National streategy imperative presentation

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  • KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY AGENDAKnowledge society is a human society in which knowledge should bring justice, solidarity, democracy, peace and also a society in which knowledge could be a force for changing society and a society which provide universal and equitable access to information. Integrating ICT in order to build the knowledge society consist of the following;Learning to know ICT and KnowledgeLearning to do New capacities Learning to live together New communicationLearning to be In the knowledge society and personal development ICT change knowledge itself: Each discipline, its concepts, processes, methods, resources available
  • The knowledge society needs new kinds of knowledge that cannot reduce to traditional disciplines, transverse knowledge and complex knowledge for example the seven complex lessons in education for the future by Edgar Morin:1. Detecting error and illusion: Teach the weaknesses of knowledge: what is human knowledge?2. Principles of pertinent knowledge: Consider the objects of knowledge in their context, in their complexity, in their whole.3. Teaching the human condition: the unity and the complexity of human nature.4. Earth identity: Teach the history of the planetary era, teach the solidarity between all the parts of the world.5. Confronting uncertainties: Teach the uncertainties in physics, in biology, in history…6. Understanding each other: Teach mutual understanding between human beings. And teach what misunderstanding is.7. Ethics for the human genre: Teach the ethics of humanity preparing citizens of the world.
  • As educatorswe need knowledge, enabling all children and all people to access knowledge and to benefit from being educated. Knowledge is a key issue in the knowledge society, and educators have a major mission. There are six major areas that will shape a beneficial use of ICT in education:1. DIGITAL SOLIDARITYIn the field of Education, ICT should help develop “Digital Solidarity”. This requires strong and joint actions of all stakeholders to guarantee the right of participation in the digital society for all students in the world.2. LEARNERS AND LIFELONG LEARNINGIn the Knowledge Society, every learner is a lifelong learner. The content and the methods of initial education must take into account preparation for lifelong learning. ICT is a key tool for developing lifelong learning. 3. DECISION-MAKING STRATEGIESIn order to help decision-makers and to make decisions meet the real needs, bridging research, practice, experimentation, innovation with decision-making is essential. Decision-makers should make better use of the experience of Practitioners and the findings of Researchers.4. NETWORKINGThe Knowledge Society is networked. Networks in Education offer many ways to access knowledge, offer many possibilities for networking people and developing collaborative work and enhancing the “collective intelligence”5. RESEARCHThe development of ICT-based education and training processes is a growing reality. There is therefore a need to continue research work on the development of these technologies and their applications6. TEACHERSBeing a teacher in the Knowledge Society requires new specific competencies: a teacher has to deal with new knowledge, new ways for accessing knowledge; with a networked world and with new types of co-operation and collaboration; with a society in which knowledge plays a crucial role; with lifelong learning.
  •  “EDUCATION FOR ALL” GOALSA couple of years ago ( April 2000) the international community met in Dakar, Senegal set itself a global challenge with the potential to change the lives of millions of children and their challenge is embodied in the six Education For All goals ,which are:1. Expand early childhood care and education2. Provide free and compulsory primary education to all3. Promote learning and life skills for young people and adults4. Increase adult literacy by 50 %5. Achieve gender parity by 2005, gender equality by 20156. Improve the quality of education
  • With the set challenges by the international community, it must be acknowledged that midway through the process significant measurable progress has been accomplished in many aspects, such as increased enrolment and expansion of free primary education. However it is stated that EI is concerned that the goal of achieving gender parity by 2005 was not met. Nor have the financing commitments met the needs: indeed the aid funds for adequate basic education actually diminished in 2005, and the issue of quality education for everyone has not been addressed. For quality education or learning to become reality for all, there are crucial factors such as teacher recruitment, their working conditions, their appropriate remuneration, as well as the quality of their initial and continuous education, to be considered. The Fast Track initiative plans to include quality measures such as the monitoring of learning outcomes as additional criteria for approving FTI country plans, and other several new initiatives focus on education quality and so on, but this growing attention on quality education does not mean quality is improving, but it indicates that it is see