.Inspired by this Mrs Lovick, 60, fromPotter Heigham, began the appeal tobuild a similar centre for people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney. Andafter looking around the building shesaid campaigners’ collective dreamhad “come to fruition”.“The building itself is amazing, it’sdone Louise proud,” she added. “Theexcitement for me will be when thedoor opens for patients and carers.“It’s been made possible by thepeople and I think it’s a centre for thepeople where they can feel safe.”Once opened the facility will provideinformation, advice and support forpeople suffering from cancer andincurable illnesses - and their carers- from the point of diagnosis, right upto end of life care.It will also offer complementarytherapies, bereavement support,family counselling and welfare adviceamong other services, and signpostpeople to other groups if they needmore specific help.Visitors will also be able to enjoy alarge sheltered garden at the centreof the building, which has beendesigned to look like an upturnedboat as a nod to its seaside settingand to represent an ‘ark’ as a placeof refuge.Therapy rooms inside the centre -which is expected to support 10,000 ayear - have been named after sponsorsand a butterfly mosaic will featurethe names of individuals, groupsand clubs that have raised more than£2,000 for the appeal.Jenny Watson, appeal coordinator,said: “Thousands of people have puttime, effort and commitment intothis. We’re not the biggest area so Ithink the local community has donea fantastic job in hard times.“We have a great hospital, but it’s avery acute, busy hospital so we needa place of tranquillity and calm andspace and that’s what we can give.”Apprentices at the Paget arewalking 10km in their pyjamas in aidof the appeal.The team is aiming to raise £2,000and will be setting off from thehospital at 11pm at night on Friday,October 5 on a round route that willtake in Gorleston seafront.To sponsor them, call Jill on 01493453070.CLOSE: New palliative carecentre: The Louise HamiltonCentre, being built in the groundsof the James Paget UniversityHospital, pictured is RobertaLovick mother of Louise Hamilton.Picture: JAMES BASSJune scores a charity bullseye in memory of her motherDARTS players have helped keep theLouise Hamilton Centre on target forits £1.5m bullseye.Mum-of-three June Dunstan raisedmore than £800 for the Palliative CareEast appeal in memory of her latemother Barbara Hewitt. A darts matchon Halvergate Playing Fields back onJuly 21 helped raise £815.50 for theappeal.The total was presented to membersof the palliative care team at the JamesPaget University Hospital (JPH) thismonth.Mrs Dunstan, her three childrenAmanda, Karl and Matthew and hersister Susan presented the cheque.She has organised that another£750 will be sent to the appeal viaWhitbread.To date, Mrs Dunstan has raised£5,300 in her mother’s name.They will have a butterfly tile in thenew centre and Mrs Dunstan wishes tocontinue to support the centre with herfundraising when it is opened.A new campaign to support the centrehas also been launched.Thousands of daffodils are to beplanted at the front of the centreand within the integral garden, andcampaigners are asking people tosupport them by buying five bulbs for£5.There will be a book in the centrewith the names of people who havecontributed to the daffodil gardens.If you would like to lend your support,write with the name of the person youwish to be remembered, a donation of£5 and your name and address or emailaddress so acknowledgement can besent.The address is: Jenny Watson:Palliative Care East, James PagetHospital, Lowestoft Road, NR31 6LAFurther events are coming up:On Thursday, October 4 there will bea demonstration and lunch with MarkGee at the Royal Norfolk and SuffolkYacht Club. Tickets cost £20.Two events are planned at GreatYarmouth Racecourse - on Saturday,November 3 an Italian night and onSunday, November 4 Circus Starr.Both will run at 2pm and also at 5pm.
  • To book or for further information please call: 01603 886747 All holidays are operated by the tour operator and contracts are between the tour operator and clientdirect. These tours are operated by Sunrise Direct. ABTA V6237.quoting WEEKLYFestive Weekendin SkegnessFriday 9th NovemberEnjoy a festive weekend break to the popular resort ofSkegness staying at the County Hotel. Along withChristmas Day and New Years Eve celebrations, weinclude two nights entertainment, a Christmas dinner andtwo excursions to Lincoln and the market town ofBoston.• Three nights half board accommodation• Two nights entertainment• Coach travel throughout• Two included excursions• Complete luggage handling• No single room supplement (subject to availability)Pick-Up Points: Gt Yarmouth - Acle - Norwich - Dereham -Swaffham - Kings Lynn4 Day Break Only £149*Subject to availabilityReader Travel FESTIVE BREAKSTurkey & Tinsel inWeston-Super-MareMonday 12 NovemberWeston-Super-Mare is the ideal destination for a fabulousfive day Turkey and Tinsel break. Our holiday includesfour nights at the Daunceys Hotel, celebrating ChristmasDay, Boxing Day and New Years Eve, along with two fullday excursions visiting the magic of Bath, Wells andGlastonbury.• Four nights half board accommodation• Two nights entertainment• Coach travel throughout• Two included excursions• Complete luggage handling• No single room supplement (subject to availability)Pick-Up Points: Gt Yarmouth - Acle - Norwich - Wymondham -Attleborough - Thetford5 Days Only £189A Torbay Turkey & TinselMonday 3 DecemberTorquay is the most glamorous of all West Country resortswith a bustling harbour, elegant street facades andwonderful views across Torbay. Our five day break staysat the Hotel Richmond boasting spectacular views andgreat hospitality. Our holiday includes festivecelebrations and excursions visiting Dartmoor & Plymouthand Exeter & Teignmouth.• Four nights half board accommodation• Two nights entertainment• Coach travel throughout• Two included excursions• Complete luggage handling• No single room supplement (subject to availability)Pick-Up Points: Norwich - Diss - Stowmarket - Ipswich - Colchester5 Days Only £179Christmas in EastbourneSunday 23 DecemberJoin us for the ultimate festive celebration on the SouthCoast in the ever-popular resort of Eastbourne. Stayingfor four nights at the Eastbourne Riviera Hotel on a fullboard basis, with a full Christmas luncheon, festiveentertainment programme and two half day excursions toBrighton and to Alfriston.• Four nights full board accommodation• Full Christmas luncheon• Festive entertainment• Coach travel throughout• Two included excursions• Complete luggage handling• No single room supplement (subject to availability)Pick-Up Points: Gt Yarmouth - Acle - Norwich - Attleborough -Thetford5 Days Only £439County Hotel Daunceys Hotel Hotel Richmond EastbourneRiviera HotelFANTASTICVALUE!NO SINGLESUPPLEMENT*FULLBOARD56 Friday, September 28, 2012 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukEatingdisorderstreatmentcentre opensTHE first in-patient centre in Suffolkcapable of treating young people inWaveney with eating disorders willopen next month in Oulton.Health bosses have said the facilityat Airey Close will mean that childrenand teenagers will be treated closer totheir homes, rather than being sentout of the county for many weeks ofrehabilitation.It comes after doctors warnedthe number of youngsters referredto them in the county with eatingdisorders had risen by 20pc.Andy Goff, Child and AdolescentMental Health Service (CAMHS)manager for Norfolk and Suffolk NHSFoundation Trust, said the eight-bedunit, which is a result of £500,000of improvements to existing healthbuildings, would be a “step forward”for the county.He said: “It will be used to treatyoung people with a variety of mentalhealth issues, but that will includethose with eating disorders.“There are currently a numberof people going out of the countylocation and young people with eatingdisorders don’t want to go miles awayfrom home.”Mr Goff said that in-patienttreatment would last, on average,about three months.Patients would then be supported athome where “the best recovery takesplace”.The unit, which will employ 30 staff,is due to open in the second week ofOctober.B-eat – the national eating disordercharity – can offer a great deal ofinformation and support throughtheir helpline on 0845 634 1414 ortheir website at www.b-eat.co.ukSupporters get a sneakpeek at new care centreSUPPORTERS of a long-running campaign to provide acarecentreforpeoplesufferingfrom incurable illnesses weregiven a sneak peek around thestate-of-the-art facility theyhave been tirelessly backing.Campaigners gathered at theLouise Hamilton Centre to lookinside the distinctive yellow buildingas it continues to take shape withinthe grounds of the James PagetHospital.Work on the £1.5m building beganin March and is expected to becompleted by Christmas, with thecentre opening to patients in the newyear.Funding has been raised throughthe Palliative Care East appeal whichlaunched in 2006.Groups, individuals, schools andclubs from across the area havedonated towards the centre and theimpending opening is creating a buzzamong campaigners.Among those to get an early view ofits unique surroundings was RobertaLovick who helped spearhead theproject from the beginning. Thecentre is named after her daughterwho died aged 28 after battling breastcancer.While Louise was living with hercancer, she received great supportfrom a cancer help centre in Bristol.Inspiredbythis,MrsLovick,60,fromPotter Heigham, began the appeal tobuild a similar centre for people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney. Andafter looking around the buildingshe said the campaigners’ collectivedream had “come to fruition”.“The building itself is amazing, it’sdone Louise proud,” she added.Once opened the facility will provideinformation, advice and support forpeople suffering from cancer andincurable illnesses – and their carers– from the point of diagnosis, rightup to end-of-life care.It will also offer complimentarytherapies, bereavement support,family counselling and welfare adviceamong other services and signpostpeople to other groups if they needmore specific help.Visitors will also be able to enjoy alarge sheltered garden at the centreof the building, which has beendesigned to look like an upturnedboat as a nod to its seaside settingand to represent an ark as a place ofrefuge.Therapy rooms inside the centre– which is expected to support 10,000people a year – have been named aftersponsors and a butterfly mosaic willfeature the names of individuals,groups and clubs that have raisedmore than £2,000 for the appeal.Jenny Watson, appeal co-ordinator,said: “Thousands of people have puttime, effort and commitment intothis. We’re not the biggest area so Ithink the local community has donea fantastic job in hard times.”Apprentices at the Paget arewalking 10km in their pyjamas inaid of the appeal. The team is aimingto raise £2,000 and will be setting offfrom the hospital at 11am on Friday,October 5 on a round route that willtake in Gorleston seafront. To sponsorthem, call Jill on 01493 453070.James Bond’s latest offering willbe shown before the release date ina special charity preview for thepalliative care centre at the hospital.The suave spy will be an agent forthe Palliative Care Centre’s appealin October, as a charity preview ofthe 23rd Bond film is shown at GreatYarmouth’s Hollywood Cinema onThursday, October 25, at 7pm, theevening before the general release incinemas across the country.There will also be a charity auctionwith items donated by HollywoodCinema’s Trevor Wicks, including aframed poster of the film, a life-sizecardboard cut-out of Daniel Craigand a year’s admission to the cinema.Also on on offer from the HippodromeCircus will be a family ticket for theChristmas Circus while Blue SkyLeisure is providing a winter breakat Kelling Heath Holiday Park.Tickets to this special previewof Skyfall, which marks the 50thanniversary of Bond’s screen debutin Dr No, are on sale now from theHollywood Cinema during normalopening times, priced at £20 and £15.Tickets can be booked in person atthe Hollywood Cinema or by phoning01493 852600.TAKING SHAPE: The Louise Hamilton Centre, being built in thegrounds of the James Paget University Hospital, is due to open topatients in the new year. Picture: JAMES BASS
  • A brand new, two day celebration of the bestlocal food and drink, set within the historicgrounds of Bungay Castle.Indulge in the Waveney Valley’s best producein style with a mouth-watering festival from thishidden gem, running through the borderbetween Norfolk and Suffolk.Showcasing local breweries and top qualityartisan food producers, with demonstrationsand activities to keep the whole familyentertained over the weekend.Come & join us it’s FREECELEBRATING THE BEST PRODUCE FROM THE WAVENEY VALLEYThe Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE) is funded by Defra and the EUEarly Dawn Building Serviceswww.earlydawnwindows.co.ukRushmere Road, Carlton Colville, LowestoftFor free advice call us on01502 531825Quality Workmanship Guaranteed• New Build• Extensions• Garden RoomsWINDOWS & CONSERVATORIESJournal online: bbjournal24.co.uk Friday, September 28, 2012 9Campaigners’ anger over ‘lobbying’CAMPAIGNERS againstplans to construct a heritagerailway on a stretch of Suffolkcountryside have accuseddevelopers of lobbyingsupport.Letters in favour of theSouthwold Railway Trust’s bidto bring a half-mile steam lineto Wenhaston have been sentfrom across the globe, but theyhave denied accusations thatthey have been “whipping upsupport”.Villagers who criticised theproject for being located ona flood plain and threateningheavy visitor traffic are uppingtheir campaign after lettersof support for the proposalreached more than double thenumber of objections.Phil Montague, who liveswith his family at the east endof the line, said: “The trusthas been lobbying membersto write to Suffolk Coastal insupport of this development.”However, the trust’s publicityofficer, the Rev Simon Pitcher,refuted the claim, saying: “Wehave not been whipping upsupport. Obviously, the storyhas appeared in the monthlyrailway press that is readaround the world. The lettersof support reflect a globalinterest in the application.”Trains last operated at thesite more than 80 years agoand, since 1994, the trust hasexplored reopening the line.Plans also include rebuildingthe old station and creatinga wildlife and visitor centre,featuring a cafe and museum.Consultation expires onOctober 4.New carecentre is nowtaking shapeanthony.carroll@archant.co.ukBy ANTHONY CARROLLPROUD: Roberta Lovick at the care centre named after herdaughter Louise Hamilton.SUPPORTERS of a longrunning campaign toprovide a much-neededcare centre for peoplesuffering from incurableillnesses were given asneak peek around thestate of the art facilitythey have been tirelesslyfund-raising for.Campaigners and patronsgathered at the LouiseHamilton Centre to look insidethe distinctive yellow buildingas it continues to take shapewithin the grounds of theJames Paget Hospital.Work on the £1.5m buildingbeganinMarchandisexpectedto be completed by Christmas,with the centre opening topatients in the new year.Funding has been raisedthrough the Palliative CareEast appeal which launchedin 2006.Groups, individuals, schoolsand clubs from across thearea have donated towardsthe centre and the impendingopening is creating a buzzamongst campaigners.Among those to get anearly view of its uniquesurroundings was RobertaLovick who helped spearheadthe project from the beginning.The centre is named after herdaughter who died aged 28after battling breast cancer.While Louise was living withher cancer, she received greatsupport from a cancer helpcentre in Bristol.Inspired by this Mrs Lovick,60, from Potter Heigham,began the appeal to build asimilar centre for people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.And after looking around thebuilding she said campaigners’collective dream had “come tofruition”.“The building itself isamazing, it’s done Louiseproud,” she added. “Theexcitement for me will bewhen the door opens forpatients and carers.“It’s been made possible bythe people and I think it’s acentre for the people wherethey can feel safe.”Once opened the facilitywill provide information,advice and support for peoplesuffering from cancer andincurable illnesses - and theircarers - from the point ofdiagnosis, right up to end oflife care.It will also of fercomplimentary therapies,bereavement support, familycounselling and welfareadvice amongst other services,and signpost people to othergroups if they need morespecific help.Visitors will also be able toenjoy a large sheltered gardenat the centre of the building,which has been designed tolook like an upturned boat asa nod to its seaside setting andto represent an ‘ark’ as a placeof refuge.Jenny Watson, appeal co-ordinator, said: “Thousandsof people have put time, effortand commitment into this.We’re not the biggest area soI think the local communityhas done a fantastic job inhard times. We have a greathospital, but it’s a very acute,busy hospital so we need aplace of tranquillity and calmand space and that’s what wecan give.”
  • Wednesday, October 3, 2012James Bond film toboost centre appealJAMES Bond’s latest offering willbe shown before the release date in aspecial charity preview in aid of thepalliative care centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital in Gorles-ton.The suave spy will be an agent forthe palliative care centre’s appeal, as acharity preview of the 23rd Bond flickis shown at Great Yarmouth’s Holly-wood Cinema on Thursday, October 25,at 7pm, the evening before the generalrelease in cinemas across the country.There will also be a charity auctionwith items donated by Hollywood Cin-ema’s Trevor Wicks, including a framedposter of the film, a life-size cardboardcut-out of Daniel Craig and a year’sadmission to the cinema. Also on offerfrom the Hippodrome Circus will be afamily ticket for the Christmas Circuswhile Blue Sky Leisure is providing awinter break at Kelling Heath HolidayPark.Tickets to this special preview ofSkyfall, which marks the 50th anniver-sary of Bond’s screen debut in Dr No,are on sale now from the HollywoodCinema during normal opening times,priced at £20 and £15.Palliative Care East appeal patronand event organiser Tony Mallion said:“People are, as always, invited to dressup if they wish.“It’s a premiere, so no one will lookout of place in a Bond syle dinnerjacket.“There’s always keen anticipationabout every Bond film, even after halfa century, and most of us can’t wait, soit is good to be able to see it even a dayin advance.“But when we held the first premierewith Casino Royale, it was in the veryearly days of the appeal. Now the centreis fast taking shape at the James PagetHospital.“It is there for all to see and should beopening its doors very soon.“While we will continue to raisefunds for its day-to-day running this issuch an important milestone.“We hope that we will attract a fullhouse, although seats are limited, forwhat will be a real night of excitementand celebration.”Work on the palliative care cen-tre - now officially named the LouiseHamilton Centre in memory of a localwoman who died of breast cancer - ismaking rapid progress.It is hoped to be completed by theend of the year.Tickets can be booked in person atthe Hollywood Cinema or by phoning01493 852600.Santa-Claus-is-coming, to-townFESTIVE lights and a Christmas tree area familiar sight in Great Yarmouth as thetown gets into the holiday spirit.But this year these Christmas classicswill be joined by dozens of charitable StNick’s as the town prepares to host itsfirst ever Santa Run.Organised by East Anglia’s Children’sHospices (Each) the novelty race, whichbegan in Bury St Edmunds in 2006,encourages entrants to don a Santa suit- topped off with a hat - and complete acircular route of the seaside resort.But the fancy dress guidelines are notstrict and participants are welcome tocome as an alternative Christmas charac-ter, such as a Christmas tree or reindeer- both of which have featured at previousevents.The Santa run will be taking over thetown on Sunday, December 9 and it ishoped fundraisers of all ages will turnout in force to take part. Entrants are wel-come to run, jog, walk or stroll the 1.7kmroute and to even bring their pets alongfor the festive day out.An Each spokesman said: “We are soexcited to be hosting our first ever GreatYarmouth Santa Run. Our LowestoftSanta Run works really well and runnersreally enjoy running right by the sea, someeven go for a brave dip afterwards!”Since the first event six years ago,the al fresco fundraiser has expandedacross the region and in 2011 races wereheld in Peterborough, Lowestoft, BurySt Edmunds, Cambridge, Braintree andIpswich raising more than £47,000 forEach.The event, sponsored by the ComfortHotel in Albert Square, sets off from theWellington Pier at 11am. Registrationcosts £10 for adults, including a Santasuit, or £8 without and £5 for childrenunder 13 including a Santa hat.For more information visit www.each.org.uk or call 01953 715559 for an entryform.LOTS OFTHEM!Covering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonCovering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonNEXTWEEKin YOURGREATYARMOUTHMERCURY16-pagebird’s eye viewof our gloriouspart of Norfolkwith picturesby aerialphotographerMIKE PAGE in theOctober 15 issueCOASTline16-PAGE bird’s eye view of our glorious part of NorfolkSign up to Mercury campaignand make a difference1 High Mill Link, off Gapton Hall Road, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk NR31 0DL • info@docwras.com • www.docwras.comGreat Yarmouth’s Largest Vehicle Dismantler & Scrap Metal MerchantsDVLA Authorised Treatment Facility Fully Licensed by the Environment AgencyMIKE DOCWRA & SONLOOKING TO SCRAP YOUR CAR?££££ BEST PRICES PAID LOCALLY ££££1000s OF SECOND HAND CAR PARTS IN STOCKCall the professionals for the best price and peace of mind01493658504
  • Midweek Mercury, Wednesday, October 3, 2012 3lucy.clapham@archant.co.ukBy Lucy ClaphamSUPPORTERS of a longrunning campaign toprovide a much-neededcare centre for peoplesuffering incurable ill-nesses were given a sneakpeek around the state-of-the-art facility for whichthey have been tirelesslyfundraising.Campaigners and patrons gath-ered at the Louise Hamilton Cen-tre to look inside the distinctiveyellow building as it continues totake shape within the grounds ofthe James Paget Hospital.Work on the £1.5m buildingbegan in March and is expected tobe completed by Christmas, withthe centre opening to patients inthe new year.Funding has been raisedthrough the Palliative Care Eastappeal, championed by the GreatYarmouth Mercury, and launchedin 2006.Groups, individuals, schoolsand clubs from across the areahave donated towards the centreand the impending opening is cre-ating a buzz among campaigners.Among those to get an earlyview of its unique surroundingslast Friday was Roberta Lovickwho helped spearhead the projectfrom the beginning. The centreis named after her daughter whodied aged 28 after battling breastcancer.While Louise was living withher cancer, she received great sup-port from a cancer help centre inBristol.Inspired by this Mrs Lovick,60, from Potter Heigham, beganthe appeal to build a similar cen-tre for people in Great Yarmouthand Waveney. And after lookingaround the building she said cam-paigners’ collective dream had“come to fruition”.“The building itself is amaz-ing, it’s done Louise proud,” sheadded. “The excitement for mewill be when the door opens forpatients and carers.“It’s been made possible by thepeople and I think it’s a centre forthe people where they can feelsafe.”Once opened the facility willprovide information, advice andsupport for people suffering fromcancer and incurable illnesses -and their carers - from the pointof diagnosis, right up to end of lifecare.It will also offer complementarytherapies, bereavement support,family counselling and welfareadvice among other services, andsignpost people to other groups ifthey need more specific help.Visitors will also be able toenjoy a large sheltered garden atthe centre of the building, whichhas been designed to look like anupturned boat as a nod to its sea-side setting and to represent an‘ark’ as a place of refuge.Therapy rooms inside the cen-tre - which is expected to support10,000 a year - have been namedafter sponsors and a butterflymosaic will feature the names ofindividuals, groups and clubs thathave raised more than £2,000 forthe appeal.Jenny Watson, appeal coordi-nator, said: “Thousands of peoplehave put time, effort and commit-ment into this. We’re not the big-gest area so I think the local com-munity has done a fantastic job inhard times.“We have a great hospital, butit’s a very acute, busy hospital sowe need a place of tranquillity andcalm and space and that’s what wecan give.”Apprentices at the Paget arewalking 10km in their pyjamas inaid of the appeal.The team is aiming to raise£2,000 and will be setting offfrom the hospital at 11pm at nighton Friday, October 5 on a roundroute that will take in Gorlestonseafront.To sponsor them, call Jill on01493 453070.CLOSE: New palliative care centre:The Louise Hamilton Centre,being built in the grounds of theJames Paget University Hospital,pictured is Roberta Lovick,mother of Louise.Picture: JAMES BASSPalliative care campaignersproud as vision takes shapeMASSIVE 2ND HANDFURNITUREwww.palmerstores.com37-39 Market Place, Great Yarmouth Tel: 01493 844291Celebrating 175 Years 1837 – 2012PALMERS CAR PARK FREE AFTER 4PMNO SUITEOVER £150STRICTLY SOLD ON A“FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIS”Car Park, Stonecutters Way, back of Palmers Department Store Great YarmouthOPEN FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 9am – 11am
  • Covering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonCovering Great Yarmouth & GorlestonYOUR MUSTREAD FREENEWSPAPERWednesday, October 10, 2012Bond premiere in townEXCITEMENT is mounting asthe opening of the latest JamesBond adventure at the end of themonth gets nearer.Fans in Great Yarmouth have thechance to see Skyfall ahead of the rest ata charity premiere being organised at theHollywood Cinema on Thursday, October25, the day before general release.The screening will benefit the new Lou-ise Hamilton Palliative Care Centre at theJames Paget University Hospital which isfast approaching both completion and thetarget of £1.5 million which it is costingto build.“We are nearly there,” said appealpatron Tony Mallion who is arrangingthe special showing of the 23rd Bondfilm,”but even when the building cost iscovered there will still be other expensesand continuing running costs for the cen-tre which we will need to find.”Daniel Craig will once again play 007and while the plot is being kept a closelyguarded secret it will centre a lot aroundBond’s boss, M, played as always by DameJudi Dench. Last Friday was dubbed BondDay in recognition of the release of thefirst film, Dr No starring Sean Connery,50 years ago in 1962. The day also saw therelease of the latest Bond theme, sung thistime by Adele.“I think everyone feels this is going tobe a really strong addition to the series,”said Tony.“EveryBondfilmisanevent-andwe’rehoping once again to make it even moreso. It’s a chance for people to dress up andenjoy a bit of glamour if they wish.”Barkers Photographic will be on handto take photographs of groups and indi-viduals which will be on sale at the end ofthe evening with a donation going towardsthe appeal.As well as the preview screening therewill be an auction conducted by MarkDuffield of Aldreds.Hollywood Cinema chain ownerTrevor Wicks has not only given the cin-ema for the night but is providing somereal collectors items for screen buffs. Hehas donated a framed poster of Skyfalltogether with the full-sized cardboardstand up advertisement with DanielCraig which you see in the foyers pro-moting the film.In addition there’s a year’s admis-sion to the Hollywood while MichaelTimewell of Blue Sky Leisure has pro-vided a break at the company’s KellingHeath holiday park in North Norfolk andPeter and Christine Jay a family ticketfor the Hippodrome Christmas Circus.“We are really grateful for this sup-port,” said Tony.The evening begins at 7pm and tick-ets can be booked in advance price £20and £15 from the Hollywood box officewhich is open from 5 pm on weekdaysand from lunchtime at the weekends on01493 852600.Showing: DanielCraig as JamesBond in thelatest Bondmovie releaseSkyfall, thatis released atthe end of themonth andis showingAt Hollywoodcinema in abid to raisemoney for theLouise HamiltonPalliative CareCentre at theJames PagetUniversityHospital.Join our team and make a differenceto where we live See Page 9Get intothe Spirit!Page 4Goss to makeleap of faithPage 51 High Mill Link, off Gapton Hall Road, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk NR31 0DL • info@docwras.com • www.docwras.comGreat Yarmouth’s Largest Vehicle Dismantler & Scrap Metal MerchantsDVLA Authorised Treatment Facility Fully Licensed by the Environment AgencyMIKE DOCWRA & SONLOOKING TO SCRAP YOUR CAR?££££ BEST PRICES PAID LOCALLY ££££1000s OF SECOND HAND CAR PARTS IN STOCKCall the professionals for the best price and peace of mind01493658504
  • YarmouthAdvertiserThis is just a small selection fromour large and varied programme.To book, or for further details,call 01502 574669www.bellecoaches.co.ukDUNOON TURKEY & TINSEL Saturday 24th - Friday 30thNovember 7 Days £349.00This super Highland Turkey & Tinselbreak is sure to get you well andtruly in the party mood. As well as afull coach itinerary of superexcursions, you will be wined, dinedand entertained!.WARNERS THORESBY HALL HOTELMonday 14th - Friday 18th January2013 5 Days £359.00However you view it, Thoresby Hallis an architectural delight. Set inrolling parklands on the edge ofSherwood Forest, this 18th CenturyGrade I listed Victorian countryhouse is the ideal place to relax and unwind.NOVEMBERFRI 23 MANCHESTER XMAS MARKET3 DAYS£159.00FRI 30 DURHAM XMAS MARKET 4 DAYS£239.00FRI 30 BOULOGNE 3 DAYS£159.00DECEMBERSUN 9 EDINBURGH XMAS MARKET 5 DAYS£299.00FRI 14 BIRMINGHAM XMAS MARKET 4 DAYS£259.00THU 27 ISLE OF WIGHT 4 DAYS£249.00MON31 LONDON NEW YEAR 3 DAYS£229.00JANUARYFRI 4 LIVERPOOL 4 DAYS£249.00FRI 18 SHEFFIELD 3 DAYS £149.00FRI 25 BINGO BREAK 4 DAYS £229.00MON28 ISLE OF WIGHT 5 DAYS £225.00FEBRUARYFRI 1 MANCHESTER 3 DAYS £149.00MON4 BOURNEMOUTH 5 DAYS £249.00FRI 8 MIDLAND EXPLORER 3 DAYS £129.00FRI 15 WELL MEET AGAIN 5 DAYS £239.00SAT 16 COSTA BRAVA 15 DAYS £849.00SAT 16 LONDON WEEKEND 2 DAYS £109.00MON25 MORECAMBE 5 DAYS £239.00MARCHTHU 7 OSTEND 3 DAYS £175.00FRI 8 HARROGATE 4 DAYS £229.00FRI 15 SHROPSHIRE 4 DAYS £259.00FRI 15 IRELAND 5 DAYS £369.00MON18 EASTBOURNE 5 DAYS £269.00FRI 22 YORK 3 DAYS £159.00SUN 24 MIGHTY RHINE 5 DAYS £389.00MON25 TORQUAY 5 DAYS £239.00MON25 LAKE DISTRICT 5 DAYS £289.00SUN 31 LONDON 2 DAYS £129.00APRILMON1 CARDIGAN BAY 5 DAYS £289.00MON8 ISLE OF WIGHT 5 DAYS £279.00MON15 LAKE GARDA 8 DAYS £499.00SUN 21 SCOTTISH HOUSE PARTY 7 DAYS £369.00Book online atwww.gorlestonpavilion.com01493 662832Personal Callers Mon - Thurs 10am - 3pmWhat’s on...Friday 12th October, 7.30pmANN BREENFor many years Ann has been sharing her uniquestyle of music with audiences all over the world.Listen to her sing her hits that will include thepopular chart topping Pal of My Cradle Days and YourOld Wedding Ring. With Ann’s special blend of magic,she will have you singing along till yourheart’s content.Saturday 13th to Saturday 13th OctoberWHEREVER YOU AREWherever You Are is a special benefit show in aid ofone of the charities that is supporting our disabledtroops and the families who have lost dear ones inrecent conflicts.Starring Andy Eastwood plus special guestappearances from Lucia Matisse - Olly Day and TheMarine Band from T.S. Fearless - this is aperformance you won’t want to miss.Thursday 18th to Friday 19th OctoberZOMBIE WEDDINGNerdy but loveable Neil has just two things on hismind: pharmacology and a secret love for his bestfriend Cathy. So when he returns from a long stay inHaiti to find her finalising her wedding day plans - ourhero has to make the toughest decision of his life.Should he tell Cat how he feels or help make herspecial day one to remember?THEHITE WAN1 North Quay, Gt YarmouthTEL: 01493 8420272 FOR 12 People can eat for £7.30Mon - Sat Lunch TimesFri - Sat EveningFind us on facebookSundayAfternoonGIGGY STARDUSTStartersHomemade cream of Asparagus Soupserved with crispy croutonsCheesy Mushroom Hotpotwith a touch of cream and brandyDuck Patewith an orange glaze served with Melba ToastMelon Skewersdrizzled with a honey and yoghurt dressingButterfly King Prawnsserved with a sweet chilli dipMainsChicken Palma HamChicken Breast wrapped with Palma Hamtopped with melted cheeseBeef Chasseurin a mushroom tomato and tarragon saucePork Loin Steakserved with an apple and cinnamon compoteTraditional Roast Turkeyserved with all the trimmingsFillets of Plaice and Prawnplaice fillets wrapped with prawnscoated in a white wine sauceChristmas Wrapfilled with tomato and vegetables topped with a creamy sauceand melted cheeseDessertsTraditional Christmas Puddingand Brandy SauceWinterberry Cheesecakeand creamLemon Meringue PieCheese & BiscuitsFestive Christmas PartyFriday 14th December Saturday 15th DecemberSaturday 22nd December3 Course Meal with Entertainment : £25 per personHemsby’s family friendly pub next to the seaFantastic Fish Friday &Saturday Steak & Grill SpecialsBuy any 2 meals from the Specials...get a bottle of wine FREE!Sunday Carvery & Hot BuffetNot just a carvery!!!£7.95 Adults £4.95 ChildrenServed from 12 noon til 5pmBookings advised as very popular!Tel 01493 733 281Sea View Rd, Hemsby, Norfolk NR29 4JG T: 01493 733 281www.thelaconarms.co.ukChristmas & New YearsEve Parties are just around thecorner... reserve your place now!Tel: 01493 733 281YOUR RIGHTSIf you buy goods from a trader you have rightsunder the Sale of Goods Act. It is important,therefore, that you know whether you arebuying from a trader or a private individual. Toprotect consumers, The BusinessAdvertisements (Disclosure) Order 1977demands that trade advertisers clearly indentifythemselves.As a matter of policy, this newspaper requiresall traders to include their name in anadvertisement. Where it is not immediatelyclear to consumers from the name and contactindicated in the advertisement that a businesssale is taking place, the letter ‘T’ is placed atthe end of the advertisement. For example,‘Jones’ would require a T, whereas ‘Jones Cars’would not.October 11, 2012 71Bond premiere in Great Yarmouth!HALVERGATE Parish Church is holdingan Antique Valuation and Identificationday at the Village Hall in Halvergate,tomorrow 10am-2pm. Experts fromHorners will be there to value items. Eachvaluation is £1 and a maximum of threeper person. Also refreshments, cakes andproduce, gifts, raffle, books and bric-a-brac. Proceeds to Halvergate Church.AN Autumn Bazaar takes place onOctober 13 starting at 10am. Venue isGunton Estate Tenants Hall,Hollingsworth Road, Lowestoft.Refreshments, stalls and three mediums.All money raised to the Norfolk andSuffolk Animal Trust who re-homeunwanted dogs and cats.VARIETY performers are joining forcesat Gorleston’s Pavilion Theatre for anannual show which helps servicemenand woman. Wherever You Are is beingstaged on October 13 and aims to beat itsbest-ever total of £10,000 for Help forHeroes, SSAFA Forces Help and the RoyalAnglian Regiment Benevolent Fund. Theshow is tomorrow at 2.30pm and 7.45pm.Seats £15, concessions and groups of 10 ormore £14. To book call the box office on01493 662832, Monday to Thursday10-3pm.ST Peter’s Wednesday club is holding acoffee morning for the Sandra ChapmanUnit at the James Paget Hospitaltomorrow, 10.30am. Cakes, raffle, plants,bric-a-brac, books, tea, coffee, biscuits atSt Peter’s Church, Lowestoft Road,Gorleston. Entry 50p.EXCITEMENT is mounting asthe opening of the latest JamesBond adventure at the end ofthe month gets nearer. Andfans in Great Yarmouth havethe chance to see Skyfall aheadof the rest at a charitypremiere being organised atthe Hollywood Cinema onThursday, October 25, the daybefore general release.The screening will benefitthe new Louise HamiltonPalliative Care Centre at theJames Paget UniversityHospital which is fastapproaching both completionand the target of £1.5 millionwhich it is costing to build.Daniel Craig will once againplay 007 and while the plot isbeing kept a closely guardedsecret it will centre a lotaround Bond’s boss, M, playedas always by Dame Judi Dench.Last Friday was dubbed BondDay in recognition of therelease of the first film, Dr Nostarring Sean Connery, 50years ago in 1962. The day alsosaw the release of the latestBond theme, sung this time byAdele.Barkers Photographic willbe on hand to take photographsof groups and individualswhich will be on sale at theend of the evening with adonation going towards theappeal.As well as the previewscreening there will be anauction conducted by MarkDuffield of Aldreds.Hollywood Cinema chainowner Trevor Wicks has notonly given the cinema for thenight but is providing somereal collectors items for screenbuffs. He has donated a framedposter of Skyfall together withthe full-sized cardboard standup advertisement with DanielCraig which you see in thefoyers promoting the film.In addition there’s a year’sadmission to the Hollywoodwhile Michael Timewell ofBlue Sky Leisure has provideda break at the company’sKelling Heath holiday park inNorth Norfolk and Peter andChristine Jay a family ticketfor the Hippodrome ChristmasCircus.The evening begins at 7pmand tickets can be booked inadvance price £20 and £15 fromthe Hollywood box officewhich is open from 5 pm onweekdays and from lunchtimeat the weekends on 01493852600.
  • “Britain’s most gifted medium”STEPHEN HOLBROOKIn an exciting evening ofCLAIRVOYANCEWednesday 17th October 7.30 pmDoors open 6.45pm for 7.30pm startHOTEL VICTORIA, LOWESTOFTAll Seats £16 or £17 on the doorBooking Line 01924 256542or pay on the door88 Friday, October 12, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukRoll out the red carpetfor Hollywood premiereEXCITEMENT is mounting asthe opening of the latestJames Bond adventure atthe end of the month gets nearer.And fans in Great Yarmouth havethe chance to see Skyfall ahead ofthe rest at a charity premierebeing organised at the HollywoodCinema on Thursday, October 25,the day before general release.The screening will benefit the newLouise Hamilton Palliative CareCentre at the James PagetUniversity Hospital which is fastapproaching both completion andthe target of £1.5 million which itis costing to build.“We are nearly there,” said appealpatron Tony Mallion who isarranging the special showing ofthe 23rd Bond film. “But evenwhen the building cost is coveredthere will still be other expensesand continuing running costs forthe centre which we will need tofind.”Daniel Craig will once again play007 and while the plot is beingkept a closely guarded secret itwill centre a lot around Bond’sboss, M, played as always byDame Judi Dench. Last Fridaywas dubbed Bond Day inrecognition of the release of thefirst film, Dr No starring SeanConnery, 50 years ago in 1962.The day also saw the release ofthe latest Bond theme, sung thistime by Adele.“I think everyone feels this isgoing to be a really strongaddition to the series,” said Tony.“Every Bond film is an event – andwe’re hoping once again to makeit even more so. It’s a chance forpeople to dress up and enjoy a bitof glamour if they wish.”Barkers Photographic will be onhand to take photographs ofgroups and individuals which willbe on sale at the end of theevening with a donation goingtowards the appeal.As well as the preview screeningthere will be an auction conductedby Mark Duffield of Aldreds.Hollywood Cinema chain ownerTrevor Wicks has not only giventhe cinema for the night but isproviding some real collectorsitems for screen buffs. He hasdonated a framed poster ofSkyfall together with the full-sized cardboard stand upadvertisement with Daniel Craigwhich you see in the foyerspromoting the film.In addition there’s a year’sadmission to the Hollywood whileMichael Timewell of Blue SkyLeisure has provided a break atthe company’s Kelling Heathholiday park in North Norfolk andPeter and Christine Jay a familyticket for the HippodromeChristmas Circus.“We are really grateful for thissupport,” said Tony.The evening begins at 7pm andtickets can be booked in advanceprice £20 and £15 from theHollywood box office which isopen from 5pm on weekdays andfrom lunchtime at the weekendson 01493 852600.PREMIERE:James Bondfans have thechance to seethe new filmSkyfall at acharitypremierebeingscreened atthe Hollywoodcinema.Pictured,Daniel Craigas JamesBond.Blood, brains, with fantastic singing and many surprisesFOLLOWING its success at theNew York Fringe FestivalZombie Wedding, brainchild ofNorfolk-based composer DanielSturman, comes to GorlestonPavilion Theatre for its UKpremière.The musical “zomedy” is set inthe 1980s, events leading to thelead character’s dream-turned-zombie-infested wedding.Daniel Sturman, raised inBeccles and now living inNorwich, came up with the ideawhile at Dartington College inDevon, where he studied musiccomposition and digital arts.His interest in theatre and musicstarted as a teenager, when hejoined Gorleston-based YoungPeople’s Theatre CompanyDusmagrik, the highlight of hisfour-year involvement being hisinterpretation of Billie Bigallowin Carousel.After meeting American lyricistRC Stabb Daniel decided toshape Zombie Wedding further.RC polished the script andwrote the lyrics while Danielreviewed existing songs andadded new ones. A first readingwas held in Los Angeles in 2010,followed by a staged reading inSan Francisco. The musicalbeing well received, Daniel andRC decided to present ZombieWedding for inclusion at theNew York Fringe where it wasdescribed as “the pick of theFringe” in What’s On New York.When Alex Youngs from XanderProductions approached him tostage it at the Pavilion, it wasthe prefect opportunity forDaniel to go back to his rootsHe said: “Having spent 10 yearsaway from the Pavilion Theatre,it’s great to return and presentmy own show. It’s a unique,atmospheric and beautifulvenue, which holds very manyhappy memories for me.”Alex Youngs adds: “Havingworked with Daniel over tenyears ago, it’s wonderful towelcome him back and to hearhis Zombie Wedding successstory.”Zombie Wedding will be stagedat the Gorleston PavilionTheatre with a grand openingnight on October 18 and aclosing party on the October 19.Tickets can be booked atgorlestonpavilion.com or via thebox office on 01493 662832.Pictured, Daniel Sturman’sZombie Wedding at the PavilionTheatre.Perfect workoutfor better bodyCharity fundraiserA CHARITY rock ‘n’ roll fundraiser is beingstaged on Saturday, November 17 at the OceanRoom in Gorleston.The Jets and The Rat Pack are the main actssupported by Mark ‘Memphis’ King and DJ-TheProfessor.All proceeds to the Great Yarmouth Go-AheadClub , a social club for adults with learningdisabilities, which is fundraising for a holidaynext year.Also bumper raffle, dress rail provided by DollyOddballs - the 1950’s dress shop oppositeGorleston Library, basket meals.Tickets £10 in advance or £12.50 on the doorfrom the Ocean Room, Dolly Oddballs, EastCoast Swing and Jive Dance Club.FROM LA to Gorleston the latest work-out crazeBootybarre is honing and toning bodies atRiverside Studios.Since starting with just one class a week thestudio now has seven Bootybarre classes.All classes are taught by Hannah Powsey,Teresa Hurren and Katie Cornish.Bootybarre is about strengthening, toning andsculpting the body without throwing yourselfaround the room to create balance, posture,body awareness, flexibility and cardiovascularendurance.All the while burning calories and fat andsimultaneously building “bulk-free” lean musclemass.The techniques learned are said to help toincrease your resting metabolism, which allowsyou to burn more calories and fat while you areat rest.Call 07926565902 to book or visit www.riverside-studio.com. Classes are £5 for 45minutes please see timetable for times.
