Inland Living
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Inland Living

on

  • 722 views

Inland Living magazine came out and put together a stellar write-up on Humanity. We were so stoked to have them, and greatly appreciate all the time and energy they put in.

Inland Living magazine came out and put together a stellar write-up on Humanity. We were so stoked to have them, and greatly appreciate all the time and energy they put in.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
722
Views on SlideShare
722
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Inland Living Inland Living Document Transcript

  • INLAND LIVING MAGAZINE VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3 contents 18 ENTREPRENEURS · Rialto snowboard company practices Humanity TASTE · Elegance and comfort food 21 are served at Cafe Montclair 24 WINE · Expressive, affordable selections for spring 28 HEALTH . As technology evolves, medical imaging gets more precise 32 RETIREMENT • Moving doesn't mean it's time to say "goodbye" 34 CAREERS • Make a successful leap into a new line of work also Can't Miss and Arts & Culture 8; Dining 38; Seen 45; Nonprofit calendar 48 On the cover: Snowboarder Davis Poul at Mountain High in Wrightwood PHOTO BY PRI SCILLA IEZZI, CHE STUDIOS MAKEUP BY CHRISTINA M. GAUDY, CMG COSMETICS
  • By CARLA SANDERS AV]S PAU L ce rtain ly knows how to land on hi s feet. And th e multi-spa n at hlete has done jus t that in the pas t few yea rs, as a standout college soccer player and on snowy terrain where he 's leavi ng hi s mark in the world of snowboarding. His laid-back conversational style gives little hin t to the dri ve n young m an who has car ved out a niche ro r him se li bo th on and o fr th e playing field . He auribmes hi s success to ti ming, great parents and a w illingness to be open about th e ru ture. "] have so many different interes ts," he says from Mammoth Lakes, where's he's o n a trip to he lp create a s nowboa rding video. "] wa nt to see w here life takes me" In his 21 years, it's alread y taken him from the sea to the snow and hack. Born in San Diego, he moved to La Ve rn e as a child . Durin g his eight h g rade yea r at EI Roble Intermedi ate School in Clare mont , he joined I he snowboa rd cl u b and bought a season pass to Mountain High . "My first year, 1 had a lot. of fun I had a lot of friends who were good , a nd 1 wa nted to be as good as th em . I lea rn ed a 10 l of tri c ks ," Pau l reca ll s. "The second season I got into th e video s ide of things. [love filmin g friends" Humanity snowboarder Davis Paul of Upland and UC Berkeley catches some air at Mountain High. PHOTO BY LAfONZO ' SNOWDOGG" CARTER
  • --------------;-- ~ - - ~- ~---~---~- -- -~ --- -~- - ~ 'I love extreme sports and at 21, I've been able to work on the administrative side as well. I get to work the cameras and help set them up.' That filming led to offers from After graduation in 2007, he companies for product placement , headed north to ue Berkeley on an which , in turn have aided Paul athletic scholarship. In 2008 , he financially. "Since my second year started 19 of 21 games for the of snowboarding, I haven't had to Golden Bears, earning All-Pac 10 pay for any of the gear," he says honorable mention honors. That year enthusiastically. he also was a Pac 10 all-academic When he was a junior at Damien honorable-mention selection. Now a High School1n La Verne, his parents, junior, he plays forward on the team. Doug and Donna Paul, moved the He expects to graduate after the family to Upland. By then he'd also fall term this year, and is majoring become a stellar soccer player. At in marketing, advertiSing and Damien, Paul led the team to back­ American culture, a program he was to-back Division 1 e lF titles as both allowed to devise himself to suit his the goal and points leader. In 2006, particular interests, which circle he was an NSCAA/adidas boys youth right back to snowboard ing. While All-American and selected to the he enJoys riding, he's becoming more prestigious adidas Elite Soccer interested in the video production Program (ESP) He was one of 35 side of things~ When he's not on the soccer field at Calor working players chosen to play in the ESP "I love the marketing and on a video, Damien High School grad Davis Paul likes All-Star Game that year. adve rtising areas," he explains. to escape to the slopes. Humanity rider Ryan Pluche, 18, of Camarillo slides along a rail a t Mountain High.
