Istiqomah2[Slide Share]Amnded

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Istiqomah2[Slide Share]Amnded

  1. 1. “ Towards becoming Muslims - and its challenges.” Friday night lecture series by: Ustaz Zhulkeflee Hj Ismail @ Masjid al- Istiqomah (Serangoon, Singapore) ©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail #2 … continuation from #1
  2. 2. “ Towards becoming Muslims - and its challenges.” <ul><li>What is </li></ul><ul><li>“ Ad-Deen al -Islam”? </li></ul>Topic of discussion ©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  3. 3. UNDERSTANDING FROM THE TERMS <ul><li>“ AD-DEEN” - usually translated as “ the religion ” more accurately it should be “ a total way of life or a comprehensive system of living ” </li></ul><ul><li>a Muslim regard his/her entire life as a religious experience. Islam provides for guidance in not only matters of worship but as to how he/she is to conduct in daily matters - be it social, economic etc. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  4. 4. definition of “Deen” <ul><li>from root word “ daa-na “ which can also mean : be indebted, to owe one’s thanks, to be subjected, bow, yield, owe allegiance. </li></ul><ul><li>from “ dain ” which means debt, obligation, liability. </li></ul><ul><li>from “ dainuu-na ” which means judgement, Last Judgement. </li></ul><ul><li>related to the word “ maaddana ” which means “to build or found cities to civilize, to refine and to humanize” from which the word “ tamaddun ” meaning “civilization and refinement in social culture” </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  5. 5. definition of “Deen” <ul><li>The primary signification of the term “ deen ” thus can be reduced to four: </li></ul><ul><li>(1) Indebtedness </li></ul><ul><li>(2) Submissiveness/submission/surrender </li></ul><ul><li>(3) Judicious power </li></ul><ul><li>(4) Natural inclination or tendency </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  6. 6. definition of “Deen” <ul><li>Thus, the implication of “ religion ” in the ordinary usage which tends to be affected by secular thoughts is not in accord to Islam’s concept of religion which is life in totality, all-encompassing and cannot be dichotomized. </li></ul><ul><li>A Muslim always is mindful that ultimately he is a servant of God whether in mosque or in the market place, in private or in public etc. Life of this world is intrinsically link with the Hereafter (also referred to as ‘ Yaum al- Deen’ -The day of Judgement). </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  7. 7. Dilemma of the Present-day Muslim……. “… One can find in the Islamic world today a full spectrum of people ranging from purely traditional elements , through those who are caught between traditional values and modernism , to the blatant modernists who nevertheless still move within the Islamic orbit , and finally to the few who no longer consider themselves to belong to the Islamic universe at all.” (Prof. Seyyed Hossein Nasr in book “ Islam and the Plight of Modern Man ” published by Longman) * I have underlined passage to highlight four types or categories of Muslims he has identified ©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  8. 8. “ Every child is born in a state of Fitrah (pure innocence); it is the parent that will make him to be a Jew, or a Christian, or a pagan (Majusi).” ( Hadith of Prophet Muhammad s.a.w .) REFLECTION ©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  9. 9. STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT <ul><li>INFANT </li></ul><ul><li>PRE-SCHOOL </li></ul><ul><li>Parents may already provide nurturing in accordance with Islamic traditions. Yet although much time spent confined at home, we must also become aware of strong influences through exposures of the mass media and our family lifestyle and parental behavior. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  10. 10. STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT <ul><li>SCHOOLING PERIOD </li></ul><ul><li>EXPOSURE TO TODAY’S “TEENS SUB-CULTURE” </li></ul><ul><li>Although some basic knowledge of Islam may have been provided, yet when they sent the children to formal school, stress towards “ academic excellence ” only and tend to neglect the “ Aqidah-mic ” element in their education which must continuously be complimented in tandem with their development while in and throughout their schooling age. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  11. 11. STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT <ul><li>EXPOSURE TO TODAY’S “TEENS SUB-CULTURE” </li></ul><ul><li>With lesser contact-time at home, and inadequate mentoring & monitoring Islamically by parents, their education becomes “ secularized ”; children may be left to peers and media influences. Islamic values may began to be subsumed by negative trends and sub-cultures opposed to Islam. Some may begin to have doubts about Islam or even loose their Muslim identity. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  12. 12. STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT <ul><li>COLLEGE & VARSITY – </li></ul><ul><li>NATIONAL SERVICE / TASTE OF WORKING LIFE </li></ul><ul><li>At this level, our young may become more independent (less attached to family influence); their idealism may lead them to ‘try out’, to adapt and adopt values alien to Islam itself. