REAL DISCIPLINERonald Morrishby Allison Tomasek&Zahra Hassan<br />
Morrish’s Background Info<br />Ronald Morrish has been an educator and behavior specialist since 1972. He was a teacher in...
 His second book, With All Due Respect, focuses on the keys for improving a teacher’s personal discipline skills, and buil...
 In 2003, he published Flip Tips, a mini-book of discipline tips and helpful hints, drawn from his books and presentations...
Viewpoint<br />Discipline is best established through purposeful teacher guidance<br />Teacher sets standards and helps st...
Modern Discipline Gone Wrong<br />School discipline is an ever growing problem<br />Blames much of it to discipline approa...
3 Reasons Why Modern Discipline Has Failed<br />Discipline experts have claimed that plentiful student choice leads to sel...
History of Discipline<br />
What Morrish Believes about Discipline<br />Students should be taught what is acceptable and what is unacceptable before t...
Morrish’s Real Discipline<br />Not a new theory but an organized set of techniques that teachers and parents have used ove...
So, What Exactly is REAL DISCIPLINE?<br />Teaches students how to behave properly<br />REQUIRES them to show courtesy and ...
Phase 1- Training for Compliance<br />
Phase 1- Training for Compliance <br />Train students to accept adult authority and instantly comply<br />Non thinking act...
Practice till habitual<br />When a mistake is made, show them how to do the act again properly then PRACTICE IT! <br />Sta...
Limits<br />Set limits on behavior and do not negotiate these<br />Can be done formally or informally<br />Let them know y...
Phase 2- Teaching Students How to Behave <br />These will lead to:<br />cooperation, proper behavior, and increased respon...
Phase 2- Teaching Students How to Behave <br />Class rules have been established at this point- with rules, explanation, m...
Phase 3- Managing Student Choice<br />Rule of thumb: if students  care about an outcome then only should they make a choic...
Phase 3- Managing Student Choice<br />At this point, students are ready to move towards independence and make choices <br ...
Example  of Morrish Classroom behavior:<br />Morrish was once visiting a 2-3rd grade classroom and the teacher announced s...
Planning and Implementing The Discipline Program<br />Teacher’s should have a vivid highly detailed image of how their stu...
1. Decide in advance how you want your students to behave<br />Teachers should have a vivid, highly detailed picture of ho...
2. Design the supporting structure<br />After you have developed a clear picture of how you want your students to behave, ...
3. Establish a threshold for behavior at school<br />To ensure effective discipline in school, you must not allow them to ...
4. Run a two-week training camp<br />The investment you make in discipline during the first two weeks of school determines...
5.  Teach students how to behave appropriately<br />Many students arrive at school without the skills necessary for respon...
Skills per month Activity<br />
Skill per month for 10 months<br /> (Each skill was presented in the school hallway on a large frame and glass display.)<b...
6. Set the stage for quality instruction<br />Discipline cannot be successful if the students are bored. Make lessons inte...
7. Provide active, assertive supervision<br />Discipline requires supervision which is a proactive process used to ensure ...
Provide active, assertive supervision continued…<br />Assertive Presence:<br />move with a sense of purpose (stand tall, r...
8. Enforce rules and expectations<br />Warnings and consequences are not effective ways of getting students to conduct the...
9. Focus on prevention<br />Real discipline isn’t what you do when students misbehave, its what you do in advance so they ...
10. Set high standards<br />Make it clear that underachievement is unacceptable in any form (academic or social). <br />Su...
11. Treat parents as partners <br />Work with parents towards child’s success.<br />Inform them of serious incidents and r...
Developing Teacher-Student Relationships<br />The relationship between teacher and students and a student’s understanding ...
Consequences In Real Discipline<br />Consequences, when structured and applied correctly, are helpful in teaching students...
14 Strategies for Effective Management<br />Learning should be the highest priority. Therefore, every teacher should have ...
Motivation and Rewards<br />Make learning as enticing as possible<br />We cant MAKE students do anything- WRONG!<br />Very...
Don’t promote self indulgence <br />Many think self esteem determines success or failure… Morrish says success actually de...
When students fail to comply <br />Students will of course exhibit inappropriate behavior- how do we usually react?<br />M...
Maxims of Morrishism<br />
Maxims of Morrishism<br />Discipline is a process, not an event<br />Discipline comes from the word disciple.  It’s about ...
