Light to the Nations - Week 11

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Light to the Nations - Week 11

  1. 1. S E S S I O N 11 To Open the Eyes of Modern Man
  2. 2. We have been allowing the thought of Pope John Paul II to lead us into an understanding of the beauty of the human person “created male and female” and into an understanding of our current culture. True leaders are willing to face the brutal truth about their current situation without losing hope.
  3. 3. The Ultimate Temptation • Ricoeur has called Freud, Marx, and Nietzsche „masters of suspicion‟” (John Paul II, October 29, 1980). • Jean Paul Sartre and Simone du Beauvoir were successful in integrating the three “masters of suspicion” in a way that attacked the union of man and woman. • Love is impossible. It restricts our freedom, which makes us less human. “Hell is other people.” • Woman are the “sex second” because their ability to bare life. To become more human, they must become more free by rejecting their maternity and becoming more like a man.
  4. 4. The Devil as an Imposter • “I will ascend above the heights of the clouds, I will make myself like the Most High” (Isaiah 14:14). • “In the beginning was the Word … And God said” (John 1:1 and Genesis 1:3). • “When the devil lies, he speaks according to his own nature, for he is a liar and the father of lies” (John 8:44). • God uses the union of man and woman as a “primordial sacrament” by which he works in the world. The “one flesh union” of man and woman is simultaneously a sign and an actuation of the mystery. • The devil uses the Pill as a type of “anti-sacrament.” It is a sign of man and woman hiding from the Father, but it also actuates the mystery.
  5. 5. The Consequences of the Fall 1. Adam and Eve experience a changed personal reality that directly impacts their union. 2. Adam and Eve hide from God precisely because of their changed personal reality. 3. Adam and Eve‟s changed reality flows upon their children. 4. Adam and Eve‟s changed reality flows upon greater creation.
  6. 6. A Changed Reality for Man and Woman • “Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together” (Genesis 3:7). • Man and woman first perceive a change within themselves and then this change directly impacts their union.
  7. 7. 80 100 140 BreastCancerIncidenceRate (Cases/100,000Women) 1950 1970 200 0 2010 60 120 1940 1960 1980 1990 A Changed Reality for Woman Source: Cutler, S., et al, “Trends in Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the USA.” Host Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Cancer in Man, Doll, E., et al, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 1973. Cutler, S., et al, “National Cancer Institute Monograph. Bethesda: DHEW Publications, 1975. Third National Cancer Survey: Incidence Data, v. 41. Howlander, N., et al, SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. See http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/,based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to SEER web site, April 2013. Region Incidence Western Europe 89.7 Australia/New Zealand 85.5 Northern Europe 85.0 North America 76.7 Central America 26.0 Eastern Asia 25.3 Middle Africa 21.3 Eastern Africa 19.3 Source: Ferlay, J., et al, GLOBOCAN 2008 v1.2, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide: IARC CancerBase No. 10.
  8. 8. The Reality of Breast Cancer • BMI over 25: increased risk over 50%. • Smoking: increased risk approximately 14%. • Stress (Divorce or separation): increased risk more than doubled. • Number/Timing of Children: Increased risk up to ⅓. • Breast Feeding: Decreased risk of approximately¼ per 6 months. • Oral Contraceptive Use: Increased risk up to 50%. Sources: Cecchini, R., et al., “Body Mass Index and the Risk for Developing Invasive Breast Cancer Among High-Risk Women in NSABP P-1 and STAR Breast Cancer Prevention Trials,” Cancer Prevention Research, 2012. Xue, F., et al, “Cigarette Smoking and the Incidence of Breast Cancer,” Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 171, No. 2, January 24, 2011. Lillberg, K., “Stressful Life Events and Risk of Breast Cancer in 10,808 Women: A Cohort Study,” American Journal of Epidemiology, 2003. Ewertz, M., et al, “Age at First Birth, Parity and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 8 Studies from the Nordic Countries,” International Journal of Cancer, 1990. Tryggvadottir, L., “Breastfeeding and Reduced Risk of Breast Cancer in an Icelandic Cohort Study,” American Journal of Epidemiology, 2001. Kahlenborn, C., et al, “Oral Contraceptive Use as a Risk Factor for Premenopausal Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis,” Mayo Clinic Proceedings, October, 2006. Glass, A., et al, “Breast Cancer Incidence, 1980-2006: Combined Roles of Menopausal Hormone Therapy, Screening Mammography, and Estrogen Receptor Status,” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, August 1, 2007. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Report on Carcinogens (RoC), “Known to be Human Carcinogen” (1 of 58 substances). International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of the World Health Organization: “IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogen Risks to Humans,” v. 91, “Group 1 Carcinogen: Known to cause cancer in humans.”
