Books For Childrens Lit

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Books For Childrens Lit

  1. 1. Graphic Novel
  2. 2. Meagan Mitchell READING RESPONSE PROJECT
  3. 3. Rosa Parks Graphic Biographies <ul><li> By Rob Shone and Illustrated by Nick Spender </li></ul><ul><li> This is a GRAPHIC NOVEL that depicts the story of Rosa Parks and her fight against segregation and the inequality of men during the 1950s. It describes the bus boycott and the suffering that Mrs. Parks and her family went through, but also ends with on a happy note that Mrs. Rosa Parks walked in the front of the Million Man March with Martin Luther King. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate book </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach about the history of Black Suffrage and People that should be admired and looked up to for their courage. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this in the classroom to demonstrate different styles of books, and how they have transformed. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this type of book is great for ESOL students because the graphic match the story and the conversation is based on social interaction language. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Non-fiction books are Informational books or Biographies </li></ul><ul><li>Genres include: </li></ul><ul><li>Text books, Informational, Biographies, Auto-Biographies </li></ul>Non-Fiction
  5. 5. Biography <ul><li>Let’s read about Squanto </li></ul><ul><li>By Sonia Black Illustrated by Bob Doucet </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story about a Wampanoag Indian that translated between Englishman and the Native Americans. The English took him back with them and he was sold to the Spanish as a slave, until friendly monks helped him escape. Next he was brought back to the new world. He was a great help to the Pilgrims during their first year. At the end of this year, he suggested inviting the native Americans over for a feast. This later became known as Thanksgiving. </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach about the first thanksgiving and the Pilgrims </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this book to demonstrate that even though there are differences in language that people of other cultures can still be friends. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would use this book to show that all students should get along, regardless of language and culture. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Autobiography <ul><li>Diary of Anne Frank </li></ul><ul><li>This is the heroic story of a Jewish Girl, trapped in the attic, </li></ul><ul><li>In Holland during the rein of Hitler and the Gestapo. She and her family lived with another family in secret, facing many obstacle in order to to save their lives. Eventually they are betrayed and their location is discovered and they are inevitably killed by the Germans. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach about the Holocaust. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach about Diaries, and autobiographies. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would use this book to show that there are many people who have experienced religious persecution or have felt isolated at some time. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Informational
  8. 8. 101 Things You Need to Know About SPACE <ul><li>By Tim O’Shei & Andrea D’Angelo </li></ul><ul><li>This book offers up 101 facts of the Solar System, such as the sun is only 8 light years away, and definitions of ellipse and galaxy. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this as a resource for readers who are interested in space. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use these fun facts when teaching the unit on the solar system </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this book has plenty of space definitions that are accompanied by visuals that are helpful in the definition. </li></ul>Three Quarter Moon                                                                                Three Quarter Moon                                                                               
  9. 9. NASCAR Racing to the Finish teamwork at 200 mph <ul><li>By K.C. Kelly </li></ul><ul><li>This book goes over information about NASCAR and it’s drivers. It explains that there are many people that help the driver win the race and explains the positions they play on the team. It explains that teamwork is the only way a driver can win any of the races that they partake in over the season, much less the season championship. </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Book </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach the concept of different embers of a team </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this as a tool to get a reader’s interest for those who </li></ul><ul><li>are intrigues by racing </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: there are great pictures of each one of the positions on the </li></ul><ul><li> team. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Culturally Diverse