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  13. 13. STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT <ul><li>COLLEGE & VARSITY – </li></ul><ul><li>NATIONAL SERVICE / TASTE OF WORKING LIFE </li></ul><ul><li>At this level, our young may become more independent (less attached to family influence); their idealism may lead them to ‘try out’, to adapt and adopt values alien to Islam itself. </li></ul><ul><li>Serious crisis of identity usually occur at this stage – usually when they become ‘worldly-wise’ but unfortunately their knowledge of Islam stagnates at “ kindergarten or primary ” level. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  14. 14. Is part-time Islamic classes adequate? <ul><li>No, if approach to learning Islam merely as subjects to be learnt rather than a lifestyle and character building. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  15. 15. Is part-time Islamic classes adequate? <ul><li>No, if approach to learning Islam merely as subjects to be learnt rather than a lifestyle and character building. </li></ul><ul><li>No, when learning does not conform to its systematic ways according to tradition – fardh ‘ayn before kifaayah ; and began with eclectic before specialization. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  16. 16. Is part-time Islamic classes adequate? <ul><li>No, if approach to learning Islam merely as subjects to be learnt rather than a lifestyle and character building. </li></ul><ul><li>No, when learning does not conform to its systematic ways according to tradition – fardh ‘ayn before kifaayah ; and began with eclectic before specialization. </li></ul><ul><li>No, if parents merely delegate tasks to teachers without they themselves participating in child’s holistic development, and providing good role models. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  17. 17. Is part-time Islamic classes adequate? <ul><li>No, if approach to learning Islam merely as subjects to be learnt rather than a lifestyle and character building. </li></ul><ul><li>No, when learning does not conform to its systematic ways according to tradition – fardh ‘ayn before kifaayah ; and began with eclectic before specialization. </li></ul><ul><li>No, if parents merely delegate tasks to teachers without they themselves participating in child’s holistic development, and providing good role models. </li></ul><ul><li>No, when their identity as Muslims allowed to be eroded by other values and “ idols ” as role models.” </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  18. 18. Is part-time Islamic classes adequate? <ul><li>No, if approach to learning Islam merely as subjects to be learnt rather than a lifestyle and character building. </li></ul><ul><li>No, when learning does not conform to its systematic ways according to tradition – fardh ‘ayn before kifaayah ; and began with eclectic before specialization. </li></ul><ul><li>No, if parents merely delegate tasks to teachers without they themselves participating in child’s holistic development, and providing good role models. </li></ul><ul><li>No, when their identity as Muslims allowed to be eroded by other values and “ idols ” as role models.” </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  19. 19. Is Islamic education achieved by integrating knowledge? <ul><li>Mere integration (formal school with Islamic class) does not make it an Islamic education. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  20. 20. Is Islamic education achieved by integrating knowledge? <ul><li>Mere integration (formal school with Islamic class) does not make it an Islamic education. </li></ul><ul><li>It is only when the dominant worldview, approach and philosophy is that of Islam; and the conscious objective is of moulding a Islamic identity becomes the primary concern. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  21. 21. Is Islamic education achieved by integrating knowledge? <ul><li>Mere integration (formal school with Islamic class) does not make it an Islamic education. </li></ul><ul><li>It is only when the dominant worldview, approach and philosophy is that of Islam; and the conscious objective is of moulding a Islamic identity becomes the primary concern. </li></ul><ul><li>That it must proactively equip them to discern between ‘haqq’ and ‘baatil’ when learning from other systems. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail
  22. 22. Is Islamic education achieved by integrating knowledge? <ul><li>Mere integration (formal school with Islamic class) does not make it an Islamic education. </li></ul><ul><li>It is only when the dominant worldview, approach and philosophy is that of Islam; and the conscious objective is of moulding a Islamic identity becomes the primary concern. </li></ul><ul><li>That it must proactively equip them to discern between ‘haqq’ and ‘baatil’ when learning from other systems. </li></ul><ul><li>That the three primary ‘Tawhidic’ development of iiman, ‘amal and ihsan continues to be nurtured. </li></ul>©2006ZhulkefleeHjIsmail

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