as being of crucial importance. Two main policy dilemmas remain ahead: how to combine quality and equality and how to measure quality. There are three main challenges in relation to equality of educationLearning outcomes should be monitored.Learning environments must be approved.Attracting more and better teachers is paramount. The 2007 EFA Global Monitoring Report highlighted the compelling case for early childhood education and care. ECE programmes contribute to young children’s physical, mental, social and emotional development, eliminate disadvantage and prepare children for formal schooling. The GMR also acknowledges a fundamental principle of learning- that the intersection between the student and the teacher is the key determinant of the quality of education programmes but the shortage of qualified teachers threaten the achievement of quality education for all. “EI strongly believes that quality education cannot be achieved without adequate numbers of properly trained qualified teachers.”The Education International believes that governments should play a leading role in training teachers, who should be equitably deployed to urban and rural schools and they also believe that there is a need to improve teachers’ conditions of service, including salaries, which I believe will also improve the quality and equality of the education programmes and also help illiteracy rate among woman
  • “The White Paper on e-Education, published in 2004, guides the Department of Education's approach to e-education and the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) into teaching and learning. The Information and communication technologies are to be used to create greater access to learning opportunities, redress inequalities, improve the quality of teaching and learning, and provide personalised learning experiences.”Schools that implement e-Education are characterised as institutions that have learners who use ICT to enhance learning, access to ICT resources that support the curriculum etc., therefore all teachers will thus require the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes, as well as the necessary support to integrate ICT into teaching and learning.
  • The approach to teacher development in ICT is reflected as a hostile approach and it acknowledges that the development of ICT skills cannot be practised in isolation from their context and that the development of ICT skills and knowledge for teachers should be an integral part of initial and continuing teacher development programmes. This approach to teacher development has the following three dimensions: A pedagogical dimension, which implies an understanding and application of the opportunities of the use of ICT for teaching and learning in a local curriculum context. A technical dimension, which implies• An ability to select, use and support a range of ICT resources as appropriate to enhance personal and professional effectiveness; and• The willingness to update skills and knowledge in the light of new developments. A collaboration and networking dimension, which includes• A critical understanding of the added value of learning networks and collaboration within and between partners; and• The ability to create and participate in communities of practice
  • There are also principles for ICT in teacher developments that are to be followed in the professional development programmes for teachers and they are as follow:• Educational goals should be primary. The focus should not be on providing technical ICT skills only, but on the use of ICT to achieve learning outcomes.• Teacher development programmes should provide teachers with situated/contextualised learning experiences. Programmes should be subject-specific and relevant to the learning areas.• Teacher development programmes should be needs driven. Programmes should respond to the requirements of subjects such as Computer Application Technology, Information Technology, Geography, Design and Accounting.• Ongoing support should be consistently available. This includes pedagogic support (particularly from subject advisers), technical support and creating communities of practice.
  • These development programmes will then be implemented properly following certain guidelines that would make the development programmes a success and taking into consideration the following five development levels:Entry level. The teacher is computer literate and is able to use computers.Adoption level. The teacher is able to use various ICT, including computers, to support traditional management, administration, teaching and learning, and is able to teach learners how to use ICT.Adaptation level. The teacher is able to use ICT to support everyday classroom activities at an appropriate NCS level, assess the learning that takes place and ensure progression.Appropriation level. The teacher has a holistic understanding of the ways in which ICT contributes to teaching and learning.Innovation level. The teacher is able to develop entirely new learning environments that use ICT as a flexible tool, so that learning becomes collaborative and interactive.Like any other programmes this programme also has its own skills level and how these will be achieved and what resources must be used to make the development programme a success.