  • www.palmerstores.com37-39 Market Place, Great Yarmouth Tel: 01493 844291OpeningHours:9am - 5.30pmMonday to SaturdayTuesday 9.30am - 5.30pmPALMERS CAR PARKFREE AFTER 4PM1837 - 2012CelebratingY E A R SWinter WarmersWinter Warmers“BE PREPARED”Pifco Fleece Heated UnderBlanket Single SizeNormally £29.99NOW ONLY £24.99Other Sizes AvailableCotton Embrace 13.5 TogWinter Warmth DuvetSingle Size RRP £100 - Normal Price £65NOW ONLY £48.75Other Sizes Available3.5lLSlow CookerONLY £21.99A must have for thosewinter eveningsBrowstonHallEvening Carvery 2 For £10.95Now available until the end of October 2012Mon-Sat evenings 5.30pm-8.30pmLunchtime Carverymain course only For £4.95 - Excluding SundayWe also serve carvery all day on sunday £8.95 main course onlyFountain SuiteAvailable for hire for:Weddings, Birthdays,Anniversaries, wakes etc.Please Call For Details.Driving RangeOpening TimesMon - Fri 8am-9pmSat & Sun 8am-8pmBrowston Green, Browston NR31 9DW | 01493 667591| www.browstonhall.com | infobrowstonhall@aol.comJoin our team and help makea difference to where we liveSeePages6&7Friday, October 19, 2012 yarmouthmercury24.co.uk 65pFROM £36YOU’VE DONE IT!JUBILANT campaigners arecelebrating as the Mercury’s£1.5m campaign for a newpalliative care centre reachedits target today.Dedicated fundraisers threw theirweight behind the drive for a supportcentre in the grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital (JPH)when efforts began in 2006.And after six years of hard graft,Roberta Lovick - mother of the lateLouise Hamilton, who the centre isnamed after - told those who helpedthe campaign: “Thank you from thebottom of my heart.”A donation of £27,000 from theLouise Hamilton Cancer Help CentreTrust pushed the total over thefinishing line, and building workon the centre for those withlife-limiting illnesses is well underway.The centre is named after LouiseHamilton, from Gorleston, who diedof breast cancer aged 28.Her mother, Mrs Lovick, was adriving force behind the appeallaunch back in 2006.She said: “It was my dream to havethis kind of service locally.“This type of centre has beenneeded for so long and I’d like tothank people from the bottom of myheart for donating and helping makeit happen.“We will still need donations tomake sure the centre offers the bestsupport we can provide.”Jenny Watson, Palliative Care Eastappeal organiser, said: “We launchedthe appeal six years ago and it’s reallybeen embraced by local people.“Thank you to everyone whohas donated. We will continue tofundraise now to support the centreand the 10,000 people a year who willuse it.”samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLIN MEMORY:Louise Hamilton,who died at theage of 28 frombreast cancer,and who the newpalliative carecentre on theJames PagetHospital site willbe named after.Continued on Page 5WHEN Ping the cat went missing after escaping from his catbox at GreatYarmouth’s RSPCA branch, his family were distraught. Despite manysightings, they had given up all hope. But this week, three months later,he turned up at his Hemsby home having made his own incrediblejourney. Full story on page 2Ping’s Incredible Journey
  • READER TRAVELREADER TRAVELAN EVENING OFCLAIRVOYANCEwithSTEPHEN HOLBROOKat THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS, NORWICHon THURSDAY 29TH NOVEMBER 2012Doors open at 7pmShow starts at 7.30pmTickets in advance £16On the door (subject toavailability) £17Even the most hardenedsceptics will leave Steve’s showuncomfortably challenged!The evening will take you on aroller coaster of emotions,comfort and joy, and fromlaughter to tears andback again.Now featuring special guestSandy Ingham - Psychic ArtistDON’T MISS THIS EMOTIONAL,COMPELLING AND MOVINGNIGHT TO REMEMBER – BOOK NOW!To book call 01823 666292 (Mon - Fri 9am-5pm)or online at www.steveholbrook.co.ukMercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, October 19, 2012 5For local news online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInBriefCaister man onABH chargeA 33-year-old Caister man has beencharged with detaining a womanagainst her will, assault, causingactual bodily harm and stealingmobile phone and cash from her.Lee Orchard, of Beach Road, isalleged to have held a woman captivein his home, punched and kickedher and stolen from her on the nightof October 3.He was arrested on October 14, andappeared at Great YarmouthMagistrates Court the next day,where a bail application was refusedand he was remanded in custody toappear at Norwich Crown Court onOctober 22.Pups rescuedTWO dogs and their litter of fivepuppies had to be rescued from ablaze which broke out in aconservatory.Fire crews from Great Yarmouth andMartham were called to a home inScratby Road, Scratby, shortly after8pm on Wednesday.Firefighters wearing breathingapparatus cut away part of thestructure to reach the blaze andcarry out the rescue.They put out the fire using hose reeljets and stopped it spreading.Man trappedA MAN was taken to hospital afterhis leg became trapped in a dumpertruck.Firefighters used cutting gear to freethe man, thought to be in his 20s,after being called to the scene in StOlaves yesterday.He was taken to the James PagetHospital. His injuries were notknown but he was said to beconscious while being freed.The appeal will continue to work withpartners to ensure local patients andcarers get the very best support throughtheir diagnosis and treatment throughto palliative care for any life-limiting orprogressive illness.They will continue to look at ways ofimproving all aspects of care provision,supporting choice around where peoplewish to be cared for, and supportingwellbeing.When the centre opens in Januaryit will provide a range of specialistpalliative care services, lymphoedemaservice, advice and support includingwelfare and money matters, therapygroups, a variety of information abouthealth conditions.Complementary and relaxationtherapies including music and arttherapy will be part of the feeling goodand wellbeing aspect of the centre’sservices.Families are also included and will beable to access advice, support includingfamily therapies and support groups andservices such as bereavement support,all specific for their needs.Nikki Sawkins, project manager ofthe Louise Hamilton Centre said: “Thisis just the start for a centre that willprovide a really homely environmentfor supportive care and enable patients,carers and families to live their lives asfully as possible.”The centre will host services providedby a wide range of organisationsworking in partnership: which includeslocal health and social care services,local and national cancer charities,family support and care organisations,patient support groups, a variety oforganisations with the focus on specificconditions and bereavement charities.The Louise Hamilton Centre is beingbuilt on a greenfield site at the northernend of the JPH by Norwich-basedarchitects LSI.For updates on the centre please visitwww.palliativecareeast.blogspot.com orcontact Nikki Sawkins Project managervia Palliative Care East office 01493453348APPEAL CO-ORDINATOR:Jenny Watson.Continued from Page 1You’ve done it! £1.5m target reached!My dream born out ofsadness and despairI FEEL the time has come forme to give a personal thankyou to everyone connected withthe Louise Hamilton Centre.Very soon we will open the doors toa state-of-the-art dedicated palliativecare facility. However, this didn’thappen without an impressive amountof work going on behind the scenes.I have witnessed many peopleworking together to produce a servicethat we can be proud of.My dream will soon be realised, adream born out of sadness and despairwhilst caring for my daughter Louisein Bristol.I became a carer overnight withno real experience of looking after acancer patient, but I wished to fulfilmy duties to the best of my ability, asindeed any mother would.The transition from shopkeeper toa full-time carer overnight was, tosay the least, overwhelming, and whatbecame apparent almost immediatelywas the lack of either help orinformation.I found myself struggling to copewith the comprehensive drugs regime,Louise’s needs, and the wellbeing ofmy two small grandsons.Both Louise and I had questions weneeded to ask, and yet there was noone to help.I was told by professionals I wascoping so well when actually I wasscreaming inside and nobody noticed.I didn’t realise I could ask for helpbecause no-one had told me.Eventually, my mum came to therescue when she moved near tohelp take care of the boys while Iconcentrated on Louise.When Louise’s condition worsenedsadly, through ignorance and sheerlack of information, I called 999, whicheventually resulted in Louise dyingin a busy accident and emergencydepartment on a Friday evening.The guilt associated with this actionhas weighed heavy on my shouldersand still does to this day.As a full-time carer I definitely hadneeds of my own which I did notaddress because my only concern wasthe wellbeing of Louise.After losing Louise I began to realisethat many other people would findthemselves in just such a position, andthen I knew that I had to campaign tochange things in the future.I was able to look back and see thatduring those last months so muchprecious time was wasted. Instead ofusing time wisely and living life tothe full we were preoccupied with justcoping with each day due to lack ofsupport.How marvellous it would have beento have had a centre of support andyes information, for with that kindof help Louise may have died at homeas we had wished and I would not livewith the guilt that weighs me down.So I say a huge thank you to DrPatrick Blossfeldt who wasinstrumental in setting up thePalliative Care East appeal; toeveryone working behind the scenes,all the partners around the tablewho will provide the very necessaryservices, the volunteers who will bethe backbone of the centre; and lastbut by no means least, everyone whohas so generously donated and madethis possible.No-one will be more pleased or proudwhen the doors of the Louise HamiltonCentre open and I will know that inthis area at least, no-one will have tosuffer the way my daughter and I did.By ROBERTA LOVICKPicture:SUPPLIEDTERESA TUCKER: ‘Youngpeople have risen to thechallenge.’HOSPITALHELP: Theappeal isgetting off toa flying start,thanks to thehelp of localcharities andtheirfundraisers.Do you have a story? Call the newsdesk — 01493 847956/847957Dream holiday for the community-mindedFriday, February 24, 2006 17THE first annual meeting of theMia-Lucy Trust is on Sunday atthe etech Centre at HarfreysIndustrial Estate, GreatYarmouth.The trust has been responsiblefor the trim-trail on GorlestonCliffs and raises money for theInternational Rescue Corps.Chairman Mark Rose, brotherof 24-year-old Mia-Lucy, who diedwhen she was swept away on theRiver Mekong two years ago, saidmembers of the public werewelcome to attend the meeting,which starts at 11am.Mia-Lucy had been travellingaround south-east Asia with herboyfriend.Treasurer Belinda Plane said:“This is very important to us andwe invite the public to attend.”She is asking people to call firstso she has an idea of numbers.Anyone interested in attendingthe meeting should call 01493604336 or 781029.AN appeal for cash to build a£1.5 million centre for treatingserious illnesses is launched today— and organisers want the public toput forward suggestions for itsname.The James Paget Hospital is fundraising fora palliative care centre for Great Yarmouth,Waveney and associated villages.It will offer people with serious illness suchas cancer or motor neurone disease practicalhelp so they can remain independent andhave a better quality of life.The appeal is being led by consultant inpain relief Dr Patrick Blossfeldt, also leadconsultant for palliative care, and Macmillannurse specialist team leader Kathy Nobes.Ms Nobes said: “The centre will offer boththe science of palliative care — includingclinic appointments, in-depth assessments,symptom control, lymphoedema care — andthe art of it, with space to reflect, comfortablewaiting areas, time and opportunity to sharefears and staff and volunteers that cansupport and advise.”Donations have already been made, with£10,000 being given by the Lowestoft-basedPaul Cole Cancer Fund. And cancer charitythe Big C is also planning to give some cash.Palliative care involves not only treatingserious illnesses physically but easing theproblems caused by it psychologically,financially and socially.The centre will be a separate building onthe site of the JPH, close to the mainbuilding.The aim is to provide an open-plan loungeand waiting area, four counselling andfamily support rooms, four multi-purposeclinic or treatment rooms, and a largeresource room, accommodating up to 20 forsupport meetings with patients and carers.There are also a number of semi-privateareas throughout the building suitable forsmall family groups.Specialist palliative care team membersinclude doctors, Macmillan nurses,therapists, a social worker, the hospice-at-home staff, the bereavement co-ordinatorand volunteers.The centre will offer rapid access clinics,one-stop assessments, physiotherapy andcomplementary therapies such asacupuncture, reflexology and aromatherapy.A play area for children, an exhibition areafor art by people using the centre, and acovered terrace, conservatory and gardenare also planned.The trust is inviting architects to take partin a competition to design the centre.The dedicated line for the public appeal is01493 453348 or e-mailpalliativecare.centre@jpaget.nhs.ukRainbow Days, a voluntary group which hasraised more than £250,000 over the years forthe JPH, is joining the appeal. The volunteersare at the JPH, in the foyer near PagetsPantry, from 7am-5pm, Monday to Friday.They are appealing for unwanted goods or oldmobile phones, which can be delivered to thestall or collected by volunteers.GET involved with your communityin Great Yarmouth and you couldwin a dream holiday, is thetantalising offer to young peoplefrom the countywide Wham project.Trips could be to Disneyland,Paramount Studios and other themeparks in the US or to Europe.It is designed to get 11 to 16-year-olds contributing to theircommunity. Teams of up to fourundertake projects of their ownchoosing, using their imaginationand creative energies to the full.The Wham project is organised byPartners Against Crime Trust(Pact) and supported by businesses.Project manager Teresa Tuckersaid: “We hear so often about thebad behaviour of the minority thatit is very uplifting to see the goodwork achieved through a diverserange of projects and once againyoung people have risen to thechallenge of the Wham project.”With the success of the recentenvironment action days inYarmouth, Wham hopes toencourage youngsters to becomeinvolved with tidying neglectedareas, work on a project thatidentifies the needs of thecommunity and help elderly people.The registration deadline is March31 and the closing date is June 30.The first prize holiday will beduring the school holidays for2006/2007 and the second prizeholiday for September 8-10.Schools, clubs and other groupswhich would like to take partshould contact the Wham project atNorfolk Pact, Jubilee House,Falconers Chase, Wymondham,Norfolk NR18 0WW.Healthy start for£1.5m projectMy suggestion for the name for the new Palliative Care Centre is:“..............................................................................................................”From:.........................................................................................................Address:......................................................................................................................................................Phone no:..................................................Please return to:Palliative Care Centre Public Appeal, c/o Specialist Palliative Care Service,James Paget Healthcare NHS Trust, Lowestoft Road, Gorleston NR31 6LAHave your say — help pick a nameMia-LucyTrust holdsfirst AGMJPHPalliativeCareAppealEXPRESSFREEFITSCAMPAIGNER: Roberta Lovickon the site of the new palliativecare centre; above, how theMercury told readers about theappeal in February 2006.
  • 10 Friday, October 19, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukOpinionIN just over six years the people of GreatYarmouth and Waveney have haveraised a massive £1.5m to make adream come true.The building of the Palliative Care Eastcentre - to be named the Louise HamiltonCentre - on the site of the James PagetUniversity Hospital, is a milestone and onewhich everyone should be so proud of.When the appeal first started and we beganwhat was to become a weekly page ofreports and pictures of fundraisers, thetarget was a million miles away - it seemedan impossible amount to raise.But there were people who knew themoney would come and their faith wasrewarded.No-one should be singled out for praise forthe way the appeal has generated suchaffection in the hearts of local people; ithas been a real team effort - and the teamat the top should be heartily congratulated.When the centre opens next year, that iswhen the congratulations will be done inthe right and proper way.When the first people walk in to benefitfrom everything it has to offer, that is wheneveryone who contributed - whether largeor small amounts, or just time - should patthemselves on the back and say a selfcongratulatory well done.Of course, the fundraising doesn’t stophere, it needs to continue to fund the workinside the building, as well as purchaseequipment and contribute towards therunning costs.Please do not think the job is over - farfrom it; but at least we will be able to seesomething tangible and in place, ready tobenefit those who need it most.And remember, it could be you, a memberof your family, a close friend.VolunteersALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY Volunteers are neededin Great Yarmouth. Help us support even morepeople with dementia and their carers locally atgroups giving as little as a few hours a monthor more if you able to. It is important you arewilling to develop your knowledge of dementia,have good listening and communication skills.We can provide ongoing support, good trainingand any out of pocket expenses. Pleasecontact Helen Dingle on 01603 763517 orHelen.dingle@alzheimers.org.ukCENTRE 81, Great Yarmouth - Needs twovolunteers for its door-to-door commuity busservice., an adminstrator every Friday (10am-4pm) to handle customer bookings and anoccasional relief driver aged 21-70. Call 01493852573RSPCA East Norfolk Branch - Volunteers arerequired for fundraising events and other roles.Contact Debra on 07927 000466 or emailrspcaeastnorfolk@aol.comRSPCA Regent Street Charity Shop -Needsvolunteers for all areas of the shop. Please popin and see Stacey or call her on 07789390119.AGE CONCERN GREAT YARMOUTH - Needsbefriending volunteers in all areas of GreatYarmouth to spend an hour or two a weekvisiting someone for a coffee and a chat, ormaybe take them along to one of our lunchclubs.GREAT YARMOUTH GATEWAY CLUB - Driversneeded on a Friday evening (CRB check will bemade). Call Ray on 07599 274208.DIAL - The charity is looking for volunteers tohelp support its office and charity shop inYarmouth. Call Jo Howes on 01493 856900.GREAT YARMOUTH STROKE CLUB - Join thevolunteer team, every Thursday, 2-4pm.Contact Sue Casey on 07528 518132.PRIORY CENTRE - We are appealing forvolunteers for our Living Well project – we needpeople to help with our internet cafe and withour One Stop phone line – if you like workingwith people, have IT skills and / or areconfident on the phone please contactRaymond Baxter on 01493 743053.Hope to improverailway stationI READ with interest the plansto set up TeamGY, October 6. Theparticular points that caught myattention were the reference to thevolunteers at the Olympics andParalympics and the suggestionsto become involved with GreaterAnglia to implement changes atYarmouth Rail Station. I hope theideas will complement work wehave been doing at Great YarmouthCommunity Trust in conjunctionwith Greater Anglia.Since the takeover of the railfranchise in February, the Trusthas been working in partnershipwith Anglia on initiatives toupgrade the experience for therail traveller. The first was ourWelcome Host scheme whichprovided incoming passengers,during the holiday season, withinformation and advice. OurWelcome Host’ were trained to thesame standard as the Olympic/Paralympic volunteers so there isan immediate connection with theTeamGY aims. The initiative wasso successful it was nominated fora national award.We are now in discussion withAnglia on an upgrading of theHost service for next year and theimprovement of various facilitiesat the station. These would includea number of the items that werepointed out in the TeamGY article.To achieve these aims wewould welcome both working inpartnership with all interestedand the recruitment of volunteersto progress to a successful outcomefor all in Yarmouth. Contact meat the Community Trust on 01493743000.TONY ROZIERGreat Yarmouth CommunityTrustLearning to obeyrules at schoolWHAT an interesting reflectionof the times in which we live isthe article in this week’s Mercuryabout the 13 year old girl who“….has reached deadlock” withOrmiston Venture Academyregarding her refusal to removesomething called a “tongue bar”.Unfortunately, this young ladywill eventually have to learn oneof the reasons our society runsreasonably smoothly is becauseof rules and responsibilitieswhich one cannot pick and choosewhether to obey or accept. It usedto be that one’s school was the placeto start that learning process andparents would actually support aschool in helping their childrenachieve this understanding. Nottoday it seems!One might ask exactly whatmessage her mother’s support ismeant to be sending out; that it’sokay in life to ignore rules if youdon’t happen to agree with them?Banning piercings is not a trivialrule. In the event of an injuryoccurring I can well imagine thefurore and the cries for blame andcompensationagainsttheAcademy.I sincerely hope, for Kyde’s sake,that Ormiston Venture Academydoes not back down or compromiseon this.DENNIS J BEANBurgh St Peter, BecclesGet cyclists outof town centreI THOUGHT Great YarmouthMarket Place was a pedestrianonly zone between 10am and 4pm.My reason for asking is I amgetting fed up with having to dodgespeeding cyclists who expect thewalking public to get out of theirway. Will the police and marketwardens please do somethingbefore someone gets hurt?N S WILLIAMSONParkland Drive, BradwellEmpire lettingdown seafrontHAVING some friends come andstayattheweekend,ItookthemintoGreat Yarmouth, and we walkedalong the seafront. I told them thata lot of money had been spent onimproving it, and then we cameto the Empire; what a disgustingstate that beautiful building is in.The front steps and top level arecovered in pigeon droppings andfeathers; the building itself is justbeing left to rot.Someone on the borough councilshould instruct whoever owns thatbuilding to restore it to it’s rightfulstate. It is an eyesore in the middleof what is now an attractive front.R TWITCHINemailNot recruitmentfor forces of evilIN response to E Barkhuizen’sletter: “…Hallowe’en again.” I feelI must comment on the generaltone and detail of this letter, almostit seems designed to have parentsand carers diving for their biblesat this time of year. But wait! Howmany of your readers believe ineither God or the Devil?How many will feel inspired tocavort (with evil intent and cackle)aroundabonfirealanude?BecauseHalloween, far from being somesort of Satanic rite, designed toprovoke fear and recruit evil doers,is a pre-Christian festival. One thatcelebrates the final harvest homewith no reference to the dark lordand his minions.In fact, if E Barkhuizen had takenthe time to do a little researchhe/she will have discovered mostpagans and practicing witchesdon’t actually believe in Satan.Could I also point out that Wicca isa faith of witches… but that not allwitches follow Wicca.In this time of economicdepression, where joyous eventssuch as the Jubilee and Olympicsare eclipsed by reports of poverty,it is a small escape for children tobe able to escape all that and so alittle harmless fun, under adultsupervision and a little celebrationto echo autumnal festivals of ourforebears is hardly the recruitmentdrive for the forces of evil.SARAH BAILEYOlive Road, Great YarmouthChrist would becondemningYOUR correspondent Mr Allcockcannot understand why I sayCobholm Church is not fit forpurpose. I was brought up C of E,my church encouraged me to puton my uniform and kill Germans.Germans were encouraged by theirclergy to put on uniforms and killthe British. Christ said we shouldlove our enemies and do good tothem that hate us. Both sides inthe war claimed to be Christians.Christ would have condemnedthem out of hand as he did thereligious people of his day.PHILIP KNIGHTWherry Way, Great Yarmouth£5m for Syria,£10m less for usWILLIAM Hague chose toannounce during the OlympicGames that £5m of taxpayers’money was to be given to supportthe Syrian rebels. I wrote to ourMP Brandon Lewis to ask if hewould explain to me, and voters inYarmouth, why taxpayers’ moneywas to be spent in this way. So farhe has not replied.It seems strange that £5m can bespent this way when people arelosing their jobs in Yarmouth asthe borough seeks to cover a £10mshortfall in government funding.Our MP should be expected tocomment.DAVID EVANSCommon Road, WestSomertonIt’s a broken UK,Mr PicklesI HAVE just had the privilege ofwatching Eric Pickles. He hastold the Tory conference to go andcanvass all the council tenantsin their areas that there is a newright-to-buy campaign. What ajoke. I cannot remember the timethat a Tory candidate canvassedand consulted any of the counciltenants in Cobholm, Newtown,Middlegate or the Barrack estate.The right-to-buy programmehas given many people their ownhome, but it has also left manywithout a home, Mr Pickles. Intimes of hardship people needhope of a reasonably paid job anda roof over their head.In broken Britain 2012 we havestudents unable to afford to go touniversity, cuts in public sectorjobs and Etonians running thecountry. Mr Pickles said in hisoffice he has a bust of Disraeli, apicture of Winston and Margaretand a portrait of Che Guevara.Glad you remember DisraeliEric, most people did not have ahome then, children worked ateight, were sold to baby farmersin poor areas, life expectancy waslow. Glad you remember MargaretThatcher: the privatisation ofelectricity, water, steel.When I get my electricity billI remember Margaret, poll taxriots, and the Tories removingher because she had becomeunelectable.RICHARD HUDSONClarendon Drive, MarthamCatholic Saintsday is holy dayTHANK you for allowing Mr EBarkhuizen to draw attentionto Halloween and his woefulignorance about the CatholicChurch. Halloween is the eve ofAll Hallows and not a feast day.In the Catholic Church, AllSaints (Hallows) is a holy daywhen members of the Church areremembered for their disciplineand rigour in observing the rulesand practices of the Christain wayof life. They are an example to us,not to worshiped or idolised in anyway that would break the secondCommandment.With regard to the colourful andgrotesque tat available at this timeof year, let’s see it for what it is,namely a commercial opportunityimported from America via thefactories of China.MARIA BROWNBoat Dyke Road, UptonDisgust overpigeon crueltyIN response to the letter (October5) concerning the pigeon. I wasdisgustedandheartbrokenwiththeperson who deliberately torturedand killed a helpless, beautifulpigeon who was doing no harm.It seems to me the action is howsociety is becoming; no one cares,authorities, council workers,passers by etc. I love all creatures,birds in particular as they get araw deal – spikes on lamp-posts,nets around buildings, anything todeter them. They are not vermin.People who drop litter, maim, lie,torture, take drugs, steal, leave dogpoo about are vermin.Name and Address withheldCost forces mumout of day centreHOW do I tell my 94 year oldpartially sighted, disabled mumshe can no longer afford to go tothe day centre that she loves somuch. A bill for £120 has just hither doorstep for two days a weekat a day centre. Charges have gonefrom nothing to £15 a day plus £5 aday for her dinner.Sadly, with the rising cost of gasand electricity and the fact she hasto pay for care three times a dayit is unlikely that she will be ableto afford the day centre any more.LettersA NAME and address is onlywithheld at a correspondent’srequest IF the publication ofpersonal details might lead tointimidation or targeting ORthe correspondent is employedin a position where theirview contradicts that of theiremployer, or would place themin an embarrassing position.Anonymous letters, submittedwithout a name and address,are NEVER published.FEEDBACK is YOUR page — it’s the Great Yarmouth area’s most important forum for public debate on the issues of the week. We welcome yourviews, which can be sent to the Editor in the form of:A LETTER, addressed to: Great Yarmouth Mercury, 169 King Street, Yarmouth, NR30 2PA; A FAX, to Great Yarmouth 847979; orAN E-MAIL, with your name and address, to anne.edwards@archant.co.ukThe editor welcomes contributions but reserves the right to amend and edit as necessary. Please endeavour to keep letters to a maximum 250words. Material accepted for publication in the Mercury may also be published on the internet and World Wide Web version of our service.
  • for sale tosoldsequencehome.co.uk & rightmove.co.uksoldfind us onsequencehome.co.uk & rightmove.co.ukto letfind us onsequencehome.co.uk & rightmove.co.uklet agreedfind us onsequencehome.co.uk & rightmove.co.ukfor salefind us onCall William H Brown today01362 692238 or 01603 760044find us on www.homes24.co.uk, for more properties.46 NEWS www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Friday, October 19, 2012School deemed‘good’ afterOfsted reportA south Norfolk high school iscelebrating after being judged “good”by Ofsted.Long Stratton High School, the firstNorfolk high school to be inspectedunder the new Ofsted framework,was judged “good” across the board –an improvement from the lastinspection in 2009 when inspectorsfound the school to be “satisfactory”.The school has faced a turbulenttime after former headteacher PaulAdams was suspended from his rolein September 2011. It was revealed inSeptember this year that he had beendismissed for gross misconduct.John Wilson, who has been actingheadteacher since July 2011, said hewas delighted with the report.“It’s about buying into success,” hesaid. “If students feel that they aregetting a good quality product thenthey will be more interested in it. Theteaching and learning is better thanit was. It was never poor but it issomething we have worked on.”Inspectors visited the school onSeptember 27 and 28 and observed 34lessons.The report said: “This is a good,happy and improving school becauseof the mutual respect that existsbetween students and staff.”The school was given targets towork towards which includedimproving communication withparents and carers and to providemore opportunities for pupils to workindependently during lessons.LONG STRATTONDREAM: Roberta Lovick at the site of the support centre at the James Paget University Hospital.£1.5m target is reachedPicture: JAMES BASSGORLESTONBy SAM RUSSELLJubilant campaigners are celebratingtoday as a £1.5m campaign for a newpalliative care centre in Gorlestonreached its target.Dedicated fundraisers threw theirweight behind the drive for a supportcentre in the grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital (JPH)when efforts began in 2006.And after six years of hard graft,Roberta Lovick – mother of the lateLouise Hamilton, after whom thecentre is named – told those whohelped the campaign: “Thank youfrom the bottom of my heart.”A donation of £27,000 from theLouise Hamilton Cancer Help CentreTrust pushed the total over thefinishing line, and building work onthe centre for those with life-limitingillnesses is well under way.Louise, from Gorleston, died ofbreast cancer aged 28.Her mother was a driving forcebehind the appeal launch in 2006.She said: “It was my dream to havethis kind of service locally.“This type of centre has beenneeded for so long and I’d like tothank people from the bottom of myheart for donating and helping makeit happen.“We will still need donations tomake sure the centre offers the bestsupport we can provide.”Jenny Watson, Palliative Care Eastappeal organiser, added: “Welaunched the appeal six years agoand it’s really been embraced by localpeople.“Thank you to everyone who hasdonated.Wewillcontinuetofundraisenow to support the centre and the10,000 people a year who will use it.”The appeal will continue to workwith partners to ensure local patientsand carers get the very best supportthrough their diagnosis andtreatment, into survivorship orthrough to palliative care for any life-limiting or progressive illness.They will continue to look at waysof improving all aspects of careprovision, supporting choice aroundwhere people wish to be cared for,and supporting wellbeing.When the Louise Hamilton Centreopens in January it will provide arange of specialist palliative careservices, lymphoedema service,advice and support including welfareand money matters, therapy groupsand a variety of information abouthealth conditions.samuel.russell@archant.co.uk
  • Friday, October 19, 2012 3The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukFirefighter’sdeathinvestigationcontinuesINVESTIGATIONS are continuinginto the death of a Lowestoftfirefighter who was taken ill duringa training exercise at an Olympicvenue.Alan Soards, 38, was taking part ina water rescue course, attended byNorfolk and Suffolk firefighters, atthe Lee Valley White Water Centre inHertfordshire on October 2.Three ambulances and two airambulance teams were called to thescene after he was taken ill in thewater, but attempts by his colleaguesand paramedics to resuscitate himfailed.At the time of the incident, Suffolkfire service said it was working withHertfordshire police and the Healthand Safety Executive to establishfull details of Mr Soards’s “untimelydeath”.Yesterday, police said that they wereawaiting the results of toxicologytests and, as a result, an inquest hadnot been formally opened.A spokesman for the Hertfordshirecoroners office confirmed an interimdeath certificate had been issued.Meanwhile, plans are being madefor Mr Soards’s funeral in Gorleston,which is expected to be attendedby senior fire officers, colleaguesand representatives from the GreatYarmouth and Gorleston RNLILifeboat, where he was a member ofthe crew before becoming a full-timefirefighter.A provisional date has been set fornext Friday, although this is still to beofficially confirmed.Mr Soards had served with Suffolkfire service for more than 11 years.A massivethank-youas appealtarget hitIT has taken more than six-and-a-half years and involvedthousands of people.But today the organisers of thePalliative Care East appeal issued aheatfelt “thank-you” to everyone whohelped turn a vision into reality – byraising £1.5m for a centre for peoplewith life-limiting illnesses.In February 2006, the appeal waslaunched to help fund the centre atthe James Paget University Hospital,which will provide care to peoplefrom across Waveney and GreatYarmouth.This week, that target was hit witha donation of £27,000 from the LouiseHamilton Cancer Help Centre Trust.Appeal organiser Jenny Watsonsaid she was grateful to everyonewho had contributed, including thosein Lowestoft and Waveney who hadorganised or supported events ormade donations.“It’s really been embraced by localpeople. Thank you to everyone whohas donated. We will continue tofund-raise now to support the centreand the 10,000 people a year who willuse it,” she said.Construction is already under wayat the new Louise Hamilton Centreon the main James Paget site atGorleston.However, the appeal will remainopen and organisers will continue towork with partners, to help ensurethat patients and carers receive thebest possible support at the centrefor any life-limiting or progressiveillness.When the centre opens inJanuary, it will provide a range ofspecialist palliative care services,a lymphoedema service, advice andsupport – including welfare andmoney matters – therapy groups, andhealth information.Complementary and relaxationtherapies, including music and arttherapy, will also be available andpatients’ families will be offeredsupport and advice and given help indealing bereavement.The centre is named after LouiseHamilton, from Gorleston, who diedof breast cancer, aged 28.Her mother, Roberta Lovick, wasa driving force behind the appeallaunch back in 2006.MrsLovicksaid:“Itwasmydreamtohave this kind of service locally. Thistype of centre has been needed for solong and I’d like to thank people fromthe bottom of my heart for donatingand helping make it happen. We willstill need donations to make sure thecentre offers the best support we canprovide.”The centre will host servicesprovided by a wide range ofpar tnership org anisations,including local health and socialcare services, local and nationalcancer charities, family support andcare organisations, patient supportgroups, a variety of organisationswith the focus on specific conditions,and bereavement charities.Nikki Sawkins, project manager ofthe centre said: “This is just the startfor a centre that will provide a reallyhomely environment for supportivecare and enable patients, carers andfamilies to live their lives as fully aspossible.”The Louise Hamilton Centre isbeing built on a greenfield site atthe northern end of the James PagetUniversityHospitalbyNorwich-basedarchitects LSI. For updates on theproject visit www.palliativecareeast.blogspot.com or contact NikkiSawkins via the Palliative Care Eastoffice on 01493 453348.UNDER WAY: The first turf is cut in the construction of the newPalliative Care East Building at the James Paget University Hospital.Now the appeal target has been reached, fund-raising will continueto help support the centre. Picture: NICK BUTCHERGRATEFUL: Appeal organiserJenny Watson.IN MEMORY:Above, LouiseHamilton fromGorleston,after whomthe carecentre isnamed. Left,Louise’s mumRobertaLovick.
  • Bird in HandChurch Road, Wreningham,Norwich, NR16 1BJTheINTRODUCING OUR NEWLUNCH MENU.Available Mondays to Fridays 12pm - 2.30pmSaturdays 12pm - 5.30pmGreat Prices:Baguette & Wraps from £4.95Jacket Potatoes from £5.25Main Course Meals from £7.45Plus a wide range of:Starters, Mains and Desserts.Shaun’s Fish Specials,Shaun’s Retro SpecialsShaun’s Vegetarian Specials.Tris’s delicious DessertsSpecial Lunch Menu all day on SundaysDinner Menu available seven days a weekfrom 5.30pm - 9.30pmSteak Night on SundaysChristmas Party Menu available now.For reservations please call: 01508 489438AmentiesV P18 NEWS www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Saturday, October 27, 2012FILM PREMIERE:From left toright, PalliativeCare EastAppeal patronTony Mallion,appeal co-ordinator JennyWatson, matronand fundraiserDawn Taylorand appealchairman JohnHemming.Picture: SIMONFINLAYGREAT YARMOUTHPremiere helps care appealIt had all the makings of a top filmpremiere – and indeed it was, witha touch of glamour coming to GreatYarmouth’s Hollywood Cinema.Thursday saw the resort host theUK preview of the new James Bondfilm Skyfall, raising nearly £3,500 atthe same time for the Palliative CareEast Appeal.Filmgoers dressed up to make it anight to remember, mingling in thefoyer before taking their seats towatch Daniel Craig leap into actionagain as the super agent 007.And a cardboard cut-out of DanielCraig sold at auction for £250, withother memorabilia also going underthe hammer.Only last week appeal organisersrevealed the charity, set up to providea palliative care centre in the groundsof the James Paget UniversityHospital, had reached its £1.5m targetand building work has started.Appeal co-ordinator Jenny Watsonsaid: “I think it is wonderful thatpeople realise we still need to keepfundraising, despite having reachedour initial target for building thecentre. It is down to evenings likethis, where we all come together toshow support.“It has been made by the people forthe people.”Members of the public had paid £20for the privilege of seeing the muchanticipated movie before the rest ofthe country.Harry Gaskin, 18, from Bradwell,said: “It was really good how itreferenced other James Bond movies.It is one of the best for a while.”And Vicky Staegemann, 33, fromLingwood, said: “It was amazing,with the action and twists and theway it tied in and made sense with allthe other movies. Certainly wellworth seeing.”Ellie Bignall, 16, from Beccles saidshe found the film funny.“It was good, quite funny and mademe laugh,” she said. “I liked CasinoRoyale, maybe this comes in a closesecond.“Javier Bardem as the villain wasprobably the best part of the film,and I like that it had an originalstoryline.”NORWICHIt was the hottest ticket in town.More than 300 people paid up to £75each to attend an exclusive regionalcharity screening of the new JamesBond film Skyfall to raise money fortwo of East Anglia’s leading charitieson Thursday.The black tie gala screening of theeagerly-awaited movie was held atthe Odeon, in Riverside, Norwich,and is expected to raise thousands forthe East Anglian Air Ambulance andthe Norfolk and Norwich Associationfor the Blind.And filmgoers were both shakenand stirred by the presence of theAston Martin DB5 that 007 DanielCraig drives in the film, alongsideother glam-cars that define Bondmovies of the past, supplied byStratton Motor Company, based inLong Stratton, Norfolk.The Bond fans had the rareopportunity to see Skyfall, which alsostars Judi Dench, Ralph Fiennes andAlbert Finney, 24 hours before it wenton general release yesterday.Stratton Motor Company ManagingDirector Roger Bennington said: “Wehave a long association with EonProductions in looking after the Bondcars.“We are extremely pleased onceagain to be able to hold this privatescreening of Skyfall in aid of charityand would like to thank both Eon andSony who have made this possible.“We are working once again withthe East Anglian Air Ambulance anda new charity partner, the Norfolkand Norwich Association for theBlind, which are both worthwhilecauses.“We are hoping to raise in excess of£25,000 on their behalf with the helpof our sponsors, customers andfriends.”The NNAB’s events fundraiser, ex-Norwich City star, Jeremy Goss, said:“The gala is generating much-neededfunds for us to continue our workamong the blind and partially sightedcommunity in Norfolk. It will helpadults and children fulfiltheir potential to live independentlives.”Patrick Peal, deputy chairman andtrustee of the life-saving East AnglianAir Ambulance Charity, said: “It’sthrough events like this that that wecontinue to maintain a high profile inthe local community, which is socritical in raising the funds needed tokeep our lifesaving air ambulancesin the air.“We’re most grateful to StrattonMotor Company for their continuinggenerous support.”Bond comes to aid of good causesBy LUCY WRIGHTBLACK TIEEVENT: StrattonMotor Companymanagingdirector RogerBennington,charity galascreeningorganiser KateCummings,EAAAfundraisingmanager JessDowns andNNAB eventsmanagerJeremy Goss atthe showing ofthe new JamesBond film,Skyfall, at theNorwich OdeonRiverside.lucy.wright@archant.co.ukONSALENOWNew issuewith theHairyBikersLet’sTalk –subscribeon 0844848 0846
  • 16 www.eveningnews24.co.uk Norwich Evening News Monday, October 29, 2012StaciaBRIGGSContact Stacia on 01603 772417 or email stacia.briggs@archant.co.ukDying with dignity mustnot rest on charity aloneBrilliant news for Gorleston thisweek after the announcement thata support centre for people withlife-limiting or progressiveillnesses will shortly open itsdoors for business.Less brilliant news, however,that it’s had to be funded bycharitable donations rather thanbeing paid for outright by thegovernment: should such a vitalservice really have to rely onhand-outs?I have nothing but praise for thepeople who threw their weightbehind the drive for the supportcentre in the grounds of theJames Paget University Hospital:without such people our healthservice would be a far palerreflection of what it is today.But this kind of centre, thesekind of resources are the reason Ipay my taxes without (too much)moaning – add to the pot withcharitable donations, yes, but theyshouldn’t be the bedrock offunding.My Dad spent his last days in ahospice of sorts – a long-termrespite care facility – which waseverything you hope a hospicewouldn’t be: it was grim, staffedby stone-faced people-haters andas life-affirming as a funeraldirector visiting Death Row on aMonday morning.It’s been a revelation to see howhospices have changed in the twodecades since my old man died ina grey side room and one which Iknow has been largely funded bycharitable donations and theselfless work of volunteers.Back in 2010, the governmentannounced that hospices wouldsoon be receiving as much in NHScash as they get from charityfundraising: within “three to fouryears”, it said. That’s aroundthree-and-a-half years longer thanthe average terminal illnessprognosis.In an ideal world, charitabledonations to hospices would bepaying for embellishments andluxuries rather than rates, wagebills and necessities: I’d be farhappier to know that mydonations were paying for lapdances and foie gras for patientsthan essential things like water,electricity and staff.It used to be said that the twocertainties in life were death andtaxation, but Jimmy Carr and hisreprehensible tax-avoiding cronieshave proven there’s an exceptionto that rule, so death remains thenumber one thing none of us canhope to avoid.Like it or not, we’re all going topop our clogs, but before we go,the government would be gratefulif we could raise the necessarycash to fund our own demise – youknow, go on a quick fun run beforeour diagnosis. Be sponsored to liein a bath of cold baked beans inorder to peg it in style.Meanwhile, it’s fine for us tohelp fund pointless universitydegrees in pop art knitting;military grandstanding to thetune of countless billions; childbenefit payments to people thatearn more in a year than I will ina lifetime, and pointless, self-serving quangos.We can spend three times morethan Canada does on weaponry,but we have to go cap in hand topeople already paying their taxesto ask for money to fund servicesthat aren’t about showboating orbox-ticking, but are aboutensuring people die with dignity.It’s enough to make a cat laugh.I am in no way downplaying thevital role that fundraisers play inkeeping the doors open athospices: these are good peoplewho, in the words of my life guruJeremy Kyle, are stepping up tothe mark to plug a gap that asuccession of governments haveshamefully failed to fill.Without them, presumablyJeremy Hunt would be happy forus all to quietly die in the gutter,warmed only by the knowledgethat we could wipe out most of theplanet with our missiles and thatthe University College ofFleggburgh awarded History ofBoybands degrees to a slew of 20-somethings who can barely spelltheir forename, let alone form acoherent sentence.Hospices offer us peace-of-mindat a time where peace-of-mindisn’t just desirable, it’s essential.It figures, then, that state-funding for hospices is equallyessential: we shouldn’t muckaround when people who’ve paidtaxes all their lives are reachingtheir final chapter and weshouldn’t rely on people’sgenerosity to fund their care.The new centre in Gorlestonwill be named after local womanLouise Hamilton, who died ofbreast cancer aged 28, and whosemother was a driving force behindthe appeal launch in 2006.“It was my dream to have thiskind of service locally,” saidRoberta Lovick, “this type ofcentre has been needed for so longand I’d like to thank people fromthe bottom of my heart fordonating and helping make ithappen.“We will still need donations tomake sure the centre offers thebest support we can provide.”The point is, the Lovicks andevery other family who have lost –or are losing – a loved oneshouldn’t have to worry about thecontinued funding for such anessential service.Nothing so vital should have tosurvive with uncertainty in itsfuture.The new centre is a victory forNorfolk, but another shamefulindictment on the government.Too big to fitbehind a desk?Whatever next!Schoolchildren have devised a cunning newway to skive lessons: by becoming too fat tofit under their desks.Standard school furniture is based onmeasurements made in the 1960s whenchildren were smaller, thinner, didn’t talk backand didn’t communicate primarily by text.Research, however, has suggested that theaverage height of children has increased atthe rate of 1cm a decade, with the majorityof growth in the lower leg, and that obesityamong pupils has risen from around five percent in 1985 to 19 per cent in 2011.I’m not sure about you, but when I readthose figures I’m not worrying about schoolfurniture, I’m worrying about 1,000 yearshence when all our children will have lowerlegs that are a full metre longer than they aretoday. They’ll look like grasshoppers. Buyingthem school trousers will be a nightmare.If the obesity crisis continues to rise at itscurrent pace, those spindly lower legs won’tbe any use at all – the first time they standup they’ll buckle under their own weight andneed to be wheeled round on giganticskateboards. Thank God I’ll be dead by then.According to studies, unless schools start‘going large’ with their furniture orders,children’s schoolwork could suffer as backpain distracts their attention. Poor lambs.I certainly wasn’t overweight when I wasat school although I may have been slightlyunder-height for my weight.But even at my lowest, ahem, height, Icould still fit under a school desk and haveroom for a copy of Jackie magazine to readduring geography, particularly when learningabout trade in Nigeria (a subject as relevantto my life then as it is now, ie not at all).Back then, namby-pamby excuses aboutdesks and bad backs would have been metwith hollow laughter and a month oflunchtime detentions in the lair of theterrifying, bearded maths teacher whosehatred of young people was considered abonus, rather than an impediment, to histeaching career.It practically took the production of deathcertificate to get you out of PE lessons, andeven if you had that you’d still be expectedto carry the netball bibs, keep score andapply pressure to wounds when required.Forget small desks, bad backs andobesity-based bullying, the PE knickers at myschool caused the kind of injuries to one’sself-esteem from which many, including me,never truly recovered.I do remember, however, that even thepregnant student – who stayed at schooluntil she was more than eight months gone– could lever herself behind a desk, so justhow big are kids these days? Should I besaving up for a winch for my grandchildren?Personally, I think all this trouble beganwhen they got rid of the nit nurses. I have noproof to back this up, but that’s neverstopped me in the past.If this music be the food of love, I think I’d rather starveMore important research fromacademics: what’s on your musicplaylist is as important as yourphysique when it comes toimpressing the object of youraffection.A study conducted atGoldsmiths University in Londonconcluded that more than 40 percent of people say that listeningto music is more arousing thantouch during ‘an intimateencounter’.This, I would imagine, saysmore about the partners involvedthan the music.Researchers compiled a list of20 ‘seduction tunes’ which, alongwith hammy old favourites suchas Serge Gainsbourg, BarryWhite and Marvin Gaye,mystifyingly included Queen’s‘Don’t Stop Me Now’, ‘I Want ToBreak Free’ and ‘Who Wants ToLive Forever’, which if you take itin context, sounds slightlydesperate, if not illegal.Other tracks included Ravel’sBolero, Celine Dion’s Titanic,‘anything’ from the DirtyDancing soundtrack, the Soundof Music (!), ‘Grease’ from, er,Grease and Kings of Leon, Sex onFire (don’t even go there).I despair of the human race, Ireally do.Lifeline: TheLouise HamiltonCentre, picturedduringconstruction inthe grounds ofthe JamesPaget UniversityHospital, willsoon open itsdoors forpalliative care.Should such avital servicehave to rely onfundraisers tokeep going?PHOTO: JAMES BASS
  • Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4LEE RALPH HAWORTH26th January 1966 - 25th October 1992Dear Lee, twenty long years havepassed since leukaemia took awayyour life at just 26 years of age, witheverything to live for.All who knew you remembers yourhappy nature and zest for life.Time does not dull the extreme lossand sadness of your death.My memory and love for youremains the same as ever.Love DadAdvert ID:229207GF32 mm by24.1 mmBooking Code:229207GFCustomer ID:JARVIS EFFIEColour:1First Appearance:26/10/12Last Appearance:26/10/12MARSDENCHRISTINEOn your birthdayOctober 29th.RENATAOn your anniversaryNovember 1stMissing you both.Love and prayersfrom all the Familyx x x xAdvert ID:229303GF32 mm by57.9 mmBooking Code:229303GFCustomer ID:MORSE ESMEColour:1First Appearance:26/10/12Last Appearance:26/10/12Advert ID:229803GF32 mm by30.4 mmBooking Code:229803GFCustomer ID:PORTER ELSIEColour:1First Appearance:26/10/12Last Appearance:26/10/12CARLROBERTSOctober 29th, 1999Throughout the yearI think of you,And once in a while Ill cry,For although youve gone,It was much too soonto say goodbye.Love and miss you always,Mum and Cliffx xNEILSINCLAIROctober 28th, 2009Dearly loved son and brotherRemembered and lovedevery day,In our hearts you willalways stay.Fondest memoriesAll your lovingFamilyx x x xELSIETOOKEOctober 30th, 2011Remembering with love,a wonderful Wife, Mum,Nanny and Great-nanny.Always in our thoughtsand hearts.Love fromDudley,Linda, Shirley,Chris and Familiesx x xRUTHTRETTOctober 27th, 2007Remembering with love adear mum, nan and great-nan.If memories bring uscloser Mum,We will never be far apart,For you are always inmy thoughts,And forever in my heart.Your lovingdaughter Frances,son-in-law Ianand Familyx x xAdvert ID:TIBIRMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:BIRMEMCustomer ID:BIRMEMColour:4RIAHELSONOctober 30th.Happy Birthday to oursweet, precious Angel.Miss you moreeach day.Love always,Mum and Dadx xRIAHELSDONPrecious birthday memoriesof our beautiful Ria.Love and miss you,Auntie Frannie,Auntie Bubbuband Familiesx x xAdvert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4Advert ID:229723GH32 mm by47.3 mmBooking Code:229723GHCustomer ID:BAILEY MAGGIEColour:1First Appearance:26/10/12Last Appearance:26/10/12Advert ID:229203GF32 mm by49.5 mmBooking Code:229203GFCustomer ID:DEAN LILYColour:1First Appearance:26/10/12Last Appearance:26/10/1216 Friday, October 26, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news online: www.yarmouthmercury24.co.uk‘A passion forthe Post Office’MARY Graystone, whoserved as postmistressat Ormesby St Margaretfor 56 years, has diedaged 79.The modest and generouswoman with a sharp memorydied peacefully at the JamesPaget University Hospital, onSeptember 24.She was postmistress inOrmesby St Margaret from1956, remaining at the CromerRoad branch until her death.She was known for beingkind and caring and heavilycommitted to Ormesby StMargaret. She was a goodorganiser who did lots for thevillage and raised money forthe Royal British Legion butwent about her business in amodest manner.She was also known for beingthe chairman of the Norwichand Great Yarmouth branchof the National Federation ofSub Postmasters.Born on November 16 1932,she grew up in Filby and wentto St Louis Convent School inGreat Yarmouth.She joined the Post Office at17, and became the youngestsub postmistress in thecountry.Mrs Graystone and husbandRonald were married in StPeters Church on St PetersRoad in Yarmouth, beginninga union that lasted 63 years.They lived beside the postoffice on Cromer Road, andhad two children, Peter andTeresa.She was involved withthe local church as ayoungster and adult, whereshe volunteered and helpedorganise the Harvest Supperand was instrumental informing the young wives’group in the village, providinga social club for the youngerwomen, which would meet atBracecamp Hall.In 1977, she was one of thosebehind the Queen’s SilverJubilee celebrations on thevillage green, where herhusband was in charge of thefood.She also sat on the parishcouncil for about 30 years.Mr Graystone, 83, said: “Shewas a person who gave all.She had a lasting memory anda loving kindness.“She had a fantastic memoryfor everything, she wouldremember all her friend’sgrandchildren’s names andso on.“Shehadagoodmathematicalbrain, she could add up fasterthan the computer.”Mrs Graystone’s funeral wasa full house at Ormesby StMargaret church on October9, and was attended by a RBLstandard bearer in honour ofher decades of fundraisingand involvement with thePoppy Appeal.Son Peter, 60, said: “Shewould do her utmost to helpanybody. She would give allwithout expecting anythingin return, if anyone was in amuddle she would help themout.“She always did thingsin a subtle way, she wouldorganise things in such a waythat you wouldn’t realise shehad organised it at all.”Herpostofficewasknownforthriving while others closedacross the county. In 2006 theMercury reported how, on theeve of her 50th year in the role,her branch was bucking thetrend by remaining well usedin the village, ably assistedby friend and colleague JulieGeorge, who has worked therefor 30 years.She received a long serviceaward that year, and, despiteher calm manner, felt stronglyabout the decline of the PostOffice.Mr Graystone added: “Shehad strong views the PostOffice and community wenttogether, that it should be thehub. She wasn’t the sort tostand on a soapbox but shewas passionate about the PostOffice in general and verymuch cared about the villageand did lots for it.“She is buried at OrmesbySt Margaret church so shecan remain here, she wouldn’twish to leave the village yousee.”joe.wilkes@archant.co.ukBy JOE WILKESA BOWLS tournamenthelped raise more than£1,000 for palliative carenurses. The Louise HamiltonCentre, in the grounds ofthe James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH), is onschedule to open in Januaryafter the £1.5m fundraisingtotal was reached.But continued charityefforts will help supportrunning costs at the advicecentre for those with life-limiting conditions.Ella Cooke and IleneHadden presentedMacmillan nurses with acheque for £1,120 lastmonth.The pair raise money eachyear for different charitiesand this year they chose todonate to the palliative careteam.Their endowment fundbenefits people in theNorfolk and Suffolk areaswhich the Macmillan Nursescover.Ella and Ilene raised thismoney through differentevents throughout the year,with the main one being abowls tournament in July onGorleston seafront.Other events included a quizat a local pub, raffles and arace night.JARVISEFFIE MAYTreaured memories of a dearmother, who died on October29th, 1985. Loved amdremembered always andmissed so very much.God bless.Janice.MORSEESME JEANOctober 23rd, 2011A special Mum.It doesn’t seem that one yearhas gone,In our hearts you still live on,A space that no one else canfill,We miss you, Mum andalways will.God bless.Fred, Glenys, Jane, Chris andGilly x x.Loving Nanny.Mark, Richard, Julie, Toni,Clifton, Hayley, Warren andKarl x x.Caring Little NannyJade, Sam, Bex, Alivia,Jemima, Leah, Jake, plusBump x x.PORTERELSIEOctober 23rd, 1977A dear mum and nannie.This day is remembered andquietly kept,Words are not needed,We will never forget.Love, Malcolm and Freda,Valerie, Susan, Melvyn andJulie.BAILEYMAGGIEAlison and Family would liketo thank everyone who sentcards, letters and flowers afterthe recent loss of Maggie andfor the support they havereceived from friends. Asincere thank you to all thosewho sent donations, £650 wasraised for Macmillan Cancersupport. Special thanks to thestaff at the James PagetHospital and to Julie, theMacmillan Nurse. Thank youto all who attended the funeralservice, to the Rev. ArthurBowles and Arthur Jary &Sons, for their excellentarrangements.DEANLILYPamela, Kathryn and Familywould like to thank everyonefor attending the funeral ofLily and for all the cards,messages of sympathy anddonations for Palliative Care.Thank you also to the Co-operative Funeral Service fortheir kindness and mostexcellent arrangements and toRev. Sandy Mitchell for hercomforting and thoughtfulservice. They would also liketo thank Ward 17 at the JamesPaget Hospital for the careand attention shown to Lilyand the staff at Care UK forcaring for Lily, the past 6months.
  • Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4WILLIAM HENRY(BILLY)POLLARDNovember 9th, 2009It is lonely here without you,I miss you more each day,For life is not the same,Since you were called away.If I could have one lifetime wish,One dream that could come true,I would pray to Godwith all my heart,For yesterday and you.Your loving wife Karenx x x x xNever more thana thought away,Loved, missed andremembered every day.Love always Courteney(Corkey)x x xFondest memoriesof ourson-in-law BILLYAlan and Gloria.STEPHENSHUCKFORD1996, a dear BrotherYVONNEWESTERN2008, a dear SisterandSIDNEYSHUCKFORD2008, a dear DadRemembrance keeps youall so nearLove,Pauline and JackieGod blessfrom Mumx x xAdvert ID:231201GF32 mm by34.6 mmBooking Code:231201GFCustomer ID:SMITH EDITHColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12ANTHONY EDWARDWATERSIn treasured memory ofmy wonderful husbandtaken so suddenly,November 11th, 1999.Thirteen lonely years Darlingand I miss you as much nowas I did thenYou were, you areand you always will bethe light and the loveof my life.Thank you for all the happinessyou gave meSleep peacefully until we meetagain.God bless you Tony.Your ever-lovingwife,Jackie x x xAdvert ID:229203CB32 mm by32.5 mmBooking Code:229203CBCustomer ID:WILLIAMS JACKColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12GRAHAM ROBERTWOOLBRIGHTTreasured memories ofmy dear brother,taken from usNovember 9th, 1984Years may pass,but memories stay,Loved and rememberedevery dayTricia, Frankand Family(Vacaville,California)GRAHAM ROBERTWOOLBRIGHTNovember 9th, 1984Our dear brother,still loved,still missed,still very dearSister Pearl, Johnnyand Brianx x xAdvert ID:230513GF32 mm by21.9 mmBooking Code:230513GFCustomer ID:WRIGHT GEORGEColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12Advert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4Advert ID:231212GF32 mm by47.3 mmBooking Code:231212GFCustomer ID:CARLYON PEGGYColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12Advert ID:231213GH32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:231213GHCustomer ID:COOPER WILLIAMColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12Advert ID:230606GF32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:230606GFCustomer ID:LEGGETT JAMESColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12Advert ID:231221CE32 mm by138.4 mmBooking Code:231221CECustomer ID:SOARDS ALANColour:1First Appearance:09/11/12Last Appearance:09/11/12TO PLACE APERSONALANNOUNCEMENTOR REMEMBER ALOVED ONEPlease call01493 847942or e-mailfrontcounter@archant.co.uk16 Friday, November 9, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk16 y y ySMITHEDITH KATEChosen November 10th, 1998.A loving thought, a silent tear,A constant wish you were stillhere, Mum.Love, Tony x.In God’s garden you restabove,In our hearts you rest withlove.Ann, Tony and Family(Australia).WILLIAMSJACKNovember 10th 2009Treasured memories of ourwonderful Dad.Your lovely ways and smilingfaceAre a pleasure to recallYou always had a kindly wordAnd were loved so much by allLove and miss you foreverDadfrom Gillian, Susan, Patriciaand Judith xxxWRIGHTGEORGETreasured memories of mydear husband, who left us onNovember 13th, 2006. Alwaysin our hearts and thoughts.Missing you so much.Ivy and Family x.CARLYONPEGGYThe Family would like toexpress sincere thanks torelatives, friends andneighbours, for cards andfloral tributes and to all whoattended the funeral. A specialthank you to Hunts ofGorleston for excellentfuneral arrangements, SteveHaughton for a verycomforting service. Carolwishes to say a very big thankyou to all Mum’s Carers, whoshe couldn’t have managedwithout. Thank you all.Please accept this as the onlybut very sincereacknowledgment.COOPERWILLIAM C.Doreen, Gavin and Sue wouldlike to thank everyone for thelovely cards and kindmessages. A special thank youto The Windmill for lookingafter Bill so well, to ArthurJary & Sons Ltd. for excellentfuneral arrangements, theRev. Charles Powles for alovely service and a big thankyou to those who gave to theBritish Heart Foundation atotal of £270 was collected.LEGGETTJAMES CHARLESPauline, Elaine, Alison andFamilies would like to extendtheir heartfelt gratitude forthe cards of condolence,flowers and donations sent onJim’s passing. Their thanks toall who attended the funeralservice, the Rev. JamesStewart for his kindness andcompassion and Arthur Jary& Sons, Funeral Directors,for their professionalism andsensitivity.SOARDSALAN MICHAELMichael, Jackie and Avrilwant to express their gratitudeto everyone involved in sayinggoodbye to their belovedAlan.To the magnificent StAndrews Church forwelcoming them; to SuffolkFire and Rescue Service whodid a superb job in organisingevery detail of the traditionalFirefighter’s funeral, ensuringthat it was a tribute to Alanthat everyone could sharewhilst maintaining the dignityand solemnity of theoccasion. To Dale, the piper;to the standard bearers; to thefirefighters and RNLIvolunteers who formed theguard of honour, and toKaren who made the jacketfor Tyson, Alan’s preciousdog.To Steve for the daily contactand concern for their welfare;to White Watch for their lovein guarding and carrying Alanand to Andy Fry for ensuringeverything was handledsympathetically.They will be eternally gratefulto Revd Albert Cadmore andRevd Canon Peter Morrisonfor conducting such a sincere,moving, uplifting service.They know the amount ofwork and emotion that wentinto writing and delivering thetributes; the poem ‘Al by Tiff’;the homily and reading thelessons: thank you so muchGentlemen.They appreciated the waySean, Melanie and Darren ofArthur Jary and Sons guidedand cared for themthroughout. To everyone whoattended the funeral and thosewho sent the hundreds ofcards, letters, emails, textsphone calls and beautifulflower arrangements; thankyou. For all the hugs andhandshakes; thank you.Thanks to the Wherry Hotelfor hosting the wake and toJean for her patient help withthe table decorations.Finally, thank you to everyonewho donated to the AlanSoards Memorial Fund.For local news: www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukBulbs gift tomark birthdayA GENEROUS centenarian said no topresents for her special birthday andinstead asked wellwishers to makedonations towards Gorleston’s newpalliative care centre.Annie May Armstrong turned 100 onMonday and celebrated her milestone at homewith friends and family - with her day beingmade extra special after receiving a card fromthe Queen.But instead of tearing open presents,kind-hearted Annie requested donationsto purchase daffodils as part of the LouiseHamilton Centre’s buy a bulb campaign.The scheme aims to plant thousands ofbulbs outside the centre in the grounds of theJames Paget University Hospital, and Annie’sbirthday fundraiser boosted the coffers by£120.Annie was born in Ilkeston, Derbyshireand moved to Lowestoft with her husbandHerbert in 1966 and is described by herfriends and campaigners as a “lovely lady”and a “true inspiration”.The centre, named after Gorleston womanLouise Hamilton who died from breast cancerat the age of 28, reached its £1.5m fundraisingtarget last month but donations are stillencouraged via the buy a bulb campaign, andother upcoming events.Tickets are still up for grabs for a trolleydash in Morrisons on December 4, with achance to win up to £250 to spend in theGorleston store.A quiz night is also being held at the PierHotelonNovember27.Ticketscost£5pertable,with teams of up to five, with refreshmentsbeing provided.And people who would like to volunteeronce the centre is opened are still encouragedto get in touch.For more details about the buy a bulbcampaign, becoming a volunteer or either ofthe events listed call 01493 663831 / 453348.lucy.clapham@archant.co.ukBy LUCY CLAPHAMTAKING SHAPE: The Louise Hamilton Centre is taking shape in the grounds of theJames Paget Univesity Hospital.100: Annie May Armstrong who donatedmoney for bulbs for the new centre.
  • YarmouthAdvertiserTHE WHERRY HOTELOulton Broadto be held at. . .Then do come toThursday 22nd September7pm-10pmThis will be a SuperbBridal Event full ofTrade Stands withexperts to offer adviceto help make yourSpecial Day reallyspecial!!!• FREE Admission• FREEPrize Draw Entry• Licensed BarPlanning aWedding?BRIDAL FAYREBRIDAL FAYRETHE GRANDTHE GRANDALL ENQUIRIES 07876 0677121www.eastangliaweddings.co.ukPLEASE TELL YOUR FRIENDS -AND WE’LL SEE YOU THERE!!20 November 15, 2012Centenarian’sbirthday wishboosts coffersA GENEROUS centenarian said no topresents for her special birthday andinstead asked wellwishers to makedonations towards Gorleston’s newpalliative care centre.Annie May Armstrong (pictured) turned100 on Monday and celebrated hermilestone at home with friends andfamily – with her day being madeextra special after receiving acard from the Queen.But instead of tearingopenpresents,kind-heartedAnnierequesteddonationsto purchase daffodils aspart of the LouiseHamilton Centre’s buy abulb campaign.The scheme aims toplant thousands of bulbsoutside the centre in thegrounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital,and Annie’s birthdayfundraiser boosted thecoffers by £120.Annie was born in Ilkeston,Derbyshire and moved toL owe s t o f t w i t h h e r h u s b a n dHerbert in 1966 and is described by her friendsand campaigners as a “lovely lady” and a“true inspiration”.The centre, named after Gorleston womanLouise Hamilton who died from breast cancerat the age of 28, reached its £1.5m fundraisingtarget last month but donations are stillencouraged via the buy a bulb campaign, andother upcoming events.Tickets are still up for grabs for atrolley dash in Morrisons onDecember 4, with a chance to winup to £250 to spend in theGorleston store.A quiz night is also beingheld at the Pier Hotel onNovember 27. Ticketscost £5 per table, withteams of up to five, withrefreshments beingprovided.And people who wouldlike to volunteer once thecentre is opened are stillencouraged to get intouch.For more details aboutthe buy a bulb campaign,becoming a volunteer or eitherof the events listed call 01493663831 / 453348.TAKING SHAPE: The Louise Hamilton Centre is taking shape in the grounds of theJames Paget Univesity Hospital.By Lucy Claphamlucy.clapham@archant.co.uk
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, November 16, 2012 9For local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInBriefTributes toPercy TrettA PASSION for exploring andunderstanding the natural worlddrove Great Yarmouth naturalist,Percy Trett, who has died aged 86after a long illness.For more than 25 years, he was oneof the team of four specialists whowrote the EDP’s In the Countrysidecolumn. After the death of Ted Ellis,who always signed himself as EAE,he became a regular contributor in1986. “Ted Ellis was really mymentor . . . who was like an olderbrother to me,” he said on his 80thbirthday.He was still working in the family’sVictoria Road garage in GreatYarmouth at the age of 84, althoughit was later sold in early 2011. Itmarked the end of an era of Trett’sbusiness involvement in the town,which had been started by hisgrandfather, also called Percy, in1898.See p44 for full obituaryPolice votesTHE results of the vote for Norfolk’sfirst ever Police and CrimeCommissioner (PCC) will be kowntoday.People heading to the polls inNorfolk yesterday had fivecandidates to choose from - SteveMorphew (Labour), Jamie Athill(Conservative), James Joyce (LibDems), Stephen Bett (Independent)and Matthew Smith (UKIP).According to the Home Officewebsite, the PCC’s job will be to“bring more of a public voice topolicing”.Motor-home garage wastoo small for motor-homessamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLA FAMILY-run motor-home garagesparked a Fleggs village spat when itsought to build a taller workshop.Beck’s Motor-homes was founded more than30 years ago in leafy Rollesby, and is nestledamong homes in Martham Road.But the size of motor-home vehicles hasincreased over the years, and today’s vehiclesare too big for the 1978 workshop.Owners hoped to build a modern garage toallow the business to continue, but angryneighbours said the industrial unit wouldspoil their street - with the planned garage“more at home” on Gapton Hall industrialestate. John Maitland, whose father-in-law DonBeck founded Beck’s Motor-homes, addressedplanning councillors at Tuesday’s developmentcontrol meeting.“Don built the building which now needs tobe replaced,” he explained. “It has an asbestosroof, it’s hard to keep warm and is of singlebrick construction.“Today’s motor-homes are larger than thoseof before, and physically do not fit in thebuilding.”He pleaded with councillors that he couldchange the look of the facade to blend inwith the street, but the size of the building iscrucial.“If we were able to get approval we couldeven remove the old petrol canopy,” he added.“It’s just used to help people with dogs in theircars stay in the shade nowadays.“We could get rid of it.”Six letters of objection had been received -relating to the visual impact of the building- but the person living next to Beck’s Motor-homes withdrew their objection “at theeleventh hour” with no reason given as towhy.Resident Mr O’Reilly addressed the meetingat Great Yarmouth town hall on behalf of theobjectors.He said: “We realise this is an admirablebusiness in our village that we have benefitedfrom, but the nub of our objection is that thisis a Broadland rural village and this road isthe centre of the village.“From the pond to the garage and the old puband village hall, the bowling green, farm shopand St George’s Church.“It’s the historic centre and we care aboutwhat’s being built there.”Under plans lodged by Mr Maitland, thecurrent east building would be demolishedand replaced with a new building around0.7m taller. It would measure 37m long, 10.5mwide and 6.2m to the ridge of the roof, withthe original petrol pumps and canopy in frontof it and a large showroom in front of theworkshop.Charles Reynolds, councillor for Ormesbyward, said: “This business has been therefor years and this romantic view of a villagegarage has gone out of the window.“Petrol had to stop as you lose money doingit.“We need to encourage this type of villagebusiness. Frankly no-one is very badly affectedapart from next door, and I’m glad to see thatobjection has gone.”Plans were approved, with the conditionthat the possible petrol canopy demolition isdiscussed with council officers.Go online to complete quick centre surveyPEOPLE are being asked tocomplete a survey about theLouise Hamilton Centre, soonto open in the grounds ofthe James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH).Construction work is ontrack to finish next monthand the doors are due to opento the public in January.The centre will provide aninformation and supportivecare centre for everyone in theGreat Yarmouth and Waveneyarea who needs advice andsupport from diagnosis,during treatment or throughto palliative care. People cancomplete the survey onlineat www.surveymonkey.com/s/PCEFIRE officers and paramedicsscaled new heights in teamworkduring a daring rescue on thetower of St Nicholas Minster, inGreat Yarmouth.And at a fire service awardspresentation at Norwich CityFootball Club this week theirsterling efforts were recognisedwith a collaborative workingaward.Yarmouth station’s blue watch, aretained crew from Gorleston andan urban search and rescue(USAR) team from Dereham wereall commended.Incident commander Phil Berry,station manager at Carrow, saidthe rescue was a “celebration ofNorfolk’s blue light emergencyservices coming together for thebenefit of the community”.Mr Berry, who put the crewsforward for the award, said it wasone of the most complicatedrescues in his career.He said: “It started with a reportthat an adult male had fallen fromscaffolding and landed on a lowerlevel sustaining injuries that werepotentially spinal.“That created a problem that ifwe moved him without carefulplanning, it could make hiscondition a lot worse.”He said as soon as the nature ofthe incident became apparent,USAR watch manager AlanNicholls was sent ahead of histeam to Yarmouth to help planthe rescue.Mr Berry said: “Police played animportant role from the outset,creating a cordon to keep out thepublic. It was a warm day in Juneand there was a crowd of peoplestanding watching.”He said it was not feasible toreach the tower with an aerialladder platform and it was notpossible to come down the stairsinside with a spinal board so theyhad to organise a rescue usinglines.The USAR crew set up the lineson the tower in preparation forspecially trained paramedics fromthe hazardous area response teamto abseil down with the patient.Mr Berry said: “It was essentialto co-ordinate all the specialskills, and carrying it out 90ft up– where one slip could bedisastrous – made it all the moredifficult.”Once down the tower on to thetransept roof, it was possible tolower the casualty, MichaelSheldrake, to the ground using theaerial ladder platform.Mr Sheldrake, 26, thankfullyescaped with only broken ribs.Yarmouth MP and Home Officeminister Brandon Lewis, a guest ofhonour at the awards, praised theperformance of his home towncrew, also presenting them withan award for best stationcontribution to the firefighters’charity.Addressing the award winners,Chief Fire Officer Nigel Williamssaid: “Tonight is an occasion forrecognising and celebrating withstaff of NFRS who have workedunselfishly and diligently to makeNorfolk one of the safest places tolive in the UK.“I am privileged to work with afantastic team of people who havemoved our service forward, all ofwhom espouse the ethos ofselfless public service.”
  • The Assembly HouseEastern DailyPressWEDDING SHOWThe Assembly House, Theatre Street, Norwich, NR2 1RG50 exhibitorsFREE entry and show guideTel: 01603 772190 www.weddinglink.co.uk/norfolkFollow us for all the latest news EDP Weddings #EDP24WeddingsWIN!A champagneafternoon teafor four justfor attendingthe show!NEWEXHIBITORSFOR THISSHOW!THIS WEEKEND!54 Friday, November 16, 2012 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukJANUARY OPENING: The new £1.5m Louise Hamilton Centre.Palliative carecentre gearsup for launchCHARITIES and theNHS are teaming up tolaunch services at theeast coast’s new £1.5mpalliative care centre.After a six-and-a-half-yearfunding appeal supportedby hundreds of people inWaveney and Great Yarmouth,the Louise Hamilton Centre isdue to open in January in thegrounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital.Building work is now welladvanced and, with theopening only two months’away, the groups and agenciesthat will be based at the centreare busy making preparationsto welcome its first patientsand their carers.Dr Bernadette Auger,consultant in palliative careat the James Paget, said: “TheLouise Hamilton Centre givesus a fantastic environmentto meet patients, talk withfamilies and help us supporttheir physical and emotionalneeds. The centre is part ofour vision for enhancingexisting palliative careservices in Great Yarmouthand Waveney.”Maggie Parsons, cancerand end-of-life programmemanager at HealthEast,said: “Commissioning thisnew service was one ofthe priorities identifiedby local stakeholders fromthe Marie Curie deliveringchoice programme. It is areally positive step towardstruly integrated palliativecare across Yarmouth andWaveney. As well as providinga wide range of supportiveservices a key aspect will alsobe signposting patients andtheir carers to other existingservices across all localcare settings, to ensure thatpatients and carers receive thecare and support they need.”Believed to be the first ofits kind in East Anglia, theLouise Hamilton Centrewill provide supportive andpalliative care for patientsand families whose lives areaffected by a life-limiting orprogressive illness.It will offer a range ofemotional and practicalsupport including specialistpalliative care services, adviceand information on welfareand money matters, therapygroups, and complementaryand relaxation therapies.The centre will also actas the hub for a network ofsupportive and palliative careservices and will help signpostpeople towards community-based services, including thenew Big C centre in GreatYarmouth.The services available atthe centre will be supportedby partners including: theAlzheimer’s Society, Big C,the British Heart Foundation,Crossroads Care Services,Cruse Bereavement Support,East Coast CommunityHealthcare, Great Yarmouthand Waveney SpecialistPalliative Care Team, JamesPaget University HospitalsNHS Foundation Trust,Macmillan Cancer Support,Marie Curie Cancer Care,neurological conditioncharities, NHS GreatYarmouth and WaveneyClinical CommissioningGroup, Norfolk CountyCouncil, Norfolk FamilyCarers, St Elizabeth Hospice,and Suffolk Family CarersJane Petit, chief executiveof St Elizabeth Hospice, said:“St Elizabeth Hospice isinvesting £2.2m over a three-year period into the GreatYarmouth and Waveney areato provide hospice services forlocal people. Our vision is toprovide care close to people’shomes, through partnershipworking, recruiting local staffand avoiding duplication ofservices, and our involvementin the Louise Hamilton Centrehelps us move this forward.”VISION:Jane Petitof the StElizabethHospice.Wrestling night to raise fundsPRIME-TIME wrestling is set to return toLowestoft next month.Lowestoft wrestler Steve Quintain has teamedup with the World Association of Wrestlingto host a fund-raising show at the WaterLaneLeisure Centre on Saturday, December 1.Allproceedsfromtheshowwillgotothefamilyof Lowestoft teenager Lewis Stanners-Lee, toaid his recovery from an unexplained bleed inhis neck that has led to him being paralysedfrom the waist down. He is currentlybeeing treated at Stoke Mandeville Hospital.A raffle will also be held on the night, withits proceeds going to Waveney Enterprises inBeccles.Quintain will clash with the legendaryKing Kendo in battling for the Jordan SmithMemorial Trophy, with other bouts featuringThe Hooligans, ‘Rowdy’ Ricky Knight, SueThomson and Sweet Saraya.Doors open at 7.30pm, with tickets now onsale from Skin Graphics in Battery GreenRoad, Lowestoft; WaterLane, or online at www.wawuk.co.uk They cost £8 for adults and £6 forchildren/OAPs. Tickets on the night are £10for adults and £8 for children/OAPs. Ringsidemeet and greet tickets are also available at £12from Skin Graphics or by calling 01502 560115.
  • 16 Friday, November 23, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInShortHeritageprotectedA £10,000 grant is funding a projectto document the heritage of GreatYarmouth.Great Yarmouth-based VauxhallLinks was one of the first groupsin the UK to benefit from aHeritage Lottery Fund (HLF) ‘AllOur Stories’ grant.The funding will allow VauxhallLinks to work with the communityof Yarmouth to record andcelebrate the town’s transportheritage, drawing on local people’smemories to tell the story.The project will explore theimportant role that bridges,waterways, railways andtramways have played in thetown’s development.At the heart of the project is theiconic Vauxhall Bridge, which is akey gateway to both the town andcountryside.The former railway bridge nolonger carries trains or trams butdoes provide for pedestrians andcyclists between the town andstation, and follows the AnglesWay, one of the popular NorfolkTrails, across the River Bure.All Our Stories, a brand newsmall grant programme, launchedearlier this year in support of BBCTwo’s The Great British Story, hasbeen designed as an opportunityfor everyone to get involved intheir heritage.The popular series by historianMichael Wood and supported bya programme of BBC Learningactivitiesandeventsgotthousandsof us asking questions about ourhistory and inspired us to look atour history in a different way.Market getsXmas twistA GORLESTON garage willbe transformed into a festivefoodie bazaar for the secondof a successful indoor farmersmarket.The Christmas spectacular hasbeen organised by Chris Browne,body shop manager at Pertweeand Back accident repair centre,where the market is being held.The dad was keen to establish amarketinthetowntogiveshoppersa chance to pick up local produceand meet with suppliers, but alsoto give businesses a chance tomeet and greet. His first market,held in September with 13 stalls,was a great success attractingaround 300 shoppers and raising£200 for Gorleston Cubs.And he is now hoping to build onthemomentumwithhisChristmasevent, which has attracted almostdouble the amount of stalls.Many traders will be returningincluding Perry the butchersfrom Cobholm who will be takingorders for Christmas turkeys, aswell as some new faces. Amongthe produce on offer will be fruitand veg, cakes, honey and wine aswell as craft stalls.The market will be raising moneyfor the East Coast Hospice witha Christmas hamper that will beraffled off.The market is on Sunday,December 2 from 9am - 1pm.Pyjama parade raises £4kfor palliative care centreHOSPITAL apprentices wenton a night time walk dressedin their pyjamas to raise morethan £4,000 for charity - andcash is still pouring in.TheJamesPagetUniversityHospital(JPH) team are supporting the £1.5mLouise Hamilton Centre, which is setto be completed next month.And local charities and the NHS inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney areteaming up for its launch.The centre, believed to be thefirst of its kind in East Anglia, willprovide supportive and palliativecare for patients and families whoselives are affected by a life-limiting orprogressive illness.Located in the grounds of theJPH the new centre, funded by thePalliative Care East appeal, will openin January 2013.Some patients and their familieslive with an illness and its effectsfor many years and need emotionaland practical support. For illnesseswhere a cure is not possible the focusis on quality of life to help them cometo terms with the situation and to livetheir lives as fully as possible.The Louise Hamilton Centrewill provide specialist palliativecare services, advice and supportincluding welfare and moneymatters, therapy groups, a variety ofinformation about health conditions,support for carers and will alsooffer complementary and relaxationtherapies.The centre will also act as the hubfor a network of supportive andpalliative care services across GreatYarmouth and Waveney and will helpsignpost people towards community-based services, including the new BigC centre in Great Yarmouth.Dr Bernadette Auger, consultantin palliative care at the JPH, said:“The Louise Hamilton Centre givesus a fantastic environment to meetpatients, talk with families, and tohelp us support their physical andemotional needs.“The centre is part of our visionfor enhancing existing palliativecare services in Great Yarmouth andWaveney.”Maggie Parsons, cancer and endof life programme manager atHealthEast, said: “Commissioningthis new service was one of thepriorities identified by localstakeholders from the Marie CurieDelivering Choice programme.“It is a really positive step towardstruly integrated palliative care acrossGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.“As well as providing a wide rangeof supportive services a key aspectwill also be signposting patients andtheir carers to other existing servicesacross all local care settings, to ensurethat patients and carers receive thecare and support they need.”Jane Petit, chief executive of StElizabeth Hospice, said: “St ElizabethHospice is investing £2.2 millionover a three-year period into theGreat Yarmouth and Waveney areato provide hospice services for localpeople.“Our vision is to provide careclose to people’s homes, throughpartnership working, recruitinglocal staff and avoiding duplicationof services and our involvement inthe Louise Hamilton Centre helps usmove this forward.”The services will be supported bya wide variety of partners in theLouise Hamilton Centre, including:Alzheimer’s Society, Big C, BritishHeart Foundation, Crossroads CareServices,CruseBereavementSupport,East Coast Community Healthcare,Great Yarmouth and WaveneySpecialist Palliative Care Team,James Paget University HospitalsNHS Foundation Trust, MacmillanCancer Support, Marie CurieCancer Care, Neurological conditioncharities, NHS Great Yarmouth andWaveney Clinical CommissioningGroup, Norfolk County Council,Norfolk Family Carers, St. ElizabethHospice, Suffolk Family Carers.Fundraisers are still running adaffodil campaign which they saypeople are taking to their hearts.And they are also selling ticketsfor a trolley dash in Morrisons onTuesday, December 4.The event offers the chance to winup to £250 to spend in Morrisons atGorleston.Volunteer are also sought for thenew centre.Fundraising organiser JennyWatson said: “We have had a greatresponse already but always welcomemore people.”samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLGREAT Yarmouth Borough Council’s tree officerhas said that anyone who finds the fungaldisease Ash Dieback on a tree should contactspecialists or the government.Ash Dieback is a fungal disease that has sweptthe globe and recently emerged in England,killing trees. People across the country areurged to contact the Forestry Commission (FC)or the Department for Environment, Food andRural Affairs if they spot it.Patrick Tabor, council tree officer, said: “Wehave had a few calls from people that we havedirected to the FC, but no actual cases.“It is not the right time to check now, we haveto wait until spring to see if it emerges inYarmouth.“We have not seen it on our trees. We will keepan eye on trees that belong to us but if peoplesee it on privately owned trees they shouldmake a call to the FC.”Mr Tabor said ash trees can be found all overthe borough, mainly in parks such as StGeorge’s and Gorleston Recreation Ground andthey commonly grow in people’s gardens.He said that to detect the disease on a treepeople should look out for the normally elephant-grey bark of an adult ash tree turning brown andlesions on the bark.If you spot the disease call the FC hotline on08459 33 55 77.Borough’s trees escape disease - for now
  • Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4Advert ID:233110GH32 mm by17.7 mmBooking Code:233110GHCustomer ID:LEAK MARGARETColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Advert ID:233103GH32 mm by17.7 mmBooking Code:233103GHCustomer ID:MORRIS DORISColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12PITCHERNORMANDecember 16th, 1989andDOROTHYDecember 5th, 2010Treasured memories ofdear parents, grandparentsand great-grandparents.Your lovingFamilyx x xAdvert ID:232103GF32 mm by30.4 mmBooking Code:232103GFCustomer ID:PITT ROBERTColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Last Appearance:30/11/12Advert ID:233207GF32 mm by38.9 mmBooking Code:233207GFCustomer ID:PLATFORD BETTYColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Last Appearance:30/11/12Advert ID:233218GH32 mm by19.8 mmBooking Code:233218GHCustomer ID:SCOTT GREENARDColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Last Appearance:30/11/12OLIVER GEDGESCOTT-GREENARD15th October 1992 -29th November 2011His beautiful smileforever in our heartsThomasina, Elliott,Isobel and Alexx x xOLIVER GEDGESCOTT-GREENARDNovember 29th, 2011Our beloved grandson, OliverIn our hearts today,tomorrow and always.Your lovingGrandmaand GrandadAdvert ID:233203GH32 mm by19.8 mmBooking Code:233203GHCustomer ID:SYMONDS ROBERTColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Last Appearance:30/11/12Advert ID:233209GH32 mm by21.9 mmBooking Code:233209GHCustomer ID:WRIGHT ELSIEColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Last Appearance:30/11/12Advert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4Advert ID:233107GF32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:233107GFCustomer ID:BARKER ALANColour:1First Appearance:30/11/12Last Appearance:30/11/1216 Friday, November 30, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukFor local news and views online: www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukJazzy wins shop dashA TROLLEY dash around aGorleston supermarket hashelped raise more than £1,500for Palliative Care East (PCE).Tickets sold for £1 each were a hit,with 1,525 being snapped up - withentrants hoping to win three minutesof free shopping time in Morrisons.Winners were drawn this week byMercury editor Anne Edwards, withMrs Jazzy Baker taking the top prize.Second was Mr Sherwood and thirdwas Rachel Stevens, who both winprize hampers.The prize shop will take place at7.45am on Tuesday, before Morrisonsopens its doors for the day. Up to £250of shopping can be bagged if thewinner is quick enough around theshop.Organisers The Buzz Team say theyare delighted at the amount theyhave raised. Jeanne Henderson, whohelped sell tickets, said: “We’re happypeople have been supporting us.”Jenny Watson, fundraiser for PCE,said she hopes people will continueto support them when the LouiseHamilton Centre opens in the groundsof the James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH) in January 2013.Further events are planned to helpthe centre to support people affectedby terminal illness when it opens.Cliff Park Infant School’s choir willlaunch the Shine A Light collectionon Thursday. Shine A Light is to helppeople reflect on thoughts of lovedones while helping raise money forPCE.To have the name of someone specialon the Shine A Light website, peoplemust fill in a form with their lovedone’s name, relationship to them anddedication for the website.The website, which contains details,is: http://bit.ly/sHiNeA charity Christmas dinner isoffered at the Furzedown Hotel onThursday, December 13.Fans of the 1960s can enjoy a themednight at the Ocean Room on March 16.Strictly Ballroom is also coming toYarmouth next year - with a date tobe fixed in October.A Nelson’s Monument in GreatYarmouth to Nelson’s Column inLondon charity bike ride is also onthe horizon.The £1.5m Louise Hamilton Centre,is set to be completed in December,will provide supportive and palliativecare for patients and families whoselives are affected by a life-limiting orprogressive illness.For illnesses where a cure is notpossible the focus is on quality oflife. The centre will also act as thehub for a network of supportive andpalliative care services across GreatYarmouth and Waveney and will helpsignpost people towards community-based services, including the new BigC centre in Great Yarmouth.Death of former art teacherA WELL-known and respected artteacher working at Great Yarmouth’screative heart during what manyconsider to be the town’s moststimulating and productive periodhas died aged 78.Barry Drake died suddenly inhospital on Friday, one of a group ofsignificant figures including BruerTidman and Sam Chilvers who helpedelevate the town to national and oftenaward-winning standing in the worldof art.Born in Great Yarmouth he grewup in Gorleston his obvious talentleading to his acceleration to thetown’s College of Art in TrafalgarRoad, aged just 14. It was while atcollege that he met his wife Christine,the sister of a fellow student Kevin.The couple married in St NicholasChurch in 1963.He went on to study art and print-making at Leicester University.Having excelled there he displayedequally impressive abilities in thearmy during his national service,earning him the honour of ChampionRecruit.Although to his disappointment hewas posted no further than Wrenthamin Suffolk, he discovered a life-longpassion for cars and could reportedlyget behind the wheel of anything,however large, and drive it.Returning to Great Yarmouth hetook a teaching job at the town’sHospital School in the Market Place,then a secondary modern, workingwith his great childhood and collegefriend Sam Chilvers.Over the next ten years the schoolgained a national reputation for itsart, winning a string of accoladesand leaving many “better” schoolstrailing in its wake.Riding on that success he wasoffered a job at the art college wherehe was once a student as head of printmaking.Later when the Yarmouth andNorwich colleges merged he becamehead of foundation studies for both.He retired in 1994 at the age of 60 as asenior lecturer.However he soon had itchy feet andtook up lecturing on a part time basisat Great Yarmouth College, inspiringa new generation.As well as teaching he was also anaccomplished artist in his own rightexhibiting at Snape, Holkham and theTheatre Royal in Norwich and stillproducing work until recently.As a young man he supplementedhis income working with seasidephotographer Edgar Barker and wasrecentlyinterviewedforaforthcomingbook about snappers who plied theirtrade on the English prom.MrDrakeenjoyedadrinkandastory,and was fascinated by technology andhow it worked. He also had a passionfor jazz, rubbing shoulders with manyof the greats including George Mellyin his home village of Ormesby StMargaret whose Royal Oak pub wasonce at the hub of many musicalevenings attracting top names.He leaves his wife Christine, twodaughters Sophie and Fiona andfour grandchildren Griffin, Tuesday,Cicely and Foxe. His funeral is onFriday December 7 at GorlestonCrematorium at 11.20am.LEAKMARGARETNovember 28th, 2006Remembered and lovedalways.Douglas x x xMORRISDORISTreasured memories of a dearsister.Always in our thoughts.Love, Madeline and Ted.PITTROBERT(Bob)1946 - 2002Can’t believe it’s 10 years sinceyou left us.Still missing you lots.Your loving wife Yvonne, sonsChris and Richard, Vicky andgrandchildren Georgina andTristan, who you sadly neverknew, also mother-in-law Lily.PLATFORDBETTY ANNDecember 3rd, 2011Sadly missed and neverforgotten by husband Micky xMom, losing you left aheartache that no one canheal,But loving you leaves amemory that no one can steal.Eileen xAlways in my thoughts, Momand forever in my heart.Lisa xSCOTT-GREENARDOLIVERTreasured memories of ourgrandson Ol - will beremembered today andalways.Nan and Grandad S-G x xSYMONDSROBERTIn loving memory of my dearhusband, who fell asleep onDecember 3rd, 1998.Remembered every day.Love, Margaret and Family.WRIGHTELSIENovember 26th, 2006Remembering a dear mumand nanny, loved and missedalways.God bless.Your little Family x xBARKERALAN GARYElizabeth and Ron (Alan’sMum and Dad), Julie-Ann(wife) and Children wish tothank everyone, who by theiracts of kindness andexpressions of sympathy,helped them through a verydifficult time. Thanks also tothose who donated to HelpFor Heroes, or Children’sHospice, QuidenhamPersonalAnnouncementsBirths, Marriages,Engagements, Deaths andIn MemoriamsCall in person to169 King Street, Gt. Yarmouthor fax (01493) 847977Personal announcementsthat can be placed bytelephone are Birthdays,Congratulations, Get Well,Good Luck, Anniversaries andSpecial Occasions.Call (01493) 847942E-mailfrontcounter@archant.co.uk
  • NOW ONMASSIVE WINTERSALEMASSIVE WINTERSALESAVE UP TO50%SAVE UP TO50%OFFTHROUGHOUT THE STOREOFFTHROUGHOUT THE STORE1000’S OF SAVINGS IN:FASHIONS, MENSWEAR, SHOES, ACCESSORIES, LINENS,TABLEWARE, COOKWARE, ELECTRICAL, FURNITURE, BEDS,CARPETS AND CURTAINSwww.palmerstores.com37-39 Market Place, Great Yarmouth Tel: 01493 844291Celebrating 175 Years 1837 – 2012PALMERS CAR PARK FREE AFTER 4PMOPENSunday10am - 4pmNew Years Day11am - 3pmFriday, December 28, 2012 yarmouthmercury24.co.uk 70pSAVE ££SHalf price entry voucher: P25The Louise Hamilton Centrehas been built: P6/7Cobholm Jack’stravels: P4/5BrowstonHall01493 667591www.browstonhall.com • BROWSTON GREEN, BROWSTON, NR319DW2 For £10.95Mon-Sat Lunchtimes+ Mon-Thurs Eveningsthroughout December(Excluding Bank Holidays)New YearsEve Party3 Course Dinner & DiscoSome Space Still AvailableOnly £34.95Call for DetailsWE WOULD LIKETO WISH ALL OURCUSTOMERS AHAPPY NEW YEARCounty leader calls forMP to resignA POLITICAL row betweenGreat Yarmouth’s rulingparties has deepened afterthe town’s Tory MP accusedLabour councillors of“squealing with indignation”over a funding cut he haspersonally overseen.But the councillors have retaliatedto the comments from BrandonLewis and said they have been leftwith a gaping deficit by the previous“incompetent” Tory administrationwhich - along with the coalition’sdecision to hack their funding by19pc - was now forcing them to makestringent savings.And some residents have also hitback at the under-fire MP claiming heis “more concerned about his partyandhispositionthanhisconstituents”with a senior county council leadercalling for him to resign from his postas local government minister.George Nobbs, leader of NorfolkCounty Council’s Labour group,described Mr Lewis’ actions as“absolutely extraordinary” and said:“I cannot understand how any selfrespecting MP can stand there andlucy.clapham@archant.co.ukBy LUCY CLAPHAMPOLITICAL ROW: Brandon Lewis (left) should quit his ministerial postsays George Nobbs (right), leader of the council council’s Labour group.Continued on Page 2A HAPPY NEWYEAR TO ALLOUR READERSANDADVERTISERS!