  11. 11. Molly’s Pilgrim <ul><li>By Barbara Cohen Illustrated by Daniel Mark Duffy </li></ul><ul><li>This is a story of a Yiddish girl that is spending her first thanksgiving in America. She is asked to make a Pilgrim girl for a project and she and her mother make a small polish school girl. When Molly brings the doll to school, she is made fun of because hers does not look like everyone else's. She explains that made her like that because her mother was a PILGRIM in her own way, escaping from Russia. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book about the Jewish Culture and prosecution in Russia. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this as a tool to teach a lesson to accept and embrace the differences in people. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this is a great book to use because it describes some of the feelings of exclusion that ESOL students might go through </li></ul>
  12. 12. When Marian Sang <ul><li>By Pam Munoz Ryan Illustrated by Brian Selznick </li></ul><ul><li>Received the Robert F. Sibert Award </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of African American singer Marian Anderson who tried to make it meet during the 1950’s when blacks were not considered equal to whites. But she held onto her dream of being a singer and conquered the obstacles in her path and became a great entertainer to both races. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this to teach some Black history </li></ul><ul><li>during the appropriate unit. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this book to show the diversity of the culture and what African Americans had to </li></ul><ul><li>suffer through </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: Showing that all cultures had some form of hardship and discrimination </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>A piece of literature that SPRINGS from the Author’s imagination </li></ul><ul><li>Genres include: </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional Fantasy, Modern Fantasy, </li></ul><ul><li>Historical Fiction and </li></ul><ul><li>Contemporary Realistic Fiction </li></ul>Fiction
  14. 14. Fantasy
  15. 15. Traditional Fantasy <ul><li>Cinderella and Other fairy tales </li></ul><ul><li>The Princess and the Pea </li></ul><ul><li>Once upon a time there was a very picky prince who could not find a princess that he thought was suitable to marry. One night during a storm a girl showed up claiming she was a princess from a far away land. The queen tested her by putting a pea underneath 100 mattresses. Only a real princess could feel that, she thought. In the morning the girl complained that she had not slept a wink because of the pea. The queen was satisfied and so was the prince;. They were married and lived happily ever after. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach about the genre of </li></ul><ul><li>fantasy and fairytales </li></ul><ul><li>I could also relate it to other tall tales, Fables, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this book has illustrations that follow along </li></ul><ul><li>really well with the story </li></ul>
  16. 16. Fairy Tale Treasures Goldilocks and other fairy tales <ul><li>Beauty and the Beast </li></ul><ul><li>Once upon a time a merchant stole a rose for his daughter beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Out of the garden of a mean beast. He agreed to let the merchant go </li></ul><ul><li>if Beauty took his place. The Beast was very nice to Beauty and she </li></ul><ul><li>grew fond of him. One day she found out that her father was ill and </li></ul><ul><li>she asked if she could go back to nurse him. The Beast agreed and </li></ul><ul><li>made Beauty promise to return. She lost track of time and soon </li></ul><ul><li>Learned that the Beast was ill. She rushed back and kissed him </li></ul><ul><li>And he turned into a Prince, telling her that because she loved him in spite of his looks the evil spell had been broken </li></ul><ul><li>This will be used to teach the genre of Fairy tales </li></ul><ul><li>I will also use this in order to teach children not to judge a person by appearances </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: The pictures are illustrative of the actions of the story. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Fairy tale treasures Snow White and other Fairy tales <ul><li>Hansel and Gretel </li></ul><ul><li>Once upon a time there was a woodcutter and his wife and their two children that lived at the edge of the forest. They were very poor and one day Hansel overheard his mother telling his father to take the children out into the forest and leave them there. The woodcutter protested, but the mean woman insisted. So Hansel gathered up some rocks and dropped them on the path so they could find their way home. The next day, he used bread, and the birds gobbled it up. Hansel and Gretel found a cottage made out of gingerbread and candy. The old woman invited them in and she turned out to be a witch! She locked up Hansel and fed him in order to make him fat enough to eat, but he was a smart boy, and used a stick to fool her. One day the witch decided it was time to eat , but Gretel fooled the witch and pushed her in the oven instead. They found gold in her house and returned safely home to find their evil mother was dead and their father was very happy to see them. </li></ul><ul><li>Primary or Intermediate reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this to demonstrate the genre of fairy tales </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use it to teach children to not trust strangers </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: The book is filled with action graphics and Hansel and Gretel are German names </li></ul>
  18. 18. Modern Fantasy
