Laura Mulvey<br />The Male Gaze<br />
The Gaze<br />Parent concept-what the male gaze stems from<br />...a concept which was originally used in film theory in t...
“The male gaze” can be traced back to Mulvey’s essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” which was published in 1975.<b...
Features of the male gaze<br />Camera lingering on the curves of the female body.<br />Anything that happens to a woman is...
Three parts to the Male Gaze<br />Men looking at women: <br />	Men tend to look at the 'curvy parts' of women. Like the id...
Applying Mulvey’stheory<br />Two and a Half Men episode-http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=megan+fox+two+and+a+ha...
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Becca - Laura mulvey the male gaze

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Becca - Laura mulvey the male gaze

  1. 1. Laura Mulvey<br />The Male Gaze<br />
  2. 2. The Gaze<br />Parent concept-what the male gaze stems from<br />...a concept which was originally used in film theory in the 1970s but is now used more widely with media theorists<br />A way to refer to the ways in which the audience view the people presented. <br />
  3. 3. “The male gaze” can be traced back to Mulvey’s essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” which was published in 1975.<br />In this essay Mulvey states that women in film are typically objects of the gaze-meaning women on screen are seen as the objects of desire.<br />Mulvey believes that film audiences have to view characters from the perspective of a heterosexual male and this is the reason women were seen more as objects.<br />In the era of classical Hollywood cinema, audiences were encouraged to identify with the protagonist of the film-who was usually male. <br />Whereas, Hollywood female characters of the 1950s and 60s were, according to Mulvey, coded with "to-be-looked-at-ness." <br />
  4. 4. Features of the male gaze<br />Camera lingering on the curves of the female body.<br />Anything that happens to a woman is presented largely in the man's reactions to this event.<br />The film degrades the woman to the extent of making her an object or possession. <br />Female viewers must experience the narrative secondarily by identification with the male.<br />The gaze suggests that women are weak and defenceless.<br />
  5. 5. Three parts to the Male Gaze<br />Men looking at women: <br /> Men tend to look at the 'curvy parts' of women. Like the idea that men don't tend to look women in the eyes, but at other parts of their bodies. (Camera in films sometimes focuses more on the women's bodies)<br />Women looking at themselves:<br /> Women are made to look at themselves in a negative way, picking fault with parts of their appearance when they see how women look in the media; when they have been airbrushed. It triggers a lack of self esteem and makes women aspire to be like models in magazines or on TV. Women become reflective.<br />Women looking at women:<br /> Women can look it other in a sexual way. But mainly they judge and compare themselves to other girls. E.g. Looking at what another girl is wearing and then comparing it to your own clothing.<br />
  6. 6. Applying Mulvey’stheory<br />Two and a Half Men episode-http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=megan+fox+two+and+a+half+men+&aq=f<br />Starring Megan Fox<br />Mid-shot/ Close-Up Shot of Prudence Shots focus on her looks and figure<br />Clothing-revealing/figure hugging<br />Charlie and Alan-Menare literally drooling over her<br />Staring at Prudence…cant keep their eyes off her<br />Even Jake (young boy) is shown looking at Prudence…implies all men treat women like objects<br />

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