The Diaspora Dividend
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The Diaspora Dividend

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How to leverage immigrant remmitances.

How to leverage immigrant remmitances.

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The Diaspora Dividend The Diaspora Dividend Presentation Transcript

  • The Diaspora DividendLeveraging Remittances for Local Development By Alvaro Lima
  • The Diaspora Dividend Ronaldinho, the Brazilian soccer superstar, has come a long way from the poor suburbs of Porto Alegre where he grew up... … like some 1 million fellow Brazilians, he makes a living outside his homeland… … unlike most of them, Ronaldinho has access to the best advice and services that money can buy...
  • The Diaspora Dividend … it is unlikely that Ronaldinho finds himself going to the corner grocery and paying a high fee to send a $100 remittance back to family members… … or that he and his advisers are at loss when it comes to figuring out what to do with any money he wants to save, invest, give away, or use to buy insurance… That is precisely the problem many Brazilians working and living in the U.S. (and elsewhere) face...
  • The Problem The Diaspora Dividend  THE MARKET IS FAILING THEM… Low-income Immigrant Financial Needs Cashing Checks Paying Bills Sending Money Home Bills Payment Bills Payment Short Term Borrowing Savings & Loans Check Cashing Savings Deposit Accounts Deposit Accounts Money Transfer Money Transfer Mainstream Depository Institutions’ Offerings Non-Depository Institutions’ Offerings As a result, immigrants are kept at the margin of the financial sector. Their remittances are not leveraged since they are made by non-depository institutions – IT IS A CASH-TO-CASH SYSTEM.
  • The Problem The Diaspora Dividend “CASH TO-CASH” SYSTEM REMITTERS REMITTANCES NON-DEPOSITARY INSTITUTIONS REMITTANCES NON-DEPOSITARY INSTITUTIONS REMITTANCES RECEIVERS
  • The Opportunity The Diaspora Dividend  The remittance economy is an example of globalization at the “bottom of the pyramid” - a transnational BOP - where most remitters and receivers come from low- income communities. They are not Ronaldinhos: Globalization at the Bottom of the Pyramid – Brazilian Example * Students * Employees of Brazilian * embassies & consulates * Employees of Brazilian companies with US branches or offices 1.9 BILLION DOLLARS * Brazilian employees of IN SEARCH OF multinational companies in the U.S. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 80% of remittances from (99.7% of the Brazilian pop. living Brazilians living in the U.S. in the U.S. are immigrants are sent to low-income (mostly low-income workers) Brazilians Brazilian immigrants (99.7% pop. - mostly low-income workers)* Brazilian Population Living in the U.S. Remittances sent to Brazil Source: UC Davis, Immigration Data, 1999; Institute of International education, 2005. Analysis by Alvaro Lima and Peter Plastrik, 2006.
  • The Opportunity The Diaspora Dividend The Remittance “Economy”  The World Bank estimates that about $232 billion was remitted through formal channels in 2005  Conservative estimates put the number of people receiving some form of economic benefits from remittances at 1 billion – almost 1/6 of the planet’s population  In 2005 remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean totaled more than $53.6 billion, making the region the largest remittance market in the world
  • The Opportunity The Diaspora Dividend Remittance Flows to Latin America and the Caribbean Total amount sent (2005): $53.6 billion Average amount sent: $240 Frequency of remittance: 12.6 per year Where the money comes from… 38% 58% Ecuador 4% 0% 50% 31% Brazil 2% 17% 5% How money is sent… 31% Colombia 9% IMT Company* 79% 1% Person traveling 11% 76% Dominican 21% Bank 7% Republic 30% 0% Mail 2% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Credit union 1% U.S. Europe Latin America Japan 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Inter-American Development Bank Source: Multilateral Investment Fund, 2005; Sergio Bendixen, 2005 IMT Company = International Money Transfer Company
  • The Opportunity The Diaspora Dividend  Remittances are the initial point of contact with the world of financial services for many poor individuals and families  Once these individuals and families are sending/receiving remittances, they have joined the global financial service system  However, most do not continue to move through the “value chain” of financial services – savings, investment, credit, insurance, etc.
