Portfolio of J. Adam Huggins
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Portfolio of J. Adam Huggins

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A composite portfolio of the photographic work of J. Adam Huggins

A composite portfolio of the photographic work of J. Adam Huggins

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Portfolio of J. Adam Huggins Presentation Transcript

  • 1. J. ADAM HUGGINS COMPOSITE PORTFOLIO
  • 2. Women of Barsana partake in a Holi festival procession near Mathura. GOKUL; UTTAR PRADESH; INDIA; MARCH 2002
  • 3. The 14th Dalai Lama, 2003 DEHRA DUN; UTTARANCHAL; INDIA; MARCH 2003
  • 4. A Gaddi shepherd watches over his sheep on a Himalayan slope. LAKA GOT; HIMACHAL PRADESH; INDIA; OCTOBER 2002
  • 5. Children from a nearby village play in the Amazon backwater. MAGUARI; BRAZIL; MAY 2006 (From series for COLORS #68: AMAZON)
  • 6. Aftermath of 2004 South Asian Tsunami. CHENNAI; TAMIL NADU; INDIA; JANUARY 6, 2006
  • 7. Women sort fishermen's catch early morning on the beach of Lake Tanganika. KALEMIE; DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO; SEPTEMBER 2006 (From series "Lines of Food: Men and Fishing")
  • 8. Fishermen use a bedsheet as a makeshift net to catch fish off the beach of Lake Tanganika. KALEMIE; DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO; SEPTEMBER 2006 (From series "Lines of Food: Men and Fishing")
  • 9. Inside the -40C blast-freezer below deck on the Cape Clear fishing boat, Josh dips a recently caught salmon into a bucket of water, coating it with a layer of ice to maintain freshness. SITKA; ALASKA; USA; AUGUST 2006 (From series "Lines of Food: Men and Fishing")
  • 10. The two man crew (Rick, left; Josh, right) of the Cape Clear fishing boat during a moment of rest inside their ship. SITKA; ALASKA; USA; AUGUST 2006 (From series "Lines of Food: Men and Fishing")
  • 11. A human chain of brick workers build their brick kiln two bricks at a time. These are the men and women building the new India; for every thousand bricks, they earn a bit less than $5.50 USD. A family, with five adult laborers, pockets on average a little more than $2 a day. This is the life behind the great Indian construction boom, propelled by an economy still growing at 9 percent a year. The lure of steady work is drawing more and more migrants who come to brickyards around the country because they can no longer sustain themselves by farming. MORBI; GUJARAT; INDIA; MAY 8, 2007 Published: The New York Times; June 3, 2007; Page A1 "In a New India, an Old Industry Buoys Peasants"
  • 12. A brick worker husband and wife make bricks by hand, by taking mud and shaping into bricks with wooden moulds. These are the men and women building the new India; for every thousand bricks, they earn a bit less than $5.50 USD. A family, with five adult laborers, pockets on average a little more than $2 a day. This is the life behind the great Indian construction boom, propelled by an economy still growing at 9 percent a year. The lure of steady work is drawing more and more migrants who come to brickyards around the country because they can no longer sustain themselves by farming. MORBI; GUJARAT; INDIA; MAY 8, 2007 Published: The New York Times; June 3, 2007; Page A1 "In a New India, an Old Industry Buoys Peasants"
  • 13. The view of the coast at sunset seen from the Galle Face Green in the Sri Lankan capital, Colombo. The Galle Face Green is the city's largest and most elegant promenade. Adjacent to the coast, this mile-long stretch in the heart of the city is a constant beehive of activity. In the evenings it plays host to families and children playing sports and flying kites, lovers embracing under umbrellas and health enthusiasts taking their daily evening walks. While the city remains a bustling, noisy metropolis, there are distinct signs of anxiety associated with the conflict taking place on the opposite side of the island, in the northeast. Tourists are fewer in number, military checkpoints are pervasive, and many public buildings are off limits to camera-carrying visitors, for fear that they may be LTTE spies. GALLE FACE GREEN; COLOMBO; SRI LANKA; MAY 18, 2007 (Published: The New York Times; Jun 15 2007; "Sri Lanka’s Scars Trace Lines of War Without End")
  • 14. The younger sister of S. Romila holds her picture inside the family's home that Romila largely contributed to building. S Romila was a victim in the August 4, 2006 massacre at the Action Contre Faim (ACF) training centre in Mutur by which 17 mostly ethnic tamil employees of the French aid organization were forced to lie face down on the ground in a line next to one another and shot dead. S Romila was born in 1981 and was working as a hygene promotions officer for ACF. TRINCOMALE; SRI LANKA; MAY 22, 2007 (Published: The New York Times; Jun 24 2007; "A Year After Massacre of Aid Workers, Sri Lanka Still Asks Who, When and Why?")
  • 15. Portrait of Bengali farmers. Story: At the Singur Block Development Office (BDO), two elderly brothers try to fix an irregularity with the cheque that had been issued by the Block Development Office to buy their land. As is the case with most farmers on the land, they have been working their fields (now property of Tata Motors Company) all their lives. Government pressures to sell their land following the acquisition, left them with the feeling they had little other choice. SINGUR; WEST BENGAL; DECEMBER 22, 2007 Published: The New York Times; Page A3; December 29, 2006; "Razing Farms for Factory Creates Battleground in India"
  • 16. Singur farmers cultivating a portion of land left to the locals from Tata Motor Company. In the background, the fence surrounding the fields, 997 acres, where the plant will be built. SINGUR; WEST BENGAL; DECEMBER 22, 2007 Published: The New York Times; Page A3; December 29, 2006; "Razing Farms for Factory
  • 17. Workers set a manhole mold in the factory floor without wearing even rudimentary protecting gear. HAORA; WEST BENGAL; INDIA; SEPTEMBER 1, 2007 (From series: NYC SEWER - MADE IN INDIA)
  • 18. At a temperature over 100F degrees, workers collect molten metal in ladles at the base of the foundry's furnace which, once filled, they rush to pour into the many molds that line the foundry's factory floor. HAORA; WEST BENGAL; INDIA; SEPTEMBER 1, 2007 (From series: NYC SEWER - MADE IN INDIA)
  • 19. Barefoot workers pour molten metal from their ladles into one of the many manhole molds that line the foundry's factory floor. HAORA; WEST BENGAL; INDIA; SEPTEMBER 1, 2007 (From series: NYC SEWER - MADE IN INDIA)
  • 20. Backstage of India Fashion Week 2007 NEW DELHI; INDIA; SEPTEMBER 2007
  • 21. J. Adam Huggins Born in Canada in 1981, J. Adam Huggins is an award-winning documentary photographer who uses his camera as a medium to tell stories that aim to get people involved in the issues that affect us all. In 2002, Adam moved from Canada to India, where he lived and worked until 2006, when he was invited for a one-year residency at FABRICA in Italy. At the end of 2006, he returned to the Indian Subcontinent, where he covered assignments for The New York Times and became a TED Fellow in 2009. 
 He has worked with numerous publications, which include The New York Times, ELLE, Der Spiegel, COLORS, and the International Herald Tribune. His photography has been exhibited at Centre Pompidou, La Triennale di Milano, the Shanghai Art Museum, and Shiodomeitalia Creative Center in Tokyo. 
So far, Adam’s work has taken him into over 20 countries across five continents and he currently resides in New Delhi. www.adamhuggins.net India: +91 9811 67 0154 NYC: +1(646) 233-1254