Don’t let students make choices that are not theirs to make<br />Train students to comply with your directions.  Complianc...
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  1. 1. REAL DISCIPLINERonald Morrishby Allison Tomasek&Zahra Hassan<br />
  2. 2. Morrish’s Background Info<br />Ronald Morrish has been an educator and behavior specialist since 1972. He was a teacher inCanada, for 26 years. During that time, he taught regular education and special education classes, was a learning resource teacher, and spent 16 years as the Board’s behavior specialist.<br /> In 1997, he became an independent consultant. In addition to presenting at conferences, Mr. Morrish provides professional development programs for teachers, and speaks to parent groups and child care providers, internationally. <br />Mr. Morrish has written and published three books: <br /><ul><li> His first book, Secrets of Discipline, which was also produced in video and DVD formats, discusses twelve keys for raising responsible children without deal-making, arguments, and confrontations.
  3. 3. His second book, With All Due Respect, focuses on the keys for improving a teacher’s personal discipline skills, and building effective school discipline as a team.
  4. 4. In 2003, he published Flip Tips, a mini-book of discipline tips and helpful hints, drawn from his books and presentations. </li></ul>Mr. Morrish’s educational background includes two undergraduate degrees, one in psychology from Queen’s University and one in education from Lakehead University, as well as a Master’s degree in education from the University of Toronto.<br />
  5. 5. Viewpoint<br />Discipline is best established through purposeful teacher guidance<br />Teacher sets standards and helps students understand how they are expected to behave.<br />Self control happens over time, rarely occurs without a supportive adult<br />The best approach to discipline emphasizes rules, teacher influence, and student compliance. <br />Establish rules, teach the behavior, require compliance, and redo misbehavior properly.<br />Result will be acceptable behavior.<br />
  6. 6. Modern Discipline Gone Wrong<br />School discipline is an ever growing problem<br />Blames much of it to discipline approaches that call on students to decide how they will behave in school<br />In those approaches the teacher’s role is to encourage good choices and discourage poor ones.<br />Focus on behaviour management rather than real discipline.<br />Both are needed but management is about making the learning environment functional, keeping students on task and minimizing disruptions, it deals with whatever behavior students bring to school. Real Discipline teaches student how to behave properly.<br />
  7. 7. 3 Reasons Why Modern Discipline Has Failed<br />Discipline experts have claimed that plentiful student choice leads to self-esteem, responsibility, and motivation to achieve. The teacher’s role is to encourage good choices and discourage poor ones.<br />According to Morrish:<br />1st it does not demand proper behavior from students<br />2nd the approach doesn’t teach students how they are expected to behave in school<br />3rd it leaves teachers to bargain and negotiate endlessly to get students to cooperate<br />
  8. 8. History of Discipline<br />
  9. 9. What Morrish Believes about Discipline<br />Students should be taught what is acceptable and what is unacceptable before they are given the liberty to make choices<br />Today’s discipline allows students to underachieve, behave discourteously, engage in high-risk behaviors, contribute little or nothing to the school environment, and use intimidation and violence in dealing with others<br />Discipline based on student choice is not producing the results we want<br />
  10. 10. Morrish’s Real Discipline<br />Not a new theory but an organized set of techniques that teachers and parents have used over the years that teaches students to be respectful, responsible and cooperative.<br />Many children are over indulged and very self centered, concerned with their needs. We as a society have stressed individual rights but have not focused a lot on personal responsibility.<br />They should have choice but only when they are prepared to deal with those choices and are mature enough to do so. Before they can make choices they must have a degree of compliance and respect for authority. <br />
  11. 11. So, What Exactly is REAL DISCIPLINE?<br />Teaches students how to behave properly<br />REQUIRES them to show courtesy and consideration<br />Teaches needed social skills <br />Trains students to work within a structure of rules and limits<br />Protects students from self-defeating mistakes<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Phase 1- Training for Compliance<br />
  14. 14. Phase 1- Training for Compliance <br />Train students to accept adult authority and instantly comply<br />Non thinking activities<br />Example- stopping at a stop sign, saying bless you when one sneezes<br />Students should automatically be able to pay attention, follow directions, and speak respectfully automatically <br />Direct Instruction & close supervision <br />Tell students what you expect and model how it should be done. <br />Example- if you want students to raise their hands to answer a question- TELL THEM! <br />