  • Education is a basic human right; a pathway to maximise individual potential, extend freedoms, build capabilities and open up opportunities.And strategic actions need to be taken to improve the quality of education. in the DFID’s Education Strategy 2010–2015 strategic objectives have been made to deal with issues such as the quality and equality of education worldwide, and they are as follows:ACCESS, QUALITY AND SKILLS1. We will pursue a vision of quality basic education for all. This will be coupled with a new determination to develop skills and expertise for development beyond basic education .2. Our definition of a good school is one that is accessible to every child in their locality. Distance and cost should not prevent children from attending regularly year on year, from primary to lower secondary.3.To support improved access to good quality basic education for all children DFID will: allocate most of our bilateral education aid to basic education – at about 70%; focus on the 72 million primary aged children out of school, including expanding investments in fragile and conflict affected states, to around 50% of our bilateral programmes; where we have education programmes, support the expansion of basic education to lower secondary at affordable costs, including through innovative partnerships with non-state providers; where we have education programmes, support supply and demand side strategies. These will include helping to construct 15,000 classrooms a year, increasing access to water and sanitation in schools and removing primary school fees. 4.We will ensure that our education aid is well aligned to the education MDGs and the broader EFA goals. About 70% of our education aid will be allocated to basic education, as defined by UNESCO’s Global Monitoring Report on Education for All and as measured by the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee. 5.Greater effort is needed to reach those currently marginalised from education if the MDG and EFA goals are to be achieved. There are often complex patterns of multiple disadvantages, where different circumstances require different solutions. 6.Girls and boys have equal rights to quality education. The fact that 39 million girls fail to attend primary school is both a tragedy for the girls themselves and a disaster for development. 7.We will support the whole education sector where we can, through long-term flexible funding. This best enables partner governments to align resources to their policy priorities and to support long-term recurrent costs, including teachers’ salaries .( Learning For All: DFID’s Education Strategy 2010–2015 )
  • National streategy imperative presentation

    1. 1. NATIONALSTREATEGYIMPERATIVE21 FEBRUARY 2013
    2. 2. KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY AGENDA Knowledge society is a human society inwhich knowledge should bring justice,solidarity, democracy, and peace. A society in which knowledge could be aforce for changing society..
    3. 3. KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY AGENDA
    4. 4. KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY AGENDAIntegrating ICT to build the knowledgesociety …. Learning to knowICT and Knowledge Learning to doNew capacities Learning to live togetherNew communication Learning to beIn the knowledge society and personaldevelopment
    5. 5. The seven complex lessons in education forthe future by Edgar Morin: 1. Detecting error and illusion: Teach the weaknesses of knowledge:what is human knowledge? 2. Principles of pertinent knowledge: Consider the objects ofknowledge in their context, in their complexity, in their whole. 3. Teaching the human condition: the unity and the complexity ofhuman nature. 4. Earth identity: Teach the history of the planetary era, teach thesolidarity between all the parts of the world. 5. Confronting uncertainties: Teach the uncertainties in physics, inbiology, in history… 6. Understanding each other: Teach mutual understandingbetween human beings. And teach what misunderstanding is. 7. Ethics for the human genre: Teach the ethics of humanitypreparing citizens of the world.
    6. 6. As educators we need knowledge forenabling all children and all people toaccess knowledge and to benefit from beingeducated.1. DIGITAL SOLIDARITYIn the field of Education, ICT should help develop “Digital Solidarity”. Thisrequires strong and joint actions of all stakeholders to guarantee the right ofparticipation in the digital society for all students in the world.2. LEARNERS AND LIFELONG LEARNINGIn the Knowledge Society, every learner is a lifelong learner. The contentand the methods of initial education must take into account preparationfor lifelong learning. ICT is a key tool for developing lifelong learning.3. DECISION-MAKING STRATEGIESIn order to help decision-makers and to make decisions meet the realneeds, bridging research, practice, experimentation, innovation withdecision-making is essential. Decision-makers should make better use of theexperience of Practitioners and the findings of Researchers.
    7. 7. Cont.…4. NETWORKINGThe Knowledge Society is networked. Networks in Education offermany ways to access knowledge, offer many possibilities fornetworking people and developing collaborative work andenhancing the “collective intelligence”5. RESEARCHThe development of ICT-based education and training processes is agrowing reality. There is therefore a need to continue research work onthe development of these technologies and their applications6. TEACHERSBeing a teacher in the Knowledge Society requires new specificcompetencies: a teacher has to deal with new knowledge, new waysfor accessing knowledge; with a networked world and with new typesof co-operation and collaboration; with a society in which knowledgeplays a crucial role; with lifelong learning.
    8. 8. “EDUCATION FOR ALL”GOALS
    9. 9. Education for all… Is a global movement led byUNESCO, aimed at meeting the learningneeds of all children, youth and adult by2005. But education for all doesn’t necessarilymean Quality education for all…. Education is also a very good investment.Why deprive children from qualityeducation ?