  9. 9. 3 4 6 TesticularCancerIncidenceRate (Cases/100,000Men) 1950 1970 200 0 2010 2 5 1940 1960 1980 1990 A Changed Reality for Men Source: National Cancer Institute, SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1793-1996, Table I-3. SEER Database, SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2010. Region Incidence Western Europe 7.8 Australia/New Zealand 6.7 Northern Europe 6.7 North America 5.1 Central America 3.7 Eastern Asia 0.5 Middle Africa 0.2 Eastern Africa 0.5 Source: World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer, GLOBOCAN 2008 Database
  10. 10. Control Fertile 8.0 8.5 9. 0 9.5 10.0 TestosteroneLevel(ng/dl) Non- Fertile Source: Sharpe, R., “Male Reproductive Health Disorders and the Potential Role of Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, ChemTrust, May, 2009. Travison, T., et al, “A Population-Level Decline in Serum Testosterone Levels in American Men,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2007. Miller, S., et al, “Scent of a Woman: Men’s Testosterone Responses to Olfactory Ovulation Cues,” Psychological Science, 2009. Brizendine, L., “The Male Brain,” Broadway Books, 2010, pp. 80-81. The Reality of the Change for Men • Significant increase in reproductive tract disorders for men throughout the “developed world.” • Research points to hormonal disruption during fetal development. • Between 1988 and 2003 testosterone levels have dropped by 17%. • Testosterone levels in men respond to the fertility of a woman. They increase when she is fertile, decrease after ovulation and decrease during pregnancy. • Women on oral contraception are placed in a chemical pregnancy state. 9.01 9.86 8.36
  11. 11. 1940’s 1960’s 0 10 20 30 40 PercentageEverDivorced Source: General Social Survey. Year Married The Changed Reality of their Union 20.4 43.7 20 40 50 Age MilitaryNo Job PillIncome (10) CauseofDivorceRateIncrease Unaccount Source: Michael, R., “Why Did the U.S. Divorce Rate Double Within A Decade?” Research in Population Economics, 1988. 30 0 10 24.9 23.1 49.6 (0.8) (2.6) 5.8 Reason Divorce Rate IncreasedDivorce Rate
  12. 12. ImportanceinMateSelection Source: Havlicek, J., et al, “He sees, she smells? Male and female reports of sensory reliance in mate choice and non-mate choice contexts,” Personality and Individual Differences, 2008. Wedekind, C., et al, “MHC-dependent mate preferences in humans,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 1995. Garver-Apgar, “Major Histocompatibility Complex Alleles, Sexual Responsivity, and Unfaithfulness in Romantic Couples, Psychological Science, 2006. Sight Smell 0 0. 2 0. 4 0. 6 0.8 Sight Smell WomenMen Chemically Changed Attraction • In mate selection, women are particularly sensitive to olfactory clues. • Through pheromones, women seek men with dissimilar but compatible immune systems (MHC), which provides their offspring with the greatest immune system protection. • Women on the oral contraception are more likely to select men with similar MHC profiles. • In couples with more MHC similarities, women are less sexually responsive to their partners, are more attracted to other men and have more extra partner couplings. 0.47 .045 .015 .075
  13. 13. A Changed Relationship with God • “And they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the garden … I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself” (Genesis 3:8-10). • Man and woman from God precisely because of their changed reality.
  14. 14. 2.0 2.5 3.5 TotalFertilityRate (ChildrenperWoman) 1950 1970 200 0 2010 1.5 3.0 1940 1960 1980 1990 Hiding from God the Father Source: CDC, National Center for Health Statistics, Total Fertility Rate, 1940-2010. Region TFR Western Europe 1.6 Australia/New Zealand 1.9 Northern Europe 1.8 North America 2.0 Central America 2.5 Eastern Asia 1.7 Middle Africa 5.7 Eastern Africa 5.3 Source: United Nations Population Division, World Fertility Patterns 2009.