  • 6 Friday, December 28, 2012 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukwww.coxandson.co.ukSALE NOW ON!(2 weeks only)Huge Savings ~ Gold beads ~ Beads from £15Last Chance to have many rare beadsSALEUP TO 40% OFFSELECTED BEADSFor local news and views online: go to www.yarmouthmercury24.co.ukInShort£1,600 nowup for grabsTHE next Great Yarmouth Town FC Lotterywill take place at Crown Eyewear inGorleston High Street on Monday at 11am.Crown Eyewear in Gorleston is part of anindependent, family run business whichoffers full eye examinations and a greatrange of traditional and designer frames atcompetitive prices.The business has been around since 1984and also consists of Martham based CrownSpectacles.The top prize for the GYTFC Lottery hasagain increased to a record high of £1,600for matching all numbers in the correctorder (to be shared if more than onewinner) with other prizes of £250 (shared ifmore than one winner) and £10 (outright)for matching four and three numbersrespectively.Anyone wishing to enter and find out moreabout the lottery can do so by visitingGreat Yarmouth Town FC’s official websitehttp://www.pitchero.com/clubs/greatyarmouthtown/.Application forms can be found under the“documents” section of the website.Alternatively, application forms areavailable at the Bloaters Bar Clubhouse onmatchdays and any event the clubhouseholds.If you would like your venue or business tobe featured as the location of aforthcoming draw please contact promoterMaurice on 01953 851315.Draws are every alternate Monday, day orevening, and can be anywhere in theBorough of Great Yarmouth.Winners will be announced on the footballclub website and in the Great YarmouthMercury.PUBLIC SUPPORT: Donations have flooded in for the Palliative Care East Appeal since the launch in 2006 - and the result can be seen inthe completed Louise Hamilton Centre in the grounds of the James Paget University Hospital.BOSSES at the James PagetUniversity Hospital say theyare blessed to have a facility as“fantastic” as the Louise HamiltonCentre.Architects took the project toheart, and even brought theirfamilies in at the weekend to doplanting in the garden - ensuringit is perfect for visitors.And all involved are delightedthey achieved their goal ofcreating a support centre with a“friendly” atmosphere.Trust chairman David Wrightsaid: “It’s absolutely fantastic.Light, warm, friendly, beautifuldesign, calm - all these sorts ofwords come to mind.“Everybody I’ve spoken to thinksit’s a wonderful building that willdo the job it’s designed to do.“It’s close to the hospital butnothing like a hospital, which iswhat we were trying to achieve.”He was impressed not only at theprofessional finish of the centre,but that it was completed on timeand on budget.“I think it’s been achieved likethat as everybody is so highlymotivated to get this right for thepatients that it’s going to work,”reasoned Mr Wright. “All powerto the people who have beenmanaging the process.”And he stressed that thewhole focus is on what’s best forpatients.“When we came in and saw thecentre we just knew people willfeel comfortable here,” he added.“I can’t wait for the first peopleto begin to use it in the middle ofJanuary.“It was just a pleasure to becomechairman of a trust with such afacility.”Louise Knights, of Norwich-based LSI Architects, saiddesigning the centre became morethan a job.“Staff definitely have taken it toheart,” she said. “Lots of peoplehave lost loved ones to cancer, sothey can see the benefit of thisproject.“I organised a Saturday of workso staff and family came out anddid the planting. They were verykeen to come and help.”Plants in the courtyard weredonated by Lound Garden Centre,and staff have hailed Roy andLinda Mace and all their stafffor their continued support andfundraising for the appeal.Mrs Knights added she waspleased with the yellow wall - withinteraction from inside to out.“We wanted to keep the domesticfeel, so it feels homely as soon asyou walk in,” she added.The 525sqm building will havea meet and greet atmosphere atthe entrance instead of a formalreception.An inner garden is designedto be enjoyed rather than act asa show garden, and it is hopedit will become a wildlife havenovernight.The building’s interior layoutconsists of a main lounge, seating,a children’s play area and bothcounselling and multi-functionrooms for therapy.The counselling rooms offersprivacy with screened doors.It is estimated 10,000 people ayear will use the centre.When the centre opens inJanuary it will provide a range ofspecialist palliative care services,lymphoedema service, advice andsupport including welfare andmoney matters, therapy groups,a variety of information abouthealth conditions.Complementary and relaxationtherapies including music and arttherapy will be part of the feelinggood and wellbeing aspect of thecentre’s services.Families are also included andwill be able to access advice,support including family therapiesand support groups and servicessuch as bereavement support, allspecific for their needs.The centre will host servicesprovided by a wide range oforganisations working inpartnership: which includes localhealth and social care services,local and national cancercharities, family support and careorganisations, patient supportgroups, a variety of organisationswith the focus on specificconditions and bereavementcharities.Building work was carried outby Suffolk-based ISG.For details, see: www.palliative-care-east.org.ukIt’s close to the hospital, but nothing like a hospitalReady on timeand on budget
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, December 28, 2012 7and you can also join us on Facebook!InBriefBurglars fleeempty-handedWould-be burglars smashed akitchen window to try to break into aBelton home, before fleeing empty-handed. They targeted the home inYare Road between 6.15pm and10.30pm on Saturday, December 22.The victim returned home to find thekitchen window broken and on itshinges with damage caused to thebottom of the right hand corner.Broken glass was found in the potplants. Nothing was taken althoughproperty was strewn over thekitchen work surface.The summerhouse and shed doorwas also open, but again nothing wastaken. A screwdriver and towel werefound in the garden. Call police on101.Hemsby fundsTEENAGERS who admitted causingdamage to Hemsby Sports Club havehelped raise money for the repairsthrough a community scheme.The group of nine teens signed up toa community resolution where theyagreed to work to raise money to beput towards repairing the footballdug outs at Waters Lane, that weredamaged in November.They raised just over £54 by washingcars.Louise’s shoes were thefirst to walk into centreTHIS is the poignantmoment when amother first visited thecompleted palliativecare centre named afterher daughter, who diedof breast cancer.The £1.5m Louise HamiltonCentre dream is now a reality,after builders finished workand handed it to the JamesPaget University Hospital(JPH).Campaigners have hailedfundraisers for making thispossible, after efforts beganin 2006.And Roberta Lovick, motherof the late Louise Hamilton,took her first steps in thenew centre wearing a pair ofher daughter’s shoes - so thefirst steps would be Louise’s.Mrs Lovick said: “It’s veryemotional, as what was adream is now a reality. Icouldn’t have asked for anymore. It’s what the people ofthis area deserve.”Gorleston woman LouiseHamilton was born inGorleston in 1969 and was apupil at Wroughton and LynnGrove schools before she wentto Bristol University andgraduated with a degree inlanguages.At the age of just 26, Louisefound she had breast cancer.She died aged 28.And her mother has beena leading voice for PalliativeCare East, determined toimprove the support availablefor those affected by terminalillness on the east coast.“It’s what I’ve always wishedfor for the people of this area,”she said. “It’s warm, homelyand colourful.“They’ve got a wonderfulbuilding and it’s not only thebuilding but what will happeninside.”As she took in the light andairy lounge, with an arcingwall as its centrepiece, shecould not contain her delight.“My face is aching fromsmiling,” said Mrs Lovick.“I know they will be pleasedwith what they see - nothinghas been skimped. I’m sograteful for that and I know ifLouise was here she would beso proud of the centre.”She was overwhelmed bythe hard work fundraisershave put in to get the projectto where it is today - thecompleted centre was handedover to the hospital onDecember 14 and is now readyto welcome people through itsdoors.“I still have to keep nippingmyself as it doesn’t seem likeit’s real,” revealed Mrs Lovick.“I’m just so grateful to all thepeople who worked so hard tomake it possible.”Furniture and computersare being brought in nowthe build is complete, andstaff are completing trainingand familiarisation beforeservices are introduced nextmonth.The centre and outreachservice is a partnershipbetween NHS Norfolk andWaveney,localcountycouncilsand the voluntary sector;including funds from thePalliative Care East appeal.It will bring together a widerange of organisations thatcan help support patients whoare living with a life-limitingillness and also help theirloved ones.John Hemming, chairmanof Palliative Care East (PCE),has been on board since dayone - and was chairman ofthe JPH when plans wereunveiled in 2006.And he was over the moonwhen he saw the end product.“It’s stunning,” he said.“Ithink it’s a benchmark for thequality of care we’re goingto produce for long-termconditions.“It’s so different from anormal hospital building andwill provide excellent care.“It’s testament to the faith ofthe people in Great Yarmouthand Waveney who donated£1.5m to get it built.”And he said ultimately theLouise Hamilton Centre willprovide better palliative carefor patients, their familiesand their carers on the eastcoast.samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELL IT’SFINISHED:Building workwascompletedthis month atthe newPalliative CareEast Centre,which will becalled theLouiseHamiltonCentre.Pictured fromleft: JennyWatson, DavidWright,RobertaLovick, JohnHemming andDr WillyNotcutt.Picture: JAMESBASSwhich is what the appeal leaders were trying to achieveMEMORY:LouiseHamilton ofGorleston,who died onbreastcancer at theage of 28.The newcentre hasbeen namedin hermemory afterpopularsupport.• This voucher may be redeemed once• Offer may be withdrawn at any time without prior notice• Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer• Excludes dessert, coffee and drinks• Booking is Essential• Not valid on Take Aways or Home DeliveryName ..................................................................Address ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................Postcode ..............................................................Email ..................................................................Tel ......................................................................Come and celebrateNew Year! 2013on presentationof this voucherNOT VALID ON SATURDAYSOR BANK HOLIDAYS50%OFF50%OFFIndian Restaurant50/51 Marine ParadeGreat Yarmouth NR30 2EJ01493 856666OFFERVALID UNTIL31st January2013
  • Eastern Daily Press, Monday, December 31, 2012 www.EDP24.co.uk/news NEWS 27HONORARYDEGREEUEA award forElaine PaigeLet’s Talk –subscribe on0844 848 0846Whats Your Dream?Pay off your mortgage?Buy a new car?A family holiday?Get rid of your debts?If you are over 55 and a home owner and you needadditional income with no repayments then these andmany other options are available to you today.This is a lifetime mortgage, to understand the features and risks ask for a personalised illustration.Business Matters is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority no 301141Initially Michael will explain the benefits and optionsavailable to you without any obligation or fee.Business Matters, The Tumbledown Dick, Norwich Rd,Woodton, Bungay NR35 2LP emailjewsonboon@btinternet.comTel: 01508 483983www.businessmattersifa.co.ukDid you know?..Equity Release is regulated bythe FSAInterest rates are fixedThe "No negative equityguarantee" means that the loanrepayment will never exceedthe property valueYou can remain in your homefor life with the right to sell atany time in the future.LOWESTOFTKind-hearted students at a Lowestoftschool rallied round to ensure peopleless fortunate than themselves had apresent to open this Christmas.Pupils at Benjamin Britten Highdonated 50 shoeboxes full of goodiesto St John’s Housing Trust todistribute to homeless people livingin its hostels over the festive period.RachelHarris,fundraisingmanagerat the Lowestoft-based charity, said:“We are thrilled to have received somany presents and so grateful for allthe brilliant work the school hasdone. We know finances are tight foreveryone this year so we askedstudents to work together on ashoebox rather than do oneindividually.”Students were asked to put togethera selection of presents for singleadults who, according to St John’s,are often forgotten at this time ofyear.The boxes included practical itemssuch as socks and toiletries as well asedible treats.They were handed out to residentsat the Fyffe Centre and BostockHouse in Lowestoft and at AdmiraltyTerrace in Great Yarmouth.St John’s Housing Trust runshostels for adults and young peoplein Lowestoft, Great Yarmouth andThetford.The charity serves Christmasdinner to its residents every year andits drop-in centre in CommericalRoad, Lowestoft, was also open forlunch on Christmas Day for peoplewho would otherwise be spendingChristmas alone.Students donate presents to homelessGORLESTON£1.5m care centredream is a realityBy SAM RUSSELLA mother whose daughter diedof breast cancer has visited thecompleted palliative care centrenamed after her daughter for the firsttime.The £1.5m Louise Hamilton Centrein Gorleston is now a reality, afterbuilders finished work and handedit to the James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH).It was completed on time and onbudget.Campaigners have hailedfundraisers for making this possible,after efforts began in 2006.And Roberta Lovick, mother of thelate Louise Hamilton, took her firststeps in the new centre wearing apair of her daughter’s shoes – so thefirst steps would be Louise’s.Mrs Lovick said: “It’s veryemotional, as what was a dream isnow a reality. I couldn’t have askedfor any more. It’s what the people ofthis area deserve.”Louise Hamilton was born inGorleston in 1969 and was a pupil atWroughton and Lynn Grove schoolsbefore she went to Bristol Universityand graduated with a degree inlanguages.She found she had breast canceraged 26 and died aged 28.And her mother has been a leadingvoice for Palliative Care East,determined to improve the supportavailable for those affected byterminal illness on the east coast.“It’s what I’ve always wished forfor the people of this area,” she said.“It’s warm, homely and colourful.“They’ve got a wonderful buildingand it’s not only the building butwhat will happen inside.”As she took in the light and airylounge, with an arcing wall as itscentrepiece, she could not containher delight.“My face is aching from smiling,”said Mrs Lovick. “I know they will bepleased with what they see – nothinghas been skimped. I’m so gratefulfor that and I know if Louise washere she would be so proud of thecentre.”She was overwhelmed by the hardwork fundraisers have put in to getthe project to where it is today – thecompleted centre was handed over tothe hospital this month and is nowready to open.“I still have to keep nipping myselfas it doesn’t seem like it’s real,”revealed Mrs Lovick. “I’m just sograteful to all the people who workedso hard to make it possible.”‘VERY EMOTIONAL’: Roberta Lovick at the new palliative care centre, named after her daughter LouiseHamilton, inset.Picture: JAMES BASSsamuel.russell@archant.co.uk
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 29Norwich Evening News Monday, December 31, 2012Dream becomes reality ascare centre is completedA mother has visited thecompleted palliative carecentre named after herdaughter, who died ofbreast cancer.The £1.5m LouiseHamilton Centre dream isnow a reality, after buildersfinished work and handed itto the James PagetUniversity Hospital (JPH)in Gorleston. And RobertaLovick took her first stepsin the new centre wearing apair of her daughter’sshoes – so the first stepswould be those of herdaughter LouiseHamilton, whodied 15 yearsago aged just 28.Mrs Lovick said:“It’s veryemotional, aswhat was adream is now areality. I couldn’thave asked forany more.”She has been a leadingvoice for Palliative CareEast, determined toimprove the supportavailable for those affectedby terminal illness on theeast coast. “It’s what I’vealways wished for for thepeople of this area,” shesaid. “It’s warm, homelyand colourful. They’ve gota wonderful building andit’s not only the buildingbut what will happeninside. I know ifLouise was hereshe would be soproud of thecentre.”She was overwhelmed bythe hard work fundraisershave put in to get theproject to where it is today.Furniture and computersare being brought in, andstaff are completingtraining and familiarisationbefore services areintroduced in January.The centre and outreachservice is a partnershipbetween NHS Norfolk andWaveney, local countycouncils and the voluntarysector; including fundsfrom the Palliative CareEast appeal.It will bring together awide range of organisationswhich can help supportpatients living with a life-limiting illness and alsohelp their loved ones.John Hemming,chairman of Palliative CareEast said: “It’s stunning. Ithink it’s a benchmark forthe quality of care we’regoing to produce for long-term conditions. It’stestament to the faith of thepeople in Great Yarmouthand Waveney who donated£1.5m to get it built.”samuel.russell@archant.co.ukSam Russell So proud: Roberta Lovick at thenew Louise Hamilton Centre,named after her daughter.,pictured below. PHOTO: JAMES BASSShop to beturned intoan art galleryProposals to convert a former shopinto an art gallery, café andstudios have been approved.Applicants Russell and SophieEade put forward the changes for224 Unthank Road, Norwich, to thecity council.Calls were made during thepublic consultation for more carparking spaces.The plans stated it is expected“many thousands of potentialcustomers” are within walkingand cycling distance, with fewexpected to use cars.Bruce Bentley, principaltransportation planner at the citycouncil, wrote: “The site is easilyaccessible from the Unthank Roadshops and is ideally served bypublic transport and cycle routes.He added: “The principle ofactively reducing car use iswelcome, even if the parkingincreases slightly from the twoshown.“Maximum parking limits aretwo spaces for the dwelling andfive spaces for the artist studios/café/gallery (including onedisabled space).”Hospital bosses delighted with facilityBosses at the James PagetUniversity Hospital saythey are blessed to have afacility as “fantastic” as theLouise Hamilton Centre.Architects took theproject to heart, and evenbrought their families in atthe weekend to do plantingin the garden – ensuringit is perfect forvisitors.And all involvedare delighted theyachieved their goalof creating a supportcentre with a“friendly”atmosphere.TrustchairmanDavid Wright, pictured,said: “It’s absolutelyfantastic. Light, warm,friendly, beautiful design,calm – all these sorts ofwords come to mind.Everybody I’ve spoken tothinks it’s a wonderfulbuilding which will do thejob it’s designed to do. It’sclose to the hospital butnothing like ahospital, which iswhat we were tryingto achieve.”And he stressedthat the focus is onwhat’s best for patients.“When we came inand saw the centrewe just knew peoplewill feel comfortable here,”he added. “I can’t wait forthe first people to begin touse it in the middle ofJanuary.”Louise Knights, ofNorwich-based LSIArchitects, said designingthe centre became morethan a job.“Staff definitely havetaken it to heart,” she said.“Lots of people have lostloved ones to cancer, so theycan see the benefit of thisproject. I organised aSaturday of work so staffand family came out anddid the planting. They werevery keen to come andhelp.”Tell us your newsCall our reporters on 07501 481521Keep up with the local news by likingthe Norwich Evening News page atwww.facebook.com/EveningNews24inLspcSh
  • Friday, January 4, 2013 45The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukChance to lend a helping handPEOPLE keen to make a differencein the community are beingencouraged to give up their sparetime to work as volunteers forcharities and other organisationsacross Waveney.The Lowestoft Volunteer Centre(LVC) has the followingopportunities available this month:The British Red Cross is lookingfor volunteers for its Home fromHospital scheme to provide short-term care and support for peoplewho have been recently dischargedfrom hospitalThe British Red Cross is seekingvolunteers for the Accident andEmergency Department at theJames Paget University Hospital toprovide support to patients awaitingtreatment or dischargeThe Independent MonitoringBoard based at HMP Blundeston islooking for volunteers to workwithin the prison to supportinmates and to process theirapplicationsFeedback, which supports mentalhealth service users, islooking for volunteers. Theorganisation provides feedbackon people’s views andexperiences to commissioners andprovidersThe May Centre in Beccles needsa volunteer organiser/co-ordinatorto support and organise itsactivities. Hours would be two daysa week on Tuesdays and Thursdaysfrom 9.30pm to 3.30pmWaveney Stardust requires aminutes secretary. Meetings areheld once a month on board thecharity’s boatSally-Ann’s charity shop, run bythe Salvation Army in Lowestoft, islooking for a volunteer to work inits furniture department who wouldbe able to lift and assembleincoming stockThe British Heart Foundationcharity shop in Lowestoft needsvolunteers. Tasks would includesorting stock, stacking the shelves,assisting and serving customersand handlingFor details on all the aboveopportunities and many more, or forinformation on particularvolunteering options, contact LVCat the Kirkley Centre at 154 LondonRoad South, Lowestoft, on 01502558352 or just call in.READER TRAVELREADER TRAVELAN EVENING OFCLAIRVOYANCEwithSTEPHEN HOLBROOKat THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS, NORWICHon TUESDAY 5 MARCH 2013Doors open at 7pmShow starts at 7.30pmTickets in advance £17On the door (subject toavailability) £18Even the most hardenedsceptics will leave Steve’s showuncomfortably challenged!The evening will take you on aroller coaster of emotions,comfort and joy, and fromlaughter to tears andback again.DON’T MISS THIS EMOTIONAL,COMPELLING AND MOVINGNIGHT TO REMEMBER – BOOK NOW!This evening is for entertainment purposes onlyTo book call 01823 666292 (Mon - Fri 9am-5pm)or online at www.steveholbrook.co.ukThis evening is for entertainment purposes onlyPower station work offer to studentsUNDERGRADUATES arebeing offered the chance towork at the Sizewell nuclearpower station.EDF Energy wants torecruit students for itsIndustrial Placementscheme at Sizewell B.It is looking for thosewho are studyingsandwich courses in areassuchasengineering,nuclearscience and commercial.Sizewell B stationdirector Jim Crawfordsaid: “We see the IndustrialPlacement position as a keyrole for us, as it allows usto work with an individualfor a year and thenhopefully see them backas part of the company’ssuccessful g raduateprogramme.”The Industrial Placementswill undergo an intensivetraining course at the startof their time with thecompany, before joiningthe site’s team where theywill be given a full-time“learning mentor” and gainhands-on experience.For more information,visit www.edfenergy.com/placements£1.5m carecentre toopen soonsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLA NEW £1.5m centre whichwill provide palliative careto people in Waveney andGreat Yarmouth is preparingto welcome its first patientsafter being handed over tothe James Paget UniversityHospital.Work on the Louise Hamilton Centreis now complete and it is on course toopen later this month.The project to build and equip thenew centre got under way in 2006when the Palliative Care East (PCE)appeal was launched – prompting ahuge fund-raising effort from peopleliving in the two districts.The centre and outreach serviceis a partnership between NHSNorfolk and Waveney, local countycouncils and the voluntary sector;including funds from the appeal. Itwill bring together a wide range oforganisations that can help supportpatients who are living with a life-limiting illness and also help theirloved ones.Furniture and computers arenow being brought in, and staffare completing training andfamiliarisation.John Hemming, chairman of PCE,has been on board since day one andwas chairman of the James Pagetwhen plans were unveiled in 2006. Hewas over the moon when he saw theend-product.“It’s stunning,” he said. “I thinkit’s a benchmark for the qualityof care we’re going to produce forlong-term conditions.“It’s so different from a normalhospital building and will provideexcellent care.“It’s testament to the faith ofthe people in Great Yarmouth andWaveney who donated £1.5m to get itbuilt.”The centre is named after Gorlestonwoman Louise Hamilton who died,aged 28, from breast cancer.At the official hand-over, her motherRoberta Lovick took her first steps inthe new centre wearing a pair of herdaughter’s shoes, so the first stepswould be taken by Louise. She said:“It’s very emotional, as what was adream is now a reality. I couldn’t haveasked for any more.“It’s what the people of this areadeserve.”Mrs Lovick, who has been a leadingvoice for PCE, added: “It’s what I’vealways wished for the people ofthis area – it’s warm, homely andcolourful. They’ve got a wonderfulbuilding and it’s not only the buildingbut what will happen inside.”As she took in the light and airylounge, with an arcing wall as itscentrepiece, she could not containher delight.“My face is aching from smiling,”said Mrs Lovick. “I know they will bepleased with what they see – nothinghas been skimped.“I’m so grateful for that and I knowif Louise was here she would be soproud of the centre.”EMOTION:RobertaLovick in thegrounds ofthe newcentre. Inset,LouiseHamilton.Main pictures:JAMES BASSSTYLE: The interior of the newpalliative care centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital.
  • 4 Friday, January 4, 2013 Journal online: bbjournal24.co.ukInBriefHave your sayon admissionsPARENTS and carers across thecounty are being asked by SuffolkCounty Council to have their sayover the proposed school admissionprocess.They have until Thursday, February28, to comment on the draftadmissions arrangements forcommunity and voluntary controlledschools in 2014/2015.The proposed arrangements can beviewed online and the consultationcan also be completed online: http://www.suffolk.gov.uk/your-council/decision-making/consultations/Folk musicNEXT Saturday sees the first in the2013 series of folk songs and musicat the Raveningham Centre.The candle-lit cafe at the centrewelcomed many musicians from thelocal area and further afield during2012 and this popular format is set toconinue in the New Year.Mal Cannell, said: “The essence ofthese free Saturday evening sessionsis the variety of the music and thewarm welcome.”Items stolenAN outboard motor, a small portablegenerator and a petrol cancontaining fuel were stolen aftersomeone broke into a boat at BecclesQuay at Fen Lane between 4.45pm onSunday, December 30, and 10.45am onMonday, December 31.Anyone who may have been in thearea between these times and haveinformation about the theft is askedto contact police on 101.Caring dreamis a realitysam.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLA MOTHER whosedaughter died of breastcancer has visited thecompleted palliativecare centre named afterher daughter for thefirst time.The £1.5m Louise HamiltonCentre in Gorleston is nowa reality, after buildersfinished work and handed itto the James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH).It was completed on timeand on budget. Campaignershave hailed fund-raisers formaking this possible, afterefforts began in 2006.And Roberta Lovick, motherof the late Louise Hamilton,took her first steps in the newcentre wearing a pair of herdaughter’s shoes – so the firststeps would be Louise’s.Mrs Lovick said: “It’s veryemotional, as what was adream is now a reality. Icouldn’t have asked for anymore. It’s what the people ofthis area deserve.”Louise Hamilton was bornin Gorleston in 1969 and wasa pupil at Wroughton andLynn Grove schools beforeshe went to Bristol Universityand graduated with a degreein languages.She found she had breastcancer aged 26 and died aged28. And her mother has beena leading voice for PalliativeCare East, determined toimprove the support availablefor those affected by terminalillness on the east coast.“It’s what I’ve always wishedfor for the people of thisarea,” she said. “It’s warm,homely and colourful.“They’ve got a wonderfulbuilding and it’s not only thebuilding but what will happeninside.”As she took in the light andairy lounge, with an arcingwall as its centrepiece, shecould not contain her delight.“My face is aching fromsmiling,” said Mrs Lovick.“I know they will be pleasedwith what they see – nothinghas been skimped. I’m sograteful for that and I know ifLouise was here she would beso proud of the centre.”She was overwhelmed bythe hard work fundraisershave put in to get the projectto where it is today – thecompleted centre was handedover to the hospital last monthand is now ready to open.“I still have to keep nippingmyself as it doesn’t seemlike it’s real,” revealed MrsLovick.“I’m just so grateful to allthe people who worked sohard to make it possible.”Bosses at the James PagetUniversity Hospital say theyare blessed to have a facilityas “fantastic” as the LouiseHamilton Centre.Architects took the projectto heart, and even broughttheir families in at theweekend to do planting in thegarden - ensuring it is perfectfor visitors.And all involved aredelighted they achieved theirgoal of creating a supportcentre with a “friendly”atmosphere.David Wright, chairman ofthe James Paget UniversityHospital, said: “It’s absolutelyfantastic. Light, warm,friendly, beautiful design,calm – all these sorts of wordscome to mind.“Everybody I’ve spokento thinks it’s a wonderfulbuilding that will do the jobit’s designed to do.“It’s close to the hospitalbut nothing like a hospital,which is what we were tryingto achieve.”For details, see: www.palliative-care-east.org.ukTRIBUTE:Roberta Lovickat the newpalliative carecentre namedafter herdaughter Louise.Picture: JAMESBASS
  • YarmouthAdvertiser4 January 3, 2013PUBLICSUPPORT:Donations haveflooded in for thePalliative CareEast Appeal sincethe launch in2006 - and theresult can be seenin the completedLouise HamiltonCentre in thegrounds of theJames PagetUniversityHospital.Bosses at the James PagetUniversity Hospital say theyare blessed to have a facility as“fantastic” as the LouiseHamilton Centre.Architects took the projectto heart, and even broughttheirfamiliesinattheweekendto do planting in the garden -ensuring it is perfect forvisitors. And all involved aredelighted they achieved theirgoal of creating a supportcentre with a “friendly”atmosphere.Trust chairman DavidWright said: “It’s absolutelyfantastic. Light, warm,friendly, beautiful design, calm- all these sorts of words cometo mind. Everybody I’vespoken to thinks it’s awonderful building that willdo the job it’s designed to do.“It’s close to the hospital butnothing like a hospital, whichis what we were trying toachieve.”He was impressed not onlyat the professional finish ofthe centre, but that it wascompleted on time and onbudget.“I think it’s been achievedlike that as everybody is sohighly motivated to get thisright for the patients that it’sgoing to work,” reasoned MrWright. “All power to thepeople who have beenmanaging the process.”And he stressed the wholefocus is on what’s best forpatients. “When we came inand saw the centre we justknew people will feelcomfortable here,” he added.“I can’t wait for the first peopleto begin to use it in the middleof January. It was just apleasure to become chairmanof a trust with such afacility.”Louise Knights, of Norwich-based LSI Architects, saiddesigning the centre becamemore than a job.“Staff definitely have takenit to heart,” she said. “Lots ofpeople have lost loved ones tocancer, so they can see thebenefit of this project. Iorganised a Saturday of workso staff and family came outand did the planting. Theywere keen to come and help.”Plants in the courtyard weredonated by Lound GardenCentre, and staff have hailedRoy and Linda Mace and alltheir staff for their continuedsupport and fundraising forthe appeal.Mrs Knights added she waspleased with the yellow wall -with interaction from inside toout. “We wanted to keep thedomestic feel, so it feels homelyas soon as you walk in,” sheadded.The 525sqm building willhave a meet and greetatmosphere at the entranceinstead of a formal reception.An inner garden is designedto be enjoyed rather than actas a show garden, and it ishoped it will become a wildlifehaven overnight.The building’s interiorlayout consists of a mainlounge, seating, a children’splay area and both counsellingand multi-function rooms fortherapy. The counsellingrooms offer privacy withscreened doors.It is estimated 10,000 peoplea year will use the centre.When the centre opens inJanuary it will provide a rangeof specialist palliative careservices, lymphoedemaservice, advice and supportincluding welfare and moneymatters, therapy groups, avariety of information abouthealth conditions.Complementary andrelaxation therapies includingmusic and art therapy will bepart of the feeling good andwellbeing aspect.Families are included andwill be able to access advice,support including familytherapies and support groupsand services such asbereavement support, allspecific for their needs.The centre will host servicesprovided by a wide range oforganisations working inpartnership: which includeslocal health and social careservices, local and nationalcancer charities, familysupportandcareorganisations,patient support groups, avariety of organisations withthe focus on specific conditionsand bereavement charities.Building work was carriedout by Suffolk-based ISG.For details, see: www.palliative-care-east.org.ukIt’s close to the hospital, but nothing like a hospital whichReady on time and on budget
  • YarmouthAdvertiserJanuary 3, 2013 5First steps innew palliativecentre made inLouise’s shoesThis is the poignant momentwhen a mother first visitedthe completed palliative carecentre named after herdaughter, who died of breastcancer.The £1.5m Louise HamiltonCentre dream is now a reality,after builders finished workand handed it to the JamesPaget University Hospital(JPH).Campaigners have hailedfundraisers for making thispossible, after efforts began in2006.AndRobertaLovick,motherof the late Louise Hamilton,took her first steps in the newcentre wearing a pair ofher daughter’s shoes - so thefirst steps would be Louise’s.Mrs Lovick said: “It’s veryemotional, as what was adream is now a reality. Icouldn’t have asked for anymore. It’s what the people ofthis area deserve.”Gorleston woman LouiseHamilton was born inGorleston in 1969 and was apupil at Wroughton and LynnGrove schools before shewent to Bristol University andgraduated with a degree inlanguages.At the age of just 26, Louisefound she had breast cancer.She died aged 28.And her mother has been aleading voice for PalliativeCare East, determined toimprove the supportavailable for those affected byterminal illness on the eastcoast.“It’s what I’ve alwayswished for for the people ofthis area,” she said. “It’swarm, homely and colourful.“They’ve got a wonderfulbuilding and it’s not only thebuilding but what will happeninside.”As she took in the light andairy lounge, with an arcingwall as its centrepiece, shecould not contain her delight.“My face is aching fromsmiling,” said Mrs Lovick. “Iknow they will be pleasedwith what they see - nothinghas been skimped. I’m sograteful for that and I know ifLouise was here she would beso proud of the centre.”She was overwhelmed bythe hard work fundraisershave put in to get the projectto where it is today - thecompleted centre was handedover to the hospital onDecember 14 and is now readyto welcome people through itsdoors.“I still have to keep nippingmyself as it doesn’t seem likeit’s real,” revealed Mrs Lovick.“I’m just so grateful to all thepeople who worked so hard tomake it possible.”Furniture and computersare being brought in now thebuild is complete, and staffare completing trainingand familiarisation beforeservices are introduced nextmonth.The centre and outreachservice is a partnershipbetween NHS Norfolk andWaveney,localcountycouncilsand the voluntary sector;including funds from thePalliative Care East appeal.It will bring together a widerange of organisations thatcan help support patients whoare living with a life-limitingillness and also help theirloved ones.John Hemming, chairmanof Palliative Care East (PCE),has been on board since dayone - and was chairman of theJPH when plans were unveiledin 2006.And he was over the moonwhen he saw the end product.“It’s stunning,” he said.“Ithink it’s a benchmark for thequality of care we’re going toproduce for long-termconditions.“It’s so different from anormal hospital building andwill provide excellent care.“It’s testament to the faithof the people in GreatYarmouth and Waveney whodonated £1.5m to get itbuilt.”And he said ultimately theLouise Hamilton Centre willprovide better palliative carefor patients, their familiesand their carers on the eastcoast.IT’S FINISHED: Building work was completed this month at the new PalliativeCare East Centre, which will be called the Louise Hamilton Centre. Pictured fromleft: Jenny Watson, David Wright, Roberta Lovick, John Hemming and Dr WillyNotcutt. Picture: JAMES BASSis what the appeal leaders were trying to achieveMEMORY:LouiseHamilton ofGorleston,who died ofbreastcancer at theage of 28.The newcentre hasbeen namedin hermemoryafter popularsupport.By Sam Russellsam.russell@archant.co.uk
  • Eastern Daily Press, Saturday, January 26, 2013 www.EDP24.co.uk/news NEWS 41Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Advert ID:302312GF32 mm by30.4 mmBooking Code:302312GFCustomer ID:DRIVER KENColour:1First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13MEAKINJOYCE YVONNEJanuary 27th, 2009It’s hard to believeit’s four whole yearssince you passed away,You were so very special,You’re in our hearts andthoughts every day.Our love for youwill never go away.We miss you more every day.Beloved husbandJohn, Julia, Matt,Isobel, Charlie,James, Elaine andJaron x x x xSMITHIn loving memory of DAVIDAlthough five years have nowgone by,I still miss you, I still cry,But try so hard not to be sad,And remember the wonderfulyears we had.Thank you David, all my loveMaureen x xYoure sadly missedby us three.Love, Christine,Dave and Katy x xAdvert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Advert ID:302517CE32 mm by43.1 mmBooking Code:302517CECustomer ID:JENKINS ROYColour:1First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Advert ID:302501OL32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:302501OLCustomer ID:LAWSON CLIFFJILLY,Colour:1First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Advert ID:302308GY32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:302308GYCustomer ID:PYKE MELVYELAINEColour:1First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Advert ID:302446CE32 mm by26.2 mmBooking Code:302446CECustomer ID:RICHARDS STUARTColour:1First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Advert ID:TIFUNDIR32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:FUNDIRCustomer ID:FUNDIRColour:4First Appearance:26/01/13Last Appearance:26/01/13Young’s(Independent)Funeral Directors.Private chapel of rest Loddon,01508 528274DRIVERKENTreasured memories of Ken, adearly loved husband, dadand grandad, called to restJanuary 26th, 2012.Remembered with love everyday and very sadly missed.Loving wife Irene, son Greg,daughter Bridgette, also Timand grandchildren Sam andAlex x x x x.JENKINSThe Family of the late ROYwish to thank friends for theirkind messages of sympathyfollowing their sad loss andfor the support received on theday of Roy’s funeral.Special thanks are given to thestaff of The Manor House fortheir care, to the East AnglianCycling Club forcompanionship over manyyears; also to John Hemsleyfor his services and MurrellCork for their funeralarrangements.Please accept this most sincereacknowledgment from thefamily.LAWSONCLIFFJilly, Ian, Martin, Andrew,Simon and Families wouldlike to thank everyone for allthe kindness and cardsreceived following the suddenand sad loss of Cliff, wewould also like to thankeveryone who gave to theBritish Heart Foundation, atotal of £220 has beendonated in Cliff’s memory.Please accept this as the onlybut most sincereacknowledgement.PYKEMELVY ELAINEFrank and all the family ofthe late Melvy wish to thankeveryone who came to herservice and sent kind messagesand donations whichamounted to £425 for the EastAnglian Air Ambulance.Thanks also to Clive Mitchellfor a lovely service andCromer & District FuneralServices for arrangements.Please accept this as the onlyand most sincereacknowledgment.RICHARDSSTUARTStu’s Family would like toexpress their gratefulappreciation for all thedonations and kind messagesof support following their sadloss.Please accept this as the only,but very sincere,acknowledgment.SCRAP GOLDBEST PRICES PAIDPART EXCHANGE WELCOMEALBROW & SONS LTD10 ALL SAINTS GREEN, NORWICHOPPOSITE JOHN LEWISTEL : 01603 622569www.albrowjewellers.co.ukIDENTIFICATION REQUIREDFamily Run BusinessSPECIALISTS IN AMTICO AND KARNDEANQUALITY CARPETSFROM A LOCAL RETAILERCarpets supplied and fitted in Norfolk & SuffolkSALE ENDS SOONSALE ENDS SOONFurther Reductions Across Stock - Huge Selection ofCarpets, Vinyls, Remnants and Rugs In StockPlus Free Shagy Rug or Underlay with orders over £250*Hurry Whilst Stocks Last!* Terms and conditions applyVISIT OUR SHOWROOM• Gosford Road • Beccles01502 714008www.becclescarpetcentre.co.ukGORLESTONHealth ministerinspects futuresite of hospiceTwo government ministers and coastal MPsvisited the planned East Coast Hospice site inHopton to hear from trustees.Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis,welcomed health minister Norman Lamb toland off Sidegate Road, Gorleston, where the£4m hospice is set to be built.And the visit yesterday saw Mr Lamb guidedthrough the plans.After a tour of the site where the hospicewill be built, the minister met a delegation oftrustees and MPs including David Nettleship,chief executive of East Coast Hospice, MrLewis, who is also communities minister,Waveney MP Peter Aldous and Suffolk CoastalMP Therese Coffey.Mr Lewis said: “I would like to thank theminister for taking the time to come and visitthe East Coast Hospice site.“As a local MP, he knows the amount of hardwork that has gone into getting the project offthe ground.“The difference that the hospice will maketo local people should not be underestimatedand his visit today is a recognition by thegovernment of the importance of schemessuch as this across the UK.”Mr Aldous added: “It’s great news thatPalliative Care East has opened as it has animportant role to play in end-of-life care.“Its opening is a great tribute to all thosewho have contributed so generously to itsprovision.“There remains a shortage of hospice bedsin Waveney and Great Yarmouth as evidencedby the fact that 1pc of people in the area endtheir life in hospices compared to 5.2pc inEngland as a whole.“It is important that support and guidanceis provided to East Coast Hospice to helpthem address this shortcoming.”samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLSITE VISIT: MPs Norman Lamb, Brandon Lewis, Peter Aldous and Therese Coffey arepictured with East Coast Hospice trustees at the location off Sidegate Road, Gorleston.Pictures: JAMES BASSFUTUREVISION: Anartist’simpressionof theproposedEast CoastHospice.
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, February 1, 2013 13SEEPAGE 39HAPPY TOGETHER: Natalie and Kalvin shared six months together before she diedPicture: JAMES BASSAs the festive holidaysapproached Natalie Wilson’sfamily hoped for a Christmasmiracle to help her beat thedevastating cancer that hadsuddenly struck her.At the age of just 25 Natalie,who grew up in Hemsby andCaister, had been diagnosedwith stage four colon cancer.Despite the unexpecteddiagnosis she was planningon going to the Universityof East Anglia to train to bea teacher and had dreams ofone day opening a cafe, thatwould also run art classes.But tragically her miraclenever came, and the formerFlegg High student died ather mum’s house in Caister,just six days shy of her 27thbirthday.Her doting boyfriend hasnow pledged to honour hergentle, loving nature andkeep her memory alive bydedicating2013tofundraisingfor charity in her name.Kalvin Scott, who metNatalie through an onlinedating site, said: “There’s alot of good that comes frombad, it can have a silverlining.“And to givesomethingback topeople,that’ssomething I’d like to do.”The 26 year old fromBlundeston is now preparingto run 500 miles andswim a further 50 throughoutthe year in aid of PalliativeCare East and the LouiseHamilton Centre, whichprovides care and supportto people suffering terminalillnesses.His fund has already nettedmore than £500 and Natalie’smum Sharon Davies hasheaped praise on his efforts.She said: “He was rightthere up to the point (shedied). He held her hand inthe last moments.“Kalvin made Natalie very,very safe even to face deathand that blew me away.”Natalie was living in MeltonMowbray with her brotherwhen she began to feel ill andwhen she was first checkedover it was thought she wassuffering from an irritablebowel.But as the pain continued,and after moving back toNorfolk in 2011, she wastransferred to hospital toundergo scans.It was eventually a biopsythat revealed she wassuffering from colon cancer,which came as a devastatingblow to her family.Sharon, 51, said: “Wewere all shocked. Itwas a very bad casethat had spread to herperitoneum.“We werejust hopingshe would beone of thoselucky ones,that wouldhave amiracle.“Youjusthold onto hope, you don’t think atsuch a young age you’re notgoing to make it.”WhilebattlingherconditionNatalie joined a dating site,initially for friendship, butthings changed when she metKalvin, a pharmacist at theJames Paget Hospital.Sharon added: “Slowlyshe fell in love, which shedidn’t expect and neitherdid Kalvin, and that’s theblessing.”On their second date, tothe Sealife Centre in GreatYarmouth, Natalie made thebrave decision to tell Kalvinabout her health.He said: “It was quite adifficult decision to make, Ihad to think would I be strongenough to deal with that?“At the end of the day Iknew I liked her and I madethe decision that (her cancer)shouldn’t be the thing thatstops me and we should enjoywhatever time we have.”The couple dated forsix months until Nataliebecame very poorly at thebeginning of December anddied tragically just a fewdays later, with her mum andKalvin at her bedside.At her funeral Kalvinsuggested his fundraisingidea to Sharon and throughit they have been able tochannel their grief intosomething positive.“It’s easy to get drawn intogrief, this does keep yourmind focused,” he added.“I did have a chance to askNatalie before she passedand she thought it was a goodidea.”To donate to his causevisit www.justgiving.com/Kalvin-Scott1 You canalso follow his progressvia www.facebook.com/InMemoryOfNatalieWilsonMy pledge fortragic Natalielucy.clapham@archant.co.ukBy LUCY CLAPHAM
  • HOLIDAYSNewquay & the Eden ProjectApril 8 – 12 / 5 Days / £329.00Cornwall is a delight to visit with its mildclimate & dramatic Landscapes. The highlightof this tour is a visit to the spectacular EdenProject, with its giant biomes housing plantsfrom around the world. Includes ExecutiveCoach Travel, 4 nights dinner bed & breakfast& full Itinerary.Scottish House PartyApril 15 – 19 / 5 Days / £299.00This spring break offers a real insight into therich history of some of the many beautifulCastles of Scotland. The tour also includes avisit to a whisky distillery & full entertainmentpackage at the hotel. Includes Executive CoachTravel, 4 nights dinner bed & breakfast & fullitineraryEastbourne & the South CoastMay 4 – 9 / 6 Days / £395.00We return to this popular coastal resort withits mild climate & busy promenade & pier.The tour includes visits to Hastings,Chichester & Yesterdays World as well as theShipwreck Heritage Centre. IncludesExecutive Coach Travel, 5 nights dinner bed& breakfast & full itineraryPrices based on twin shareMercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, February 1, 2013 35N&N staff togive adviceon tinnitus atChapelfieldThe Norfolk and Norwich UniversityHospital (N&N) is to give shoppersat Chapelfield shopping centre inNorwich advice on tinnitus.As part of National Tinnitus Week- which starts on Monday - theaudiology department at the N&Nwill be on hand to answer questionson tinnitus as well as providefrom shoppers in Chapelfield withinformation on the importance ofprotecting hearing.The N&N audiologist and therapistswill be located on the upper groundfloor of Chapelfield from 9am to 8pmon Thursday, February 7.Information will be available ontinnitus which is not a disease or anillness.It is a symptom generated withina person’s own auditory pathwaysand is estimated to affect six millionpeople in the UK.Doctors say it is often assumed thattinnitus occurs as a result of diseaseof the ears, but this is often not thecase.The precise cause of tinnitus is stillnot fully understood.Claire Gatenby, chief hearingtherapist at the N&N said: “This isa great opportunity for shoppers tocome and find out more informationon the condition, what support isavailable and how people can manageliving with this condition.“We also hope to increase awarenessof the importance of protectinghearing from damage from noisynight clubs, discos and gigs.”Chapelfield’s general managerDavina Tanner said: “We are verypleased to continue our partnershipwith the N&N in 2013, bringing healthawareness advice to our shoppers ona regular basis.“Chapelfield is committed tosupporting the local community andhaving these events in the centremakes them really accessible.”The event is part of a partnershipthat has been forged betweenChapelfield and the N&N to bringhealth information to locals.Protectionfrom floodingGreat Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewismet a representative from theEnvironment Agency this week tohearabouttheongoingimprovementsto flood defences across the borough.TheEnvironmentAgencyiscurrentlyundertaking a £25 million projectto better protect the area againstflooding.The fund also has a proportion fromthe private sector and the agency willbestartingmanyof theimprovementsnecessary in the next financial year.And a flood warning system is now inplace covering 80pc of all homes thatare affected in Yarmouth, meaningthe vast majority of households willreceive text or email alerts before aflood.Mr Lewis said: “Sixty years on fromthe terrible floods in 1953, Yarmouthis much better placed to deal withflooding.“The agency is currently workingwith partners to secure the remainingmoney needed from non-governmentsources and I am confident that theywill be successful in this.”Funding drivea successStaff at a Great Yarmouth pet supplystore are celebrating after raising£1,083 to help abandoned animals.The team at Pets at Home raisedthe cash, with help from generouscustomers, as part of its Santa Pawsfundraising drive that ran throughoutDecember.Grandma of 4In a story in last week’s villagepages (Life goes on, but slower) weincorrectly stated Diane Rushbrookfrom Reedham was a grandmother oftwo.We would like to clarify she is in agrandmother of four and would liketo apologise for any upset caused bythe article.Charity nightA charity night for East Anglia’sChildren’s Hospices (EACH) is to beheld in Fleggburgh Village Hall.Guests can enjoy a quiz, raffle,drinks, hog roast, real ales and freenibbles next Saturday, February 9from 7.30pm. Entry is £3. To bookemail stephenpeteralger@hotmail.com or call 07515 638175.Cash stolenBurglars stole money from a charityjar after breaking into a business inGreat Yarmouth.The front window of the premises inMillRoadwassmashedbeforethecashwas stolen. Police are now appealingfor witnesses to the burglary, whichhappened between 9pm on Sundayand 4.25am on Monday. Call 101.Revisit children’s books with UEA groupAdults are being invited to revisittheir childhoods at a new bookgroup run by staff and studentsfrom the University of EastAnglia (UEA).The group, which is run inconjunction with the Norfolk andNorwichMillenniumLibrary,willexplore how children’s literatureimpacts on culture and influencesgenerations.In the first session on February13, people aged 15 or over willbe invited to bring along theirfavourite children’s book andshare why they like it.Future meetings will look atbooks ranging from classicslike Peter Pan through to recentpublications such as PatrickNess’s A Monster Calls.Dr BJ Epstein, from UEA’sSchool of Literature, Drama andCreative Writing, will be leadingthe group.She said: “We’re convincedthat everyone can learn fromchildren’s literature, and we wantto encourage people to thinkabout children, childhood, andchildren’s books.”UEA Literature studentEmily Hibbs, said: “Revisitingchildren’s literature on mycourse completely changed myperspective on the books I lovedwhen I was young. It will be greatto offer others in the communitythe same opportunity.”The first meeting is at theMillennium Library at theForum on February 13, at 5.30pm.Following meetings will occurmonthly on a Wednesday evening–datestobeconfirmed.Fordetailsemail Dr Epstein on b.epstein@uea.ac.uk, call 01603 591349 or see@NorwichKidLit on twitter.Health Minister’swhistlestop toursamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLHealth Minister Norman Lambvisited the James Paget UniversityHospital (JPH) and the future EastCoast Hospice site to hear how theborough will cope with growinghealthcare pressures.Care and Support Minister MrLamb visited the planned East CoastHospice site in Hopton to hear fromtrustees, who are trying to raise £4mto build the 10-bedroom hospice.Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis,welcomed him to land off SidegateRoad where he was guided throughthe plans.After a tour of the site where thehospice will be built, the ministermet a delegation of trustees and MPsincluding David Nettleship, chiefexecutive of East Coast Hospice,Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis, who isalso communities minister, WaveneyMP Peter Aldous and Suffolk CoastalMP Therese Coffey.Mr Lewis said: “I would like to thankthe minister for taking the time tocome and visit the East Coast Hospicesite.“As a local MP, he knows the amountof hard work that has gone intogetting the project off the ground.“The difference that the hospice willmake to local people should not beunderestimated and his visit today isa recognition by the government ofthe importance of schemes such asthis across the UK.”Mr Aldous added: “It’s great newsthat Palliative Care East has openedas it has an important role to play inend-of-life care.“Its opening is a great tribute toall those who have contributed sogenerously to its provision.“There remains a shortage ofhospice beds in Waveney and GreatYarmouth as evidenced by the factthat 1pc of people in the area endtheir life in hospices compared to5.2pc in England as a whole.“It is important that support andguidance is provided to East CoastHospice to help them address thisshortcoming.”Mr Lamb MP also made a whistle-stop visit to the JPH and the newly-built £1.5m Louise Hamilton Centre,which offers support to those withlife-limiting conditions.The minister met with hospitalchairman David Wright, vice-chairman Peter Franzen and chiefexecutive David Hill to hear how thehospital is continuing to improveperformance, delivering good patientcare and also planning for thefuture.He also visited the accident andemergency (A&E) department wherehe chatted with staff about thechallenges of a very busy A&E whichtreats more than 65,000 patients ayear.Despite an increase in emergencymedical admissions in the year todate, bosses say the four hour waitingtime target of 95pc has been metconsistently since April 2012.Mr Lamb then went on anexclusive tour of theLouise Hamilton Centrewhich is due to openFebruary/March.Chairman Mr Wrightsaid: “We are grateful tothe minister for takingthe time to visit the trust.Friday’s visit was a greatopportunity to update MrLamb on the turnaroundin performance during2012 and to highlightfuture developmentssuch as the new day caseunit and upgrade to ouroperating theatres andthe opening of the LouiseHamilton Centre.”CAPTION: East Coast Hospice site visit by Health Minister Norman Lamb MP, Brandon Lewis MP, PeterAldous MP and Therese Coffey MP. Pictured with trustees of the East Coast Hospice at the site off SidegateRoad, Gorleston.Picture: James Bass
  • Friday, February 1, 2013 3The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukARTHUR JARY & SONS LTDIndependent Funeral Directors and Memorial Specialists(01502) 581506WOULD LIKE TO INVITEYOU TO OUR OPEN DAYon Saturday, February 2nd, 2013from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.Why not come along and join us for refreshmentswhere you will meet our helpful staff who willbe happy to show you around andanswer any of your questions.You will also be able to see the beautiful FresianHorses and snowy white DovesAmple free parking for customersat our new premises at76 Denmark Road,Lowestoft,Suffolk NR32 2EQ(formerly The Norfolk PH)Search is onfor county’stop bakerQUALITY cakes will be on displayat Lowestoft College tomorrow,as judging gets under way in thesearch for Waveney’s top bakers.The college in St Peters Street ishosting the first heat of The GreatSuffolk Bake Off between noon and2pm.The contest is aiming to identify andrecognise the county’s best amateurbakers while raising funds for the StElizabeth Hospice charity.And there is still time for peoplein Waveney to don their pinnies andbake their own cakes, pastries tarts,biscuits or sweet pies for judgingtomorrow. The only criteria forentries that they must represent thetheme of Suffolk.Thejudgeswillbedrawnfromapanelthat includes chef Emma Crowhurst;BBC Radio Suffolk presenter LesleyDolphin; editor of Suffolk magazine,Jayne Lindill; restaurant owner RegisCrepy; Chris Lee, the head chef at theaward-winning Bildeston Crown, andqualified cookery judge Jane Sago,of the Suffolk East Federation ofWomen’s Institutes.There are sweet and savourycategories and separate prizes forgrown-up bakers and young bakersunder 16.The event has been organised byGenesis PR in aid of St ElizabethHospice,whichhasrecentlyexpandedthe services it provides in Waveneyand Great Yarmouth.Contestants need to register theirentry for tomorrow’s event onlineand then make a minimum £5 entrydonation to the charity. To enter, orfor more information visit www.greatsuffolkbakeoff.co.ukKalvin: I’ll run 500miles for my NatalieA BLUNDESTON man hasembarked on a year-long fund-raising drive – in memory ofthe woman he loved.Kalvin Scott, 26, was inspired tolaunch his charity effort after hisgirlfriend Natalie Wilson lost herbattle against colon cancer, dying ather mother’s house at Caister just sixdays before her 27th birthday.He is now preparing to run 500 milesand swim a further 50 throughout thisyear in aid of Palliative Care Eastand the new £1.5m Louise HamiltonCentre at the James Paget UniversityHospital, which will provide care andsupport to people in Waveney andGreat Yarmouth who are sufferingfrom terminal illnesses.Kalvin, who met Natalie throughan online dating site, said: “There’sa lot of good that comes from bad– it can have a silver lining. And togive something back to people issomething I’d like to do.”Natalie, who was diagnosed withstage-four colon cancer when shewas 25, was hoping to attend theUniversity of East Anglia to train tobe a teacher and had dreams of oneday opening a café that would alsorun art classes.But, tragically, her dream nevercame true and now Kalvin haspledged to honour the former FleggHigh School pupil’s gentle, lovingnature and keep her memory alive bydedicating 2013 to fund-raising in hername.His fund has already collected morethan £500 and Natalie’s mum, SharonDavies, praised his efforts.She said: “He was right there up tothe point [she died]. He held her handin the last moments. Kalvin madeNatalie very, very safe even to facedeath and that blew me away.”Natalie who grew up in Hemsbyand Caister, was living inMelton Mowbray with her brotherwhen she began to feel ill, and whenshe underwent her first tests it wasthought she was suffering froman irritable bowel.But as the pain continued, and aftermoving back to Norfolk in 2011, shewastransferredtohospitaltoundergoscans. It was eventually a biopsythat revealed she was suffering fromcancer.Ms Davies, 51, said: “We were allshocked. It was a very bad case thathad spread to her peritoneum.“We were just hoping she would beone of those lucky ones, that wouldhave a miracle. You just hold on tohope – you don’t think at such a youngage you’re not going to make it.”While fighting her illness, Nataliejoined a dating site. Initially it wasfor friendship, but things changedwhen she met Kalvin, who worksas a pharmacist at the James PagetUniversity Hospital.Ms Davies added: “Slowly she fellin love, which she didn’t expect andneither did Kalvin, and that’s theblessing.”On their second date, Natalie madethe decision to tell Kalvin about herhealth.But it only brought them closer.He said: “It was quite a difficultdecision to make. I had to think wouldI be strong enough to deal with that?At the end of the day I knew I likedher and I made the decision that[her cancer] shouldn’t be the thingthat stops me and we should enjoywhatever time we have.”The couple dated for six monthsuntil Natalie became very ill at thebeginning of December and died justa few days later.At Natalie’s funeral, Kalvinsuggested his fund-raising idea toher mother and through it they havebeen able to channel their feelings ofloss into something positive.“It’s easy to get drawn into grief,this does keep your mind focused,”Kalvin said.To donate, visit www.justgiving.com/Kalvin-Scott1You can also follow hisprogress at www.facebook.com/InMemoryOfNatalieWilsonMinister visits new centre – page32TOGETHER: Kalvin and Natalie on a weekend break in London last year.Natalie died, aged just 26, a fewdays before Christmas.PLEDGE: Kalvin Scott who has launched a year-long fund-raising driveafter the death of his girlfriend Natalie Wilson, inset.Pictures: JAMES BASS and SUPPLIED
  • Gunton HallGunton HallLeisurLeisure Clube Club"A Leisure Clubwith a difference"As well as access to our 23 metre indoor heated pool and gymfacilities, we also offer you the chance to enjoy your membership7 nights a week with full access to all the bars in the evening,discounted 3 course meals in our rosewood restaurant andfun-filled evening Entertainment with some great comics andmusical tribute acts!2013 Tribute acts include:The Rolling Stones, Take That, ABBA, Queen, Rod Stewart + Many More!Also included in your membership• Free classes incl aqua, Zumba, tai chiand pilates• Archery, Rifle Shooting and Crossbows• 2 x snooker tables• 4 indoor bowls rinks• Table tennis table• Pool table• Full use of the daytime coffee shop• Discount in our Health and beauty salonAll this for as little as £39 per month.Join before 28th February and pay nojoining fee on annual payments!!For more informationabout the open weekend and open nightor what our leisure club has to offerPlease call 01502 730288Alternatively emailliam.hembling@bourne-leisure.co.ukExclusively forGunton Hall andWarner LeisureHotels!!Come and join uson our OpenWeekend and tryout our do you warner dance workshop!!We offer friendly, fun workshops in all populardance styles such as Jive, Rock & Roll, Cha Cha,Merengue, Salsa & Modern Jive.We are holding a FREE Do you Warner Dance?afternoon extravaganza on Sunday 3rd 2.00pm -5.00pm, where you can come along and join inwith our professional instructors in a relaxed,friendly atmosphere for:Latin Party - combining basic steps of Cha Cha,Merengue & SalsaJive - Learn to Shake Rattle & RollNo previous experience required, we welcomecomplete beginners!!Please call 01502 730288 to book your place -all absolutely FREE!!And make sure to bring a friend!!So why delay and come visit us this weekendand see for yourself what makes us different!!Exclusivelyfor Adults!!!Open Weekend2nd - 3rd Feb7:30am - 6:00pmOpen night6th Feb5:00pm - 9:00pm32 Friday, February 1, 2013 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukMinister: Care centrewill be a vital assetTHE new £1.5m palliativecare centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital willbe a vital asset to people inWaveney and Great Yarmouth,according to health ministerNorman Lamb.Mr Lamb, the minister of state forcare and support, made a whistle-stop visit to the James Paget lastFriday, accompanied by Waveney MPPeter Aldous and Suffolk Coastal MPTherese Coffey.They met the hospital’schairman David Wright, vice-chair man Peter F ranz enand chief executive DavidHill to hear how it was continuing toimprove its performance, deliveringgood patient care and planning forthe future.Mr Lamb visited accident andemergency where he chatted withstaff about the challenges of a verybusy department which treats morethan 65,000 patients a year.Despite an increase in emergencyadmissions in the year to date, theJames Paget has consistently met thefour-hour waiting time target of 95pcsince last April.The minister was then given a tourof the new £1.5m Louise HamiltonCentre which is due to open withinthe next four to six weeks. Thebuilding will be a support centre,offering palliative care to people withincurable illnesses such as cancer,and respiratory, neurological, andcardiac diseases.It will also serve as a hub for anetworkof supportandpalliativecareservices and organisations acrossGreat Yarmouth and Waveney.After his tour, the Liberal DemocratMP for North Norfolk, said hewas impressed with what he hadseen. “The new palliative andsupportive care services that willbe provided through the LouiseHamilton Centre will play a vital rolein many people’s lives,” Mr Lambsaid.“Information and support is notonly important for patients withlife-limiting illnesses, but also theirfamilies, carers and friends.“The people of Great Yarmouthand Waveney have worked very hardto raise funds for this unit and itwas a pleasure to see this new centrewhich will serve their needs formany years to come.”Mr Wright added: “We’re gratefulto the minister for taking the time tovisit the trust.“It was a great opportunity toupdate Mr Lamb on the turnaroundin performance during 2012and to highlight futuredevelopments such as the new daycase unit and upgrade to ouroperating theatres as well as theopening of the Louise HamiltonCentre.”NEEDSSERVED: Healthminister NormanLamb (centre)visited the new£1.5m LouiseHamilton Centreat the JamesPaget UniversityHospital and wasimpressed bywhat he saw.Pictured with himare ThereseCoffey (far left),Peter Aldous(second right),David Wright (farright) withmembers of thepalliative careteam.Drivers facehazardousmorningon roadsMOTORISTS were faced with“hazardous” driving conditionsin north Suffolk as they began theworking week.Ambulance crews were called tosix collisions in the space of threehours across the county in what theydescribed as “a turbulent Mondaymorning on the roads” .In the Lowestoft area, police werecalled to two crashes. The firsthappened just before 8.20am atBenacre Road in Henstead where acar had rolled into a ditch near thejunction with Toad Row.A police spokesman said: “A manhad suffered cuts and a bang to hishead and a woman in the vehicle hadleg pains. The vehicle – a Ford Ka –was on its side in the 6ft-deep ditch.”The scene was cleared by 10.20am,with the man and woman dischargedafter being assessed.At about 9.10am, two people wereinjured after a two-car crash atRackhams Corner – on the junctionof A12 and B1375 – near Corton.The police spokesman said: “Theroad was partially blocked at theroundabout after a Skoda Citigoand a Ford Fiesta were in collision.The man driving the Skoda, whois believed to be in his late 80s, wastaken to the James Paget UniversityHospital in Gorleston with minorinjuries.” A second person wastreated and discharged at the scene,which was cleared by 10.30am.