  15. 15. Practice till habitual<br />When a mistake is made, show them how to do the act again properly then PRACTICE IT! <br />Start small and you will see compliance grow out of many small compliances<br />Rules for compliance<br />Should be teacher made, no need to see if students agree, they should learn rules not make them<br />Teach students WHY we have rules and why people who are in authority make them <br />Take their opinions into account, but don’t let them think they are deciding what the rules should be <br />ENFORCE THEM and be consistent or they are pointless<br />Take all breaking of rules into account- even small ones<br />Use insistence<br />Develop students mindset <br />Barely use punishments- they are not positive <br />
  16. 16. Limits<br />Set limits on behavior and do not negotiate these<br />Can be done formally or informally<br />Let them know your word is final <br />Too much time is wasted bargaining with students and it doesn’t give desired results either. <br />Authority<br />Authority needs to be reestablished in classrooms<br />It is conveyed by a teacher’s tone, choice of words, and presentation of themselves <br />Teachers need to communicate clearly and then expect exactly what is asked of students <br />Never raise your voice or sound threatening <br />If students question your authority, say “its my job”<br />First gain students’ respect and appreciation will soon follow <br />
  17. 17. Phase 2- Teaching Students How to Behave <br />These will lead to:<br />cooperation, proper behavior, and increased responsibility.<br />
  18. 18. Phase 2- Teaching Students How to Behave <br />Class rules have been established at this point- with rules, explanation, modeling, practice, feedback, and repetition.<br />Do not assume students will learn how to behave through experience- this will take forever. <br />Instead, teach students what to do through direct instruction and supervised practice. <br />
  19. 19. Phase 3- Managing Student Choice<br />Rule of thumb: if students care about an outcome then only should they make a choice about it! <br />
  20. 20. Phase 3- Managing Student Choice<br />At this point, students are ready to move towards independence and make choices <br />Students are ready for this if they take other students’ needs and rights into account <br />Teachers and students can make choices together<br />BUT if students don’t care about the outcome of a goal, they shouldn’t be allowed to make choices about it <br />Know how to handle students who do not care- example <br />Help students make decisions till they start caring about the output <br />Morrish says, “Schools are not democracies. Teachers must be willing to make the decisions that are theirs to make.”<br />
  21. 21. Example of Morrish Classroom behavior:<br />Morrish was once visiting a 2-3rd grade classroom and the teacher announced she was going to leave the room. <br />How do you think they behaved while she was gone?<br />How did the teacher acquire this desired result?<br />What did the teacher do if the students misbehaved? <br />As students get older, they move towards making independent choices on their own. <br />Real discipline helps them make these choices by teaching them three things <br />Independence requires balancing rights with responsibility <br />The rights and needs of others should be taken into account<br />Students should demonstrate responsibility even when unsupervised. <br />
  22. 22. Planning and Implementing The Discipline Program<br />Teacher’s should have a vivid highly detailed image of how their students will behave.<br />Calls on teachers to be proactive (anticipate, prevent, and prepare)<br />
  23. 23. 1. Decide in advance how you want your students to behave<br />Teachers should have a vivid, highly detailed picture of how they want their students to behave. Every difference between what they see in front of them and what they see in their brain is a job which needs to be done.<br />
  24. 24. 2. Design the supporting structure<br />After you have developed a clear picture of how you want your students to behave, you need to support your efforts by developing a structure of rules, limits, and procedures.<br />(All are teacher created and adapted for grade level)<br />Procedures:<br />entry and exit<br /> arriving late<br /> asking and answering questions<br /> what to do when you finish work early<br /> access to restroom<br /> working with peers<br />Classroom Rules: <br /> come to class prepared to work<br /> arrive on time<br /> complete your work<br /> allow others to get their work done<br />Limits and Restrictions:<br /> no violence<br /> no weapons<br /> no academic dishonesty<br />
  25. 25. 3. Establish a threshold for behavior at school<br />To ensure effective discipline in school, you must not allow them to bring negative home and community behaviors and attitudes into the learning environment.<br />(The management approach does not do this.)<br />For classroom discipline the most effective threshold is the classroom door. If a school-wide discipline plan is in tact the thresholds include the school doors (easiest to enforce) and school grounds (more effective but harder to implement)<br />Ensure that there are school-based solutions to most violations.<br />