  19. 19. The Giver <ul><li>By Lois Lowery </li></ul><ul><li>Winner of the 1994 Newberry Award </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of a young boy growing up in a contrived </li></ul><ul><li>Community. Everyone is assigned a family, everyone is </li></ul><ul><li>Assigned a career. Jonas’s job is the receiver of Memories. He meets the Giver of Memories right after his twelfth birthday. The giver gives him the memories of love and pain, warmth and cold, but is selective on the memories that Jonas receives. Soon Jonas realizes that these are feelings and that the people of the community need to experience them. So he runs away with his brother, who is to be killed, giving the community a chance to feel and Gabe a chance at living. He uses his memories to keep both of them alive through the journey </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this in the classroom to teach literary circles </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this to teach the importance of identifying feelings </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would have the children work in groups so that the ESOL children could see the other students drawings of the story </li></ul>
  20. 20. ABC Books
  21. 21. Chicka Chicka Boom Boom <ul><li>By Bill Martin, Jr. Illustrated by Lois Ehlert </li></ul><ul><li>This book is a favorite of children because all of the letters climb up </li></ul><ul><li>the Coconut tree. It is written in Rhyme as the letters race up the tree </li></ul><ul><li>When x, y, and z make it up the tree there is no more room and they </li></ul><ul><li>all fall down CHICKA CHICKA BOOM BOOM !!! </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used to teach the alphabet in a fun way. </li></ul><ul><li>This book can also be used to teach students Prediciton </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this book shows each letter, so the ESOL children can pronounce each letter and its sound </li></ul>
  22. 22. ABC, An Amazing Alphabet Book <ul><li>Dr. Seuss </li></ul><ul><li>This is an alphabet book that has the crazy Dr. Seuss twist. Each letter has a Dr. Seuss creature, some that we have heard of, like grinchs and hoos, and some that we have not heard of, like Zaxes and Zooks </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book will be used to teach the alphabet using the beloved style and </li></ul><ul><li>characters of Dr. Sues. </li></ul><ul><li>This book will also be used in discussing books that Rhyme. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: This will help the ESOL children learn their letters </li></ul><ul><li>and the sounds they produce </li></ul>
  23. 23. Predictable
  24. 24. Ira sleeps over <ul><li>By Bernard Waber </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Book </li></ul><ul><li>Ira has been invited by his best friend Reggie to sleep over, but he has a great dilemma…does he bring his Teddy Bear or leave it at home? He and Reggie make big plans for the night and he asks his parents what to do. Ira’s sister makes him worry about what Reggie will think about her Bear, so he leaves it at home. When it turns out that Reggie has a Teddy too, he goes home to get his and falls fast asleep. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to talk about feelings of fear or apprehension. </li></ul><ul><li>This book can also be used in an activity in which children predict what will happen in the story using the cover or as the story progresses. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would bring in my own Teddy Bear to help the ESOL kids to grasp the concept and remember the words. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also have the ESOL students identify the different feelings in the book using visuals of faces. </li></ul>
  25. 25. The Very Hungry Caterpillar <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>By Eric Carle </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This is the beloved story of a caterpillar that hatches </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>and begins eating. He is very hungry and eats many things such as one apple and five oranges, a cupcake and a pickle. But he is still Hungry, so he eats the leave and crawls inside his cocoon. When he emerges, he is a beautiful Butterfly </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Beginning Reader </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This book will be used in a science lesson when describing the transformation of caterpillar to butterfly </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This book can also be used to teach numbers and colors </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ESOL: this is a very useful book. It can be used to teach colors, numbers and vocabulary with the great visuals that it posses. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  26. 26. Historical Fiction
  27. 27. Sarah Plain and Tall <ul><li>By Patricia MacLachlan </li></ul><ul><li>Winner of the Newberry Award </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of a pioneer family that has lost it’s mother. The father puts an add in the paper for a new wife and Mother. Sarah answers and they write back and forth and then decide that she will come for a visit. When she arrives, Sarah brings with her treasures from the Sea where she is from in Maine. Sarah likes to sing and draw pictures of the ocean She becomes homesick, but still becomes part of their family. She learns how to plow and ride the horses. When she finally learns to drive a wagon, she leaves and the children are scared that she will not return. But she does, and brings with her colored pencils. The colors of the Sea. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used for those children who are interested in </li></ul><ul><li>Pioneer times </li></ul><ul><li>I will also suggest this book for anyone who gets a step-mother </li></ul><ul><li>Or is homesick </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I will have the children use this book in a literary circle, </li></ul><ul><li>Drawing and sharing pictures </li></ul>