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 15FEBRUARY FEVERBUY ONE GET ONE FREEVisit The Outback restaurant for lunch or dinner, Monday to Friday, and when one person purchases amain course meal from the a la carte menu, a companion may enjoy a main course meal up to the value of£12.95 free of charge, on presentation of this voucher. This offer is not combinable with any other offers orvouchers and is valid until 28th February 2013 (Excluding 14th & 15th February)One entry per person, per visit, so the more you dine with us the more chance you haveof jetting off to somewhere of your choice. Your entry forms will be on your table.Just complete the details and post them in the special FREE DRAW BOX.Dine at The Outback at any time and enter our FREEDRAW to win £500 worth of holiday vouchersWin £500 worth of Holiday VouchersMOTHERSDAYSunday 10th March3 Course LunchWaitress Service£16.95ppSee Menuon our WebsitePYEVAROTTICABARETEVENINGFriday 8th Marchwith 3 Course Dinner£25ppVALENTINESWEEKENDDon’t disappointyour loved one.Bookings being takenfor Thursday 14th,Friday 15th andSaturday 16thFebruarySUNDAYLUNCHES2 course£9.953 course£11.95View our website www.theoutbackrestaurant.co.ukBook a table e:reservations@theoutbackrestaurant.co.ukBeside the Swan Pub,Ringland, Norwich,NR8 6AB01603 869014Norwich Evening News Monday, February 11, 2013Murder appeal generatedfresh leads for detectivesThe detective hoping to solve the murderof a Norwich teenager dating back morethan two decades said an anniversaryappeal had generated about 30 differentcalls to police from people offeringinformation.Last November marked the 20thanniversary of the discovery of the bodyof Natalie Pearman at Ringland Hills onthe outskirts of Norwich. The 16-year-oldhad been working as a prostitute in thecity’s red light district and was last seen afew hours before her body was discoveredby a lorry driver in a layby at RinglandRoad at 3.50am on November 20, 1992.Her heartbroken mother Lin, 67, amother of five, grandmother of two andstep-grandmother of two, who lives innorth Norfolk, bravely decided to speakout on the eve of the anniversary to try tohelp find out who killed her daughter.Detective Chief Inspector Andy Guy,who leads the cold case team within themajor investigation team at Norfolk andSuffolk Constabulary, said the appealresulted in about 30 different calls.He added: “We were given some newnames which we’ve looked at, we weregiven some old information that wealready knew and some informationwhich was not relevant but, of course,people didn’t know it wasn’t relevant.“We’ve looked at all these things andthere’s nothing that takes us any furtherforward.“However, there are still some lines ofinquiry we’re looking at.”DNA samples were still being looked atafter being collected as a result ofinformation generated by the re-appeal,which Det Ch Insp Guy described inNovember as being “encouraging”.Det Ch Insp Guy has reiterated hisappeal to anyone who knows anything, orthinks they might know something, aboutNatalie’s murder to contact him or thepolice.He said: “We would always act on anyinformation received by the public.”Anyone with information about the NataliePearman case should contact the cold caseteam at Norfolk Constabulary on 01953 424520or 101 or call Crimestoppers anonymously on0800 555 111.Have you got a crime story? Call reporterPeter Walsh on 01603 772436 or emailpeter.walsh@archant.co.ukpeter.walsh@archant.co.ukPeter Walsh Search foranswers:LinPearman,who madean appealforinformationsurroundingthe murderof herdaughterNatalie,above right,whose bodywas foundat RinglandHills, belowright, 20years ago.Scooters setto take overseaside townQuadrophenia fever will gripGreat Yarmouth’s town centre andseafront when up to 5,000 scootersride in for a weekend of revved-uprevelry.The Great Yarmouth ScooterRally will be bringing back the1980s heydays of Vespas,Lambrettas and mods when it rollsinto the borough.Enthusiasts and scooter ownerscan enjoy three days of live music,trade and custom shows duringthe event, which runs fromSeptember 13-15.And they will get a chance toshow off the gleaming chromeof their vintage vehicles during amorning ride-out through thetown, which promises to be oneof the highlights of theweekend.The rally has been organised bymembers of the SidewindersScooter Club, which meets weeklyin Yarmouth, and will be raisingmoney for Caister’s independentlifeboat.Tickets are now on sale. To book,and for more details, visit www.greatyarmouthscooterrally.co.ukInvite to see £1.5m hospital centrePeople are invited to see the new £1.5mLouise Hamilton Centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital on Saturday,February 23.Generous residents across GreatYarmouth and Waveney have backed thePalliative Care Appeal, which waslaunched six years ago to build a much-needed palliative and supportive carecentre.Now people can look round the centre,designed by Norwich-based architects LSI,and speak to the staff and volunteers whowill be providing services. The publicopen day will run from 10am to 2pm.Some patients and their families livewith an illness and its effects for manyyears and need emotional and practicalsupport. For illnesses where a cure is notpossible the focus is on quality of life tohelp them come to terms with thesituation and to live their lives as fully aspossible.The Louise Hamilton Centre willprovide specialist palliative care services,advice and support including welfare andmoney matters, therapy groups, a varietyof information about health conditions,support for carers and will also offercomplementary and relaxation therapies.The centre will also act as the hub for anetwork of supportive and palliative careservices across Great Yarmouth andWaveney and will help signpost peopletowards community-based services,including the new Big C Centre inYarmouth.The centre opens on March 4 and willhost a range of information andsupportive care services provided by awide range of organisations working inpartnership – from the NHS, to localcancer charities, patient support groups,and bereavement groups.You can find out more at www.facebook.com/louisehamiltoncentreHave you got a crime story?Contact Peter Walsh on 01603 772439or email peter.walsh@archant.co.ukeveningnews24.co.ukBreaking news throughout the day
  • 6 Friday, February 15, 2013 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukRING DEBUT: Ashling Riva gets ready for her debut fight in Norwich this weekend. The medical secretary manager will take on JemmaThomas from Scratby over three two-minute rounds at the city’s Epic studios. Pictures: JAMES BASSFIGHTING FIT: Ashling gets insome work on the pads withtrainer Matt Smith.Barmy? Brave Ashlingall set for ring debutmark.boggis@archant.co.ukBy MARK BOGGISMost people approach their 50thbirthday by planning a party or anice holiday.But Ashling Rivá from OultonBroad has been preparing for adaunting challenge this weekend,when she takes part in the first-ever all-female bout on a regularwhite collar boxing show inNorwich.Ashling, a medical secretarymanager at the James PagetUniversity Hospital, will bemaking her ring debut as partof the Ultimate Boxing mastersevent on Sunday – a month beforeshe turns 50.For the past 18 months themother-of-one has been preparingfor her first fight with a toughtraining regime at the UltimateBoxing gym in Lowestoft HighStreet. Her first scheduled boutlast November was called off threeweeks into her training, but nowAshling – known to friends andcolleagues as Ash – is ready forSunday’s contest over three, two-minute rounds against JemmaThomas, 27, from Scratby, at thecity’s Epic studios.Ashling admitted she felt abit “nervous” but said she waslooking forward to her first bout– which will also be raising fundsfor the Palliative Care East appealat the James Paget.She told The Journal: “Mostpeople do things at 50, such asgoing to Las Vegas, but I’ll beable to say I’ve had my first fight– how fantastic is that? I justwant to soak up the atmosphereand, win or lose, it is a fantasticopportunity to say I have done it.It’s one of those memory-makingmoments and hopefully I’ll domyself proud.”Expecting to be roared on byfriends, relatives, work colleaguesand fellow gym members, Ashlingadded: “I am really chuffed torepresent the gym as its firstfemale boxer. I do feel that extrapressure being a female fighter,but the support of my coaches,work colleagues, friends andfamily has kept me going.”Her coach at Ultimate Boxing,Matt Smith, said Ashling’sdetermination convinced himit was time to set up the bout.“She’s got the fitness and realperseverance,” he said. “Ashlingreally has the boxing bug andshe did from the very beginning.When she said she wanted to fight,I thought ‘why not?’”So what do Ashling’s 16-year-old daughter, Jazz Rivá, and hercolleagues think?“They all think I’m nuts,completely barmy”, she said.Lowestoft’s Craig Poxton willalso be returning to the ring onSunday’s show, as he prepares tobox professionally again in May.He will have a warm-up fightagainst the Russian David Miko.Other fighters from Lowestoftin action include Gary Warford,Jimmy Worton and police officerPaul Larter. Doors open at 4pm,with tickets available from theUltimate Boxing gym or via www.ultimateboxing.co.ukThe Palliative Care East appealhas funded the new LouiseHamilton Centre, which will opennext month.M r S m i t h a d d e d :“Representatives from PalliativeCare East are attending the eventto do a bucket collection and weare also donating £5 to the causefrom each ticket that Ash sells.”Open day at new palliativecare centre – page 26
  • 26 Friday, February 15, 2013 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukA Lowestoft man sufferedeight puncture wounds afterhis former partner armedherself with a screwdriverbefore going to confront himabout him seeing anotherwoman, a court was told.Allison Burrows put ascrewdriver up the sleeve ofher cardigan before going tosee her ex – but claimed ithad slipped down her sleeveand injured him after shelost her temper and punchedhim.Burrows, 41, of Leas Drift,Lowestoft, denied woundingwith intent to cause himgrievous bodily harm on July13 last year and was found notguilty by a jury after a trial atIpswich Crown Court.She admitted a less seriouscharge of unlawfullywounding and will besentenced next month after apre-sentence report has beenprepared on her.The court heard Burrowshad been in a relationship,but this had ended after arow last June.Giving evidence during hertrial, Burrows claimed thatshe had wanted to get backwith her ex-partner.She told the court thaton July 13 she had beenleft feeling more hopefulabout the chances of areconciliation after he visitedher and promised that he wasnot seeing anyone else.However, after he left, shereceived a text saying he hadbeen seeing another woman,and after texting him andnot getting a reply, she wentto the woman’s house toconfront him.Burrows claimed she put ascrewdriver up her sleeve forher own protection, as she didnot know how many peoplewould be at the house.When she arrived, she waslet in by the woman and wentinto the lounge and accusedher ex of lying to her aboutnot seeing anyone else.She admitted she had losther temper and punchedhim and was unaware whenshe struck him that thescrewdriver had slipped outof the sleeve of her cardigan,injuring him.Giving evidence, her ex-partner told the court thatduring the incident he hadsuffered eight wounds to hislegs, chest, abdomen andarm but they had not causeddeep damage.He said that when Burrowsarrived at the woman’s houseshe had thought “somethingwas going on” and accusedhim of lying to her.Woman usedscrewdriverto assault exBy STAFF REPORTERNew centre to host open dayOPEN DAY: People are being invited to visit the new £1.5m Louise Hamilton CentrePicture: JAMES BASSPeople will have a chanceto take a look inside thenew £1.5m LouiseHamilton Centre nextweekend.Fund-raisers acrossWaveney and GreatYarmouth generouslysupported the PalliativeCare East appeal whichlaunched six years ago tocollect the money neededto build the centre at theJames Paget UniversityHospital.Now people are beinginvited to look round thebuilding, designed byNorwich-based architectsLSI, from 10am to 2pm onSaturday, February 22.Visitors will also have thechance to speak to thestaff and volunteers whowill be providing services.The Louise HamiltonCentre – which opens onMarch 4 – will providespecialist palliative careservices, advice andsupport including welfareand money matters,therapy groups, a variety ofinformation about healthconditions, and support forcarers, as well as offeringcomplementary andrelaxation therapies.It will also act as a hubfor a network of supportiveand palliative care servicesacross the district and helpsignpost people towardscommunity-based services,including the new Big Ccentre in Great Yarmouth.To find out more aboutthe centre and what it hasto offer, visit www.facebook.com/louisehamiltoncentre
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, February 15, 2013 5Police appealover arsonThieves stole from and then torcheda Jaguar car parked in a driveway inBelton.CDs and two pairs of binocularswere stolen from the vehicle’s glovebox before petrol was poured over theseat and set alight between 4pm onFriday and 10am on Saturday.Police are asking anyone who was inthe area around Station Road Southbetween these times who may haveseen anything suspicious or anyonewith information about who startedthe fire to call PC Steven Crisp atGorleston on 101.Call to saveparamedicA parish councillor in Ormesby israllying support for a campaign tosave the village paramedic.Barbara Tennant, said at Monday’smeeting of Ormesby with ScratbyParish Council that she hoped peoplewould back an appeal - as they had inother parts of the region - objecting tochanges which have taken a dedicatedparamedic from his village base atthe doctor’s surgery and given hima roving role. A spokesman for theEast of England Ambulance Servicesaid: “This vehicle was not beingused to its full potential as it was notpositioned for the quickest possiblecall responses or at the out of hourstimes when patients most needed it.We have increased RRV cover in thearea by 48 hours a week and stationedthis vehicle at optimum standbypoints and times so more patients inOrmesby and the surrounding areacan benefit.”Invite to look around new £1.5m care centrePeople are invited to see the new£1.5m Louise Hamilton Centre at theJames Paget University Hospital onFebruary 23.Generous residents across GreatYarmouth and Waveney have backedthe Palliative Care Appeal whichlaunched six years ago to build amuch-needed palliative and supportivecare centre.Now people can look round the centreand speak to the staff and volunteerswho will be providing services. Thepublic open day will run from 10am to2pm.Some patients and their familieslive with an illness and its effects formany years and need emotional andpractical support.For illnesses where a cure is notpossible the focus is on quality of lifeto help them come to terms with thesituation and to live their lives as fullyas possible.The Louise Hamilton Centre willprovide specialist palliative careservices, advice and support includingwelfare and money matters, therapygroups, a variety of information abouthealth conditions, support for carersand will also offer complementary andrelaxation therapies.The centre will also act as the hub fora network of supportive and palliativecare services across Yarmouth andWaveney and will signpost peopletowards community-based services,including the new Big C centre inYarmouth.The centre opens on March 4 andwill host a range of information andsupportive care services providedby a range of organisations workingin partnership. For more visit www.facebook.com/louisehamiltoncentreSTEADFAST: Parish councillor John Shaw says the money would be better spent on people who are alive.Picture: JAMES BASSAn outspoken parish councillor hasblasted a planned war memorial as “atotal waste of money”, arguing cashshould be “spent on people who arealive”.Though Bradwell villagers called fora monument to the fallen of both thefirst and second world wars, Cllr JohnShaw said he would prefer the cash tobe spent on a bandstand.Mr Shaw, 82, was a lone voice ofopposition when the ruby red granitememorial - which is costing more than£4,000 - was approved by the parishcouncil, and he remains steadfast inhis belief.“It’s almost 100 years since the firstworld war and our council is goingto spend something like £5,000,” hefumed.“I think that’s a total waste ofmoney.“It could be better spent on peoplewho are alive, but I was out-voted.”The 7ft tall memorial, which is tobe sited near Church Walk, will bearthe names of the war dead who arecurrently listed on wood surroundedbrass plaques inside the village’s StNicholas Church.Relatives of those who lost theirlives have welcomed the move for a“proper” war memorial, and have saidit will help people remember theiract of sacrifice as few went into thechurch to see the names.But Mr Shaw, who has been a parishcouncillor for four years, thinks it istime to move on.“I was brought up in Belgium andit’s full of war graves, so I’m notunsympathetic to the people who diedin wars,” he explained. “But I think solong after, it’s a pure waste of money.”He said he would rather see fundsspent on something today’s villagerscan enjoy, but admitted he has “notgiven much thought” to it.“One thing that comes to mind issomething like a bandstand on GreenLane playing fields, and seats roundthere,” he suggested. “Something thathelps the people who are there today,like ta proper path all the way roundfor people with invalid carriages.”Asked if many other locals were onhis side of the argument, he conceded:“Unfortunately I’m the only one.”The memorial was made possibleby £4,000 of backing from the wardbudgets of four borough councillorsand the support of the parish council.It is now taking shape with the helpof Colin Smith Monumental Masons,of Hammond Road, Great Yarmouth.Ted Howlett, chairman of BradwellParish Council, said he was pleasedthe project was progressing and feltthere was previously “neglect ofpeople who did give their lives”.Among those to be honoured area trooper who was aboard the SSLaconia when she was torpedoed by aU-boat, and a major who was hit by astray shell in Arras in 1917.The daughter of the trooper, wholives in Gorleston, said the memorialwould finally allow her to “close thebook” on things.It is anticipated that the memorialwill be ready around March 2013,ahead of an official ceremony tounveil it to the village.What do you think? Email anne.edwards@archant.co.uk or write toGreat Yarmouth Mercury, 169 KingStreet, Yarmouth, NR30 2PA.War memorial’s lonevoice of opposition!samuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLBRIGHTANDCHEERY:Inside thenew LouiseHamiltonCentre atthe side ofthe JamesPagetHospital.
  • Advert ID:TIDEATHS32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:DEATHSCustomer ID:DEATHSColour:4First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13Advert ID:304402GH32 mm by47.3 mmBooking Code:304402GHCustomer ID:WELDON JACKColour:1First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13Advert ID:TIINMEM32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:INMEMCustomer ID:INMEMColour:4First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13Advert ID:304310GF32 mm by28.3 mmBooking Code:304310GFCustomer ID:BILYARD EDWARDColour:1First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13JOANDENHAMFebruary 15th, 2011Treasured memoriesof a loving mumand nannyAlways in our thoughtsLove, Tony, Elizabeth,Michael and Andrewx x x xAdvert ID:304320GY32 mm by19.8 mmBooking Code:304320GYCustomer ID:HOUGHTON BRIANColour:1First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13HAROLDTENNANTFebruary 16th, 2012My thoughtsare always with you,Your place no one can fill,In life I loved you dearly,In death I love you stillYour loving wifeMiriamx x xMuch loved dad, grandadand great-grandadIrene,Barbara, Lesleyand Familiesx x xHAROLDTENNANTFebruary 16th, 2012We cant believe its beena year since you left us.We miss you so much andtheres so much wewould like to tell youand show you.Always in our thoughts,Love always, Lesley,Simon,Russell, Nina andGirlsx x x x x xJOHNWELLSRemembering ourdear Johnwho passed awayFebruary 15th, 2012Always in our hearts,God bless,Love, Brendaandall your lovingFamilyx x xAdvert ID:TIACKN32 mm by10 mmBooking Code:ACKNCustomer ID:ACKNColour:4First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13Advert ID:304403GH32 mm by36.8 mmBooking Code:304403GHCustomer ID:BALLS RAYMONDColour:1First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/13Advert ID:304409GF32 mm by62.2 mmBooking Code:304409GFCustomer ID:CHURCH COL-LEEN THEColour:1First Appearance:15/02/13Last Appearance:15/02/1316 Friday, February 15, 2013 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukDonations add tocare centre fundsamuel.russell@archant.co.ukBy SAM RUSSELLFundraisingbakersatGreatYarmouthfirm 3Sun have boosted the PalliativeCare East (PCE) appeal by more than£100.Staff took part in a bake off over theChristmas period have since presentedthe cash they have raised to organisers- in the form of a cheque for £110.Bernadette Auger and Jenny Watsonfrom PCE met with staff, and heardthey are committed to supporting theappeal through other events.Avril Blake, of 3Sun, organised theevent.She said: “We decided it would befun to have a bake off to show off ourbaking skills and raise some money forcharity. It was really easy to organiseas I work with enthusiastic people, andsome of us are a little competitive.“Everyone put loads of effort into it,wehadsomeheadtoheadcompetitionsand judges at the ready.“It really gave us an opportunity toget together at lunch time to socialisewith colleagues and enjoy some greatfood.”Wooden spoons were preparedfor categories and presented to thewinners. And she explained why staffdecided to support PCE.“As is so often the case, many of ourfamilies and friends know someonewho has been affected by illnessessuch as cancer,” she explained. “Wehave since spoken to Jenny andBernadette about the centre and thecontinued support it needs and a fewof us are also looking to volunteer atthe centre.“Due to the positive response wehave decided to hold another bakeoff for Easter and will continue tosupport the Louise Hamilton Centreand maybe even think of some otherfund raising ideas.”Meanwhile a Ladies Night at theKings Head Pub, Belton, boosted theappeal by £157.The event was organised by Jane andLois under the name Something ToSavour catering. The pair say it was agreat success thanks to everyone whoattended.Raffle prizes were donated from stallholders and other sponsors includingLove Bags, Angel Delightz, Jewelleryby Marion, Zumba by Zabby, BronzedBelle of Bradwell, Dawn Cooke IndianHead Massages, Ria BrackenburyBeautyworks, Partylite by Norma,Karma Beauty, The Little PhotographyCompany, Vintage Magpie, The HolePlaice Fish & Chip Shop Belton, TopBody Gym & Girlyglam Makeup &Hair Artistry. If anyone would liketo see further photographs of theevent they can visit the Something ToSavour on Facebook and like the pageand they hope to hold another eventvery soon.FUNDRAISERS: Ladies Night at the Kings Head Pub Belton raised £157 for Palliative Care East. Pictures: SUPPLIEDMONEY:Avril Blake,BernadetteAuger, KennyBiggin, RobynBerriman,Angie Hogg,JennyWatson.OPEN: Viewinside thenewly builtLouiseHamiltonCentre at theJames PagetUniversityHospital.Picture:JAMES BASSWELDONJACK LESLIEPassed away peacefully atJames Paget Hospital, onFebruary 8th, after a longillness. Dearly loved husbandof Eileen, for 61 years, fatherto Tracey and Gary(deceased), father-in-law toNick, and grandad to Sabrina.Love you darling, rest inpeace, waiting for me.Eileen and “Charlie” x x xFuneral service will take placeat Gorleston Crematorium,on Tuesday, February 26th, at12 noon. Flowers welcome c/oArthur Jary & Sons Ltd., 43High Street, Gorleston.BILYARDEDWARD(Albert)If I could have one wishtoday,It would not be for gold,But just to have you backagain,As in the days of old.George, Donna and Jackx x x.HOUGHTONBRIANPassed away February 18th,2006.Loved and missed always.Pam, Paul, Samantha andSebastian.BALLSRAYMONDTeresa would like to thankfamily and friends forattending Ray’s funeral, forsympathy cards, messages anddonations. Thanks also toFather Henry for the service atthe Crematorium, staff atGorleston Conservative Club,for the lovely buffet andnursing staff on Ward 2,James Paget Hospital. Pleaseaccept this as the only, butmost sincere acknowledgmentCHURCHCOLLEENThe Family of the lateColleen would like to thankeveryone for their cards,messages of sympathy anddonations (the donation fundis still open for Wellbeing ofWomen c/o A. Jary & Sons, 43High Street, Gorleston, NR316RR), on their sad loss. To seeso many people at the funeralwas truly moving. Thanks alsoto A. Jary & Sons for funeralarrangements and FatherHenry for the service at thecrematorium. Special thanksto the staff at the Breast CareDept., Sandra ChapmanCentre, Macmillan Nurse(Denise), the East CoastHospice, District Nurses, Dr.Machin and all who wereinvolved in the treatment andcare of Colleen. Please acceptthis as the only but mostsincere acknowledgment.
  • 18 NEWS www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Tuesday, February 19, 2013Meeting overscheme forshared officesCouncillors have run the rule overplans to build a £13.65m sharedoffice accommodation block forLowestoft which has created fearsover the future of the town’s seat ofdemocracy.Yesterday saw the first meeting ofthe Lowestoft shared accommodationjoint committee made up of twoWaveney District councillors, MikeBarnard and Gareth Douce, andSuffolk county councillors LisaChambers and Mary Rudd.The committee was given a briefingon the plans to close and relocate 10councilofficesinLowestoft,includingthe town hall, into one building atRiverside Road to save the tax payer£3m over 10 years in maintenancecosts.Peter Revell, project manager, saidthe £13.6m building will be occupiedby Waveney district and Suffolkcounty councils by March 2015 withthe shared customer base at theMarina Centre completed byDecember 2015.Mr Revell said: “The existingpremises will be vacated and disposedoff or alternative uses found.”Both councils have each pledged£6.8m to the project and so far £49,000has been spent.LSI Architects has been appointedas designer and the main contractoris expected to come on board by theend of March with work starting onthe shared building in December2013.LOWESTOFTand ensure this winter your homereally keeps you warmAIR TESTING SPECIAL OFFERDOMESTIC AND NEW BUILD AIR TESTINGVALID UNTIL END OF MARCHEstablished 1937www.myhillspetandgarden.co.ukVisit ourbranches at:Attleborough01953 453104Dereham01362 692975Diss01379 642465Swaffham01760 721272Watton01953 881552Wymondham01953 602272Norfolk’s oldest & largest chainof pet & garden storesCall your localshop for detailsLOCALDELIVERYAVAILABLEmy pet...my garden...MYHILLSPET & GARDENMYHILLSPET & GARDENMYHILLSMYHILLSNEW YEAR OFFERSFold Flat Pet CarriersSmall - 64x48x56cm RRP £50.49Special Offer £24.99Medium - 76x53x61cm RRP £65.89Special Offer £32.95Large - 91x63x71cm RRP £87.85Special Offer £43.95Plus Buy Any Of The Above & Get AFREE Fling N Fetch Ball Thrower, If YouBring Or Mention This Advert!PetGear Plastic Pet CarrierRegular Black- 45x33x30cm RRP £22.99Special Offer £13.95Large Black - 57x37x37cm RRP £28.79Special Offer £16.95PetGear Top Opening Pet CarrierRegular Red or Blue- 45x33x30cm RRP £24.99Special Offer £16.95Large Red or Blue 57x37x37cm RRP £29.99Special Offer £19.95GORLESTONSurvivors visit help centreBy LAUREN ROGERSBreast cancer survivors have visitedNorfolk’s new £1.5m palliative careunit two weeks ahead of its grandopening.Breast Friends, a social supportgroup for women in Great Yarmouthand Waveney, hope the purpose builtLouise Hamilton Centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital, inGorleston, will be a warm, welcoming‘home from home’ – offering servicessome of them struggled to find duringtheir own battles with cancer.The centre, funded by the PalliativeCare East appeal, is named afterGorleston woman Louise Hamilton,who died, aged 28, of breast cancer. Itwill open to the public on March 4.Yesterday, members of BreastFriends were given a tour of thebuilding and, while there, presentedcounty lymphoedema nurses SandraWestrop and Chrissie Bater – just twoof the health care professionals whowill be moving into the new centre –with a camera to use with patientsundergoing therapy.“We wanted to give somethingback,” said Ann Hacon, a foundingmember and treasurer of BreastFriends.“To know there are support groupsout there when you are first diagnosedcan make a huge difference.“When I tell some people I hadbreast cancer 15 years ago, you cansee it in their face. They think canceris a death sentence. It’s not.”The group, who have donated £2,000to the centre, want to support thecause for years to come.Breast cancer survivor MargaretHomes, of Oulton Broad, nearLowestoft, said: “Something thatimpressed me is that it’s not just acentre for cancer patients.“It’s for anyone in need of palliativecare; people with dementia and MotorNeurone Disease.”For project manager Nikki Sawkins,who was working as a cancer andpalliative care nurse for WaveneyPrimary Care Trust when PalliativeCare East began its campaign sixyears ago, having the support ofgroups like Breast Friends is areminder of the Louise HamiltonCentre’s power to bring differentorganisations together.Ms Sawkins said: “Often, if youprovide support during treatment orend of life care, you will reduce theneed for specialist palliative carebeds.“When Norman Lamb [NorthNorfolk MP and minister of state forcare and support] visited, he said hefelt that, with this centre, GreatYarmouth was leading the field. Ibelieve that too. And to see it fromconception right through to openingis going to be wonderful.”The Louise Hamilton Centre willopen its doors to the public thisweekend ahead of the official openingnext month.TAKING ALOOK:Membersof BreastFriends atthe LouiseHamiltonCentre.Picture:SUBMITTEDlauren.rogers@archant.co.uk
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 21Norwich Evening News Wednesday, February 20, 2013Talented Samis all set torelease EPThe Norfolk star of Britain’s GotTalent has announced the releaseof his first EP.Sam Kelly reached the final ofthe TV talent show in 2012, andhas spent the time since writingand performing with his band.Your Way Home is set to bereleased on March 18, and will beavailable for download fromiTunes and Amazon.The EP is made up of theSpixworth 20-year-old’s originalsongs and was recorded over thepast month at Metway Studios inBrighton, where he is a musicstudent.I’ve put a lot of effort into it,” hetold fans on his website. “I wantedit to be just right.”Sam, a former SprowstonCommunity High School pupil,reached the final of Britain’s GotTalent last summer afterimpressing judges at his auditionwith a version of Adele’s MakeYou Feel My Love.He then went on to win his semi-final and finished ninth in thefinal, behind performing dog duoAshleigh and Pudsey.Italian job thatis just so tastyvictoria.leggett@archant.co.ukVictoria LeggettA former city student nowworking at a top Italianrestaurant returned to hisold college with adeliciously tempting offerfor a group of buddingyoung chefs.Chris Murray, who is headchef of the RistoranteGrock, in Imperia, Italy,trained at City CollegeNorwich in the 1990s.He returned to the IpswichRoad site to share some ofhis knowledge and hispassion for Italian food andto offer current studentsthe chance to go to Italyand work inhis kitchen forsix weeks thissummer.Thirtystudents on thelevel twoprofessionalcookery coursegathered in thecollege’s DeliaSmith LectureTheatre, whichis designed specifically forcookery demonstrations, tolearn from Mr Murray.The successful Norfolk-born chef, who has workedin many top restaurants inItaly, spent two hoursshowing the students howto cook classic Italianfavourites such as basilpesto Genovese, wholemealfarfalle pasta, ravioli delplin and modern tiramisu.He encouraged the buddingchefs to followin his footsteps,from Norfolk toItaly, and applyfor a workexperienceplacement beingofferedexclusively tofour studentsfrom CityCollege.Mr Murray said:“This work experience willhelp the students to growup. It’s going to give them ataster of what it’s likeworking, earning money,how to respect theingredients, how to workunder pressure. I do givethem a lot of responsibility.Among the studentsenthused by thedemonstration was TomStevenson, 18, fromBarnham Broom, who said:“This has given a reallygood insight and I willdefinitely be applying to goand work in Italy because Iwant to learn more aboutItalian food and culture.”Mr Murray was joined inthe demonstration by thefour level 3 students – JoeBrackenbury, JackJennings, Alex Saundersand Tomas Uragallo – whogot the chance to workwith him last summer inthe prestigious LaMeridiana Hotel innorthern Italy.Breast cancer survivors have visitedNorfolk’s new £1.5m palliative careunit two weeks ahead of its grandopening.Breast Friends, a social supportgroup for women in Great Yarmouthand Waveney, hope the purpose-built Louise Hamilton Centre at theJames Paget University Hospital, inGorleston, will be a warm,welcoming ‘home from home’ –offering services some of themstruggled to find during their ownbattles with cancer. The centre,funded by the Palliative Care Eastappeal, is named after Gorlestonwoman Louise Hamilton, who died,aged 28, of breast cancer. OnMonday, members of Breast Friendswere given a tour of the buildingand, while there, presented countylymphoedema nurses SandraWestrop and Chrissie Bater with acamera to use with patientsundergoing therapy. “We wanted togive something back,” said AnnHacon, a founding member andtreasurer of Breast Friends.The Louise Hamilton Centre, inset,will open its doors to the public thisweekend ahead of the officialopening on March 4..Cancer survivorsvisit new centreiwitness24.co.ukShare your news & picturesFor reviews of restaurants, pubs and bars inthe Norwich area, dont miss the Weekend sectionof your Norwich Evening News every Saturday.
  • Professional gutter vacuum andunblock plus downpipe balloon £39.99East Anglian Cleaning and Maintenance,Norwich, NorfolkUsual price £94.99 Tickles price £39.9958% offBuy online at: www.tickles.co.uk/edpFor full terms and details visit our websiteDon’t miss out - limited time only!Eastern Daily Press, Tuesday, February 26, 2013 www.EDP24.co.uk/news NEWS 23Badminton forover-60s is abig successBadminton lessons aiming tointroduce the over-60s to the sporthave proved so successful that morecourses are going to be put on.The six-week badmintonprogramme started at DerehamLeisure Centre on February 1 as partof the Active Norfolk Get Intoinitiative. The sessions are designedto give adults the chance to play asport they have not tried before, orhave not been involved with for sometime, to encourage them into a moreactive lifestyle. Course coach CharlieRutterford, who is over 60, said: “Iwas excited to hear the course wasfully booked. I know only too well thebenefits of having an active lifestyleand nobody should allow age tobecome a barrier.”Sport development officer atParkwood Leisure, Julie Pike, said:“The over-60s are an important targetgroup and we will be working withActive Norfolk to run further GetInto courses at site with the aim longterm to have a sustainable weeklysocial badminton session specificallyfor this age group.”Ms Pike said Parkwood Leisure was“thrilled” with the uptake of thecourse which was fully booked aweek before it started.Visit www.activenorfolk.org/getintoor contact Julie Pike on 01362 693419or julie.pike@parkwood-leisure.co.ukDEREHAMLibrary closurefor revampHethersett Library is temporarilyclosing while work is carried out.The library will be closed fromWednesday, March 6 and will reopenon Saturday, March 9.During the closure, automatic doorswill be fitted at the entrance of thelibrary and the interior of the librarywill be redecorated.Books can be borrowed, renewed orreturned at any Norfolk CountyCouncil library. Users can also renewbooks by telephoning 0344 800 8006at the cost of a local call, or online atwww.norlink.norfolk.gov.ukHETHERSETTPALLIATIVE CARE CENTRE: Roberta Lovick at the Louise Hamilton Centre, named after her daughter, below.GORLESTONCentre has been built with‘so much love and care’By LAUREN ROGERSThe mother of a woman who died ofcancer aged just 28 has shown peoplearound Norfolk’s new £1.5 millionpalliative care centre named in herdaughter’s honour.The Louise Hamilton Centre, basedin the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital in Gorleston,near Great Yarmouth, was open tothe public at the weekend, givingpeople a closer look ahead of theofficial opening next month.The centre is named after Gorleston-born Louise Hamilton who died in1998, two years after being diagnosedwith breast cancer.Her mother Roberta Lovick wasthere at the weekend to meet peoplelooking around and tell them herstory.“This is a joyous place,” said MrsLovick, who has been a voice for thePalliative Care East’s long-runningcampaign to open a dedicated supportand care facility since it launched in2006.“It’s incredibly cheesy but thecentre was built on the foundationsof love. Everyone involved has put somuch love and care in to it.“I felt, and still feel, that I wasted alot of time at the end of Louise’s life.Had there been a place like this wecould have shared more momentstogether, we could have embracedthat time we had left.”When the centre opens on March 4,it will bring together more than 20organisations that support and helppeople, both patients and theirfamilies, who are living with life-limiting illness, from cancer andheart failure to chronic lung diseaseand dementia.While a number of healthcareprofessionals such as lymphoedemanurses will be permantely based atthe centre alongside support groups,others, such as the hospital’s cardiacrehabilition team, will use the spacefor meetings and classes.Patients,carersandfamilymemberscan be referred to the centre, but itwill be open for walk-ins. JohnHemming, chairman of the PalliativeCare East appeal, believes thepurpose-built centre with itsemphasis on bringing various groupsPicture: JAMES BASStogether and being ‘part of ’ thehospital, will set a benchmark forpalliative care across the country.Dr Bernadette Auger, consultant inpalliative care at the James Paget,agrees.“At the moment we work where thepatients are; we see them in hospitalbut a lot of work is actually out therein the community; in care homes andin people’s own homes, helping themadjust to what is happening and also,importantly, taking time to thinkahead.“This centre means we will have aroom to see patients which isfantastic. It will probably beparticulary important for youngerpatients who often do not want us tocome to their homes. The location ofthe centre is key too. For the firsttime people will know where to comefor support from day one.“If people have just received adiagnosis or come from a particularlydifficult clinic where they havereceived devestating news, they cancome here. We can’t change the news,but we can help them absorb it. Andthey’ll know they can come back atany time for someone to talk to, forsomeone to listen.”For more information about thepalliative care centre, visitwww.louisehamiltoncentre.co.uklauren.rogers@archant.co.ukThis is a joyousplace. It’sincrediblycheesy but thecentre was builton thefoundations oflove.Roberta Lovick
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, March 1, 2013 33Have a sayon policingPeople living in South Yarmouth arebeing invited to voice any concernsthey might have about local crime.The next meeting of the SouthYarmouth Safer NeighbourhoodTeam will be held at The SalvationArmy Citadel in Tolhouse Street at11am on March 5.The meeting at the Citadel, which isnext to Great Yarmouth Library, isopen to everyone living or workingin south Yarmouth.It is a chance for people to havetheir say about local policing, askquestions, hear what has beenhappening in the neighbourhood anddiscuss what they think should be thepolicing priorities over the comingweeks.Cash swipedBurglars stole cash, a flat screen TV,jewellery and computer equipmentafter breaking into a home on TowerRoad in the Broads village Reppswith Bastwick.Police believe the offenders, whosearched the house after breaking inbetween 7.20pm on February 16 and12.50am on February 17, carried thestolen items across a field to a vehicleparked in passing place on a nearbylane. Anyone with informationshould call DC Gavin Rivett on 101Road safetyThefirstwaveof roadsafetyvolunteersfrom Norfolk County Council’s recentvolunteer recruitment drive havebegun their training.Volunteers can still register theirinterest by visiting www.norfolk.gov.uk/mindroad or calling 0344 8008020.Volunteering can be shaped aroundthe person’s commitments.INSPIRATION: Mainpicture and inset, theLouise HamiltonCentre, the region’spurpose built paliativecare unit.Right, LouiseHamilton, who died ofcancer aged 28.Pictures: JAMES BASSThe mother of a woman whodied of cancer aged 28 hasbeen meeting local peopleat the new £1.5m palliativecare centre named in herdaughter’s honour.The Louise Hamilton Centreat the James Paget UniversityHospital was open to thepublic last weekend, givingpeople a closer look aheadof the official opening onMonday, March 4.The centre is named afterGorleston-bor n LouiseHamiltonwhodiedin1998,twoyears after being diagnosedwith breast cancer.On Saturday, her motherRoberta Lovick was there tomeet people looking aroundand tell them her story.“This is a joyous place,” saidMrs Lovick, who has been avoice for the Palliative CareEast’s long-running campaignto open a dedicated supportand care facility since itlaunched in 2006.“It’s incredibly cheesy butthe centre was built on thefoundations of love. Everyoneinvolved has put so much loveand care in to it.“I felt, and still feel, that Iwasted a lot of time at theend of Louise’s life. Hadthere been a place like thiswe could have shared moremoments together, we couldhave embraced that time wehad left.”When the centre opens nextmonth, it will bring togethermore than 20 organisationsthat support and help people,both patients and theirfamilies, who are living withlife-limiting illness, fromcancer and heart failure tochronic lung disease anddementia.While a number ofhealthcare professionals suchas lymphoedema nurses willbe permantely based at thecentre alongside supportgroups, others, such as thehospital’s cardiac rehabilitionteam, will use the space formeetings and classes.Patients, carers and familymembers can be referred tothe centre, but it will be openfor walk-ins.John Hemming, chairmanof the Palliative Care Eastappeal, believes the purpose-built centre with its emphasison bringing various groupstogether and being ‘partof ’ the hospital, will set abenchmark for palliative careacross the country.Dr Bernadette Auger,consultant in palliative careat the James Paget, agrees.“At the moment we workwhere the patients are; wesee them in hospital but a lotof work is actually out therein the community; in carehomes and in people’s ownhomes, helping them adjustto what is happening andalso, importantly, taking timeto think ahead.“This centre means we willhave a room to see patientswhich is fantastic. It willprobably be particularyimportant for youngerpatients who oftennot want us to cometo their homes. Thelocation of thecentreis key too. For the first timepeople will know where tocome for support from dayone.“If people have just receiveda diagnosis or come from aparticularly difficult clinicwhere they have receiveddevestating news, they cancome here.“We can’t change the news,but we can help them absorbit. And they’ll know theycan come back at any timefor someone to talk to, forsomeone to listen.”For more information aboutthe palliative care centre, visitwww.louisehamiltoncentre.co.ukSomewhere to talk,someone to listen...lauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERSSUPPORTERS: Above,Roberta Lovick. Right, DrBernadette Auger, locumconsultant palliative care.