  15. 15. U.S. France 0 5 10 15 25 PercentNoPregnancyin12mo. Germany 20 Source: Thoma, M., et al, “Prevalence of infertility in the United States as estimated by the current duration approach and a traditional construct approach,” Fertility and Sterility, April 2013. Slama, R., et al, “Estimation of the frequency of involuntary infertility on a nation-wide basis,” Human Reproduction, 2012. Karmaus, W., et al, “Infertility and subfecundity in population-based samples from Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland and Spain,” European Journal of Public Health, 19999. Fertility Change in the Life of the Couple • Approximately 1/6 to ¼ of couples desiring a child are unable to achieve pregnancy within 12 months. • Delayed child bearing: women‟s fertility begins to decline by her mid 20‟s, falling almost ½ by her mid 30‟s. • Many STDs have impaired fertility or infertility as a consequence. • MHC similarity leads to more spontaneous miscarriages/abortions. • MHC similarity leads to higher levels of infertility. 15.5 24 26.2 Source: Dunson, D., et al, “Changes with age in the level and duration of fertility in the menstrual cycle,” Human Reproduction, 2002. Coulam, C., et al, “Association between Major Histocompatibility Antigen and Reproductive Performance,” American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and Microbiology, 1987. Ober, C., “Human leukocyte antigen matching and fetal loss: results of a 10 year prospective study, Human Reproduction, 1998.
  16. 16. 1996 2000 1 2 3 4 6 UsingART/SeekingPregnancy (Percentage) 2010 5 Source: Vital and Health Statistics, Series 23, Number 19, “Fertility, Family Planning, and Reproductive Health of U.S. Women: Data from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth, May 1997, Table 41. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 23, Number 25, “Fertility, Family Planning, and Reproductive Health of U.S. Women: Data from the 2002National Survey of Family Growth, December 2005, Table 56. National Health Reports, Number 60, “Current Contraceptive Use in the United States, 2006-2010, and Changes in Patterns of Use Since 1995,” Table 1. Statistical Abstract of the United States, 2012, Table 100. Fertility Change in the Life of the Woman • Women using Assisted Reproductive Technology to attempt pregnancy have increased substantially. • BMI > 25 increases the probability of infertility by approximately ¼. • Smoking increases probability of infertility by approximately 70%. • STDs can lead to infertility. • Animal studies suggest exposure to endocrine disruptors, including ethinyl estradiol, during fetal development decreases fertility as an adult. 2.71 3.92 5.90 Source: Killick, S., et al, “Factors associated with subfertility among women attending an antenatal clinic in Hull,” Human Fertility, December 2009. Bolumar, F., et al, “Smoking Reduces Fecundity: A European Multicenter Study on Infertility and Subfecundity,” American Journal of Epidemiology, 1996. Ryan, B., et al, In Utero and Lactational Exposure to Bisphenol A, In Contrast to Ethinyl Estradiol, Does Not Alter Sexually Dimorphic Behavior, Puberty, Fertility, and Anatomy of Female LE Rats, Toxicological Sciences, 2010.
  17. 17. Source: Carlsen, E., et al., “Evidence for Decreasing Quality of Semen During Past 50 Years,” British Medical Journal, September 12, 1992. Rolland, M., et al, “Decline in semen concentration and morphology in a sample of 26,609 men close to general population between 1989 and 2005 in France,” Reproductive Epidemiology, 2012. Bonde, J., et al, “Relation between semen quality and fertility: a population- based study of 430 first pregnancy planners,” The Lancet, October 10, 1998. Fertility Change in the Life of the Man • Sperm rates have decreased in men, especially in the “developed world.” • Sperm counts below 40 million per ml lead to reduced fertility. • Maternal alcohol consumption reduces sperm counts by approximately 1/3. • Maternal smoking reduces sperm counts of up to ½. • Animal studies suggest exposure to endocrine disruptors, including ethinyl estradiol, during fetal development decreases sperm counts as an adult. Source: Ramlau-Hansen, C., et al, “Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and semen quality in the male offspring: tow decades of follow-up,” Human Reproduction, 2010. Storgaard, L., et al, “Does Smoking During Pregnancy Affect Sons’ Sperm Counts?” Epidemiology, May 2003. Howdeshell, K., et al, “Gestational and Lactational Exposure to Ethinyl Estradiol, but not Bisphenol A, Decreases Androgen-Dependent Reproductive Organ Weights and Epididymal Sperm Abundance in the Male Long Evans Hooded Rate,” Toxicological Sciences, 2008. 1940 1989 40 60 80 100 120 SpermCountinFrenchMen (million/ml) 2005 113 73.6 49.9
  18. 18. A Changed Reality for Children • “Now Adam knew Eve his wife, and she conceived and bore Cain … and again, she bore his brother Abel … And when they were in the field, Cain rose up against his brother Abel, and killed him” (Genesis 4:1-8). • The children of Adam and Eve participate in Adam and Eve‟s changed reality.