  26. 26. 4. Run a two-week training camp<br />The investment you make in discipline during the first two weeks of school determines how the rest of the school year will unfold.<br />(i.e. sports team training camp)<br />Allows teachers to establish clear limits and expectations, train routines and compliance, and teach students how to behave appropriately.<br />Often gets skipped due to extraordinary curriculum demands.<br />Compliance before cooperation: (academics take a back seat for two weeks)<br />Establish clear limits and rules<br />Be “warm strict”<br />Train students to follow classroom procedures<br />Train transitions so they run efficiently<br />Teach students their essential skills, starting with courtesy<br />
  27. 27. 5. Teach students how to behave appropriately<br />Many students arrive at school without the skills necessary for responsible and cooperative behavior. Regardless of the reason it is up to the teacher to teach them how to behave correctly.<br />“Ten Great Skills”<br />Courtesy –(greetings, compliments, manners, listening, helpful, considerate)<br />How to treat substitute teachers- (too often seen as opportunity to misbehave, teach them how to act when you aren't there)<br />Conflict prevention-(help students recognize events that lead up to conflict and provide ways for avoiding them) <br />Self-discipline-(the ability to make the same decisions without supervision)<br />Concentration-(practice to avoid distractibility)<br />Being a part of the solution rather than the problem-(teach them how from the moment they begin school and then back it up with your expectations: either reinforcing or questioning)<br />Thinking about others-(teach them how to recognize opportunities to help others)<br />Perseverance-(don’t let them quit when they get bored)<br />Being a good role model for younger students<br />Being a good ambassador for your class and school-(behave well and dress nicely)<br />
  28. 28. Skills per month Activity<br />
  29. 29. Skill per month for 10 months<br /> (Each skill was presented in the school hallway on a large frame and glass display.)<br />
  30. 30. 6. Set the stage for quality instruction<br />Discipline cannot be successful if the students are bored. Make lessons interesting and worthwhile. <br />HLQs<br />Hands-on activities<br />Challenging assignments<br />Apply concepts to everyday experiences<br />Integrate subject areas<br />Design group learning activities<br />Presentations<br />Field trips<br />Integrate technology<br />
  31. 31. 7. Provide active, assertive supervision<br />Discipline requires supervision which is a proactive process used to ensure students don’t misbehave. You are there to prevent problems.<br />They're never too old:<br />has nothing to do with age<br />be non-intrusive not non-existent<br />Proximity:<br />move briskly<br />assess the area and know where the trouble spots are<br />use devices which extend your range of influence<br />be outside promptly<br />present in hallway<br />
  32. 32. Provide active, assertive supervision continued…<br />Assertive Presence:<br />move with a sense of purpose (stand tall, remain calm and make eye contact)<br />use an assertive tone of voice<br />always attempt to deal with the problem personally<br />Assertive Communication and Direction:<br />remind students of rules/expectations<br />communicate limits (demanding, no options)<br />redirect students<br />be specific and statement oriented<br />use the “broken record” technique<br />Govern and correct small misbehaviors<br />Reinforce positive social skills<br />walk with students when they are about to lose their cool<br />
  33. 33. 8. Enforce rules and expectations<br />Warnings and consequences are not effective ways of getting students to conduct themselves properly.<br />Require good behaviors:<br />Be willing to establish your natural authority and take charge of students<br />Help them learn to comply on small matters and it will carry over<br />Connect with them on a personal basis<br />Listen to them and take their concerns into account<br />Capitalize on their interests<br />Be understanding and supportive through hard times<br />Establish rapport, but combine it with insistence<br />
  34. 34. 9. Focus on prevention<br />Real discipline isn’t what you do when students misbehave, its what you do in advance so they won’t misbehave.<br />This can be done by:<br />Making class interesting and engaging<br />Don’t allow verbal put downs<br />Discuss potential behavior situations with students and devise ways of avoiding problems<br />
  35. 35. 10. Set high standards<br />Make it clear that underachievement is unacceptable in any form (academic or social). <br />Suggestions:<br />Redo inadequate work<br />Challenge them<br />Get them excited about everything they do in school<br />
  36. 36. 11. Treat parents as partners <br />Work with parents towards child’s success.<br />Inform them of serious incidents and repetitive misbehaviors<br />Communicate personally if possible<br />Suggest ways child can do better in school<br />Talk with parents not down to them<br />
  37. 37. Developing Teacher-Student Relationships<br />The relationship between teacher and students and a student’s understanding that discipline benefits everyone in the class are important factors to consider in classroom discipline.<br />Focus on Positive<br />Wipe slate clean after mistakes<br />Don’t back away from discipline<br />Lead the way<br />Never use humiliation to correct behaviour<br />Don’t accept mediocrity<br />