  28. 28. Bud, Not Buddy <ul><li>By Christopher Paul Curtis </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of an orphan boy that is trying to make it on his own </li></ul><ul><li>during the Great Depression. When we first meet Bud he is at a home for children. He is sent to a Family and gets into a fight with the son, so they lock him in the shed. This is where Bud makes his great escape. He goes on the lamb and meets up with people in a shantytown. Next he starts his journey out to find his father, Herman E. Calloway, the musician. He is picked up on his way to Grand Rapids by a man named Lefty, who brings him “back” to his “father.” Herman does NOT receive the young man with open arms, but his singer, Mrs. Thomas, does. Bud is allowed to stay with the band and along the way, they find out that Herman is not Bud’s father, but the father of his deceased mother, who Herman never knew what happened to. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would definitely suggest a literary Circle on this book, as some interesting feelings arise. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this book as a tool to teach about the Great Depression, and the suffering it brought on the Nation. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: This may be a tough read for ESOL children, so Pictures and Visuals should be used by the teacher to support the time period that this book takes place in. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Rhythm, Rhyme and Repetition
  30. 30. Green Eggs and Ham <ul><li>By Dr. Seuss </li></ul><ul><li>Sam-I-am is determined to get the other character in the book to try his favorite dish of Green Eggs and Ham. He asks if he would like to like to try them in a variety of different places, on a train, in a house, with a cat or with a mouse. </li></ul><ul><li>But the other character holds true to the fact that he does not like Green Eggs and Ham, he does not like them Sam-I-am. But finally Sam-I-am’s persistence pays off and the other character tries them. As it turns out , he does like Green and Ham!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used to teach Rhyme and Rhythm </li></ul><ul><li>This book can also be used to teach children to try new things </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would cook Green Eggs and Ham for everyone in the </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom, so that all students can experience it. </li></ul>
  31. 31. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, what do you see? <ul><li>By Bill Martin Jr. Illustrated by Eric Carle </li></ul><ul><li>This book introduces children to a variety of different animals, each one a unique color, with the repetition of the title that children can join in on. The Rhythm of the book is repeated through each animal that the reader comes across. The purple cat, the red bird and the yellow duck. </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning Reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach the names of animals </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach the colors </li></ul><ul><li>I would use a matching game to assess comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this is a great book to teach animals and colors because </li></ul><ul><li>of the great illustration and the way they follow the storyline </li></ul>
  32. 32. Wordless Picture Books
  33. 33. Time Flies <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>By Eric Rohmann </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This book takes the reader on a journey through time on the wings of a bird. The journey starts off in a museum with the bones of dinosaurs long gone. Then it takes the bird back into the time when the great beast roamed free across the land. At the end of our journey, the host gets snapped up and eaten by the dinosaurs, but as we turn the page, the beasts turn back to bones and our bird makes it out without harm. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I would use this book to show students that book do not have to have words in order to tell a story </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li> </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I would also use this book during the science lesson about Dinosaurs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ESOL: this book would be extremely beneficial for an ESOL child because they would not read the words, they would look at the visuals and then use their language to describe what happened in the story. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  34. 34. Beginning Chapter Series