  • 36 Friday, March 1, 2013 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukWhen her daughter died from cancerat the age of 28, Roberta Lovick wasleft in despair.But 15 years on, she proudlygreeted visitors at the new £1.5m palliativecare centre named in her daughter’s honour– confident that it would help other familiescope with the loss of their loved ones.The Louise Hamilton Centre at the JamesPaget University Hospital was open to the publicover the weekend, allowing people from GreatYarmouth and Waveney to have a closer lookat its facilities ahead of its official opening onMonday.The centre is named after Gorleston-bornLouise Hamilton who died in 1998, two yearsafter being diagnosed with breast cancer.On Saturday, her mother was there to meetpeople looking around and tell them her story.“This is a joyous place,” said Mrs Lovick, whohas been a voice for the Palliative Care East’slong-running campaign to open a dedicatedsupport and care facility since it launched in2006.“It’s incredibly cheesy but the centre was builton the foundations of love. Everyone involvedhas put so much love and care in to it.“I felt, and still feel, that I wasted a lot of timeat the end of Louise’s life. Had there been aplace like this we could have shared moremoments together – we could have embracedthat time we had left.”When the centre opens next month, it willbring together more than 20 organisations thatsupport and help people, both patients and theirfamilies, who are living with life-limiting illness,from cancer and heart failureto chronic lung disease anddementia.Maxine and Andy Cann, of Blundeamong the weekend visitors.Maxine, aged 57, has secondary stacancer and has signed up to take parcourse at the centre – a course that epeople to spend the time have left liv“Everywhere wable to accessbeen 30-mileat least,” sh“When yoa situationyou don’t ato talk wheexpected todrop-in cenis great becapop in and tawant.“When ydiagnoseda termiityoyrThousands of people acrossWaveney and Great Yarmouthsupported the PalliativeCentre opens forpublic viewing...IN MEMORY: LouiseHamiltonCare East appeal,and over theweekend there wasa chance to seethe fruits of theirefforts as thesoon-to-openLouise HamiltonCentre hostedtwo public opendays, asLAURENROGERSreports...
  • Friday, March 1, 2013 45The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukeston, wereage breastrt in a Hopeencouragesving.we’ve beens before hase drive awayhe said.ou are inlike this,lways wanten you’reo. Having antre like thisause you canlk when youyou’ve beend with cancer,inal cancer,dominatesour life andyou’ve got torememberto enjoy andlive it whenyou are stillhere.”Andy, 56, added: “It’s finding that balance ofquality of life – it is 24 hours a day and thatdoesn’t change, but you can change they way youcope.“It’s good to have this facility on our doorstep.”A number of healthcare professionals, includinglymphoedema nurses, will be permanentely basedat the centre alongside support groups, but others,such as the hospital’s cardiac rehabilitation team,will use the space periodically for meetings andclasses.Patients, carers and family members can bereferred to the centre, but it will also be open forwalk-ins.John Hemming, chairman of the Palliative CareEast appeal, believes the purpose-built centre,with its emphasis on bringing together variousgroups and being “part of” the hospital, will set abenchmark for palliative care across the country.Dr Bernadette Auger, consultant in palliativecare at the James Paget, agrees.She said: “At the moment we work where thepatients are; we see them in hospital but a lot ofwork is actually out there in the community; incare homes and in people’s own homes, helpingthem adjust to what is happening and also,importantly, taking time to think ahead.“This centre means we will have a room to seepatients which is fantastic. It will probably beparticularly important for younger patients whooften not want us to come to their homes. Thelocation of the centre is key too. For the firsttime people will know where to come for supportfrom day one.“If people have just received a diagnosis orcome from a particularly difficult clinic wherethey have received devastating news, they cancome here.“We can’t change the news, but we can helpthem absorb it. And they’ll know they can comeback at any time for someone to talk to, forsomeone to listen.”For more information about the palliativecare centre, visit www.louisehamiltoncentre.co.ukINSIDE AND OUTSIDE: The Louise Hamilton Centre, theeast coast’s new purpose-built palliative care unit, held twoopen days at the weekend to allow members of the publicto look around and meet volunteers.Pictures: JAMES BASSSUCCESS: Below left, Nikki Sawkins, project manager ofthe centre. Below right, Roberta Lovick, Louise Hamilton’smum.‘It’s incrediblycheesy but thisplace was built onthe foundations oflove’ – Roberta Lovick, LouiseHamilton’s mum
  • 20 NEWS www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Tuesday, March 5, 2013Music marks theopening of new£1.5m centreSING IT LOUD: Members of the HeartSong choir singing at the Louise Hamilton Centre yesterdaySix years after an ambitiouscampaign to open a dedicatedpalliative care centre began,the Louise Hamilton Centre hasopened its doors with the soundof singing.The £1.5m centre in the groundsof the James Paget UniversityHospital in Gorleston, near GreatYarmouth, opened to the publicfor the first time yesterday.The milestone was marked by aperformance from Suffolk FamilyCarers’ HeartSong, a communitychoir made up of carers andpatients with lung problems.The centre will act as a hub forspecialist services and supportpeople with life-limitingillnesses whether they needpractical advice,complementary therapies, orsomeone to talk to.It is open from 9.30am to7.30pm on weekdays and 10.30amto 3.30pm at weekends.GORLESTONPicture: JAMES BASSNORFOLK/SUFFOLKConcern over locumcosts at health trustBy ADAM GRETTONHealth CorrespondentA mental health trust which islooking to cut 500 jobs spent morethan £3m on locum doctors last year,the EDP can reveal.Critics of Norfolk and Suffolk NHSFoundation Trust’s plan to reducefront-line staff numbers as part of arestructure yesterday described thesum spent on temporary doctors as“mind-boggling”. Figures from aFreedom of Information requestreveal that the NHS trust spent £3.2mon locum doctors in 2012.It comes as the mental health trustis planning to cut 502 out of 2,128posts and 20pc of its inpatient bedsby 2016 in order to balance its books.Norfolk and Waveney Mental HealthNHS Foundation Trust and SuffolkMental Health Partnership NHSTrust merged at the beginning of2012 and the new group is looking tocut its budget by 5pc annually overthe next four years because ofreduced funding. The two trusts spent£3.1m on locum doctors in 2011.Bob Blizzard, Labour’s prospectiveparliamentarycandidateforWaveney,who is campaigning to save inpatientbeds at Carlton Court Hospital inCarlton Colville or at NorthgateHospital in Great Yarmouth, saidthat £3m seemed like a lot to spend onlocums.“They are saying they can functionwith 500 fewer critical staff and yet atthemomenttheyhavestaff shortages.It is mind-boggling,” he said.“It is the same with beds. How arethey going to do with fewer bedswhen the existing beds do not meetdemand?” Concerns were raised bythe doctors’ union British MedicalAssociation earlier this year after itemerged that consultant doctornumbers at Norfolk and Suffolk NHSFoundation Trust could be cut by athird and other grades of doctorreduced by 40pc over the next threeyears.A BMA spokesman yesterday said:“These figures indicate that thesystem is already under strain. Theplanned cuts to numbers of doctorswill inevitably increase that strain.That means the trust will either needto spend even more on locums, coverthe shortfall with non-medical staff,or reduce quality or access toservices.”A spokesman for the mental healthtrust said: “In recent months we havenot recruited to all vacant posts in abid to minimise the number ofcompulsory redundancies we may berequired to make as a result of theservice strategy.”“While doing this we are alsoworking closely with services acrossNorfolk and Suffolk to help themreduce the number of locums used.”adam.gretton@archant.co.ukThey are sayingthey can functionwith 500 fewercritical staff andyet at themoment theyhave staffshortages. It ismind-boggling.Bob BlizzardFELBRIGGThe cause of a blaze which destroyedtwo industrial units over theweekend remains unclear after a fireinvestigation came to an end.Firefighters from Aylsham,Fakenham, Cromer, Sheringham,Mundesley and Holt were called toMetton Road near Felbrigg just before2.20am on Sunday. The fire was putout just after 5am and the final crewleft at 1pm on the same day.A Norfolk Fire Service spokesmansaid an investigation by fireofficers had started and finishedyesterday.He said: “Due to the extent of thedamage we have been unable toestablish the definitive cause.”Car salesman and motor engineerMelvyn Jarvis, 52, owned one of twounits which was engulfed by fire.The building had been the base forhis JMS Motor Engineers businessfor the past three years.Cause of industrial blaze remains uncertainWater firm’sconsultationis extendedPeople in Norfolk are being givenanother two weeks to have their sayon how Anglian Water spends theirmoney.In January it launched its biggestevercustomerconsultation,‘Discover,Discuss, Decide’. A tour of towns andcities across the region has prompteda huge response and the company hasnow decided to keep the consultationrunning for another fortnight.The roadshow will be back inNorwich tomorrow in the Chapelfieldshopping centre.Martyn Oakley, Anglian Water’scustomer services director, said:“What our customers tell us reallywill influence our investment plansand the size of bills over the next fiveyears. The more opinions we can getthe more weight they will carry withour regulator.”The consultation now runs untilMarch 24 and people can take part byvisiting www.discoverdiscussdecide.co.ukNORFOLK
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, March 8, 2013 33Animal charityinvestigatingafter death oftethered ponyAn investigation is under way aftera horse died following a dramaticrescue attempt at Pakefield cliffs.Firefighters, coastguard rescueteams, RSPCA officers and a vetwere all involved in the attempt torescue the horse, which was founddangling by his neck from the cliffson a tether.But despite an “amazing team effort”,the incident ended in tragedy whenthe young gypsy cob died on arrivalat the Redwings Horse Sanctuary lastFriday, about six hours after he wasfound.An RSPCA spokesman said: “Weare leading on this investigationwith the police. The horse was on along tether, which was staked to theground and he had been tethered tooclose to the cliff edge so that when hefell down he was effectively chokingbecause the tether was still staked tothe ground and around his neck.”She added: “The RSPCA is deeplyconcerned about the problem ofhorses being left tethered and to ‘flygraze’ on land – this awful incidentshows the tragic consequences thatcan arise as a result of this dangerouspractice.”Emergency teams were called tothe cliffs about 6.15pm and foundthe young pony unconscious anddangling over the cliff. They managedto load him into a waiting horse boxat around 11pm but upon arrival atRedwings the horse died.Six years after an ambitiouscampaignbegan,theLouiseHamiltonCentre has opened its doors to thepublic with the sound of joyfulsinging.The £1.5m palliative centre setin the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital in Gorlestonfinally opened on Monday.To help celebrate the milestone – amassive achievement for the manypeople involved in Palliative CareEast’s appeal, community choirHeartSong, made up of carers andpatients with lung problems, were onhand to perform live.“The new Louise Hamilton Centrestruck us as a fabulously welcomingspace, full of light and openness,”said Amanda Potter, who runs thechoir with Helen Rolfe.“It will be a valuable and importantservice for years to come. The organicstructure provides a lovely place tosit, to meet, to reflect – and to sing in;the acoustics in the central atriumare great and our voices soared.“We received a wonderfully warmreception from everyone, and weredelighted that so many people joinedus in singing. We were very pleased tobe invited to be a part of the openingof the centre.”The HeartSong choir was originallyset up as part of Suffolk’s Music inOur Bones project to promote singingfor health.Today it is supported by SuffolkFamily Carers, the National Lotteryand a Carers’ Innovation grant.With the centre now open itwill act as a hub for specialistservices, supporting thousands ofpeople with life-limiting illnesseswhether they need practicaladvice, complementary therapies, orsimply someone to talk to.It is open from 9.30am to 7.30pm onweekdays and 10.30am to 3.30pm atweekends.To find out more visit www.facebook.com/louisehamiltoncentre.Singing loud and proudfor those needing carelauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERSON SONG:CommunitychoirHeartSongsigning at thepublic openingof the LouiseHamiltonCentre at theJames PagetUniversityHospital.Picture:JAMES BASS
  • 6 Friday, March 8, 2013 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukNew lifeguards sought for Waveney’s beachesNew lifeguards are being sought tocover Waveney’s award-winningbeaches.The Royal National LifeboatInstitution (RNLI) will be runningdaily patrols on Lowestoft andSouthwold’s beaches for the firsttime this summer under four-waypartnership drawn up between theRNLI, Waveney District Council,the Sentinel Leisure Trust andLowestoft Volunteer LifeguardCorps.And today, the RNLI is due tomeet with the council and otherpartners to rubber-stamp the newplans for the summer season,which would see the lifeguardpatrols based at three locations– Lowestoft’s north and southbeaches and the pier beach atSouthwold – from May 25 toSeptember 8.With the recruitment drivenow under way, RNLI lifeguardmanager, Vince Pank, said: “Thisis a great opportunity.“As Waveney is a new area forRNLI lifeguards, we’re seekingrecruits aged 16 and over to joinus.”Stephen Ardley, WaveneyDistrict Council’s cabinet memberfor commercial partnerships,said: “We are in early days ofsetting up the new service whichwill include greater opportunityfor jobs and careers with anorganisation which operatesmore beaches nationally and forlonger periods.”Andy Wilson-Sutter, chairmanof the Sentinel Leisure Trust,added: “We are confident that, aswell as being a more cost-effectiveoption for providing what iscurrently an excellent lifeguardservice, it will lead to even bettersafety on our beaches at Lowestoftand Southwold.”The next course for lifeguardsin Lowestoft runs from April 8 toApril 13 and will cost £230.For details, email vincent_pank@rnli.org.uk or call him on07917 581567.More than six years after anambitious fund-raising effortbegan, the district’s new palliativecare centre opened its doors to thepublic this week – to the sound ofjoyful singing.The £1.5m Louise HamiltonCentre opened on Monday inthe grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital, providingstate-of-the artfacilities topeople withlife-limitingillnesses andtheir families.The centrehas been builtthanks tothe moneyraised by thePalliativeCare Eastappeal,whichhas beenbacked bythousandsof peopleacrossWaveneyandGreat Yarmouth since its launchsix-and-a-half years ago.To help celebrate Monday’sopening, the community choirHeartSong, made up of carers andpatients with lung problems, wereon hand to perform live.Amanda Potter, who runs thechoir with Helen Rolfe, wasimpressed with the building.“The new Louise HamiltonCentre struck us as afabulously welcomingspace, full of lightand openness,” shesaid.“It will be a valuableand important service for yearsto come.“The organic structure providesa lovely place to sit, to meet,to reflect – and to sing in; theacoustics in the central atriumare great and our voices soared.“We received a wonderfullywarm reception from everyone,and were delighted that so manypeople joined us in singing. Wewere very pleased to be invitedto be a part of the opening of thecentre.”The HeartSong choir wasoriginallysetupaspartof Suffolk’sMusic in Our Bones project topromote singing for health and isnow supported by Suffolk FamilyCarers, the National Lottery and aCarers’ Innovation grant.Now the centre is open, itwill act as a hub for specialistservices, supporting thousands ofpeople with life-limiting illnesseswhether they need practicaladvice, complementary therapies,or simply someone to talk to.It is open from 9.30am to 7.30pmon weekdays and 10.30am to 3.30pmat weekends.To find out more,v i s i t w w w. f a c e b o o k .com/louisehamiltoncentre.Joyful opening to newpalliative care centrelauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERSVOICES: Members ofthe Heartsongcommunity choirsinging at the publicopening of the LouiseHamilton Centre.Pictures: JAMES BASS
  • Quality manufacturers of all purpose made joinery, windows, doors,staircases etc.Also PVCu window & door fabricators. We manufactureour own double glazed units with a 10 year warranty.Suppliers to domesticand trade customers.Installed or supplyonly.52 Friday, March 15, 2013 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukSpring bulbsand seedsfor every readerworth more than £40*over the next two weeksDon’t miss outBuy next week’s paperAnemone De CaenStarting next week80 anemone bulbsworth £19*for every reader(*postage payable)FREEMercury Reader OfferSalons in leading hairstyling eventTwo Gorleston hair salonshave been awarded places inthe hairdressing industry’slive regional competition, theL’Oreal Colour Trophy 2013 inCambridge in April.FusioninHighStreethasplacesin both the men’s and woman’scategories. Debbie Spencer,Samantha Laurie, MitchellSeaman, Sophie Willis, TanyaPrice and Chelsea Harrisonare part of a very excited salonteam who are overjoyed withhaving broken through to thenext level of the competition.Almond Road Hair and Beautyhave also reached the regionalfinals in both the male andfemale category. A thrilledJade Edwards and DanielleSimmons will be taking to thestage to compete in the malecategory while Sian Keelerand Amy Tovell will competein the female. Beauty therapistCatherine Delf will be themodels’ makeup artist.To gain a place in the regionalfinal salons had to submitphotographs demonstratingtechnical expertise and fashionawareness on a male or femalemodel. And they both shookoff stiff competition of over1000 entries from across theUK to make up the final 66.The fashion-fuelled, highenergy event will be hosted byTVs new “It” girl Zoe Hardman,co-host of Take Me Out: TheGossip and both teams will behoping to make it to the 58thannual L’Oréal Colour TrophyGrand Final on June 3 atGrosvenor House, Park Lane,London.Almond Road are celebratingtwice: this week they wereawarded Gold salon status fromworld leading hair extensioncompany Great Lengths forour hair extension work andcommitment to the company.The latest round of fund-raising at Lowestoft policestation is set to help a littlegirl from Great Yarmouth,who suffers from intestinalfailure and has to be fedintravenously. WillowAbbotts-Freeman, 3,currently spends almost allher life attached to herfeeding machine and mostdays needs to be hooked upto it for 12 to 16 hours.Willow’s parents arecurrently planning to adapttheir home to make her lifemore comfortable and areraising funds towards awheelchair to allow thefamily to go for walks. Thereare many other simpleeveryday items that Willowneeds while stuck indoorsfor such long periods.Willow’s father is a servingpolice officer with SuffolkConstabulary and colleagueshave supported Willow’sJourney through regularfund-raising. Staff andcustomers at the Jug andBottle off-licence inLowestoft have also playedtheir part – raising furtherfunds through a raffle.Pictured are Willow and herdad at Lowestoft policestation where they werepresented with funds by PCMalcolm Leggett and ColinPammen from the Jug andBottle (left).Great Yarmouth MP BrandonLewis has been given a tourof the Louise HamiltonCentre in the grounds of theJames Paget UniversityHospital (JPH). The £1.5mcentre is working with a longlist of partners including BigC and the Alzheimers Societyto provide a single accesspoint for patients.Mr Lewis saw the wide rangeof facilities on offer topatients with palliative careneeds, from clinical care topsychological support andcomplementary therapies. Hesaid: “The Louise HamiltonCentre is an impressive newprovider for palliative care inour area. The dedication ofthe staff and management atthe centre will be a realasset to Great Yarmouth.”Ian Ashman and JohnnyQuinn from the GeophysicalEngineering department atGardline in Yarmouth wererecently presented with theGardline Innovation Award2013 by chairman GregoryDarling. The pair developeda three-week long courseafter a training need wasidentified which could notbe addressed externally. Theonly nationally recognisedcourse in the country forgeophysical engineering, itis an introduction toengineering within theoffshore survey industry andcovers the complex practiceof a geophysical survey.Learning is supported by acomprehensive handbook ofcourse notes and isconcluded by a two daypractical assessment. Thetraining is run at Gardline’sHQ in Yarmouth in adesignated training room,simulation laboratory andservicing workshops.
  • 2 Friday, March 29, 2013 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukWho’s Who . . .EditorialManaging director, Archant NorfolkJohnny Hustler 01603 772100E-mail: johnny.hustler@archant.co.ukEditor: Anne Edwards 01493 847958E-mail: anne.edwards@archant.co.ukChief reporter: Liz Coates01493 847959E-mail: liz.coates@archant.co.ukMercury reporters: 847956/847959Mercury newslines: 847940Editorial faxline: 847979Address: 169 King Street, GreatYarmouth, NR30 2PAAdvertisingGeneral manager:Geoff Maddison01493 335000Commercial Director:James Gurney 01603 772209Advertising sales & Inquiries: 01493335000Personal announcements: 847942or e-mail: frontcounter@archant.co.ukor fax 01493 847977Postal subscriptions: 01603 7727381st Floor, 36 North Quay, GreatYarmouth, NR30 1JEABC figure January - June 201214,705.If you have any problem with anyadvertisements in this newspaper,please contact Geoff Maddison,general manager, 01493 335000or e-mail geoff.maddison@archant.co.ukRegulars . . .Cases in Court 4Down Memory Lane 8Pet of the Week 10Your Letters 10/11/12Family announcements14/15/16Competition 20Find Me a Home 58The Young Ones 42-47Children’s Birthday Club54Village Life 62-68Town Life 70Church Services 70Viewpoint 70What’s On Guide starts 71What’s On Listings 74Classifieds start 764-page TV guide starts 43Puzzle Page 875 pages sport startPage 83Harbour TrafficOn the web, go toyarmouthmercury24.co.uk and placethe cursor over NEWS; there you willfind “Track Boats” and you will beable to see the shipping trafficcoming in and out of our port - andaround the world.Fair flies infor four daysof stomachflipping funThe annual Easter fair rides intoGreat Yarmouth on Thursday for abumper four days of giddy, gallopingfun.Organisers are hoping the extendedvisit will be smiled on by the weather,attracting hordes of people to thetown.It will be officially opened by theMayor Colleen Walker at 2pm withcivic dignitaries gathering for aformal welcome, which includes thehand-over of a ceremonial key to thetown.Market superintendent GaryMchugh said the success of the fairusually hinged on having a goodThursday when prices were generallyreduced.This year, however, hopes were highfor a busy Sunday, bringing extrapeople to the resort many of whomwould stay for the day bringing widerbenefits.The logistics of organising sucha big event were complex with 120pieces of equipment to place but thatgenerally all went well.In his nine years of organising thefair Mr Mchugh said there had beenfew problems. Health and safety hesaid was paramount in everyone’smind and even more so since thetragedy in King’s Lynn last yearwhen a young child from Lowestoftdied after being hit by a car.Attention to detail and the correctpaperwork was always very thorough,he said.Preparations had been going onbehind the scenes for a year startingwith a debrief after last year’s event.“We normally start in Novemberwriting to all the guild people andshowmen because they have to sendall their paperwork in. Every singlepiece of equipment is covered bypublic liability and covered by a riskassessment from the biggest ride to alittle punch bag. Everyone has to betrained. We are very very thorough.“It is totally driven by the weathernow.”Forty men forfish oil studyForty Norfolk men are sought for astudy into how fish oils reduce therisk of heart disease and stroke.The University of East Anglia(UEA) researchers are looking forvolunteers aged 35 to 55 who are non-smokers and without a history ofheart disease, diabetes or cancer.The study aims to pinpoint exactlywhich element of fish oils is mosteffective at improving cardio vascularhealth.As well as helping to improvemedical understanding, volunteerswill receive £150.Participants will be asked to attenda clinic at UEA three times over fourmonths. During these visits theywill have blood samples taken beforeand after consuming a chocolate-flavoured drink containing differentkinds of omega-3 fats.Volunteers cannot be taking bloodpressure or cholesterol-loweringdrugs, or omega-3 supplements.For more information about thestudy email s.mcmanus@uea.ac.ukor call 07539 192809.A ROYAL APPOINTMENT: Princess Royal walkabout in Great Yarmouth as part of the Charter 800celebrations Picture:BILL SMITHPrincess Royal’sdate in boroughdavid.freezer@archant.co.ukBy DAVID FREEZERThe Princess Royal is paying anothervisit to the Great Yarmouth area nextmonth to visit three local projects.She last visited in June 2008 whenhundreds of people turned out forher walkabout in Yarmouth towncentre part of the Charter 800 yearscelebration.On this occasion, the Princesswill visit Gorleston and Caister onTuesday, April 30.ThevisitwillstartwiththePrincessofficially opening a new classroomblock and cafeteria at East NorfolkSixth Form College.An official opening ceremonyof the Louise Hamilton PalliativeCare Centre at the James PagetUniversity Hospital will follow,before the Princess Royal visitsCaister Volunteer LifeboatService to name its new inshorevessel.It will be the first royal visit toYarmouth since February 2012,when Prince Charles arrived onthe royal train to visit PalmersDepartment Store, to launch its175th anniversary celebrations andalso went on a walkabout taking inthe renovations work at St George’sTheatre and others.The Princess will be given a fulltour and demonstration of studentskills at East Norfolk Sixth FormCollege, meeting principal DaphneKing.There she will officially open the16-classroom Poulson Building,which is already in use for IT, PE,psychology and sociology classes, aswell as the college’s new cafeteria.The finishing touches are alsobeing applied to the college’s othernew seven-classroom building,which will be used to teach English,ahead of the Princess’ visit.Mrs Daphne King said: “We feeltotally honoured and it is also goingto give the college the chance toshow off the excellent work we dohere. We are a jewel in the Norfolkcrown and regularly appear in thetop 20 colleges nationally and theachievements of our young peopleare always so impressive.”The royal entourage will then moveon to the JPH to visit the new LouiseHamilton Palliative Care Centre,which was built after £1.5m wasraised through a Mercury-backedappeal.JPH chairman David Wright said:“The centre is a fantastic resourcefor the people of Great Yarmouthand Waveney. The local communityreally got behind the appeal and weare delighted the Princess Royalwill be formally opening the LouiseHamilton Centre.”Paul Garrod, chairman of CaisterVolunteer Lifeboat Service, iskeeping quiet about the official newname of the inshore lifeboat, whichwent on-station last summer.He said: “To have the PrincessRoyal come down and nameour lifeboat is such an honour,we’re all really looking forwardto it. Prince Charles and Camillacame and named our big boat (in2004) and the Duke of Edinburghcame to mark our 40th year ofindependence in 2009.“So this year we are lucky enoughto have the Princess Royal and weare over the moon. The new inshorelifeboat was paid for by variousbenefactors after we decided to havea new lifeboat and now we’ve decidedto get a new tractor as well, whichwill also be unveiled on the day.”SEEING THE SIGHTS: ThePrincess Royal will be visitingCaister Lifeboat station, theLouise Hamilton Centre at theJames Paget University Hospitaland East Norfolk Sixth FormCollege
  • 36 Friday, March 29, 2013 Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.ukPeople who braved the coldat Bewilderwood adventurepark sported silly socks fora good cause.But the brightly colouredgarments on show were notjust keeping visitors warm,they helped raise money forAutism Anglia. The parkheld Swampy’s Silly SockDay last weekend to raisemoney for the charity, whichsupports sufferers and theirfamilies.Bewilderwood founder TomBlofield, whose son Rufushas autism, is a patron ofthe organisation anddonated £1 for every personspotted wearing silly socks.A spokesman said: “Even inthis extreme weather,families made the effort toventure out and support theevent and regardless of thesnow, everyone had afabulous time.”Volunteers who keep a closeeye on the sea from Caisterhave received their latestround of training.All members of CaisterCoastwatch are now qualifiedto top notch standards aftercompleting the NationalCoastwatch Institution RYA/Ofcom approved RadioCourse.Station Manager Rob Barkersaid: “I am delighted that allmembers took up theopportunity to take the inhouse training. This make100pc of our membershipnow qualified to RYAstandards.“It is my aim to make beinga member of Caister NCIboth enjoyable andrewarding.”• To find out more about thegroup email Mr Barker viacaister@nci.org.uk or call01493 749971.Members of a medical familyhave run the Reading HalfMarathon to help raisemoney for the PalliativeCare East appeal.Veteran runner Dr MartinAuger, consultanthaematologist at the Norfolkand Norwich Hospital andhis daughter Helen, amedical student at CardiffUniversity, both ran the13.1 mile race.They were supported byHelen’s mother, DrBernadette Auger, who is alocum consultant inpalliative care at the JamesPaget Hospital.Bernadette said: “It wasHelen’s first half-marathonand the weather was justhorrible. Very wet andwindy.“I’m very proud of her andMartin for running the racefor Palliative Care East.”Rock ‘n’ roll fundraiser in GorlestonA rock ‘n’ roll fundraiser ishoped to boost the coffers ofGreat Yarmouth Go AheadClub.The charity night is set for theOcean Room in Gorleston onSaturday, April 13 from 7.30pmtill 1am.The Jets will headline theevening, supported by LightsOut and Mark ‘Memphis’King.Bands will be kept in order byDJ Rockin’ Eddie.All proceeds go to the GreatYarmouth Go-Ahead Club- a social club for adults withlearning disabilities - to takethe members on holiday inOctober.Organisers promise a brilliantraffle with prizes donated byvarious companies and also ablind auction.This is where you writeyour bid for any of the itemsavailable on a piece of paperand put it in the box.At the end of the eveningorganisers will open the boxand see who has won theitems.Included in this auction is aholiday woth £400 donated byVauxhall Holiday Camp for sixpeople to attend next year’sShake Rattle and Roll event.There will also be 1950s itemsincluding a rock ‘n’ roll skirt,shirt and petticoat and awicker picnic set. Basket mealswill be available and there willbe a 1950s stalls.Tickets cost £10 in advanceor £12 on the door, and areavailable now.They are on sale at ShakeRattle and Roll, MusicLovers or Dolly Oddballs allin Gorleston High Street orAnglia Copy and Print, byBHS, Revival Sandwich Bar,in Victoria Arcade or AvenueFabrics, in Market Row, all inGreat Yarmouth.Alternatively call Lyn on 01493309629.
  • BEST PRICES IN NORFOLK GUARANTEED½CarpetsPrice½CarpetsPrice• OPEN 7 DAYSA WEEK• AMPLE FREEPARKING• LARGEST RANGEIN EAST ANGLIA226-236 Sprowston Road, Norwich, NorfolkTelephone 01603 488082See more ranges on www.dovetail-furniture.co.ukDOVETAILNorwich’s HomeFurnishing SuperstoreDovetail Twist40oz, 80% wool, 20% nylontwist pile carpet. Choice of coloursWas £49.95sqm Now £24.95sqmFully fitted with Duralay underlayExample room 3.66m (12’) x 4.00m (13’)Was £730 Now£365AND REMEMBERWe can also uplift and dispose old carpetsMove furnitureHome Selection ServiceWe can even have doors cut!See more onwww.mustardtv.co.ukWEATHER 6UK & WORLD NEWS 8-10LOTTERY RESULTS 8CONTACT US 12OPINION 36-37LETTERS 38-39ANNOUNCEMENTS 42CLASSIFIEDS 63-67FUEL VOUCHER 60SPORT 68-76 www. 24.co.ukNEWSBid to recruit moreretained fire fightersPAGE 12Picture: NICK BUTCHERSEE TODAY’S EIGHT-PAGE PULL-OUTDELIGHT AT VISIT: The Princess Royal visits the Louise HamiltonCentre at Gorleston during a day of visits in east Norfolk.Warm welcome forPrincessCelebrating the Princess Royal’s visit to east NorfolkPicturesby JAMES BASSFantastic days out in Norfolk 2013NorfolkDiscover44-page glossy guide to the best of the county’s attractionsSPORTNorfolk brothers getcall-up to Lions squadPAGE 67FRESHDRIVETO WINTRAINSBOOSTCramped rush-hour commuterstravelling from Norfolk andSuffolk to London could face aneven bigger squeeze in the future– with new figures suggesting thenumber of travellers at peak timescould increase by 75pc in 30 years.The report, from Network Rail,has been hailed as yet moreevidence of the need for railimprovements in the Angliaregion.It suggests peak passengernumbers along the Great Easternmain line could grow from 19,500in 2011 to up to 34,100 a day by 2043,thanks partly to the building ofthousands of new homes.Norwich MP Chloe Smith, who isleading a campaign for railimprovements, said the reportunderlined why serious railimprovements were needed.She said: “Many thousands ofpeople who currently travel fromNorwich and the area into London,already know that we need fasterjourney times, more reliablejourney times and a better qualityof carriage.”Guy Dangerfield, from passengerwatchdog Passenger Focus, said:“It appears that demand will growstrongly in the coming years andpassengers will need to knowwhere the extra seats will comefrom to stop crowding simplygetting worse”.By ANNABELLE DICKSONPolitical editorReport on peak time travelFULL STORY – PAGE 13THE COUNTRY’S BIGGEST-SELLING REGIONAL MORNING NEWSPAPERWednesday, May 1, 201370pSee more onwww.mustardtv.co.uk
  • 2 PRINCESS ROYAL’S VISIT www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, May 1, 20132 NEWS www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, May 1, 2013Royal seal of approval forBy ANTHONY CARROLLA palliative care centre for people inthe Great Yarmouth and Waveneyareas has received the royal seal ofapproval from the Princess Royal.Yesterday afternoon the PrincessRoyalspentmorethananhourtouringthe Louise Hamilton Centre in thegroundsof theJamesPagetUniversityHospital (JPH) in Gorleston.During her visit she met the smallarmy of volunteers, staff and fund-raisers who have helped build andrun the centre, which hopes to help25,000 people in the Yarmouth andWaveney areas with life-limiting orterminal illnesses and their carersand family.After six years of fund-raising the£1.5m centre opened in March and itsfacilities, dedicated staff andvolunteers and high level of supportfrom the community impressed thePrincess Royal.Unveiling a plaque to mark thecentre’s official opening she said:“You have opened, it is fair to say, torave reviews.”She added she hoped the centrewould inspire other parts of thecountry to open similar facilities.The Princess Royal was shownaround the building by the centre’sambassador, Roberta Lovick, themother of Gorleston-born LouiseHamilton, who died aged 28 fromcancer in 1998.After the visit Mrs Lovick said: “Iwas a bit nervous about meeting her,but she put me at ease very quickly.“She understands the need for acentrelikethisandwasveryinterestedto see what we are doing here.“She understands what care isneeded here and what carers needhere.” When she arrived at the LouiseHamilton Centre the Princes Royalwasgreetedbywell-wishers,includingstaff from the JPH and children fromCliff Park Infant School.On her arrival she was introduced tosenior health figures, including JPHchairman David Wright, JPH chiefexecutive John Stammers, chairmanof Great Yarmouth and WaveneyClinical Commissioning Group, andalso palliative care consultant DrBernadette Auger and Nikki Sawkins,who runs the centre.After the visit Mr Wright said: “Itwas extremely generous of thePrincess Royal to give her time tocome to see us.“Today is a huge boost for the centreand has raised the awareness of whatis going on here and what it is doingin terms of advice, support and care.”During her tour the Princess Royalwas also introduced to the heads oftwo charities involved at the centre,Daniel Williams, chief executive ofthe Big C cancer charity, and JanePetit, chief executive of the StElizabeth Hospice.She then meet volunteers, includingYvonne Rudd, Myra Saunders, RobbieTyler and Mrytle Thompson, beforelistening to a joint performance bythe Carers Choir and Patient Choir.The tour then moved on to theButterfly Wall, where tributes can beleft for much-missed loved ones.At the wall the Princess Royal metvolunteer Eileen Middleton, whoseYarmouth husband Mervyn was aformer police officer who guarded theQueen at Sandringham and drovePrincess Margaret, and who died in2012 from brain tumours.Mrs Middleton and her family haveraised £5,000 for the Louise HamiltonCentre and she was delighted to meetthe Princess Royal.She said: “It was lovely to meet her.She is such a nice lady and was a realpleasure to talk to.”The Princess Royal also meetstalwart fund-raisers Brian Potter,chairman of the Potter Leisure Resortin Hopton, Tremaine Kent, of Belton,near Yarmouth, who ran the FourDeserts Challenge for the centre’sPalliative Care East appeal, and Peterand Margaret Orford who run theFriends charity shop in Lowestoft,which has raised £30,000.The Princess Royal also saw patientJane Carter, 65, from Burgh St Peter,nearBeccles,getreflexologytreatmentfor her motor neurone disease-likecondition.Mrs Carter said: “Coming heremakes a lot of difference. If I just satat home I would be surrounded byfour walls and feel like my whole lifewas closing in.”See pages 40 and 41 of the mainpaper for a feature on the LouiseHamilton Centre.IMPORTANT WORK: The Princess Royal meets members of the cancersupport team.EXCITEMENT: Staff gather for the arrival of the Princess Royal.LOUISE HAMILTON CENTREThe Louise Hamilton Centre, whichinvolves 25 organisations, needs toraise £100,000 a year to run itspalliative care services.For the last six years people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney havebanded together in large numbers toraise funds for the centre’sconstruction in the Palliative CareEast appeal.However one of the main architectsof the appeal, Jenny Watson, wasabsent from yesterday’s visit by thePrincess Royal as she has recentlyleft her post as chief fund-raisingofficer.Yesterday John Hemming, who ischairman of the fund-raising appeal,praised her work over the last sixyears, which saw her attend andhelp organise countless fund-raisingevents and functions to help reachits £1.5m target.Mr Hemming said: “Unfortunatelyshe can not be here today but Iwould like to pay tribute to Jenny’shard work for the appeal.“She worked day and night for theappeal and she deserves all theplaudits possible for what has beenaccomplished.”Describing yesterday’s visit by thePrincess Royal, Mr Hemming, aformer chairman of the James PagetUniversity Hospital, said: “I amdelighted she has come here and Ihope everyone who is here todaywho helped make this centrepossible is as happy as I am.“This centre is going to make ahuge difference to the people ofYarmouth and Waveney.The new fund-raising manager at theLouise Hamilton Centre is MaxineTaylor, from Hopton, who has abackground in banking.She said: I am looking forward tobuilding on Jenny’s work.”Anyone who wants to support thePalliative Care East appeal can visitits website: www.palliative-care-east.org.uk or email palliative-care-east@jpaget.nhs.uk or call 01493453348.TRIBUTES: The Butterfly Wall where tributes can be left for loved ones.Thousands of people came out to welcome thePrincess Royal to the east coast of Norfolkyesterday to visit three local projects whichchange and save lives across the region – EastNorfolk Sixth Form College, the Louise HamiltonCentre at the James Paget University Hospital inGorleston, and the independent Caister lifeboatstation.
  • Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 www.EDP24.co.uk/news PRINCESS ROYAL’S VISIT 3an inspiring care centrePictures: NICK BUTCHERWARM WELCOME: All smiles a the Princess Royal visits the Louise Hamilton Centre at Gorleston yesterday.LEFT:Youngstersfrom BusyBee’s nurserywait for thePrincessRoyal to arriveRIGHT:The PrincessRoyal’s visitmarked thecentre’sofficialopening.
  • 40 FEATURE www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, May 1, 2013Pictures: NICK BUTCHERA beacon of hope anda truly shining legacyCARING: The centre has lots of light and airy areas where patients and carers can chat or relax in a place which is designed as a home from homewhere people understand what they are going through.It’s a splash of sunshine in a sea ofgrey bringing light to people livingthrough their darkest times.The Louise Hamilton Centreopened its doors to the public inMarch, named after the daughter ofits most fervent supporter, tirelessfundraiser Roberta Lovick.Gorleston-born Louise was a pupilat Wroughton and Lynn Groveschools before taking a place atBristol University and graduatingwith a degree in languages.Whenshewas26,shewasdiagnosedwith breast cancer. The diseaseclaimed her life two years later andLouise died, aged just 28.Roberta, who lives in PotterHeigham, cared for her daughter inthe final months of her life and wasinspired by Louise’s experiences at asupportive care and informationservice in Bristol.Aware there was no such serviceavailable for people living withterminal or life-limiting conditionsin Great Yarmouth and Waveney, thePalliative Care East appeal waslaunched in 2006 and reached its£1.5m target last year.Set to benefit at least 10,000 peopleevery year, the dramatic design ofthe building became an instantGorleston landmark and a beacon ofhope for those living throughdifficult times.The egg-yolk yellow roof forms astriking curve which architectsdesigned to resemble an upturnedboat – a nod to the seaside locationof the centre and the notion of an“ark” as a safe place of refuge.A partnership between NHSNorfolk and Waveney, local countycouncils and the voluntary sector,The Louise Hamilton Centre – basedin the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital – brings togethera wide range of organisations thatcan support patients and theirfamilies.Experts can help people through arange of situations, from advice andsupport following diagnosis, duringtreatment and, if necessary, throughto palliative care of any life-limitingor progressive illness.In keeping with the ethos of thecentre, the building itself is floodedwith light, boasts its own “secretgarden” and has an uplifting wallcovered in brightly-colouredbutterflies, each one representing adonation. Counselling and therapyrooms are decorated in relaxing,muted pastel shades and every lastdetail has been carefully considered.The windows in the children’s areahave been lowered so small faces canpeer into the garden. One of thetoilets includes a shower for relativeswho may have travelled a longdistance to visit.Private rooms are a home-from-home rather than cold, clinicalspaces.Every square inch of The LouiseHamilton Centre has been designedwith love. As a lasting legacy, Louisecouldn’t have wished for anythingmore.Nikki Sawkins, is operational leadat the centre and explained that itwas a place where patients and theirfamilies could enjoy a holisticapproach, from practical advice toemotional support, complementarytherapies to support groups, funactivities to bereavementcounselling.“The premise of the centre is builtaround partnerships providingsupportive and palliative care topatients, families, carers and peopleaffected by any life-limiting illnessesor conditions,” she said.“Focusing on carers is extremelyimportant. So often, services aren’ttailored to meet the needs of peoplewho are caring for someone who hasan illness but we are addressing thoseneeds here.“There is a huge range ofinformation and help available tothose living with conditions andthose who care for them in additionto supportive care, practical adviceand complementary therapies.“With our partners, we run coursesthat help people deal with theirfeelings after they’ve finishedtreatment. We have a bereavementservice, support groups, choirs, artgroups and an education programme.We’re working with Nelson’s Journeyto support younger people dealingwith bereavement and have sessionsto help people claim for the benefitsthey’re entitled to.“In essence, people can just walkthrough the door and access a hugerange of services either within thecentre or within the community withoutreach work and services thatwe’re linked to. It’s a one-stop shopfor people when they need help themost.”She added: “If you can supportpeople on their journey, it doesn’tmatter which direction that journeytakes – in the case of those livingwith a terminal diagnosis, the processof dying is as important as the dyingitself. We concentrate on people’squality of life – whether that life islimited by terminal illness or by acondition that limits what they cando. If we help one person, by doingthat we’re probably helping at least10 others around them – there’s aripple effect.“Last week, a family came in wherethe lady had received a terminaldiagnosis and we were able to offerher help, her husband help, herdaughters help and were able tosuggest help for her grandchildren.“She knows that we are here, thatwe will be companions on her journey,however hard that journey is.”Visitors to the centre are greeted ata welcome desk which leads into alarge, communal area filled withcomfortable chairs and sofas wherethey can enjoy tea, coffee and a chatwith the volunteers and healthcareprofessionals on-site.Leading off the central area are aA Norfolk mother hastransformed tragedyinto triumph afterspearheading afundraising campaignin memory of herdaughter which has ledto the opening of apioneering newpalliative care centre.STACIA BRIGGS visitsThe Louise HamiltonCentre and discoversexciting plans for thefuture
  • WHERE TO JOINNorfolk Wildlife Trust: 01603 625540Norfolk and Norwich Naturalists’Society: 01986 894277RSPB (East Anglia): 01603 661662Norfolk Ornithologists’ Association:01485 525406British Trust for Ornithology:01842 750050British Dragonfly Society:0300 060 2338When caught,these littlemammals willteach us a lotAt the moment it’s not just my catthat’s catching small mammals, butalso my daughter, Jen. She’s home fromuniversity at present and running a pilotstudy for her main summer project.Having borrowed a set of Longworthtraps, she’s staked out various locationsin the nearby fields. Most have beensuccessful, but one trap set here in thegarden had to be removed after our catdiscovered how to raid it for an easysnack. I bet that’s one hazard Jen didn’thave noted on her risk assessment.The Longworth traps she’s using aremade of aluminium and consist of twoparts. These parts can fit inside eachother when not in use, so the traps aresimple to carry and store. Once set upthere’s a tunnel at the front that containsthe door tripping mechanism. Beyondthis is a larger compartment forming anest box that provides ample space forfood and bedding material. Thiscombination ensures that the trappedanimal is held securely, but is alsocomfortable until its release.Jen’s first catch was a common shrew,followed by several woodmice and a fieldvole or two. We have three possiblespecies of shrew in Norfolk, all of whichhave pointed noses and tiny eyes. Fairlyeasy to tell apart are the two species ofsmall vole. Bank voles are reddish-brownwith a short tail and field voles aregreyish with an even shorter tail.Woodmice are fairly distinctive and easyto tell apart from their other mousecousins. Each of the caught mammalshas been recorded and then released,with records being made for the Norfolkdatabase, as well as Jen’s own project.Over the summer Jen will be settingout her traps further from home, becausethe main thrust of her studies then willbe to compare the benefits or otherwiseof Higher Level Stewardship schemesagainst more intensive arable practices.She is hoping to show that the presenceof a field margin around a cropped fieldis actually of benefit to small mammals.At the moment we’re not sure if themammals she’s trapping are the sameones time after time or differentindividuals. In the summer she will bemarking those she catches to see if theyreturn to the trap for more free food oravoid it having been caught before. I’mtold the usual way to mark animals thesedays, is to clip a small section of fur.It will be interesting to see her finalconclusions about mammal behaviour,but in the meantime our volume ofmammal records is already increasing.Eastern Daily Press, Wednesday, May 1, 2013 www.EDP24.co.uk/news FEATURE 41PAM TAYLORIN THECOUNTRYSIDEPotter Heighamnewsdesk@archant.co.uknumber of rooms, each named aftera donor, which are used as privatecounselling areas, rooms forbereavement counselling, therapyrooms (a wide range of therapies areavailable, including Reiki,reflexology, massage, aromatherapy,hypnotherapy and Bach Flowerremedies) and a large art and musicroom.Bernadette Auger, palliative careconsultant at the James PagetUniversity Hospital, works on theward and in patients’ homes toprovide palliative care and said thecentre would transform the wayservices were provided.“What this offers us is somewhereto see patients privately – before, wewere borrowing rooms where wecould and they were cold, clinicalrooms, not the warm rooms we havehere,” she said.“It’s also a place where carersreceive care themselves, which isessential. Carers are essential in thepalliative care process and for themto have a place where they canreceive extra help and support iswonderful. The focus here is onliving and having quality time withyour family, being able to have thoseconversations about what you wantto happen in an environment whereeveryone understands.“A place like this makes a difficultdiagnosis less scary. You can comestraight out of hospital and straightintothecentreandyou’resurroundedby people who know exactly whatyou’re going through and know howto help you through it.“As a society, we often try andbrush the idea of dying under thecarpet because it frightens us, but inreality we need to think about it andif we can make talking about deathmore ‘normal’ it would beenormously helpful.”Fundraising for the centre isongoing – the cost of running thebuilding is estimated to be £100,000 ayear – and there are already plans toexpand the centre and add anotherfacet to its services.Behind the centre is a large, barrenpiece of waste ground. But inRoberta’s mind, it’s already beentransformed into a 10-bed hospiceunit where terminally ill patientscan spend their last days.“This is the next stage of theproject, to have an attached hospice,a lovely place where people canspend their last days in anenvironment where they can besurrounded by their family and byprofessionals,” she said.“We’re in the early stages, but I cansee it now. I have great faith and Iknow it’s going to happen.”Dr Auger added: “We see the futurehospice element of the centre as ahugely positive thing: people cominghere will have a home-from-homeenvironment where they aresurrounded by experts who can helpthem in their final days.“At the moment, patients in theirfinal days might be admitted to award where we can deal with theirpain but I’m not so sure we have theresourcestodealwiththeiremotions.Here, we would be able to offer thatextra, specialist support.“This is what palliative care shouldlooklike.Inmyjob,Imeetremarkablepeople who continually impress mewith their attitude, courage and theway they deal with their situation.“We can now offer a service thatreflects that attitude and can supportfamilies and carers. If we get it right,it makes all the difference. We can’tchange what’s happening, but wecan make the very best out of adifficult situation and it makes theworld of difference.”The Louise Hamilton Centre is nextto The James Paget Hospital inGorleston. Opening hours areMonday to Friday, 9.30am to 7.30pm,Saturday to Sunday, 10.30am to3.30pm. For more information,telephone 01493 453100 or visitwww.louisehamiltoncentre.co.uk.Tomorrow: we talk to RobertaLovick about her determination toturn the tragic death of her daughterLouise into a lasting legacy for thepeople of Great Yarmouth andWaveney.We can’tchange what’shappening, butwe can makethe very bestout of adifficultsituationBernadette AugerPOSITIVE:BernadetteAuger insidethe LouiseHamiltonCentre. Shebelieves thatthe centre ishow allpalliativecare shouldbe.