  19. 19. The Sex Programming Window • Sexual differentiation begins about the 8th week after fertilization. • The SRY gene on the Y chromosome directs the development of testes, which begin producing large amounts of testosterone. • The developing male fetus will receive approximately 10 times the exposure to testosterone as the developing female fetus. • The surge of testosterone simultaneously forms the male sexual organs and wires the brain for male typical behavior. • “If you set it up wrongly to begin with, there‟s no going back” (Professor Richard Sharpe). Source: Sobel, V., “Fetal Hormones and Sexual Differentiation,” Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America, 2004. Professor Richard Sharpe, MRC Human Reproductive Sciences Unit, Centre for Reproductive Biology, The Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburg, Hope Undimmed Series, Session 6.
  20. 20. A Changing Reality for Children • Approximately 8% of women taking oral contraception get pregnant in a given year. • Hormone levels remain altered for several months. • Animal studies on female mice indicate reduced fertility, reduced weight gain during pregnancy, decreased age of puberty, malformations of external genitalia, and defeminization of typical female behaviors. (Study used “dosage levels within the dose range…for therapeutic purposes.”) • Animal studies on male mice indicate reduced overall body weight, decreased size of testes and seminal vesicles and reduction in sperm count. (Study used dosage “approximately fivefold higher than is used for oral contraceptives.” Source: Ryan, B., et al, In Utero and Lactational Exposure to Bisphenol A, In Contrast to Ethinyl Estradiol, Does Not Alter Sexually Dimorphic Behavior, Puberty, Fertility, and Anatomy of Female LE Rats, Toxicological Sciences, 2010. Howdeshell, K., et al, “Gestational and Lactational Exposure to Ethinyl Estradiol, but not Bisphenol A, Decreases Androgen-Dependent Reproductive Organ Weights and Epididymal Sperm Abundance in the Male Long Evans Hooded Rate,” Toxicological Sciences, 2008.
  21. 21. A Changed Reality for Nature • “Cursed is the ground because of you … thorns and thistles it shall bring forth to you” (Genesis 3:17- 18). • The bareness of Adam and Eve‟s union flows out upon all of creation.
  22. 22. A Changing Reality for Nature • Approximately 27% of ethinyl estradiol consumed in the pill is excreted in urine. • Wild life around the world is being altered: reduced male/female ratios, low fertility and poor mating habits, male fish producing female hormones, intersex fish, genetic males with female organs. • Test lake in Northwestern Ontario Canada. • Ethinyl estradiol added in 5-6 ng/L for 3 summers. • Test Year 1: Within seven weeks, male fish began producing female proteins: delayed spermatogenesis/malformations of the tubules. • Test Year 2: Fish with ova-testes and primary- stage oocytes; fish population begins to collapse. Source: Johnson, A., et al, “A Model to Estimate Influent and Effluent Concentrations of Estradiol, Estrone, and Ethinylestradiol at Sewage Treatment Works,” Environmental Science and Technology, 2004. Lyons, G., “Effects of Pollutants on the Reproductive Health of Male Vertebrate Wildlife – Males Under Threat,” ChemTrust, December, 2008. Kidd, K., et al, “Collapse of a fish population after exposure to a synthetic estrogen,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, May 22, 2007.
  23. 23. Modern man has once more been tempted and he has fallen. We have now awaken to a different world. It is a type of anti-creation that impacts all of creation. Fortunately, the Father is “rich in mercy” (Ephesians 2:4).
  24. 24. Next Week A Culture of Death Small Group Discussion Starter Questions 1. How can you better see the spiritual realities behind modern culture? 2. How can you help “open the eyes” of others to the changed reality of modern man?
  25. 25. The Reality of “Impossible” Love • Michael, R., “Why did the U.S. Divorce Rate Double within a Decade?” Research in Population Economics, 1988, v. 6, pp. 367-399. • The rapid diffusion of modern contraception was the greatest reason for the substantially increased divorce rate in the 1970s. • Roberts, S., “MHC-correlated odour preferences in humans and the use of oral contraceptives,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 2008. • Women taking the Pill alter their mate selection so that the choose MHC similar men.
  26. 26. 20 40 50 1920s 1960s1950s1940s1930s 10 PercentageEverDivorced 1970s Source: General Social Survey, 1972-2010 30 Year Enter into Marriage A Changed Reality for their Union 25.0 18.8 20.4 28.4 43.7 39.3
  27. 27. 20 40 50 Age MilitaryJob PillIncome (10) CauseofDivorceRateIncrease Unaccount Source: Michael, R., “Why Did the U.S. Divorce Rate Double Within A Decade?” Research in Population Economics, 1988. 30 0 10 A Changed Reality for their Union 24.9 23.1 49.6 (0.8) (2.6) 5.8

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