  35. 35. Young Cam Jansen and the Pizza Shop Mystery <ul><li>By David A. Adler, illustrated by Susana Nati </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Book </li></ul><ul><li>Cam has a memory that takes pictures of what she sees. When her jacket goes missing at the pizza shop, she uses her gift to solve the mystery of who took it. In the end it turns out to just be a mistake and everyone just enjoys the Pizza. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book to teach children about memory and I would also use this to about dialogue and quotes in books. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: each page has graphics. In the back of the book there is a game that uses memory recall skills, I would do this after other pages as well. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Junie B. Jones is not a crook <ul><li>By Barbara Park Illustrated by Denise Brunkus </li></ul><ul><li>Junie B. Jones is a kindergartener that has many adventures, but when </li></ul><ul><li>she gets a brand new pair of Fuzzy Mittens from her Grandfather gave her and they go missing, her world is turned up-side-down. She is sent to the Principal's office. Oh, no! not again. But this time, she is not there because she is in trouble. She is introduced to the Lost-and-Found. What a great place, she thinks that she can take whatever she likes out of there. When she remembers the pain of losing her mittens and decides not to take anything. However, in the hall she finds a pen, and a girl with her mittens!!! When she gets back her own property she is inspired to give back the pen, and experience the happiness that comes with it. </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning/Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used to demonstrate the genre of beginning chapter books. </li></ul><ul><li>This book can also be used to teach children the benefit of being honest. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: this book’s vocabulary is pretty basic, although the sarcasm in the book may be lost in translation, there are illustrations to depict the major events in the story. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Contemporary Realistic Fiction
  38. 38. Flipped <ul><li>By Wendelin Van Draanen </li></ul><ul><li>There are two sides to every story!!! That holds especially true in this book. It is both sides of one story of two children that grow up together and their interactions that lead to love…or at least LIKE. Juli and Bryce have different perspectives on life and each other, but due to some events that take place they start to see each other in a new light </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used to teach children about the mentally handicapped, and that appearances can be deceiving. </li></ul><ul><li>This book can also be used to discuss the different ways that people see the </li></ul><ul><li>same situation. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: This may be difficult for ESOL students, so I suggest reading and discussing with a partner. </li></ul>
  39. 39. AWARD BOOKS
  40. 40. The Caldecott Award
  41. 41. Where the Wild Things Are 1964 Award Winner <ul><li>By Maurice Sendak </li></ul><ul><li>When Max is sent to bed without his dinner, a forest grows in his room. He sails away to a far away land where he is king of the Wild things. They had much fun together but then Max decided to go back home and he found his dinner waiting for him </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this book in an exercise to help students imagine a place that they would like to sail off to and write a couple of sentences on it. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this book to teach children about respecting their parents and not getting into trouble at home. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would have the ESOL children draw pictures and use their words to describe the place they would sail to. </li></ul>
  42. 42. Time Flies 2003 Award Winner <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>By Eric Rohmann </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This book takes the reader on a journey through time on the wings of a bird. The journey starts off in a museum with the bones of dinosaurs long gone. Then it takes the bird back into the time when the great beast roamed free across the land. At the end of our journey, the host gets snapped up and eaten by the dinosaurs, but as we turn the page, the beasts turn back to bones and our bird makes it out without harm. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I would use this book to show students that book do not have to have words in order to tell a story </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li> </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I would also use this book during the science lesson about Dinosaurs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ESOL: this book would be extremely beneficial for an ESOL child because they would not read the words, they would look at the visuals and then use their language to describe what happened in the story. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  43. 43. Newberry Award
  44. 44. The Giver 1994 Award Winner <ul><li>By Lois Lowery </li></ul><ul><li>Winner of the 1994 Newberry Award </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of a young boy growing up in a contrived </li></ul><ul><li>Community. Everyone is assigned a family, everyone is </li></ul><ul><li>Assigned a career. Jonas’s job is the receiver of Memories. He meets the Giver of Memories right after his twelfth birthday. The giver gives him the memories of love and pain, warmth and cold, but is selective on the memories that Jonas receives. Soon Jonas realizes that these are feelings and that the people of the community need to experience them. So he runs away with his brother, who is to be killed, giving the community a chance to feel and Gabe a chance at living. He uses his memories to keep both of them alive though the journey </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this in the classroom to teach literary circles </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this to teach the importance of identifying feelings </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I would have the children work in groups so that the ESOL children could see the other students drawings of the story </li></ul>