  • 4 www.eveningnews24.co.uk Norwich Evening News Wednesday, May 1, 2013Police bid tocatch fishingtackle burglarPolice have appealed forinformation to help reel in aburglar who stole a large amountof fishing equipment from shedsin the garden of a property in theTaverham area.The victim returned home frombeing away on holiday to find alarge amount of fishingequipment and tackle had beentaken from three sheds in hisgarden. These included poles, rodsand holdalls with many rare itemsamong them.The burglary happenedsometime between noon on Friday,April 19 and 3pm on Tuesday,April 23.Anyone who has knowledge ofthe whereabouts of the fishingtackle or is offered fishing tacklefor sale in suspiciouscircumstances should call police.Contact PC Steven Clarke atAylsham police station on 101 oralternatively call Crimestoppers,anonymously, on 0800 555111.Have you got a crime story for theNorwich Evening News? Call crimereporter Peter Walsh on 01603 772436or email peter.walsh@archant.co.ukFor 110 years the EDP, Evening News andsister papers have been reporting on theCanaries. Now, for the first time, you canre-live the great matches, the cup runs,the derbies, the promotions and muchmuch more through the words andpictures of the time.Every game of the 1958-1959 cup run,1985 Milk Cup, 1993 UEFA Cup run andmuch, much moreOver 150 archive pagesAvailable from Prospect House, NorwichCity FC outlets at Carrow Road, The Mall& Chapelfield and also Jarrold Norwich &Cromer stores.Unique Souvenir for just £10 inc P&P15”x12.5” with full colour pagesAvailable from Prospect House, Norwich City FC outlets atCarrow Road, The Mall & Chapelfield and also Jarrold Norwich& Cromer stores or by visiting www.subscriptionsave.co.uk/ncfciwitness24.co.ukShare your news & picturesKeep up with all the news fromthe Norwich area by followingus on Twitter @eveningnewsSun shines onBlue skies, bright sunshineand enthusiastic studentsgreeted the Princess Royalat East Norfolk Sixth FormCollege.The Gorleston college,which has 1,750 studentsfrom across Norfolk andnorth Suffolk, has spentalmost £5 million expandingits campus in recent yearsand invited the Princess toofficially open its newestbuildings as it celebrates its30th year.After being met on thesteps of the college byMayor of Great Yarmouth,Councillor Colleen Walker,and MP for Great YarmouthBrandon Lewis, the PrincessRoyal was introduced toDaphne King, collegeprincipal, who led her on atour of the campus, fromthe original 1930s buildingto the brand new Poulsonbuilding – named afterformer principal LauriePoulson – and the Gentrybuilding, named afterformer vice principal andex-head of English AnitaGentry.Along the corridors, thePrincess met and spoke withstudents and staff, stoppingto hear about scienceexperiments as well asinteractive computer gamesdesigned by East Norfolkstudents.Later in the morning,music and dance studentsperformed for the Princesswho ended her visit byunveiling plaques tocommemorate her visit andofficially named the newfacilities.“This Royal visit has beena great honour for the wholecommunity of staff,students and governors hereat east Norfolk,” said MrsKing.“Who could haveimagined 30 years ago thatfrom this small unassumingbuilding a college woulddevelop and grow to becomea key player regionally andnationally.“The Princess Royal hasbeen able to sharesomething of what makesthis college such a specialplace and her visit isanother milestone in thecollege’s history.”Lorna Anderson, chair ofthe sixth form’s governors,said: “Our students are thefuture leaders of our societyand they are being given thebest possible opportunity toexcel. We are celebratingour 30th anniversary andthis Royal visit has made ita momentous occasion, andone which will beremembered for many yearsto come.”The Princess then movedon to visit a palliative carecentre for people in theGreat Yarmouth andWaveney areas.Yesterday afternoon thePrincess Royal spent morethan an hour touring theLouise Hamilton Centre inthe grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital(JPH) in Gorleston.During her visit she metthe small army ofWarm welcome: The Princess Royal is presented withflowers at East Norfolk Sixth Form College. Below andmiddle right, the Princess meeting people at theLouise Hamilton centre and top, children with theirflags at Caister lifeboat. PHOTOS: JAMES BASS/NICK BUTCHERThousands ofpeopleturned out towelcome thePrincess Royalto the eastcoast ofNorfolkyesterday.LAURENROGERS andANTHONYCARROLLreport.Visit: The Princess Royal at the LouiseHamilton Supportive and Palliative CareCentre, Gorleston. PHOTO: NICK BUTCHER
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 5Norwich Evening News Wednesday, May 1, 2013Makeover forpost officeDrayton Post Office hasannounced it will open seven daysa week and has been given a new,modern style.The branch in FakenhamRoad reopened on April 27 afterit closed for it’s restyle, and nowhas three serving positions – ascreened counter position and twoopen-plan counters.The change ispart of the Post Office’s plans tomodernise the network.Post Office regional networkmanager for south & eastEngland Mark Lawrence said:“This modernisation is partof a three-year investmentprogramme, the largest in thehistory of the Post Office,that will see about 6,000branches (about half the PostOffice network) converting tonew-style branches. Thisinvestment makes a commitmentto no more branch closureprogrammes.”The new opening hourswill be: Monday to Saturday from7am to 6pm and Sunday from 8amto 1pm.For breaking news visitwww.eveningnews24.co.ukTell us your newsCall our reporters on 07501 481521Have you got a Broads story?Contact Steve Pullinger on 01603 772446or email stephen.pullinger@archant.co.ukroyal visitorvolunteers, staff and fund-raisers who have helpedbuild and run the centre,which hopes to help 25,000people in the Yarmouthand Waveney areas withlife limiting or terminalillnesses and their carersand family.After six years of fund-raising the £1.5m centreopened in March and itsfacilities, dedicated staffand volunteers and highlevel of support from thecommunity impressed thePrincess Royal.Unveiling a plaque tomark the centre’s officialopening she said: “Youhave opened, it is far tosay, to rave reviews.”She added she hoped thecentre would inspire otherparts of the country toopen similar facilities.The Princess Royal wasshown around the buildingby the centre’sambassador RobertaLovick, the mother ofGorleston-born LouiseHamilton, who died aged28 from cancer in 1998.After the visit MrsLovick said: “I was a bitnervous about meetingher, but she put me at easevery quickly. Sheunderstands the need for acentre like this and wasvery interested to see whatwe are doing here.“She understands whatcare is needed here andwhat carers need here.”When she arrived at theLouise Hamilton Centrethe Princes Royal wasgreeted by well-wishers,including staff from theJPH and children fromCliff Park Infant School.On her arrival she wasintroduced to seniorhealth figures, includingJPH chairman DavidWright, JPH chiefexecutive John Stammers,chairman of GreatYarmouth and WaveneyClinical CommissioningGroup, and also palliativecare consultant DrBernadette Auger andNikki Sawkins, who runsthe centre. After the visitMr Wright said: “It wasextremely generous of thePrincess Royal to give hertime to come to see us.“Today is a huge boostfor the centre and hasraised the awareness ofwhat is going on here andwhat it is doing in termsof advice, support andcare.”Princess names new lifeboatThe Princess Royal played avital role when she visitedCaister lifeboat station.Invited to officially name theindependent station’s newinshore lifeboat, the Princesspoured a bottle of champagneover the bow of the Fred Dyble.“Are you sure you want towaste this,” she said, jokingwith Paul Garrod, crew memberand chairman of the CaisterVolunteer Lifeboat Service.The five-metre long inshorelifeboat, named after a lateNorfolk long-shore fishermanand builder who lived in thenearby village of Californiafurther up coast, has been builtto operate in waves of up totwo metres high and reachspeeds of 30 knots.During an hour-long visit tothe station for the boat’s officialdedication service, the PrincessRoyal addressed the crowd,met lifeboat crews, relatives ofFred Dyble and receivedflowers from local girls GraceTurner and Casey Sheales, bothfive. The service of dedicationwas lead by the Very RevGraham Smith, Dean ofNorwich Cathedral, assisted bythe Rev Timothy Thompon,rector of Caister, and the RevAndrew Fielding, Methodistminister.
  • From July to December 2012 The Advertiser, Gt Yarmouth/Gorleston edition, 42,334. www.advertiser24.co.ukTheAdvertiserGREAT YARMOUTH EDITION Advertiser24.co.uk60p where soldWE WILL BEAT ANY QUOTEMisted Units Drafty Windows/Hinges Window Handles &Gaskets Conservatory Repairs, leaking Affordables PricesD UBLE GLAZINGDOCTOR0150253784701493202101TIRED OR WORNCONSERVATORYROOFS?NEW ROOFSFITTEDSAME DAY SERVICELocksmiths New Keys & Cylinder UPVC Doors Dropped andCatching Loose Handles No Call Out ChargePROBABLY GREAT YARMOUTHS NEWESTLARGEST AQUATIC AND REPTILE CENTREand Reptiles Too...MASSIVE DISCOUNTS THIS WEEKEND....Call us on 01493 663775Dont forget to pick up your 5% discount loyalty card in storeUNIT 12 BESSEMER WAY | HARFEYS IND. ESTATEGREAT YARMOUTH NR31 0LXCelebrating our 1st anniversarySUNDAYCARVERY£6.50 Adults £4.95 KidsCARVERY & DESSERT £912 to 5pm - BABY BOWLS FREETHIS SATURDAY KARAOKE7.30-MidnightE. E. GREEN & SON LTD.• MINI • MIDI • MAXI •LARGE •SKIPS FROM ONLY£36.00£36.00Call free now on0800 0556 750(Price dependent on size, location andwaste type -- for a quote please call)Thursday, May 2, 2013Blue skies and bright sunshine greeted thePrincess Royal in the Great Yarmouth areaon Tuesday.She visited and toured East Norfolk SixthForm College, the Louise Hamilton Centreand Caister Lifeboat and was met byenthusiastic crowds and wellwishers.The Gorleston college has spent almost £5mexpanding its campus in recent years andinvited the Princess to officially open itsnewest buildings as it celebrates its 30thyear.The Princess Royal was led on a tour of thecampus by principal Daphne King, and metand spoke to students and staff, stopping tohear about science experiments as well asinteractive computer games designed bystudents.Outside the new buildings, music anddance students performed before the Princessunveiled plaques to commemorate her visitand officially named the modern facilities.A special plaque was unveiled by thePrincess at the end of her tour of the LouiseHamilton palliative care centre for people inthe Great Yarmouth and Waveney areasat theJames Paget Hospital.During her visit she met the small army ofvolunteers, staff and fundraisers who havehelped build and run the centre, which hopesto help 25,000 people in the Yarmouth andWaveney areas with life limiting or terminalillnesses and their carers and family.After six years of fund-raising the £1.5mcentre opened in March and its facilities,dedicated staff and volunteers and high levelof support from the community impressedthe Princess Royal.The Princess’ final visit was to CaisterLifeboat where she officially named theindependent station’s new inshore lifeboat.The five-metre boat, which can reach speedsof 30 knots, has been named Fred Dyble afterthe late Norfolk long-shore fisherman andbuilder who lived in nearby California.During an hour-long visit to the station, thePrincess spoke to supporters and met withlifeboat crews. Hundreds of children fromlocal nurseries, schools and scouting groupswaved Union flags to welcome her.See tomorrow’s Great YarmouthMercury for full reports and morepictures, as well as a special 16-pagecommemorative supplement of thePrincess Royal’s visit to the LouiseHamilton Centre.Sunshine and smilesgreet Princess RoyalROYAL VISITOR: The Princess Royal visitingCaister Lifeboat Station.Picture: JAMES BASSBy Anne Edwardsanne.edwards@archant.co.uk
  • SPRING SALE NOW ONSave up to 60% on top brand name bedsWhen you are looking to selecta bed, we can assist you with:Choice of quality beds & mattresses from stockChoice of size, choice of firmnessExtensive range of pine,metal bedsteads and bunksFree deliveryFree disposal of your old bedFree parking at doorCelebrating 27YEARSWorld of BedsCurtis Road | Norwich01603 483636WORLDOF BEDSAYLSHAMRDCURTISRDMILE CROSS LANECROMERRDREEPHAMRDBy ADAM GRETTONHealth correspondentParents were last night urged to get theirchildren immunised after it emerged that morethan 11,000 children across Norfolk, Suffolkand Cambridgeshire have not been vaccinatedagainst measles.The head of public health in Norfolk warnedthat nothing was stopping a major outbreak inthe region because not enough people hadreceived the MMR jab.A national catch-up programme to increasevaccination uptake in children and teenagershas been launched to prevent the spread of thecontagious disease, which has resulted in morethan 500 cases across England this year, with100 people hospitalised.More than 1,000 cases have been reported inthe Swansea area of Wales.Public health officials have now called onparents to get their children protected after itemerged that an estimated 7,924 10 to 16-year-olds in Norfolk and Suffolk had not receivedthe MMR vaccine to protect them againstmeasles, mumps and rubella. A further 9,818Health chiefs’ bid to increase vaccination uptakeTURN TO PAGE TWONEWSFormer Canaries starhails fans ahead ofSaturday’s big matchPAGE 20WEATHER 6UK & WORLD NEWS 8-11LOTTERY RESULTS 8CONTACT US 12LETTERS 36-37ANNOUNCEMENTS 40BUSINESS 42-43CLASSIFIEDS 59--62FUEL VOUCHER 41SPORT 63-72 www. 24.co.ukMMR APPEALTO PARENTSPicture: NICK BUTCHERVISION: Roberta Lovick at the new palliative care centre at Gorleston named in memory of her daughter, Louise Hamilton. In an interviewwith the EDP’s Stacia Briggs, Roberta talks about how breast cancer has affected her family and the legacy of love that the centre hascome to represent.How new palliativecare centre will stand asa legacy of love – PAGES 38-39event03.05.13-10.05.13Great 24-page listings magazineDon’t miss our Event guide – packed with ideas for the week aheadTHE COUNTRY’S BIGGEST-SELLING REGIONAL MORNING NEWSPAPERThursday, May 2, 201370pSee more onwww.mustardtv.co.uk
  • 38 FEATURE www.EDP24.co.uk/news Eastern Daily Press, Thursday, May 2, 2013New centrewill standas legacyof loveAs Roberta Lovick walks aroundthe palliative care centre namedafter her daughter Louise, the prideradiates from every pore: throughtragic loss, an incredible legacy hasbeen created.Gorleston-born Louise Hamiltonwas working as a translator inBristol when she received adevastating breast cancer diagnosis.She died two years later, aged just28.The Louise Hamilton Centre, basedin the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital, stands as atribute to a remarkable youngwoman and her equally remarkablemother, who refused to be consumedby despair, preferring to channel hergrief into a project which willliterally transform thousands oflives.After years of tireless fundraising,Roberta’s vision of a centre wherepeople with terminal or life-limitingconditions and their families canreceive help, support and care underone roof has become reality. AndRoberta, (pictured below), just can’tstop smiling. “I smile all the timewhen I’m here because it’s happened,it’s here, it’s real and Louise wouldhave loved it so much,” she said.“I knew, right from the verybeginning, that the centre would bebuilt, but I wasn’t sure how it wouldhappen or when it would happen.“We can’t thank the people whohave donated money enough. Therearen’t enough words to explain whatthey have achieved.”Breast cancer is anunwelcome yetfamiliar enemyto Louise’sfamily: hergrandmotherDoreenSaggers haslost twosisters, twoaunts, aniece andLouise to thedisease andis still underhospital careherself afterbeing diagnosedwith breastcancerseveralyearsago.“We’ve lost so many members ofour family to breast cancer and Iwanted to be the voice that they nolonger have, trying to make thingsbetter for other people coping withillness,” said Roberta.Her mother added: “I thought Iwould be on the other side beforethis centre opened but I’m still hereand I am so proud of my daughterand what she’s achieved.”Roberta, who ran a vintage clothesshop, Grandma’s Wardrobe, in GreatYarmouth for 21 years, was herdaughter Louise’s carer whenshe became very ill and waswith her until the end.“Louise was veryintelligent, very fun-loving – everyone thatknew Louise loved her.When she became ill,there was some supportavailable but therewasn’t anything aswonderful as thiscentre,” she said.“When Louise was ill, Iwas always looking foranswers and not having oneplace to visit where I couldfind those answersmeant that I lost alot of precioustime, time whenI could havebeen withLouise.“I am notapportioningblame: it was a while ago and that’sthe way the system was for us, but itoffers me a great deal of peace toknow that we can offer that help topeople so they don’t have to gothrough something similar.“I want what happened to Louise tohave mattered, to have made adifference.“I can’t explain to you just what adifference a unit like this would havemade to Louise in the final months ofher life.“It would have allowed us to live lifeto the full and I might have had theinformation I needed so that Louisecould have died at home, in hersurroundings and not the way shehad to go.“I lost Louise in an Accident andEmergency unit on a busy Fridaynight in Bristol. It wasn’t what shewould have wanted and it certainlywasn’t what I wanted, but that’s whathappened.“I’m not a ‘why me?’ person, I’m a‘why not me?’ person. I think that inany situation if you can learn from itthenyouhavetotakethatopportunity.I think as a family we did what wecould for Louise although I still livewith the guilt about her dying inA&E.“I felt that everything about Louise’sjourney was so negative that I wantedto turn it into something positive – itwas an important mission for me andI knew I’d never give up until I sawmy dream fulfilled. I wanted Louise’slife and death to have counted, tohave had a purpose.”The seeds of an idea formed in themonths following Louise’s death andin 2006, fundraising began throughthe Palliative Care Appeal to build aspecial centre for the people of GreatYarmouth and Waveney.The centre provides much-neededinformation and supportive care forpeople who need advice and supportfrom diagnosis, during treatment,into survivorship or through topalliative care of any life-limiting orprogressive illness. It also supportsfamilies and carers.Louise’s death has, said Roberta,transformed her life. She used to beshy, retiring and a ‘background’person’, but now she stands on anational platform to talk to healthprofessionals about palliative care.“She wouldn’t recognise me now,”laughs Roberta, “she’d never havethought that I could become theperson that I am today – she’d neverbelieve that I was here today, havingmy picture taken and talking to youbecause that wasn’t what I was like.“When she was ill, she shocked mewhen she told me that if she wasspared, she would give up herbrilliant job and concentrate oncancer patients and their needs,because she recognised more neededto be done.“When she passed away, I felt that Ihad to do something: I had a choice,to wallow in grief or to use that griefto make something good happen. Ichose to do something. I’m so glad Idid.”Louise, Roberta explained, hadwanted to create a directory forpeople living with cancer where theycould access all the information theyneeded in one, simple to use book.“I wondered if that was what Ishould do, but I decided that whatwas really needed was a centre forpeople to visit, a bit like the BristolIt’s a heartfelt gift froma mother to herdaughter and from acommunity to thepeople within it. TheLouise HamiltonCentre in Gorlestonofficially opened thisweek. STACIABRIGGS spoke toRoberta Lovick aboutthe legacy of love thathas ensured herdaughter’s name willlive on
  • Eastern Daily Press, Thursday, May 2, 2013 www.EDP24.co.uk/news FEATURE 39WHERE TO JOINNorfolk Wildlife Trust: 01603 625540Norfolk and Norwich Naturalists’Society: 01986 894277RSPB (East Anglia): 01603 661662Norfolk Ornithologists’ Association:01485 525406British Trust for Ornithology:01842 750050British Dragonfly Society:0300 060 2338A longer thanusual wait fordamselfliesI can’t remember a year like it, at leastnot since I started paying attention todragonflies. Never before can I recallhaving to wait until mid-April for thefirst large red damselfly to be spottedanywhere in Britain and then anotherfive days until the second was seen.At times we wondered if the winterchill would ever end.Most years the first Norfolk recordcomes in the second or third week ofApril, but there are usually at least oneor two species on the wing soon after thestart of month in southern counties ofEngland. In some years, one or twodamselflies further to the south evensneak out before the end of March.Back in 2007, the first Norfolk recordcame earlier than expected on April 7from my own garden pond. The earlystart was short-lived though, with cool,damp weather soon bringing a pause tothe season and the rest of the summerfollowing its normal pattern.The next three years were fairlyunremarkable, but then in 2011 therewas a similarly early start to recordingin Norfolk. The first large red damselflyto be seen in the county again appearedfrom my own garden pond, this time onApril 6. The early start was sustained onthis occasion and most springtimespecies emerged earlier than expectedfor the next two months.Strangely, this abundant start to thedragonfly season in 2011 led to a lull inthe middle of the summer and adisappointing autumn. Last year, by wayof contrast, was a bit of a disaster acrossthe UK, but a reasonable season here inNorfolk. Although our summer waswetter than average, we had enoughsunny spells in between the rain fordragonflies to survive, but evenelsewhere some species didn’t fare toobadly. It’s possible the weather was moreoff-putting to dragonfly recorders than itwas to the dragonflies themselves!This year the first record for the UKwas also the first record for Norfolk. Afemale large red damselfly was seen andphotographed in a garden in Costesseyon April 14. We had to wait until the 19thfor a second to be seen in Cornwall.It’s far too early to tell what effect thelong cold winter will have on ourdragonflies, but hopefully most won’temerge until there are plenty of smallerinsects for them to feed on.If you do spot any dragonflies ordamselflies this year and you canidentify them with confidence, pleaseenter your sightings on the BritishDragonfly Society website or contact mevia the details on the website for arecording form.PAM TAYLORIN THECOUNTRYSIDEPotter Heighamnewsdesk@archant.co.ukPictures: NICK BUTCHERWELCOMING: Far left, the interiorof the Louise Hamilton Centre inthe grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital. Top, RobertaLovick, right, and Dr BernadetteAuger. Above, Louise Hamilton,for whom the centre is named.Left, the Princess Royal, whovisited the centre on Tuesday forthe official opening.Cancer Help Centre where Louisewas given some help,” she said.“A year or so after we launched theappeal I was contacted to help createa directory for people with cancer, soLouise’s wish did happen after all,which was lovely. We got thedirectory and the centre.“I love the fact that we can helpcarers as well as people who are ill. Ioften say that I should have beengiven an Oscar when I was caringfor Louise: people would ask if I wasOK and I’d say: ‘I’m fine!’ wheninside I was screaming.”The centre, which startedwelcoming visitors in March andwas officially opened by the PrincessRoyal on Tuesday this week, offers ahuge range of services, taking aholistic approach to care.“The whole concept of the centre isto help people to live their lives andenjoy their lives even though theymay have limited time. It’s aboutmaking the good times last longerand approaching the bad times head-on to make them easier for everyoneto deal with,” said Roberta, who livesin Potter Heigham. “What peopleoften do after a diagnosis is surf theinternet alone and find informationthat’s not really applicable to themand which frightens them.“Here, they can access a hugerange of information and be guidedthrough the right information by aprofessional.“If someone does die, I often saythat it can feel like a doublebereavement to carers because theylose their loved one and they lose thepeople who have supported them,who were their safety net when theyneeded help. Here, there’s no timelimit for grief – we can talk to people,give them ‘permission’ to talk aboutthe person they’ve lost, let themknow they’re never alone.“It may sound strange, but myfavourite room in the building is thetoilet and shower. Having spent fourdays and nights with my mother-in-law when she was in hospital, I couldhave done with somewhere to comefor a quick freshen-up, shower and acup of tea.“I asked ‘when Princess Anne comes,can I show her my loo?!’”Having such a time-consuming andall-encompassing project has, saidRoberta, helped deal with the achinggap left by the loss of her daughter,along with support from her familyand her faith.“I couldn’t live my life withoutfaith. I’ve had so many dramas inmy life and I’ve come out on theother side with a smile because ofmy faith. I’ve never felt bitter,” shesaid.“I feel Louise is with me all theway, whether I’m giving a speech orhaving a cup of tea, fundraising orhaving a chat, I always feel she’s bymy side.“I’m really not frightened of deathat all. I’ve bought my plot – next toLouise – and my Mum has boughtthe plot next to us so we’re ready!We’ve talked about it, too. It’s a loteasier to talk about death whenyou’re well than when you’re ill.“When the centre officially opened,I rang my Mum and said I want to dosomething for Louise, I want to wearher shoes when I walk in for the firsttime so that the first steps in thecentre are hers. I said to her: ‘am Icrazy?’ and she burst into tears andsaid: ‘I think it’s lovely’.“I just feel that you can’t lovesomeone as much as I loved Louiseand think that they’ve just gone.“She’s here. She’s with me all thetime. I am certain of it.”The Louise Hamilton Centre is nextto The James Paget Hospital inGorleston. Opening hours areMonday to Friday, 9.30am to 7.30pm,Saturday to Sunday, 10.30am to3.30pm. For more information,telephone 01493 453100 or visitwww.louisehamiltoncentre.co.ukI had a choice,to wallow ingrief or to usethat grief tomakesomethinggood happen.Roberta Lovick
  • Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, May 3, 2013 3Princess Royal visit Louise Hamilton CentreMercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, May 3, 2013 1OfficialOpeningof theLouiseHamiltonCentre byHRH ThePrincessRoyal16-page SOUVENIR SUPPLEMENTINSIDE:A 16-pageSPECIALSUPPLEMENTFREEwith yourGreatYarmouthMercuryA palliative care centrefor people in the GreatYarmouth and Waveneyareas received the royalseal of approval from thePrincess Royal.On Tuesday afternoon thePrincess Royal spent morethan an hour touring theLouise Hamilton Centre inthe grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital(JPH).During her visit shemeet the small army ofvolunteers, staff and fund-raisers who have helpedbuild and run the centre,which hopes to help 25,000people in the Yarmouthand Waveney areas withlife limiting or terminalillnesses and their carersand family.After six years of fund-raising the £1.5m centreopened in March and itsfacilities, dedicated staffand volunteers and highlevel of support from thecommunity impressed thePrincess Royal.Unveiling a plaque tomark the centre’s officialopening she said: “You haveopened, it is far to say, torave reviews.”She added she hoped thecentre would inspire otherparts of the country to opensimilar facilities.The Princess Royal wasshown around the buildingby the centre’s ambassadorRoberta Lovick, motherof Gorleston-born LouiseHamilton, who died aged 28from cancer in 1998.After the visit Mrs Lovicksaid: “I was a bit nervousabout meeting her, butshe put me at ease veryquickly.“She understands theneed for a centre like thisand was very interested tosee what we are doing here.“She understands whatcare is needed here andwhat carers need here.”When she arrived at thecentre the Princess Royalwasgreetedbywell-wishers,including staff from theJPH and children from CliffPark Infant School and BusyBees childcare centre.On her arrival she wasintroduced to senior healthfigures, including JPHchairman David Wright andJohn Stammers, chairmanof Great Yar mouthand Waveney ClinicalCommissioning Group andthe group’s chief executiveAndy Evans, palliative careconsultant Dr BernadetteAuger and Nikki Sawkins,who runs the centre.During her tour ThePrincess Royal was alsointroduced to the heads oftwo charities involved atthe centre, Daniel Williams,chief executive of the BigC cancer charity and JanePetit, chief executive of theSt Elizabeth Hospice.She then meet volunteers,including Yvonne Rudd,Myra Saunders, RobbieTylerandMrytleThompson,before listening to a jointperformance by the CarersChoir and Patient Choir.The tour then moved onto the Butterfly Wall, wheretributes can be left formissed loved ones.At the wall, the PrincessRoyal met volunteerEileen Middleton, whoseYa r m o u t h h u s b a n dMervyn, a former policeofficer who guarded theQueen at Sandringham anddrove Princess Margaret.He died in 2012 from braintumours. Mrs Middletonand her family have raised£5,000 for the centre and shewas delighted to meet thePrincess.She said: “It was lovely tomeet her. She is such a nicelady and was a real pleasureto talk to.”The Princess Royal alsomet stalwart fundraisersBrian Potter, chairman ofPotter Leisure Resort inHopton, and Tremaine Kentof Belton who ran the FourDeserts Challenge for thecentre’s appeal.Mr Potter said: “If one hasthe financial opportunity tosupport a local initiativethat so many local peoplehave taken to their ownhearts then surely there canbe no finer way.”The Princess Royal alsosaw patient Jane Carter,65, from Burgh St Peter, getreflexology treatment forher motor neurone disease-like condition.Mrs Carter said: “Cominghere makes a lot ofdifference. If I just sat athome I would be surroundedby four walls and feel mywhole life was closing in.”The Louise HamiltonCentre, which involves 25organisations, needs toraise £100,000 a year to runits palliative care services.For the last six yearspeople in Great Yarmouthand Waveney have bandedtogether in large numbers toraise funds for the centre’sconstruction through thethe Palliative Care Eastappeal.However one of the mainarchitects of the appeal,Jenny Watson, was absenton Tuesday due to holiday.She has recently left herpost as chief fund-raisingofficer.During the visit JohnHemming, chairman of thefund-raising appeal, praisedher work over the last sixyears, which saw her attendand help organise countlessfund-raising events andfunctions to help reach the£1.5m target.Describing the visitof the Princess Royal ,Mr Hemming, a formerchairman of the JamesPaget University Hospital,said: “I am delighted shehas come here and I hopeeveryone who is here todaywho helped make thiscentre possible is as happyas I am.“This centre is going tomake a huge difference tothe people of Yarmouth andWaveney.The new fund-raisingmanager at the LouiseHamilton Centre is MaxineTaylor, from Hopton andwho has a background inbanking.She said: I am lookingforward to building onJenny’s work.”Anyone who wants tosupport the Palliative CareEast appeal can visit itswebsite www.palliative-care-east.org.uk or emailpalliative-care-east@jpaget.nhs.uk or call 01493 453348.Princess gives centreroyal seal of approvalanthony.carroll@archant.co.ukBy ANTHONY CARROLLVISITOR: HRH The PrincessRoyal visit to the LouiseHamilton Centre, Gorleston, left,The Princess signs the visitorsbook.
  • 4 Friday, May 3, 2013 The Journal online: www.lowestoftjournal24.co.ukRoad crash:man soughtPolice are hunting a man who causeda three-car crash in south Lowestoft.The man – who was walking a dog – issaid to have stepped out in front ofoncoming traffic in Tom Crisp Wayat about 7.40pm last Thursday. Anumber of drivers to had to performemergency stops, causing threevehicles to collide with each other.A Suffolk police spokesman said:“Fortunately, no-one was seriouslyhurt, but one driver suffered minorinjuries.” The man, who was white,walked off in the direction of LaxfieldWay, heading towards Long Road, andfailed to stop at the scene.Anyone with information on theincident should contact PC 1519Cudmore at Lowestoft police on 101.Man chargedA 31-year-old man has been chargedwith threatening to cause criminaldamage or destroy property afterallegedly making a threat to petrol-bomb a home in north Lowestoft.Thomas Mullholland, of MontgomeryAvenue, Lowestoft, was arrested bypolice after allegedly threatening toburn down the house in Gunton onTuesday, April 23. Mullholland isdue to answer the charge when heappears at Lowestoft Magistrates’Court on Tuesday, May 14Tutorial helpYoungsters with literacy andnumeracy problems are beingoffered support at a weekly tutorialgroup in Pakefield. The group meetsfrom 10.30am to 12pm on Saturdaysin term time at the church hall inSunningdale Avenue. The tutors areall special needs teachers with CRBcover. For information and details onfees, ring Sue Plant on 01502 588963.Winning fiveThe five winners of our GreatYarmouth Racecourse Competitionwere: Nathan Warne, of GreenacreCrescent, Lowestoft; Mark Taylor,of Beechwood Gardens, Lowestoft;Barry Layton, of Keel Close, CarltonColville; David Cross, of WorthingRoad, Lowestoft; and Bernie Guymer,of Briar Close, Lowestoft.Cooker fireFirefighters were called to a cookerblaze at a terraced house StanfordStreet, Lowestoft at 7.42am onMonday. Crews from Lowestoft Southand Lowestoft North fire stationsspent about 30 minutes tackling theblaze, which was caused when a hobwas turned on accidentally. No-onewas injured in the incident.Shop burgledA 20-year-old man from Lowestofthas been arrested after a burglaryat a shop in High Street on Tuesdayevening in which fishing equipmentwas stolen. He has been bailed untilJune 13, pending further inquiries.Gorse blazeFirefighters were called to a blaze ina patch of gorse and undergrowthon Gunton Cliffs at about 2.15pm onWednesday. The fire, which is believedto have been started deliberately, wasunder control by 2.56pm.The Louise Hamilton Centre,which involves 25 organisations,needs to raise £100,000 a yearto run its palliative care services.For the last six years people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveneyhave banded together in largenumbers to raise funds for thecentre’s construction in thePalliative Care East appeal.However, one of the mainarchitects of the appeal,Jenny Watson, pictured,was absent at Tuesday’svisit by the PrincessRoyal as she recentlyleft her post as chieffund-raising officer.During the visit John Hemming,who is chairman of the fund-raising appeal, praised her workover the last six years, whichsaw her attend and helporganise countless fund-raising events andfunctions to helpreach its £1.5mtarget.Mr Hemming said:“Unfortunately shecan not be heretoday but I wouldlike to pay tributeto Jenny’s hardwork for the appeal. She workedday and night for the appeal andshe deserves all the plauditspossible for what has beenaccomplished.”The new fund-raising manager atthe Louise Hamilton Centre isMaxine Taylor, from Hopton, whohas a background in banking. Shesaid: I am looking forward tobuilding on Jenny’s work.”Anyone who wants to supportthe appeal can call 01493453348, visit its website www.palliative-care-east.org.uk oremail palliative-care-east@jpaget.nhs.ukNew care centre winsroyal seal of approvalanthony.carroll@archant.co.ukBy ANTHONY CARROLLThe new palliative care centre forpeople in the Waveney and GreatYarmouth areas was given a royalseal of approval this week.OnTuesday,thePrincessRoyalspentmore than an hour touring the LouiseHamilton Centre in the grounds ofthe James Paget University Hospitalin Gorleston.During her visit, she meet the smallarmy of volunteers, staff and fund-raisers who have helped build andrun the centre, which aims to offerhelp to 25,000 people with life-limitingor terminal illnesses and providesupport to their carers and family.After six years of fund-raising,backed by hundreds of people inWaveney and Great Yarmouth, the£1.5m centre opened in March andits facilities, dedicated staff andvolunteers and high level of supportfrom the community impressed thePrincess.Unveiling a plaque to mark thecentre’s official opening, she said:“You have opened, it is fair to say, torave reviews.”She said she hoped the centre wouldinspire other parts of the country toopen similar facilities.The Princess Royal was shownaround the building by the centre’sambassador Roberta Lovick, themother of Gorleston-born LouiseHamilton, who died, aged 28, fromcancer in 1998.Afterthevisit,MrsLovicksaid:“Sheunderstands the need for a centrelike this and was very interestedto see what we are doing here. Sheunderstands what care is needed hereand what carers need here.”On her arrival she was introducedto senior health figures, including thehospital’s chairman David Wright,John Stammers, chairman of GreatYarmouth and Waveney ClinicalCommissioning Group, palliativecare consultant Dr Bernadette Augerand Nikki Sawkins, who runs thecentre.After the visit Mr Wright said:“It was extremely generous of thePrincess Royal to give her time tocome to see us. Today is a hugeboost for the centre and has raisedthe awareness of what is going onhere and what it is doing in terms ofadvice, support and care.”During her tour, the princess wasalso introduced to the heads of twocharities involved at the centre– Daniel Williams, chief executiveof the Big C cancer charity, andJane Petit, chief executive of the StElizabeth Hospice.She also met stalwart fund-raisersBrian Potter, chairman of PottersLeisure Resort in Hopton, Peterand Margaret Orford, who run theFriends charity shop in Lowestoft,which has raised £30,000, and ZoiyarCole and Janet Ellis, from Pakefield,who have raised hundreds of poundsfor charity through the Paul ColeCancer Fund.The fund was set up in memoryof Zoiyar’s son, who died from livercancer in 1999 aged just 35. Two roomsat the Louise Hamilton centre havebeen named in memory of Paul.Mrs Ellis said: “It was an absolutehonour to meet her. We were standingin the corridor outside the Paul Coleroom and you could hear the twochoirs. She was very pleasant, reallylovely.“We would like to thank all thepeople who have supported the fundover the years. We will carry on withthe fund-raising and we must make£300,000 – that’s our next target.”The Princess Royal also paid a visitto East Norfolk Sixth Form College inGorleston on Tuesday, and Lowestoftstudent Erin Lewis was on hand toperform for her.Erin, 17, was one of 11 dancestudents who performed outside thecollege’s new cafeteria block for theprincess, who had been invited to thesixth form to officially open its newbuildings.Erin said the dancers hadchoreographed the routine togetherand set it to a song written andperformed by fellow student KatieRoddis.SMILINGPRINCESS:The PrincessRoyal is shownround the newLouise Hamiltonpalliative carecentre. She saidthe centre hadopened to ‘ravereviews’ andshe hoped itwould inspireother parts ofthe country toopen similarcentres.Pictures: NICKBUTCHERTributes paid to work of appeal’s hard-working fund-raiser
  • OfficialOpeningof theLouiseHamiltonCentre byHRH ThePrincessRoyal16-page SOUVENIR SUPPLEMENT
  • SUNDAYCARVERY£6.50 Adults £4.95 KidsCARVERY & DESSERT £912 to 5pm - BABY BOWLS FREETHIS SATURDAY KARAOKE7.30-Midnight2 Friday, May 3, 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalA royal day: Theofficialopening of theLouise HamiltonCentre and a visitfrom the PrincessRoyal caused quitea stir with peoplegathering excitedlybefore the event.Pictures: NICKBUTCHER
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 3Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalRoyal approval for a caring centreRoyal approval: The Princess Royal is shown the Butterfly Wall where tributes can be leftto loved ones. She said she hoped the Louise Hamilton Centre would inspire other parts ofthe country to open similar centres. Pictures: NICK BUTCHERlauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERSA palliative care centre for people inthe Great Yarmouth and Waveneyareas received the royal seal ofapproval from the Princess Royal.The Princess toured the LouiseHamilton Centre in the grounds ofthe James Paget University Hospitalin Gorleston on Tuesday.During her visit she met the smallarmy of volunteers, staff and fund-raisers who have helped build andrun the centre, which hopes to help25,000 people in the Yarmouth andWaveney areas affected by life-limiting or terminal illnesses.After six years of fund-raising,the £1.5m centre opened in Marchand its facilities, dedicated staff andvolunteers and high level of supportfrom the community impressed thePrincess Royal.Unveiling a plaque to mark thecentre’s official opening, she said:“You have opened, it is fair to say, torave reviews.”She added she hoped the centrewould inspire other parts of thecountry to open similar facilities.The Princess was shown aroundthe building by the centre’sambassador Roberta Lovick, themother of Gorleston-born LouiseHamilton, who died, aged 28, frombreast cancer in 1998.When she arrived at the LouiseHamilton Centre, the PrincessRoyal was greeted by well-wishers,including staff from the JPH andchildren from Cliff Park InfantSchool.She was introduced to seniorhealth figures, including hospitalchairman David Wright and JohnStammers, chairman of GreatYarmouth and Waveney ClinicalCommissioning Group, and thegroup’s chief executive Andy Evans,as well as palliative care consultantDr Bernadette Auger and NikkiSawkins, centre manager.During her tour the Princess Royalwas introduced to the heads oftwo charities who offer help fromthe centre; Daniel Williams, chiefexecutive of the Big C cancer charityand Jane Petit, chief executive ofthe St Elizabeth Hospice.She meet volunteers at the centre,including Yvonne Rudd, MyraSaunders, Robbie Tyler and MyrtleThompson, before listening to a jointperformance by the Carers Choirand Patient Choir.The tour then moved on to theButterfly Wall, where tributes can beleft for much-missed loved ones.At the wall the Princess Royal metvolunteer Eileen Middleton, whosehusband Mervyn, a former policeofficer who guarded the Queen atSandringham and drove PrincessMargaret, died in 2012 from braintumours.Mrs Middleton and her family fromYarmouth have raised £5,000 for theLouise Hamilton Centre.The Princess met stalwart fund-raisers Brian Potter, chairmanof the Potters Leisure Resort inHopton, Tremaine Kent, of Belton,who ran the Four Deserts Challengefor the centre’s Palliative Care Eastappeal, and patient Jane Carter, 65,from Burgh St Peter, who receivesreflexology treatment for her motorneurone disease-like condition at thecentre.The Louise Hamilton Centre,which involves 25 organisations,needs to raise £100,000 a year to runits palliative care services.For the last six years people inGreat Yarmouth and Waveney havebanded together in large numbersto raise funds for the centre’sconstruction in the Palliative CareEast appeal.You have opened, itis fair to say, to ravereviews.“– The Princess RoyalApril, 30, 2013
  • 4 Friday, May 3, 201301502 717718www.elloughparkraceway.co.ukE L L O U G H P A R KNEW KARTS 390ccBritish Championship CircuitCorporate Events Stag & Hen PartiesExtreme Packages Karting Leagues & RacesBirthdays & Children’s Karting Owner DriversDo something Memorable this year!Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalMeetingpeople: It wasa proud day foreveryoneconnected withthe LouiseHamiltonCentre whenthe PrincessRoyal visited andtoured the newbuilding.Pictures: NICKBUTCHER
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 5Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalProud day: The Princess Royal is taken round thenew Louise Hamilton Centre. Pictures: NICK BUTCHER
  • 6 Friday, May 3, 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalA remarkable womanwho inspired all thisLouise Hamilton: Her name will live on in a centre designed to offer people care, supportand information as they deal with serious illness.Louise Hamilton was born inGorleston in 1969.She was a pupil at Wroughtonand Lynn Grove schools before shewent to Bristol University to studylanguages.Fun-loving and intelligent, shewas 26 years old and working as atranslator in Bristol when she foundout she had breast cancer. She diedtwo years later in 1998, aged just 28.While living with the disease,Louise found support at a cancerhelp centre in Bristol – support thatpartly inspired her mother, RobertaLovick, to campaign for betterfacilities on the east coast.She was also inspired bysomething Louise said during thosefinal months. “When she was ill, sheshocked me when she told me thatif she was spared, she would giveup her brilliant job and concentrateon cancer patients and their needs,because she recognised more neededto be done,” said Mrs Lovick.Louise wanted to create a directoryfor people living with cancer wherethey could access all the informationthey needed in a simple-to-use book.“I wondered if that was what Ishould do, but I decided that whatwas really needed was a centre forpeople to visit, a bit like the BristolCancer Help Centre where Louisewas given some help,” she said.Not long after the Palliative CareEast appeal launched in Norfolk,Mrs Lovick was contacted to helpcreate a directory for people withcancer – Louise’s wish came true.When it was revealed in 2012 thatthe Palliative Care East-fundedcentre would be named afterLouise after a public consultation,Mrs Lovick said: “It was just soemotional finding out the centrewould be named after Louise.“I’m very touched that so manypeople put her name forward.“It was my dream to have thiskind of service locally and now it’salmost hard to believe it’s actuallyhappening.”Now it is here, the Louise HamiltonCentre stands as a tribute to aremarkable young woman and herdetermined mother.“When Louise was ill, I was alwayslooking for answers and not havingone place to visit where I could findthose answers meant that I lost alot of precious time, time when Icould have been with Louise,” saidMrs Lovick. “I want what happenedto Louise to have mattered, tohave made a difference. The wholeconcept of the centre is to helppeople to live their lives and enjoytheir lives even though they mayhave limited time. It’s about makingthe good times last longer andapproaching the bad times head-onto make them easier for everyone todeal with.”The Louise Hamilton Centre isin the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital in Gorleston.Opening hours are Monday toFriday, 9.30am to 7.30pm, Saturday toSunday, 10.30am to 3.30pm. For moreinformation, telephone 01493 453100or visit www.louisehamiltoncentre.co.uk.I want what happenedto Louise to havemattered, to havemade a difference...“– Roberta Lovick,Louise’s mumlauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERS
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 7Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalAfter all thefund-raising,Roberta justcould notstop smilingLouise’s mum Roberta Lovick: “When she became ill, there was some support available but there wasn’t anythingas wonderful as this centre.” Picture: JAMES BASSWhen her daughter Louisewas diagnosed with breastcancer, Roberta Lovick couldnot forsee the journey ahead.After Louise died, at just 28,Roberta became a leadinglight and dedicated supporterof the Palliative Care EastAppeal.Today, she is an ambassadorfor the centre named in herdaughter’s honour.She takes comfort inknowing what a differencewhat is on offer at theLouise Hamilton Centre willmake to thousands uponthousands of people whoface the prospect of beingso painfully separated fromloved ones.In December last year– six years after the appealbegan – Roberta, of PotterHeigham, visited the centrein Gorleston for the firsttime.She wore a pair of herdaughter’s shoes so thosefirst steps would be Louise’s.“My face is aching fromsmiling,” said Mrs Lovick asshe walked through the doors– overwhelmed and overjoyedat how far they had come.“I’m just so grateful to all thepeople who worked so hard tomake it possible.“It’s what I’ve alwayswished for the people of thisarea.“We’ve got a wonderfulbuilding, but it’s not onlythe building, it is what willhappen inside.”It is no wonder that afteryears of tireless fund-raising,Roberta can’t stop smiling.“I smile all the timewhen I’m here because it’shappened, it’s here, it’s realand Louise would have lovedit so much,” she said.“I knew, right from the verybeginning, that the centrewould be built, but I wasn’tsure how it would happen orwhen it would happen.”Breast cancer is anunwelcome yet familiarenemy to Roberta’s family.Her grandmother, DoreenSaggers, has lost two sisters,two aunts, a niece and Louiseto the disease and is stillunder hospital care herselfafter being diagnosed withbreast cancer several yearsago.“We’ve lost so manymembers of our family tobreast cancer and I wantedto be the voice that they nolonger have, trying to makethings better for other peoplecoping with illness,” saidRoberta.Roberta, who ran a vintageclothes shop, Grandma’sWardrobe, in GreatYarmouth for 21 years, wasLouise’s carer when herdaughter became very ill andwas with her until the end.“Louise was veryintelligent, very fun-loving– everyone that knew Louiseloved her.“When she became ill, therewas some support availablebut there wasn’t anythingas wonderful as this centre,”she said.“I was always looking foranswers and not having oneplace to visit where I couldfind those answers meantthat I lost a lot of precioustime, time when I could havebeen with Louise.“I can’t explain to you justwhat a difference a unit likethis would have made toLouise in the final monthsof her life. It would haveallowed us to live life to thefull and I might have had theinformation I needed so thatLouise could have died athome, in her surroundingsand not the way she had togo.“I lost Louise in an accidentand emergency unit on abusy Friday night in Bristol.It wasn’t what she wouldhave wanted and it certainlywasn’t what I wanted, butthat’s what happened.“When she passed away,I felt that I had to dosomething.“I had a choice, to wallowin grief or to use that griefto make something goodhappen. I chose todo something. I’m so glad Idid.”LoasInspiration:LouiseHamilton, whodied frombreast cancerat the age of28. Her deathpromptedmum Robertato become adedicatedsupporter ofthe PalliativeCare EastAppeal.I had a choice, towallow in griefor to use thatgrief to makesomething goodhappen. I choseto do something.I’m so glad I did...“
  • 8 Friday, May 3, 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalFantastic effort after appeal is launchedWork underway: CharlotteBullen officiallycuts the first turfin the construc-tion of the newPalliative CareEast buildingat the JamesPaget UniversityHospital.Picture: NICKBUTCHEREvery year in Great Yarmouth andWaveney 2,700 people die.And of those, 2,000 people havelived with the news that theircondition was likely to be terminal.The Palliative Care East Appealwas launched to help and supportthose people, their families andtheir carers, from the day they arediagnosed to the weeks and monthsafter their death when loved onesneed guiding through bereavement.John Hemming, chairman ofPalliative Care East, said: “Whilethere are about 2,000 people ayear diagnosed with conditionsconsidered to be terminal, theywill need help and support over anumber of years.“We’ve estimated that meansaround 6,000 patients a year willneed palliative care. Plus theirfamilies and carers, that takes us to25,000 people a year. That’s enoughpeople to fill Norwich City FootballClub’s stadium.”The Palliative Care East Appealbegan when Mr Hemming waschairman of the James PagetUniversity Hospital (JPUH).The hospital had previously raisedmoney for life-saving scannersand intensive care unit equipmentthrough public appeals and, afterdeciding to donate a legacy to thestroke unit, started a palliative careappeal back in 2005.“People of Great Yarmouthand Waveney have always beenincredibly supportive of thehospital’s public appeals,” said MrHemming.“For palliative care, we estimatedit would take around £1.5 million.And, again, the people have beenfantastic. There is no way we couldhave done it without them.”Mr Hemming remembers well thenight the newly-formed PalliativeCare East held a public fund-raisinglaunch at Potters Leisure Resort inHopton.“It was a charity show to kickstartthe fund-raising,” he recalled. “In anhour-and-a-half we raised £90,000.Brian Potter and I had a lump in thethroat. It was phenomenal – and itdid not stop there.“The Butterfly Appeal – wherepeople and local organisations couldbuy a butterfly for the wall of thenew centre, raised around £2,000and the rooms – which are namedin honour and memory of people– raised another £30,000.“The sheer number of communityevents, from the ones that raiseda few pounds and a few thousandpounds, has been fantastic.“And the centre is better than Iever envisioned. Raising money isnot easy – it is hard work, but whenyou reach the goal you forget all thehard parts and you are just so, soproud of what has been achieved.”lauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERS
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 9districtflueschimneysweepingwoodburningstovesOfficial opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalAnother superb effort: June Dunstan raised money in memory of her mum Barbara Hewitt. Here June and her three children, Amanda, Karl andMatthew, together with her sister Susan, present a cheque for £815.50 to members of the palliative care team of the James Paget University Hospital.Right, Great Yarmouth worker Jon O’Hara raised almost £2,500 for the Palliative Care East appeal by completing the UK Iroman 2012 challenge.Fund-raisers all: Topleft, Zoiyar Cole, ofPakefield, with her bookof poems which raisedfunds for the PalliativeCare East Appeal. Above,15-year-old Charlotte Bul-len sang at charity eventsin aid of the appeal. Shealso produced a charityCD the proceeds fromwhich went directly tothe appeal. Left, DanBaker and Ben Driverpedalled 400 milesfrom Wales to Lowestoftto raise cash for theappeal and the EastAnglian Air Ambulance.
