Inertia 4

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Inertia 4

  1. 1. Inertia <ul><li>Inertia is the physical property of all masses to stay at rest unless acted upon by an external force or unbalanced force. </li></ul><ul><li>An object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Example <ul><li>For example; a soccer ball will remain at rest unless kicked by someone exerting an external force on it. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Large Masses <ul><li>A large mass would require a larger force to start moving than smaller masses because inertia is the measure of mass which means mass is dependent on inertia. </li></ul><ul><li>The tendency of an object to resist changes in its state of motion varies with mass. Because mass is solely dependent on inertia a more massive object has a greater tendency to resist changes in its state of motion. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Example <ul><li>When moving a heavy piano, it will take more force to put it in motion than a toy piano because the bigger piano has a larger inertia than the baby piano. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Smaller Masses <ul><li>A small mass would require a smaller force to start moving than a bigger mass because inertia is the measure of mass. </li></ul><ul><li>A smaller mass has a smaller tendency to resist changes in its state of motion </li></ul>
  6. 6. Friction and Masses <ul><li>Kinetic friction is the force that acts upon objects in motion. </li></ul><ul><li>Static friction is the force which acts upon objects going from rest to motion. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Zero Net Force <ul><li>If the forces acting on the object equals zero, this means the object is not accelerating. Therefore the object is either standing still or moving in a straight path at a constant velocity until interrupted by an unbalanced force. </li></ul>

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