  45. 45. Sarah Plain and Tall 1986 Award Winner <ul><li>By Patricia MacLachlan </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of a pioneer family that has lost it’s mother. The father puts an add in the paper for a new wife and Mother. Sarah answers and they write back and forth and then decide that she will come for a visit. When she arrives, Sarah brings with her treasures from the Sea where she is from in Maine. Sarah likes to sing and draw pictures of the ocean She becomes homesick, but still becomes part of their family. She learns how to plow and ride the horses. When she finally learns to drive a wagon, she leaves and the children are scared that she will not return. But she does, and brings with her colored pencils. The colors of the Sea. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>This book can be used for those children who are interested in </li></ul><ul><li>Pioneer times </li></ul><ul><li>I will also suggest this book for anyone who gets a step-mother </li></ul><ul><li>Or is homesick </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: I will have the children use this book in a literary circle, </li></ul><ul><li>Drawing and sharing pictures </li></ul>
  46. 46. Coretta Scott King Award
  47. 47. Bud, Not Buddy 2000 Award Winner <ul><li>By Christopher Paul Curtis </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of an orphan boy that is trying to make it on his own </li></ul><ul><li>during the Great Depression. When we first meet Bud he is at a home for children. He is sent to a Family and gets into a fight with the son, so they lock him in the shed. This is where Bud makes his great escape. He goes on the lamb and meets up with people in a shantytown. Next he starts his journey out to find his father, Herman E. Calloway, the musician. He is picked up on his way to Grand Rapids by a man named Lefty, who brings him “back” to his “father.” Herman does NOT receive the young man with open arms, but his singer, Mrs. Thomas, does. Bud is allowed to stay with the band and along the way, they find out that Herman is not Bud’s father, but the father of his deceased mother, who Herman never knew what happened to. </li></ul><ul><li>Intermediate Reader </li></ul><ul><li>I would definitely suggest a literary Circle on this book, as some interesting feelings arise. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this book as a tool to teach about the Great Depression, and the suffering it brought on the Nation. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: This may be a tough read for ESOL children, so Pictures and Visuals should be used by the teacher to support the time period that this book takes place in. </li></ul>
  48. 48. Miscellaneous Award <ul><li>The Robert F. Sibert Award The Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award is presented annually to the most distinguished informational book published in English during the previous year. The award, named in honor of the long-time President of Bound to Stay Bound Books, Inc. (Jacksonville, Illinois), aims to honor the author whose work of nonfiction has made a significant contribution to the field of children's literature. The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), which created the award in 2001, defines an informational book as one &quot;written and illustrated to present, organize and interpret document able factual material for children.&quot; </li></ul>
  49. 49. When Marian Sang <ul><li>By Pam Munoz Ryan Illustrated by Brian Selznick </li></ul><ul><li>Received the Robert F. Sibert Award </li></ul><ul><li>This is the story of African American singer Marian Anderson who tried to make it meet during the 1950’s when blacks were not considered equal to whites. But she held onto her dream of being a singer and conquered the obstacles in her path and became a great entertainer to both races. </li></ul><ul><li>I would use this to teach some Black history during the appropriate unit. </li></ul><ul><li>I would also use this book to show the diversity of the culture and what African Americans had to suffer through </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL: Showing that all cultures had some form of hardship and discrimination </li></ul>
  50. 50. Poetry
  51. 51. The Snail <ul><li>The snail doesn’t know where he’s going </li></ul><ul><li>And he doesn’t especially care </li></ul><ul><li>One place is as good as another </li></ul><ul><li>And here is no better than there </li></ul><ul><li>The snail’s unconcerned with direction </li></ul><ul><li>But happily goes on his way </li></ul><ul><li>In search of specially nothing </li></ul><ul><li>At two or three inches a day </li></ul><ul><li>Jack Prelutsky </li></ul><ul><li>Zoo Doings </li></ul><ul><li>Rhyme, Personification </li></ul>