  • More (team) Humanity: Ryan Pluc:he It may ·be a bit early to call him "the other redhead," comparing him to Olympian and X Games friendShqun White, but 18-year-old Ryan Pluche of Camarillo is making his way as a Humanity Snowboards rider and a qualifier for the Volcom PB&Rj" fi nals at Mammoth· Mountain in April. ('PB&RJ ­ That's the Peariut Butter & Rail Jam, Volcom's amateur snowboord contest ·series during which tricks, not falls, are judged. The national tour features 17 regional events leading up to a championship event at Mamrnoth. . . Peanut butte r a nd jelly sandwiches are served, of course.) Ryan has a friendly laid-back demeanor and says he got into the sport following his.fathei who was a Rossignol representdtive in Vermont. When he's not on the slopes, Pluche likes to cook ­ and hopes to go to culinary schooL Videos arid more ciboul B uche may be found .· online at myspace.cotn/notryanpluche, . www.humanitysnow.com a nd www.vimec.corril7861443 . . PHOTO BY PRISCILLA IEZZI "I love extreme sports and at 21, I've been able to work on the ad ministrative side as well. I get to work the cameras and help set them up. I'm young and balanCing all these aspects has been great." Since Division I soccer is "super time­ consuming" with all the travel, Paul says, he's only able to hit the slopes about 14-15 days a year. So, the "days I do go have to be productive; I have to progress at a quicker rate." These days he's helped by Humanity Boards of Rialto, which sponsors him . Financially, Paul receives free boards and often assistance with tickets for local mountains. He also helps the company with his inSight into new boards. For Paul, though, there are other bonuses. "There are a lot of intangible benefits that are equa lly valuable to me. • Spring Garden Tours / Weeken ds / March 20-May 16 Right now, it's about making contacts." • Annual Wildflower Show / Saturday and Sunday / April 3 and 4 He also va lues Humanity, the company • . Garden w ith a View / Sunday I May 2 / Claremont's Premier Garden Party "Humanity is a very family oriented team," • National Public Gardens Day / Friday / May 7 he says. 'They're more about helping the • Moth er's Day Brunch and Lunch I Sunday I May 9 I Two Seat ings commun ity and being bigger than what • Native Pla nt Clinics, Grow Native Nursery, Garden Shop and more .... snoKboarding is." RSABG.org 150,() North College Avenue • Claremont, CA 91711 · 909.625.8767 16 I inlandlivingmagazine.com I february- march 2010
  • entrepreneurs I sport I 11 II I I I Director of development Daniel Malmese, left. with two of Humanity's co-owners, Ryan Monson and Tommy Czeschin PHOTOS BY LAFONZO CARTER I FINDING I; Rialto snowboard company takes a different course By AMY BENTLEY everything their colleagues, called "Humanitarians," .1 I/! do to help others and advance the snowboarding life. I· ; UMANlTY SNOWBOARDS is more than H I, "We wanted to implement our vision, and our vision ~: 'I " juSt another business out to make a buck. was do what everybody ciaims to do or wants to do," ~r It's a small, local online company, and its three owners have befriended snowboard enthusiasts said co-owner Ryan Monson of Rancho Cucamonga. "But we wanted to do it, not just say we're doing it." il nationwide who help promote the sport to underprivileged kids, do charity work and encourage Monson is a snowboard deSigner and engineer who found ed the company in 2008 with former Olympic ,. '·1 other boarders to support each other too. snowboarder Tommy Czeschin and snowboard artist The owners celebrate the sport, their business and Greg Huntoon, a childhood friend. I 18 1 inlandlivingmagazine.com 1 february-march 2010 !I
  • 'It's a platform, a community, an evolution .... Paupaw, a Brooklyn resident who hooked We're looking for people who care about riding up with Humanity Snowboards inJuly, the best boards, not the most expensive.' also started a nonprofit organization, The Hoods to 'vVoods Foundation, to introduce inner-city kids to snowboarding. The fact that the company's owners each careers and provide them with a product Snowboarder Geoff lsringhausen of have other businesses and Jobs gives them at cost so they do get it at a substantial Riverside helps promote the sport by the freedom to be socially conscious with discount. And they have the opportunity making snowboarding videos that are Humanity Snowboards, Monson says. through word of mouth to earn money posted online. Czeschin also owns a laundry facility based on products that are sold based Another Humanitarian is longtime and a firewood business in the Mammoth on their influence. Everything is tracked. snowboarder Gary Anderson, 37, president area, where he lives, while Huntoon of Online orders are taken with a specific of Ac tion Spons Mi nistries in Alexandria. Los Angeles also works full-time as the code," Monson explained. Minn. Anderson hits the slopes a couple social media director for Break Media, There are about 10 Humanitarians of times a week near his home with his a Los Angeles-based Internet company. on board so far, and the company plans Humanity board and sings its praises. Monson owns a snowboard to grow the program this spring. "They've got the guys who really know manufacturing facility in Rialto where Humanitarians must be involved what a board is supposed to ride like. I'm Humanity's snowboards and boards with a charity or give back by doing a in love with it," said