  • The Challenge The Diaspora Dividend The “4 Gaps” in the Market for Immigrant Financial Services  In order to create conditions for immigrants to move up the financial services ladder, four gaps need to be closed:  The “Trust Gap” - immigrants do not trust banking institutions for many reasons, including bad experiences with banks in their own countries;  The “Information Gap” - financial institutions have limited knowledge of immigrants’ lives, culture, and consumer habits;  The “Education Gap” - the more a consumer progresses along the financial “value chain,” the more knowledge is needed to make decisions, including planning one’s financial future;  The “Product Gap” - financial services need to be tailored and bundled specifically for immigrant markets both at the lower levels (basic bank products) as well as at higher levels (asset-building products).
  • The New Model The Diaspora Dividend Leveraging Remittances  The four gaps suggest that there is an opportunity to develop a new entity that would act as a “social broker” between:  immigrant communities in the U.S.  financial institutions in the U.S., and  financial institutions in the immigrants’ home-country  The purpose of such an entity is to increase immigrant use of financial services and the creation of philanthropic funds controlled by immigrant community themselves
  • The New Model The Diaspora Dividend “ACCOUNT-TO-ACCOUNT” SYSTEM REMITTERS Close the “Trust Gap” Close the “Information Gap” REMITTANCES Close the “Educational Gap” PARTNER BANK Close the “Product Gap” PARTNER BANK  Strategic intent (move receivers up in  Strategic intent (move remitters up in the financial value chain); the financial value chain);  Business plan (to capture a significant  Business plan (to capture a significant share of the remittance market); share of the remittance market);  Conveniently located branches;  Conveniently located branches;  Appropriate products;  Appropriate products;  Competitive prices. REMITTANCES  Competitive prices. REMITTANCES RECEIVERS
  • The New Model The Diaspora DividendDIASPORA CAPITAL SERVICES WORKS WITH COMMUNITY AND PARTNER BANKS TO: Close the “Trust Gap”when senders become customers Close the “Information Gap” more contributions, more investments Close the “Educational Gap”  Close the “Product Gap” INVESTS IN COMMUNITY PROJETCS  Market the Program & Fund BRAZILIAN COMMUNITY FUND FUND ADMINISTRATOR ( SOCIAL BROKER) BRAZILIAN COMMUNITY  Professionally managed by  Strategic intent (move Brazilians up in a Foundation or other institution (for example, a the financial value chain); BRAZILIAN donor advised fund).  Grass roots marketing & relationship Earmarked REMITTERS development; $ REMITTANCES  Disseminate and implement informational & educational programs;  Define mission, goals & policies; PARTNER BANK IN BRAZIL PARTNER BANK IN U.S.  Identify, select & fund projects.  Strategic intent (move Brazilians up in  Strategic intent (move Brazilians up in the financial value chain); BANK CONTRIBUTION ( % REMITTANCE FEE ) the financial value chain);  Business plan (to capture a significant  Business plan (to capture a significant share of the remittances sent home by share of the remittances sent home by Brazilians); more remittances, more contributions Brazilians);  Conveniently located branches;  Conveniently located branches;  Appropriate products;  Appropriate products; REMITTANCES  Competitive prices.  Competitive prices. REMITTANCES  matching funds from foundations and corporations; BRAZILIAN SOCIAL INVESTORS  “in kind” contributions such as CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVERS tuition abatement etc...
  • The New Model The Diaspora Dividend As a result:  Financial institutions would:  increase market share in the immigrant communities for remittances and other financial products;  increase fee revenues in a very profitable and highly stable market;  fulfill regulatory requirements under CRA  Immigrant communities would:  gain access to lower-priced remittance services;  increase use of higher value-added financial services and;  create community-based philanthropic capital to support own development.
  • The New Model The Diaspora Dividend The philanthropic fund could be capitalized from four sources:  Financial institutions contribute a portion of their revenues from remittances fees to the fund;  Remitters earmark a percentage of their remittances to the fund;  Other members of the targeted immigrant community contribute money to the fund;  Other organizations - foundations, governments, etc. - contribute money to the fund.
  • The Diaspora Dividend ALL IMMIGRANTS MAY NOT BE ABLE TO LIVE LIKERONALDINHO, BUT THEY CAN AND SHOULD BE ABLE TO BANK, SAVE, INVEST, AND DONATE THEIR MONEY LIKE MOST HARD-WORKING PEOPLE