  52. 52. Nobody Knows Where Our Bus Driver Goes <ul><li>Nobody knows </li></ul><ul><li>where our bus driver goes </li></ul><ul><li>While all of us kids are at school </li></ul><ul><li>Does he study a map? </li></ul><ul><li>Does he take a nice nap? </li></ul><ul><li>Or lazily lounge in the pool? </li></ul><ul><li>Nobody knows </li></ul><ul><li>Where our bus driver goes </li></ul><ul><li>Nor what he may do with his time </li></ul><ul><li>Does he work at the fair? </li></ul><ul><li>Is he cutting hair? </li></ul><ul><li>Or secretly out fighting crime </li></ul><ul><li>Nobody know </li></ul><ul><li>Where our bus driver goes </li></ul><ul><li>He’s probably a space man from Mars </li></ul><ul><li>But he might be a spy </li></ul><ul><li>Or a rock and roll guy </li></ul><ul><li>Who's wailing on ‘lectric guitars </li></ul><ul><li>Nobody knows </li></ul><ul><li>Where our bus driver goes </li></ul><ul><li>He leaves us each morning at eight </li></ul><ul><li>All that we see </li></ul><ul><li>Is our bus back at three </li></ul><ul><li>And we’re sure glad he’s not late </li></ul><ul><li>Bruce Lansky </li></ul><ul><li>My teacher’s in big trouble </li></ul><ul><li>Rhyme </li></ul>
  53. 53. That Girl <ul><li>That girl from Mrs. Finster’s Room </li></ul><ul><li>Is coming down the hall </li></ul><ul><li>I’d hide in my locker </li></ul><ul><li>But I think that I’m too tall </li></ul><ul><li>That girl’s still coming closer </li></ul><ul><li>She’ll see me seen , I fear </li></ul><ul><li>If I knew how, you bet that </li></ul><ul><li>I’d completely disappear </li></ul><ul><li>She’s almost right in front of me </li></ul><ul><li>She looks straight in my face </li></ul><ul><li>I’m catching claustrophobia </li></ul><ul><li>I think I might die </li></ul><ul><li>And then she stops and kicks my leg </li></ul><ul><li>I hold my wounded knee </li></ul><ul><li>I’m thankful that I know at last </li></ul><ul><li>That girl’s in love with me! </li></ul><ul><li>Kathy Kenny Marshal </li></ul><ul><li>My teacher is in Big Trouble </li></ul><ul><li>Rhyme </li></ul>
  54. 54. Sleeping Sardines by Shel Silverstein From the Book: Where the Sidewalk Ends I’m tired of eating just beans So I opened a can of Sardines But they started to squeak “hey we’re trying to sleep. We were snuggled up tight till you let in the light You big silly sap, let us finish our nap Now close up the lid.” So that’s I did.. Will someone please pass the beans? Literary Element: Rhyme , Personification
  55. 55. Look Out <ul><li>The witches mumble horrid chants </li></ul><ul><li>You’re scolded by five thousand ants </li></ul><ul><li>A Martian pulls a fearsome face </li></ul><ul><li>And hurls you into outer space </li></ul><ul><li>You’re tied in front of whistle trains </li></ul><ul><li>A tomahawk has sliced your brains </li></ul><ul><li>The tigers snarl, the giants roar </li></ul><ul><li>You’re sat on by a dinosaur </li></ul><ul><li>In vain you’re shouting “help” and “stop” </li></ul><ul><li>The walls are spinning like a top </li></ul><ul><li>The Earth is m melting in the sun </li></ul><ul><li>And all the horror’s just begun </li></ul><ul><li>And, oh the screams, the thumping hearts </li></ul><ul><li>The awful night before school starts </li></ul><ul><li>Max Fetchen </li></ul><ul><li>From the book: Kids pick the funniest poems </li></ul><ul><li>Literary Element: Rhyme and Imagery </li></ul>
  56. 56. The Bengal Tiger <ul><li>The Bengal tiger likes to eat </li></ul><ul><li>Enormous quantities of meat </li></ul><ul><li>Now people have been heard to say </li></ul><ul><li>That tiger’s hypnotize their prey </li></ul><ul><li>So please do not take foolish chances </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid the Bengal tiger’s glances </li></ul><ul><li>Jack Prelutsky </li></ul><ul><li>Zoo Doings </li></ul><ul><li>Rhyme, Personification </li></ul>
  57. 57. Student’s Prayer <ul><li>Now I lay me down to rest </li></ul><ul><li>I pray I pass tomorrow's test </li></ul><ul><li>If I should die before I wake </li></ul><ul><li>That’s one less test I’ll have to take </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Annonymous </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  58. 58. Buffalo Dusk <ul><li>The buffalos are gone </li></ul><ul><li>And those who saw the buffalos are gone </li></ul><ul><li>Those who saw the buffalos by the thousands and how they </li></ul><ul><li>Pawed the prairie sod into dust with their hoofs </li></ul><ul><li>Their great heads down pawing on in a great pageant of dust </li></ul><ul><li>Those who saw the buffalos are gone </li></ul><ul><li>And the Buffalo are gone </li></ul><ul><li>Carl Sandberg </li></ul><ul><li>The best poems ever </li></ul>
  59. 59. Reflection <ul><li>Each time I see the Upside-Down man </li></ul><ul><li>Standing in the Water </li></ul><ul><li>I look at him and start to laugh </li></ul><ul><li>Although I shouldn’t oughtter </li></ul><ul><li>For maybe in another world </li></ul><ul><li>Another time </li></ul><ul><li>Another town </li></ul><ul><li>Maybe he is right side up </li></ul><ul><li>And I am upside-down </li></ul><ul><li>Shel Silverstein </li></ul><ul><li>A light in the attic </li></ul>
  60. 60. A Poem is a Little Path <ul><li>A poem is a little path </li></ul><ul><li>That leads you through the trees </li></ul><ul><li>It takes you to the cliffs and shores </li></ul><ul><li>To anywhere you please </li></ul><ul><li>Follow it and trust your way </li></ul><ul><li>With mind and heart as one </li></ul><ul><li>And when the journey’s over </li></ul><ul><li>You’ll find you’ve just begun </li></ul><ul><li>Charles Ghigna </li></ul><ul><li>Rhyme, Imagery, Metaphor </li></ul>

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