Anderson, who also of other brands are made. "humanitarian deed" in their community coaches for snowboarding clubs and camps "We're doing what we wa nt to do. It's not or by helping the snowboard ing in his area. necessarily about the money," said Monson, community, Monson says. Anderson found Humanity through 34, who has enjoyed snowboard ing since One volunteers a few times a month Tommy Czeschin , a friend-of-a-friend, he was a teen. "We want people to come to serve meals at a shelter, while another and t~ey met last year in Mammoth when and be a pan of it with us. Anyone is in New York, Brian "Deka" Paupaw, creates Anderson visited California. welcome to call us, we're accessible, we're small snowboarding experiences for "One thing led to another," he said. real people. We're about being part of inner-city kids at local parks after it snows Action Spons Ministries is a Christian the community." to teach them the sport. nonprofit in Minnesota that works to Humanity Snowboards' Web site, www.humanitysnow.com. states that philosophy in a much edgier way to appeal to hip, young snowboarders: "It's a platform , a community, an evolution . We're looking for people who care about riding the best boards, not the most expensive . Riders who spend as many days riding as possible. Kids who doodle slopes on their binders and wrangle with new tricks in their head instead of counting . stupid sheep." What's unique about this business ­ which gets kudos from supporters and customers for manufacturing its boards in Rialto instead of China - is the company's "Humanitarian" program. The owners have created a network of snowboarding friends who help others and promote snowboarding; Humanity Snowboards offers them discounted snowboards and support. "We provide the Humanitarians with a lot of support to help them boost their Chris Espinoza, left, and factory manager Carlos Lopez craft new snowboards. february-march 20 to I inlandlivingmagazine.com I 19
  • ,11 ,. provide faith-based opportunities for disadvantaged youths to get them involved in action sports by helping with scholarships, money to buy Product profile equipment and coaching. Humanity Snowboards has six models Anderson plans to order some discounted snowboards from Humanity for sale, ranging in price from $349 to $399. for Action Spons Ministries, and he appreciates the charitable efforts The newest board, released in early of the owne rs. January, is the Midwest Twin, a slightly smaller board with a different shape "It's a nice company. They're doing things a little different from the big specifically designed for riders in the industr y. Helping the guys that help in the community is a new concept," Midwest who don't have huge mountains said Anderson , who noted that snowboarding is popular in Minnesota, but ride on smaller or man-made hills. which has some 20 ski resorts. "It's called the Urban Shredding As a company, Humanity Snowboards also helps Kiva (www.kiva.org), a Movement." said company co-owner Ryan lending program for low-income entrepreneurs around the globe. "We Monson. "It's growing like crazy. We're the lend money to entrepreneurs. It may be a farmer in Africa or Europe who only company at this point that has wants to expand their crop for the year and doesn't have the capital to buy developed a board just for that." more seeds," Monson said. Humanity Snowboards are made at Monson, Czeschin and Huntoon often use social networking sites Monson Snowboards, a manufacturing facility in Rialto that Monson has owned such as Facebook and Tw itter to reach out to snowboa rders and their for 13 years. The facility has six employees. friends, and they frequentl y post photos and videos of their snowboarding Monson's was the first snowboard pals on the Web. factory to use bamboo as a sidewall On Dec. 23, Monson posted a lighthearted video on the Humanity material. Web site and Facebook called , "Santa Shredd ing Hi s Humanity," of "We have found it to be a great Isringhausen snowboa rding in a Santa costume with a couple of young alternative to plastic," Monson said. "It's super durable, and it's more eco-friendly." ,I skiers at Mountain High in Wrightwood. It looked like a merry Christmas indeed. jl 'I " I' II KING KBATH? AFRA'I D OF T'A' ;1 Comfort, safety~and independence can be yours with a new :1 I WALK~IN BATHTU~Bl! ~ Walk-in tub ol;)display in showroom! • Hydrotherapy Air Spa " Replaces existing tub. or install elsewhere i'l ., , " 1-2 day installation ( ." Replacement Windows '" " Front Entry Systems t'i II "Lowest Price in Southern California" •• 'I· ~ . . .J . ' .~' CONSTRUCTION, INC. /f . ~ CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF SERVING THE INLAND EMPIRE # 1Showroom in the Inland Empire Lie. #459970 ' IE] iii FINANCI NG AVAILABLE O.A.C. Contractors Welcome 402 W. Colton Avenue, Redlands 909.792.6587 local 888.621.1811 toll free www.witwindowsanddoors.com 20 I inlandlivingmagazine.com I february-march 2010 I ;1