  38. 38. Consequences In Real Discipline<br />Consequences, when structured and applied correctly, are helpful in teaching students how to conduct themselves properly.<br />(Consequences NOT Punishments)<br />Compensation something positive for negative behaviour<br />Letter writing<br />Improvement plan<br />Teach younger students<br />
  39. 39. 14 Strategies for Effective Management<br />Learning should be the highest priority. Therefore, every teacher should have a repertoire of techniques for keeping students engaged and on task, minimizing disruptions, and maintaining the flow of lessons.<br />Use physical cues and prompts<br />Move around the classroom<br />Genuinely reinforce positive behavior<br />Get students attention before giving directions<br />Modulate your voice<br />Challenge students to beat the clock<br />Keep lessons well-paced<br />Keep groups “on a string”<br />Arrange desks to maximize learning<br />Provide “sponge” activities<br />Use delayed discussion<br />Remove seductive objects<br />Have students repeat directions<br />Use humor<br />
  40. 40. Motivation and Rewards<br />Make learning as enticing as possible<br />We cant MAKE students do anything- WRONG!<br />Very purpose of discipline is to make students do what they don’t want to do. <br />Discipline ensures that natural desires to not follow directions are put away and accept the procedures that will help them succeed! <br />Teach students how to persevere and work though activities no matter how unappealing they may be.<br />Forego reward – use occasionally<br />Use the 2 natural rewards: your personal attention and approval- IF YOU INTEND FOR IT TO SUFFICE, IT WILL SUFFICE! <br />Do not over praise <br />
  41. 41. Don’t promote self indulgence <br />Many think self esteem determines success or failure… Morrish says success actually determines an increase or decrease of self esteem. <br />Teachers do more harm to students if they directly try to build self esteem<br />There’s never pressure, never room for mistakes, which means no positive criticism to help a student excel<br />Student’s ability to overcome obstacles depends on our expectations of them. <br />
  42. 42. When students fail to comply <br />Students will of course exhibit inappropriate behavior- how do we usually react?<br />Morrish says- punishments do nothing positive for the student<br />Instead, try a “do-over” – have the student repeat the behavior in an acceptable way<br />Popular Mistake- “If, then” statements<br /> DO NOT give students a choice to misbehave.<br />students who are never required to act appropriately never will. <br />Use the tool of insistence- give them no choice in the matter than what you want them to do. <br />Harsh situations- if do over does not work:<br />Repeat instruction in serious tone <br />If doesn’t work, use a mild punishment to get message across<br />Bring student back to class <br />Expect student to show the proper behavior. <br />
  43. 43. Maxims of Morrishism<br />
  44. 44. Maxims of Morrishism<br />Discipline is a process, not an event<br />Discipline comes from the word disciple. It’s about teaching and learning…not scolding and punishing<br />Discipline isn’t what you do when students misbehave. It’s what you do so they won’t<br />Discipline isn’t about letting students make their own choices. It’s about preparing them properly for the choices they will be making later. <br />
  45. 45. Don’t let students make choices that are not theirs to make<br />Train students to comply with your directions. Compliance precedes cooperation. If you bargain for compliance now, you’ll have to beg for it later<br />Always work from more structure to less structure, not the other way around<br />To prevent major behavior problems, deal with all minor behavior problems when they occur<br />The best time to teach a behavior is when it isn’t needed. Today’s practice is tomorrow’s performance <br />If you teach students to be part of the solution, they are less likely to be part of the problem <br />
  46. 46. A single minute spent practicing courtesy has more impact than a one hour lecture on the importance of it <br />Discipline should end with the correct behavior, not with a punishment <br />Rapport is the magical ingredient that changes a student’s reluctance to be controlled into a willingness to be guided. <br />
  47. 47. Conclusion- Applying Real Discipline in the Classroom<br />Communicate to students that you are committed to providing a classroom without any put downs and teachers and students both do what is expected of them <br />Tell students about duties in the class- define what your job is and what their job is<br />Let it be known that you will be there to help students learn- let them know why its important to follow directions <br />Be friendly with the students, but friendly with authority <br />Discuss the rules thoroughly and make sure all students understand <br />During the first few days of school, remind students of the rules and make sure they stick to them. <br />Always follow through what your own directions and have students practice desired behavior. <br />

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