  • 10 Friday, May 3, 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalAppeal support: Left, members of StMary’s Church, Somerleyton, presentJenny Watson, from the Palliative CareEast Appeal, with a cheque for £1500raised from the church Christmas treefestival. From left, John Robbins, MaryTruman, Jenny Watson and the RevLeslie Hobbs. Above, Martin Pennellwas supported by the Palliative CareEast team after his partner died. Heraised more than £1,000 with a charityskydive. Top right, Jill Radcliffe, far left,with her father-in-law, in the middle.They presented a cheque for £200 tothe appeal. Right, Bungay Inner WheelClub raised £450 at a ploughman’slunch in December. Jennie Cundy andPat Tyacke presented the cheque topalliative care locum consultant DrBernadette Auger and other membersof the palliative care team.
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 1101502 677437LUXURY SERVICE AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICEtailored to your requirementswww.grebecoaches.com | grebecoaches@btconnect.comDid you know we don’t just do excursions...School Contracts -Trips - Clubs and Societies -Weddings and Special Occasions - CorporateEvents -TheatreTravel - Nights Out - Luxury AirportTravel - Restaurants & BarsCall or visit our website for more detailsSPRINGFIELD SHOPPING CENTRESPALDING £15.00Saturday 15/06/2013BURY ST EDMUNDS SHOPPING£9.50Saturday 04/05/2013Wednesday 15/05/2013Saturday 01/06/2013Wednesday 26/06/2013Saturday 24/08/2013BLUE WATER, KENT £20.00Saturday 25/05/2103Saturday 06/07/2013LAKESIDE / THURROCK £20.00Saturday 18/05/2013Saturday 08/06/2013Saturday 22/06/2013LONDON SHOPPING DROP £22.0011am Covent Garden, RETURN 5.30pm(Time to see a matinee performance!)Saturday 11/05/2013Saturday 15/06/2013Saturday 13/07/2013Saturday 10/08/2013THURSFORD £44.00Travel & ShowSaturday 14/12/2013 - 7pm ShowSaturday 23/12/2013 - 2pm ShowNEW EXCURSIONS FOR 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalSuperheroes all: Above and left, the annualLowestoft Moonlight Walk inspired fund-raisers todon a whole range of weird and wonderful costumes.Below, Potters Leisure Resort owners Brian and JudyPotter present a cheque for £20,000. From left, GrahamTuttle, director of Norfolk Community Foundation, JennyWatson, Judy Potter, Wendy Slaney, then chief execu-tive, James Paget Hospital and Brian Potter.Walking tall:Above, A spon-sored coastal– Girls on theEdge – walkhelped raise cashfor the PalliativeCare East appeal.Left, more fund-raising comes tofruition as £2,000is handed overto the appeal’sJenny Watson,left.
  • 12 Friday, May 3, 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalJames Paget University HospitalNHS Norfolk and Waveney HealthEast(commissioning)East Coast Community HealthcareBig CMacmillan Cancer SupportSt. Elizabeth HospiceCruse Bereavement SupportMarie Curie Cancer CareCrossroads Care ServicesNorfolk County CouncilSuffolk County CouncilHalesworth Community Nursing CareFundSuffolk Family CarersNorfolk Family CarersNorfolkandSuffolkNHSFoundationTrustBritish Heart FoundationBritish Lung Foundation – BreatheEasy Support GroupMotor Neurone Disease AssociationMultiple Sclerosis SocietyAlzheimer SocietyHuntington’s Disease AssociationNelson’s JourneyPartners and servicesinvolvedwiththeLouiseHamilton Centre...
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 13Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalEVERY LITTLEHELPS: Top right,Classic Car Clubmembers present-ing a cheque to DrPatrick Blossfeldt, leadconsultant in palliativecare at the JamesPaget. Right, staffat Great YarmouthM&S store present acheque for £1,302.88pto Palliative Care Eastco-ordinator JennyWatson.TOP: East Coast BlackBelt School memberstook part in a sponsoredrun for the Palliative CareEast Appeal. Above, EllaCooke and Ilene Haddenhelped raise £1,120 for theappeal. Right, a summerline dance party at CarltonColville Community Centreadded funds to the appeal.Below, a cheque for awhopping £5,000 ishanded to the appealby the Asda store atLowestoft.
  • 14 Friday, May 3, 2013Official opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalConsultant: centre offers vital supportDR BERNADETTE AUGER: ‘For the first time people will know where to come for support from day one.... Wecan’t change the news, but we can help them absorb it.’ Picture: JAMES BASSWith 32 years experience as a doctor, theJames Paget University Hospital’s palliativecare consultant Dr Bernadette Auger hasseen phenomenal improvement in treatmentsduring her career.She believes the Louise Hamilton Centre willhelp support services – vital for the wellbeingand emotional health of patients and theirfamilies – finally catch up with state-of-the-arttreatments.“People didn’t know where to go for supportand information before and having a centrenext to the hospital will definitely improvethings,” she said.“This is the right environment to meetpatients and talk with families.“Before we often had conversations just inthe corridor at the James Paget Hospital whichis difficult for families. With the new centre,people have privacy and have the confidence totalk more openly.”Dr Auger has worked in palliative care for 19years and worked at the James Paget Hospitalfor 11 years.Before that she worked for eight yearsin a hospice. She feels that providingpalliative care alongside all the otherspecialities in JPUH is what patients andfamilies need.Her dream is for this care to be provided inspecialist palliative care beds in a purpose-built unit attached to the Louise HamiltonCentre.“People have said that we have built half ahospice and would like to complete the job, butwe need to know that funding for the runningcosts is in place before we can launch a Phase2 appeal,” she explained.These beds would be used to treat patientswith difficult symptoms, especially pain, andhelp improve how they are feeling – as well assupporting their families. Most patients wouldbe discharged home once the right care andequipment was in place. However some of thebeds would be used for patients who aredying.Dr Auger said having specialist palliativecare beds on site at the JPUH would allowdoctors and nurses in training to gain hands-on experience of palliative care.“Currently they get very limitedtraining in palliative care,” she said.“We need to provide this training if we wantdoctors and nurses to provide better care,especially at end-of-life.”Back at the centre, Dr Auger believes thewarm, friendly setting – so removed from aclinical hospital room – will benefit patients ofall ages.“It is setting the bar for the rest of thecountry – we believe it is the first centre of itskind and there is a lot of interest in what weare doing. What makes the centre so special isthat it was built by the generosity of the localcommunity and is supported by people suchas Roberta (Lovick – Louise Hamilton’s mum)who have used their experience to try andimprove care for others.“It will probably be particularly importantfor younger patients who often do not wantus to visit them at home because they wantto keep that part of their lives as normal aspossible,” she said.“The location of the centre is key too.“For the first time people will know where tocome for support from day one.“If people have just received a diagnosis orcome from a particularly difficult clinic wherethey have received devastating news, they cancome here.“We can’t change the news, but we can helpthem absorb it.“And they’ll know they can come back at anytime for someone to talk to, for someone tolisten.”“If families are visiting a loved one in thehospital and need space and the chance to talkover what is happening, especially if, sadly,their loved one is dying, the centre can providethat sanctuary.”lauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERS¡¡¡¡
  • Friday, May 3, 2013 15ÊOfficial opening of Louise Hamilton Centre by the Princess RoyalPressure wason architectsto deliver planthat was valuefor moneyBack in December 2005, just as the PalliativeEast Care Appeal was starting to takeshape, the James Paget University Hospitallaunched a design competition to find anarchitect who would help them build a centreto inspire, comfort and welcome all whowalked inside.Norwich-based LSI Architects took thatas an opportunity to run an internalcompetition where all members of staff wereinvited to put forward ideas.One idea, submitted by an architecturalassistant, incorporated an unusualundulating yellow wall that wrapped theinternal and external spaces together to forma social heart to the building.This concept was developed to becomeLSI’s competition entry – and went on to winhearts and minds at Palliative Care East whodeclared it the winner in March 2006.Artist’s impressions and drawings createdby LSI Architects were eventually used tohelp support the fund-raising campaign.Architect Louise Knights became involvedin the project in 2011 when funding had beensecured and building work on the LouiseHamilton Centre could finally begin.She said: “Working closely with the usergroup, made up of key members of thedonors, the hospital palliative care teamand invested charities such as Big C and StElizabeth Hospice, we developed the designkeeping true to the original concept.”“Key to the design was ensuring we createda welcoming, homely environment that didn’tfeel like a clinical hospital.“As part of my research for the project, Ivisited similar buildings such as the Big CCentre in Norwich and Maggie’s Centre inHammersmith, London, both emphasisingthe need to generate an inspiring space thatis soaked in natural light and is open andfriendly.“The project had a limited budget withno scope for overspend and, due to it beingfunded entirely through donations, we felt anadded pressure to deliver exceptional valuefor money.Louise added: “Key to this was the carefuland sensitive selection of materials, with aparticular focus on the quality of finishes.“The successful completion of the projectwould, however, always be dependent on thequality of work on site.“Thankfully everyoneinvolved in both the designteam and constructionteam felt the same passionfor ensuring we deliveredsomething extra special.“We are delighted with theoutcome of the building andit is fantastic to see all of thehard work of the fund-raiserscome to fruition in the LouiseHamilton Centre, and the facilityit now provides for the people ofGreat Yarmouth and Waveney andthe surrounding area.”lauren.rogers@archant.co.ukBy LAUREN ROGERSFloor plan: The architects’ view of thenew palliative care centre.VISION: Images, supplied byNorwich-based LSI Archtects, ofhow the designers envisagedthe Louise Hamilton Centre.It is based on an idea by anarchitectural assistant for anundulating yellow wall thatwrapped internal and externalspaces together.
  • 2 Friday, May 3, 2013 Journal online: bbjournal24.co.ukYourEditor: David LennardTel: 01502 712502Email: david.lennard@archant.co.ukLetters: bbj.letters@archant.co.ukSport: bbjsportmail@archant.co.ukWebsite:www.bbjournal24.co.ukAdvertising generalmanager: Geoff MaddisonTel: 01493 335000For Advertising enquiries:01493 335000 or emailweekliesadminteam@archant.co.ukOffice: 20 Blyburgate,Beccles NR34 9TB.Circulation: ABC figurefor January 2012 toJune 2012 is 5,650Pharmacykept hangingon for lineContinued from page 1Chance to be a real heroThere is a chance to becomea hero in the skies and helpraise money for East Anglia’sChildren’s Hospices.Children’s Hospice Week is theUK’s only awareness and fund-raising week for children withlife-limiting conditions and theservices, like children’s hospices,that support them. It takesplace this year between April26 and May 3, culminating withSuperhero Friday – a special dayof hero inspired fund-raising.You can get involved by pledgingyour support and signing up tobe a “Superhero in the Skies”at our Team EACH Skydive onSaturday, June 22, at ElloughAirfield in Beccles.If you, your friends, family orwork colleagues have alwayswondered what it is like to doa skydive please pledge to be ahero in Children’s Hospice Weekand help raise funds for thesevital local services. For moreinformation about the TeamEACH day and our other fund-raising activities please contactEACH on 01473 276196.Children’s hospices care for andsupport children who are notexpected to reach adulthood, andtheir families.V i s i t w w w .childrenshospiceweek.org.ukand www.each.org.uk/beaherofor more information and todownload fund-raising resourcespackedwithideasandinspirationto get you, your friends andfamily involved.“Every penny you raise willmake a lifetime of difference tochildren and families,” said aspokesman for EACH.Children’s Hospice Week is co-ordinated nationally by TogetherforShortLives,theleadingcharityfor UK children’s palliative care.For more information, visit www.togetherforshortlives.org.ukTHRILLING: Sign up for a skydive and help children’s hospices.Appeal forwitnessesafter womandies in crashA woman in her 60s from the Loddonarea has died following a two carcrash at Hales in the early hours ofSaturday morning.The incident involving a blackHyundai Santa and a blue ToyotaAygo happened about a mile from theA143 Stockton roundabout at around3.35am.The woman, who was driving theToyota was taken to the Norfolkand Norwich University Hospitalsuffering from serious injuries,where she died on Sunday evening.The 38-year-old male driver of theHyundai received minor injuries.He was arrested at the scene inconnection with the crash and hassince been released pending furtherenquiries.The Hyundai was travelling awayfrom Norwich and the Toyota -driven by the woman - was travellingtowards the city.Officers are renewing their appealfor any witnesses who may have seenthe collision or either of the vehiclesprior to the incident.Contact Norfolk Constabulary’sSerious Collision Investigation Teamon 101.New care centregets royal supportROYALVISIT: Allsmiles fromthe PrincessRoyal as shevisits thenewly-openedLouiseHamiltonpalliative carecentre whichwill cover theeast coastand Waveneyvalley.Picture: NICKBUTCHERanthony.caroll@archant.co.ukBy ANTHONY CARROLLA palliative care centre for people inthe Great Yarmouth and Waveneyarea has received the royal seal ofapproval this week.OnTuesdaythePrincessRoyalspentmore than an hour touring the LouiseHamilton Centre in the grounds ofthe James Paget University Hospital(JPH) in Gorleston.During her visit she met the smallarmy of volunteers, staff and fund-raisers who have helped build andrun the centre, which hopes to help25,000 people in the Yarmouth andWaveney areas with life limiting orterminal illnesses and their carersand family.After six years of fund-raising the£1.5m centre opened in March andits facilities, dedicated staff andvolunteers and high level of supportfrom the community impressed thePrincess Royal.Unveiling a plaque to mark thecentre’s official opening she said:“You have opened, it is fair to say, torave reviews.”She added she hoped the centrewould inspire other parts of thecountry to open similar facilities.The Princess Royal was shownaround the building by the centre’sambassador Roberta Lovick, themother of Gorleston-born LouisHamilton, who died aged 28 fromcancer in 1998.After the visit Mrs Lovick said: “Iwas a bit nervous about meeting her,but she put me at ease very quickly.“She understands the need fora centre like this and was veryinterested to see what we are doinghere.“She understands what care isneeded here and what carers needhere.” When she arrived at theLouise Hamilton Centre the PrincesRoyal was greeted by well-wishers,including staff from the JPH andchildren from Cliff Park InfantSchool.On her arrival she was introducedto senior health figures, includingJPH chairman David Wright, JohnStammers, chairman of GreatYarmouth and Waveney ClinicalCommissioning Group, and alsopalliative care consultant DrBernadette Auger and Nikki Sawkins,who runs the centre.After the visit Mr Wright said:“It was extremely generous of thePrincess Royal to give her time tocome to see us. Today is a huge boostfor the centre and has raised theawareness of what is going on here.”takes two weeks.” BT warned lastnight further work will need to becarried out.A spokesman said: “We attended thesite on March 4, to carry out worksas requested by the communicationprovider for the pharmacy.“Howeverduetoamistakeinplacingthe order by the communicationprovider, we were unable to carry outany works as there was no line plantin place at the address.“We have now carried out a fullsurvey on the work needed to installall the new underground cabling andducting required.“This will require a road closureand we have given the required noticein our application for this to happen.We have managed to get a temporarysolution to get phone service and areworking with the communicationprovider to see what can be done toget broadband working at the site.“We have been doing all we can toovercome the problems caused bythe lack of line plant as quickly aspossible.”Work began on the project inJanuary last year and saw thedemolition of the mortuary block.Patients have endured a one-waytraffic system that has now beenremoved to access the hospital, mainhealth centre and existing pharmacywhile the new building has takenshape.The pharmacy will boast a largerwaiting area, new consulting roomand extra storage space for themedicines.The upstairs area will be usedby the hospital for training andadministrative purposes.Weekend flowershow at churchA flower festival is being held inNorth Cove Church from tomorrowuntil Monday.The theme of the festival is With thesehands. It is open between 10am and5pm on all three days. Refreshmentsare available and there are stalls anda raffle.Entry by voluntary donation. It is thechurch’s main fund-raising event ofthe year and it hope to raise £3,000for both Barnby and North CoveChurches.HOLD-UP:PeterHobbsinside thenewpharmacy.
  • TheAdvertiserWAVENEY EDITION Advertiser24.co.uk60p where soldFrom July to December 2012 The Advertiser, Waveney edition 44,329. www.advertiser24.co.ukOPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK01502 516781www.karpetkingdom.co.ukKarpet Kingdom, Whapload RdLowestoft, Suffolk NR32 1URPRICE PROMISE GUARANTEEWe Guarantee to Beat any Like for Like Price on ourfull range of Carpets, Beds , Sofas & Furniture**Please ask instore for full detailsCARPETS BEDS SOFAS RUGSWOOD LAMINATE FLOORINGDINING ROOM SUITESLIVING ROOM FURNITUREAND MUCH MOREPROBABLY GREAT YARMOUTHS NEWESTLARGEST AQUATIC AND REPTILE CENTREand Reptiles Too...MASSIVE DISCOUNTS THIS WEEKEND....Call us on 01493 663775Dont forget to pick up your 5% discount loyalty card in storeUNIT 12 BESSEMER WAY | HARFEYS IND. ESTATEGREAT YARMOUTH NR31 0LXCelebrating our 1st anniversaryE. E. GREEN & SON LTD.• MINI • MIDI • MAXI •LARGE •SKIPS FROM ONLY£36.00£36.00Call free now on0800 0556 750(Price dependent on size, location andwaste type -- for a quote please call)Friday, May 3, 2013Mercury online: yarmouthmercury24.co.uk Friday, May 3, 2013 1OfficialOpeningof theLouiseHamiltonCentre byHRH ThePrincessRoyal16-page SOUVENIR SUPPLEMENT16-page special supplement in thisweek’s Lowestoft Journal and Becclesand Bungay JournalA palliative care centre for people in the GreatYarmouth and Waveney area has received theroyal seal of approval this week.On Tuesday the Princess Royal spent morethan an hour touring the Louise HamiltonCentre in the grounds of the James PagetUniversity Hospital (JPH) in Gorleston.During her visit she met the small army ofvolunteers, staff and fund-raisers who havehelped build and run the centre, which hopesto help 25,000 people in the Yarmouth andWaveney areas with life limiting or terminalillnesses and their carers and family.After six years of fund-raising the £1.5mcentre opened in March and its facilities,dedicated staff and volunteers and high levelof support from the community impressedthe Princess Royal.Unveiling a plaque to mark the centre’sofficial opening she said: “You have opened, itis fair to say, to rave reviews.”She added she hoped the centre would inspireother parts of the country to open similarfacilities.The Princess Royal was shown around thebuilding by the centre’s ambassador RobertaLovick, the mother of Gorleston-born LouisHamilton, who died aged 28 from cancer in1998.After the visit Mrs Lovick said: “I was a bitnervous about meeting her, but she put me atease very quickly.“She understands the need for a centre likethis and was very interested to see what weare doing here.“She understands what care is needed hereand what carers need here.”When she arrived at the Louise HamiltonCentre the Princes Royal was greeted by well-wishers, including staff from the JPH andchildren from Cliff Park Infant School.On her arrival she was introduced to seniorhealth figures, including JPH chairmanDavid Wright, John Stammers, chairman ofGreat Yarmouth and Waveney ClinicalCommissioning Group, and also palliativecare consultant Dr Bernadette Auger andNikki Sawkins, who runs the centre.After the visit Mr Wright said: “It wasextremely generous of the Princess Royal togive her time to come to see us. Today is ahuge boost for the centre and has raised theawareness of what is going on here.”New care centregets royal supportBy Anthony Carrollanthony.carroll@archant.co.ukPAINTING & DECORATING SERVICES61 Whiting Road, LowestoftDOMESTIC COMMERCIALINTERIOR/EXTERIORBUILDING MAINTENANCECALL NOW FOR A FREE QUOTATION
  • 28 www.eveningnews24.co.uk Norwich Evening News Monday, May 6, 2013A beacon of hope anda truly shining legacyIt’s a splash of sunshine in a seaof grey bringing light to peopleliving through their darkesttimes. The Louise HamiltonCentre opened its doors to thepublic in March, named after thedaughter of its most ferventsupporter, tireless fundraiserRoberta Lovick.Gorleston-born Louise was apupil at Wroughton and LynnGrove schools before taking a placeat Bristol University andgraduating with a degree inlanguages. When she was 26, shewas diagnosed with breast cancer.The disease claimed her life twoyears later and Louise died, agedjust 28.Roberta, who lives in PotterHeigham, cared for her daughter inthe final months of her life andwas inspired by Louise’sexperiences at a supportive careand information service in Bristol.Aware there was no such serviceavailable for people living withterminal or life-limiting conditionsin Great Yarmouth and Waveney,the Palliative Care East appeal waslaunched in 2006 and reached its£1.5m target last year.Set to benefit at least 10,000people every year, the dramaticdesign of the building became aninstant Gorleston landmark and abeacon of hope for those livingthrough difficult times.The egg-yolk yellow roof forms astriking curve which architectsdesigned to resemble an upturnedboat – a nod to the seaside locationof the centre and the notion of an“ark” as a safe place of refuge.A partnership between NHSNorfolk and Waveney, local countycouncils and the voluntary sector,The Louise Hamilton Centre –based in the grounds of the JamesPaget University Hospital – bringstogether a wide range oforganisations that can supportpatients and their families.Experts can help people througha range of situations, from adviceand support following diagnosis,during treatment and, if necessary,through to palliative care of anylife-limiting or progressive illness.In keeping with the ethos of thecentre, the building itself isflooded with light, boasts its own“secret garden” and has anuplifting wall covered in brightly-coloured butterflies, each onerepresenting a donation.Counselling and therapy rooms aredecorated in relaxing, muted pastelshades and every last detail hasbeen carefully considered.The windows in the children’sarea have been lowered so smallfaces can peer into the garden. Oneof the toilets includes a shower forrelatives who may have travelled along distance to visit.Private rooms are a home-from-home rather than cold, clinicalspaces. Every square inch of TheLouise Hamilton Centre has beendesigned with love. As a lastinglegacy, Louise couldn’t have wishedfor anything more.Nikki Sawkins, is operationallead at the centre and explainedthat it was a place where patientsand their families could enjoy aholistic approach, from practicaladvice to emotional support,complementary therapies tosupport groups, fun activities tobereavement counselling.“The premise of the centre isbuilt around partnershipsproviding supportive and palliativecare to patients, families, carersand people affected by any life-limiting illnesses or conditions,”she said.“Focusing on carers is extremelyimportant. So often, services aren’ttailored to meet the needs ofpeople who are caring for someonewho has an illness but we areaddressing those needs here. Thereis a huge range of information andhelp available to those living withconditions and those who care forthem in addition to supportivecare, practical advice andcomplementary therapies. Withour partners, we run courses thathelp people deal with their feelingsafter they’ve finished treatment.We have a bereavement service,support groups, choirs, art groupsand an education programme.We’re working with Nelson’sJourney to support younger peopledealing with bereavement and havesessions to help people claim forthe benefits they’re entitled to.“In essence, people can just walkthrough the door and access a hugerange of services either within thecentre or within the communitywith outreach work and servicesthat we’re linked to. It’s a one-stopshop for people when they needhelp the most.”She added: “If you can supportpeople on their journey, it doesn’tmatter which direction thatjourney takes – in the case of thoseliving with a terminal diagnosis,the process of dying is asA Norfolk motherhas transformedtragedy intotriumph afterspearheading afundraisingcampaign inmemory of herdaughter whichhas led to theopening of anew palliativecare centre.STACIA BRIGGSvisits The LouiseHamilton Centreand discoversexciting plans forthe future.eveningnews24.co.ukBreaking news throughout the dayHave you got a health story?Contact Adam Gretton on 01603 772419or email adam.gretton@archant.co.ukWarm and welcoming: Inside the newLouise Hamilton Centre, located in thegrounds of the James Paget UniversityHospital. Right, Dr Bernadette Auger., palliativecare consultant at the JPH. PHOTOS: NICK BUTCHER
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 29Parish councilsto hold AGMsMarlingford and Colton parishcouncil will hold its annualgeneral meeting on Tuesday.The meeting will be held at7.30pm in Colton Village Hall andwill give members of the publicthe chance to raise any issues orconcerns about the area.The parish clerk, Max Bergin,can be contacted on 01603 464495or by email on max.bergin@ntlworld.com.Easton Parish Council will holdits next monthly meeting onMonday, May 13 at 7pm inMarlingford Village Hall.The council’s annual generalmeeting will be held afterwards.The meeting will discuss anyissues affecting the area.The parish clerk can becontacted on 01603 435271.Norwich Evening News Monday, May 6, 2013Cathedral hasnew updatedguidebookIt has been seven years sinceNorwich Cathedral last updatedits guidebook – and it promises thelatest offering is more captivatingthan ever.The update is more picture-focused, aiming to capture thestunning original architecturewhile including images of themost recent cathedral additions.And it is intended not just as avisitor guide, but also a souveniror gift to take away. “People canenjoy the pictures and remembertheir visit by looking at thepictures,” said Canon RichardCapper. “Pictures express so muchand as we have much betterphotographs nowadays, they tell astory in themselves.”Norwich Cathedral welcomesmore than 100,000 visitors a yearand has been voted Norfolk’sfavourite building.The guidebook’s pictures weretaken by photographer Paul Hurst,who specialises in church andcathedral architecture.“The thought that NorwichCathedral would need a newguidebook every five years wouldhave been unthinkable until quiterecently,” said the Dean, the VeryRev Graham Smith. “It’s a tellingindicator of how rapidly the workof the cathedral and its publicperception is evolving.“It’s no bad thing for thecathedral to review what visitorswant to know from a guidebook, soI greatly welcome this latestedition which benefits from thephotographs of Paul Hurst andthe text of Canon RichardCapper.”The new guidebook costs £5 fromthe cathedral gift shop and online atwww.cathedral.org.uk/shopimportant as the dying itself. Weconcentrate on people’s quality oflife – whether that life is limited byterminal illness or by a conditionthat limits what they can do. If wehelp one person, by doing thatwe’re probably helping at least 10others around them – there’s aripple effect.“Last week, a family came inwhere the lady had received aterminal diagnosis and we wereable to offer her help, her husbandhelp, her daughters help and wereable to suggest help for hergrandchildren. She knows that weare here, that we will becompanions on her journey,however hard that journey is.”Visitors to the centre are greetedat a welcome desk which leads intoa large, communal area filled withcomfortable chairs and sofas wherethey can enjoy tea, coffee and achat with the volunteers andhealthcare professionals on-site.Leading off the central area area number of rooms, each namedafter a donor, which are used asprivate counselling areas, roomsfor bereavement counselling,therapy rooms (a wide range oftherapies are available, includingReiki, reflexology, massage,aromatherapy, hypnotherapy andBach Flower remedies) and a largeart and music room.Bernadette Auger, palliative careconsultant at the James PagetUniversity Hospital, works on theward and in patients’ homes toprovide palliative care and said thecentre would transform the wayservices were provided. “What thisoffers us is somewhere to seepatients privately – before, we wereborrowing rooms where we couldand they were cold, clinical rooms,not the warm rooms we have here,”she said.“It’s also a place where carersreceive care themselves, which isessential. Carers are essential inthe palliative care process and forthem to have a place where theycan receive extra help and supportis wonderful. The focus here is onliving and having quality time withyour family, being able to havethose conversations about whatyou want to happen in anenvironment where everyoneunderstands. A place like thismakes a difficult diagnosis lessscary. You can come straight out ofhospital and straight into thecentre and you’re surrounded bypeople who know exactly whatyou’re going through and knowhow to help you through it.“As a society, we often try andbrush the idea of dying under thecarpet because it frightens us, butin reality we need to think about itand if we can make talking aboutdeath more ‘normal’ it would beenormously helpful.”Fundraising for the centre isongoing – the cost of running thebuilding is estimated to be £100,000a year – and there are alreadyplans to expand the centre and addanother facet to its services.Behind the centre is a large,barren piece of waste ground. Butin Roberta Lovick’s mind, it’salready been transformed into a 10-bed hospice unit where terminallyill patients can spend their lastdays. “This is the next stage of theproject, to have an attachedhospice, a lovely place wherepeople can spend their last days inan environment where they can besurrounded by their family and byprofessionals,” she said.“We’re in the early stages, but Ican see it now. I have great faithand I know it’s going to happen.”Dr Auger added: “We see thefuture hospice element of thecentre as a hugely positive thing:people coming here will have ahome-from-home environmentwhere they are surrounded byexperts who can help them in theirfinal days. At the moment, patientsin their final days might beadmitted to a ward where we candeal with their pain but I’m not sosure we have the resources to dealwith their emotions. Here, wewould be able to offer that extra,specialist support. This is whatpalliative care should look like. Inmy job, I meet remarkable peoplewho continually impress me withtheir attitude, courage and the waythey deal with their situation.“We can now offer a service thatreflects that attitude and cansupport families and carers. If weget it right, it makes all thedifference. We can’t change what’shappening, but we can make thevery best out of a difficultsituation and it makes the world ofdifference.”The Louise Hamilton Centre is nextto The James Paget Hospital inGorleston. Opening hours are Mondayto Friday, 9.30am to 7.30pm, Saturday toSunday, 10.30am to 3.30pm. For moreinformation, telephone 01493 453100or visit www.louisehamiltoncentre.co.uk.Tomorrow: we talk to Roberta Lovickabout her determination to turn thetragic death of her daughter Louise intoa lasting legacy for the people of GreatYarmouth and Waveney.iwitness24.co.ukShare your news & picturesMustard TV – Local TV onlinewith a strong Norwich flavour.Watch at www.mustardtv.co.uk
  • 38 www.eveningnews24.co.uk Norwich Evening News Tuesday, May 7, 2013LIFEmattersREAL LIFEAs Roberta Lovick walksaround the palliative carecentre named after herdaughter Louise, the prideradiates from every pore:through tragic loss, an incrediblelegacy has been created.Gorleston-born Louise Hamiltonwas working as a translator inBristol when she received adevastating breast cancerdiagnosis. She died two years later,aged just 28.The Louise Hamilton Centre,based in the grounds of theJames Paget UniversityHospital, stands as atribute to a remarkableyoung woman and herequally remarkablemother, who refused tobe consumed by despair,preferring to channelher grief into a projectwhich will literallytransform thousands oflives.After years of tirelessfundraising, Roberta’svision of a centrewhere people withterminal or life-limitingconditions andtheir familiescan receivehelp, supportand care under oneroof has becomereality. AndRoberta,(picturedleft), justcan’t stopsmiling. “Ismile allthe timewhen I’mherebecause it’shappened,it’s here, it’sreal andLouisewould have loved it so much,” shesaid.“I knew, right from the verybeginning, that the centre wouldbe built, but I wasn’t sure how itwould happen or when it wouldhappen.“We can’t thank the people whohave donated money enough.There aren’t enough words toexplain what they have achieved.”Breast cancer is an unwelcomeyet familiar enemy to Louise’sfamily: her grandmother DoreenSaggers has lost two sisters, twoaunts, a niece and Louise to thedisease and is still under hospitalcare herself after being diagnosedwith breast cancer several yearsago.“We’ve lost so many members ofour family to breast cancer and Iwanted to be the voice that they nolonger have, trying to make thingsbetter for other people coping withillness,” said Roberta.Her mother added: “I thought Iwould be on the other side beforethis centre opened but I’m stillhere and I am so proud of mydaughter and what she’sachieved.”Roberta, who ran a vintageclothes shop, Grandma’sWardrobe, in Great Yarmouth for21 years, was her daughterLouise’s carer when she becamevery ill and was with her until theend.“Louise was very intelligent,very fun-loving – everyone thatknew Louise loved her. When shebecame ill, there was somesupport available but there wasn’tanything as wonderful as thiscentre,” she said.“When Louise was ill, I wasalways looking for answers andnot having one place to visit whereI could find those answers meantthat I lost a lot of precious time,time when I could have been withLouise.“I am not apportioning blame: itwas a while ago and that’s the waythe system was for us, but it offersme a great deal of peace to knowthat we can offer that help topeople so they don’t have to gothrough something similar.“I want what happened toLouise to have mattered, to havemade a difference.“I can’t explain to you just whata difference a unit like this wouldhave made to Louise in the finalmonths of her life.“It would have allowed us to livelife to the full and I might havehad the information I needed sothat Louise could have died athome, in her surroundings andIt’s a heartfeltgift from amother to herdaughter andfrom acommunity tothe peoplewithin it. TheLouise HamiltonCentre inGorlestonofficially openedlast week.STACIABRIGGSspoke toRoberta Lovickabout the legacyof love that hasensured herdaughter’s namewill live onCentre will standHave you got a health story?Contact Adam Gretton on 01603 772419or email adam.gretton@archant.co.uk
  • www.eveningnews24.co.uk 39Norwich Evening News Tuesday, May 7, 2013Become a fan of LIFE MATTERS.www.facebook.com/norwich.lifeGet theon your mobilem.eveningnews24.co.ukWelcoming: Left, the interior of theLouise Hamilton Centre in the groundsof the James Paget University Hospitalat Gorleston; far left, Roberta Lovickwith Dr Bernadette Auger; above,Louise Hamilton, for whom the centreis named; top, the Princess Royal whovisited the centre for its officialopening last week. PHOTOS: NICK BUTCHERas a legacy of lovenot the way she had to go.“I lost Louise in an Accident andEmergency unit on a busy Fridaynight in Bristol. It wasn’t what shewould have wanted and itcertainly wasn’t what I wanted,but that’s what happened.“I’m not a ‘why me?’ person, I’ma ‘why not me?’ person. I thinkthat in any situation if you canlearn from it then you have to takethat opportunity. I think as afamily we did what we could forLouise although I still live withthe guilt about her dying in A&E.“I felt that everything aboutLouise’s journey was so negativethat I wanted to turn it intosomething positive – it was animportant mission for me and Iknew I’d never give up until I sawmy dream fulfilled. I wantedLouise’s life and death to havecounted, to have had a purpose.”The seeds of an idea formed inthe months following Louise’sdeath and in 2006, fundraisingbegan through the Palliative CareAppeal to build a special centre forthe people of Great Yarmouth andWaveney.The centre provides much-needed information andsupportive care for people whoneed advice and support fromdiagnosis, during treatment, intosurvivorship or through topalliative care of any life-limitingor progressive illness.It also supports families andcarers.Louise’s death has, said Roberta,transformed her life. She used tobe shy, retiring and a ‘background’person’, but now she stands on anational platform to talk to healthprofessionals about palliative care.“She wouldn’t recognise menow,” laughs Roberta, “she’d neverhave thought that I could becomethe person that I am today – she’dnever believe that I was here today,having my picture taken andtalking to you because that wasn’twhat I was like.“When she was ill, she shockedme when she told me that if shewas spared, she would give up herbrilliant job and concentrate oncancer patients and their needs,because she recognised moreneeded to be done.“When she passed away, I feltthat I had to do something: I had achoice, to wallow in grief or to usethat grief to make something goodhappen.“I chose to do something. I’m soglad I did.”Louise, Roberta explained, hadwanted to create a directory forpeople living with cancer wherethey could access all theinformation they needed in one,simple to use book.“I wondered if that was what Ishould do, but I decided that whatwas really needed was a centre forpeople to visit, a bit like theBristol Cancer Help Centre whereLouise was given some help,” shesaid.“A year or so after we launchedthe appeal I was contacted to helpcreate a directory for people withcancer, so Louise’s wish didhappen after all, which was lovely.We got the directory and thecentre.“I love the fact that we can helpcarers as well as people who areill. I often say that I should havebeen given an Oscar when I wascaring for Louise: people wouldask if I was OK and I’d say: ‘I’mfine!’ when inside I wasscreaming.”The centre, which startedwelcoming visitors in March andwas officially opened by thePrincess Royal on Tuesday thisweek, offers a huge range ofservices, taking a holisticapproach to care.“The whole concept of thecentre is to help people to livetheir lives and enjoy their liveseven though they may havelimited time. It’s about making thegood times last longer andapproaching the bad times head-on to make them easier foreveryone to deal with,” saidRoberta, who lives in PotterHeigham.“What people often do after adiagnosis is surf the internetalone and find information that’snot really applicable to them andwhich frightens them.“Here, they can access a hugerange of information and beguided through the rightinformation by a professional.“If someone does die, I often saythat it can feel like a doublebereavement to carers becausethey lose their loved one and theylose the people who havesupported them, who were theirsafety net when they needed help.Here, there’s no time limit forgrief – we can talk to people, givethem ‘permission’ to talk aboutthe person they’ve lost, let themknow they’re never alone.“It may sound strange, but myfavourite room in the building isthe toilet and shower. Havingspent four days and nights withmy mother-in-law when she was inhospital, I could have done withsomewhere to come for a quickfreshen-up, shower and a cup oftea.“I asked ‘when Princess Annecomes, can I show her my loo?!’”Having such a time-consumingand all-encompassing project has,said Roberta, helped deal with theaching gap left by the loss of herdaughter, along with support fromher family and her faith.“I couldn’t live my life withoutfaith. I’ve had so many dramas inmy life and I’ve come out on theother side with a smile because ofmy faith. I’ve never felt bitter,” shesaid.“I feel Louise is with me all theway, whether I’m giving a speechor having a cup of tea, fundraisingor having a chat, I always feelshe’s by my side.“I’m really not frightened ofdeath at all. I’ve bought my plot –next to Louise – and my Mum hasbought the plot next to us so we’reready! We’ve talked about it, too.It’s a lot easier to talk about deathwhen you’re well than whenyou’re ill.“When the centre officiallyopened, I rang my Mum and said Iwant to do something for Louise, Iwant to wear her shoes when Iwalk in for the first time so thatthe first steps in the centre arehers.“I said to her: ‘am I crazy?’ andshe burst into tears and said: ‘Ithink it’s lovely’.“I just feel that you can’t lovesomeone as much as I loved Louiseand think that they’ve just gone.“She’s here. She’s with me allthe time. I am certain of it.”The Louise Hamilton Centre is nextto The James Paget Hospital inGorleston. Opening hours are Mondayto Friday, 9.30am to 7.30pm, Saturdayto Sunday, 10.30am to 3.30pm. Formore information, telephone 01493453100 or visit www.louisehamiltoncentre.co.uk