    10. 10. “Education for all "goals April 2000 the international communitymet in Dakar, Senegal and set a globalchallenge with the potential to changelives of million children.. Their challenge was embodied in the sixeducation for all goals..
    11. 11. Six Education For All goals..1.Expand early childhood care and education2. Provide free and compulsory primary education to all3. Promote learning and life skills for young people and adults4. Increase adult literacy by 50 %5. Achieve gender parity by 2005, gender equality by 20156. Improve the quality of education
    12. 12. EDUCATION FOR ALL A number of the set challenges were notachieved by 2005, including the issues ofquality education for everyone…
    13. 13. Education for all For quality education or learning to become realityfor all, there are crucial factors that have to beconsidered… such as teacher recruitment, their workingconditions, their appropriate remuneration, as well asthe quality of their initial and continuouseducation, to be considered. Therefore , The Fast Track initiative plans to includequality measures such as the monitoring of learningoutcomes as additional criteria for approving FTIcountry plans. But this growing attention on quality education doesnot mean quality is improving, but it indicates that it issee as being of crucial importance.
    14. 14. And three main challenges in relation toequality of education remain that…. Learning outcomes should be monitored. Learning environments must beapproved. Attracting more and better teachers isparamount.
    15. 15. Learning environments doneed improvements….
    16. 16. ……..
    17. 17. We need qualified teachers for thequality of our education… . “EI strongly believes that qualityeducation cannot be achieved withoutadequate numbers of properly trainedqualified teachers.” governments should play a leading rolein training teachers, who should beequitably deployed to urban and ruralschools . With the intention to improve teachers’conditions of service, including salaries.
    18. 18. Education for all….The quality of oureducation depends onproperly trained qualifiedteachers….!
    19. 19. PERVASIVENESS OF TECHNOLOGY
    20. 20. PERVASIVENESS OF TECHNOLOGY “The Information and communicationtechnologies are to be used to create greateraccess to learning opportunities, redressinequalities, improve the quality of teaching andlearning, and provide personalised learningexperiences.” Therefore all teachers will thus require theknowledge, skills, values, and attitudes, as well asthe necessary support to integrate ICT intoteaching and learning.
    21. 21. PERVASIVENESS OF TECHNOLOGY
    22. 22. THE HOSTILE APPROACH TO TEACHER DEVELOPMENT…. The development of ICT skills cannot be practisedin isolation from their context. The development of ICT skills and knowledge forteachers should be an integral part of initial andcontinuing teacher development programmes. This approach has the following three dimensions:1.A pedagogical dimension, which implies anunderstanding and application of the opportunitiesof the use of ICT for teaching and learning in a localcurriculum context.
    23. 23. Cont.…2. A technical dimension, which implies• An ability to select, use and support a range of ICTresources as appropriate to enhance personal andprofessional effectiveness; and• The willingness to update skills and knowledge inthe light of new developments.3. A collaboration and networking dimension, whichincludes• A critical understanding of the added value oflearning networks and collaboration within andbetween partners; and• The ability to create and participate incommunities of practice.
    24. 24. Principles to be followed in the professionaldevelopment programmes for teachers….• Educational goals should be primary.• Teacher development programmesshould provide teachers withsituated/contextualised learningexperiences.• Teacher development programmesshould be needs driven• On- going support should be consistentlyavailable.
    25. 25. Cont...• Teacher development should be on-going, due to the changing nature of ICT.
    26. 26. Five development levels… Implementing these developmentsrequire guidelines to be followed for theprogrammes to be successful…. Therefore the five development levels wedeveloped to serve as guide lines for theteacher development programmes… Entry level. The teacher is computerliterate and is able to use computers.
    27. 27. Cont.… Adoption level. The teacher is able to usevarious ICT, including computers, to supporttraditionalmanagement, administration, teaching andlearning, and is able to teach learners how touse ICT. Adaptation level. The teacher is able to useICT to support everyday classroom activitiesat an appropriate NCS level, assess thelearning that takes place and ensureprogression
    28. 28. Cont.… Appropriation level. The teacher has a holisticunderstanding of the ways in which ICTcontributes to teaching and learning. Innovation level. The teacher is able todevelop entirely new learning environmentsthat use ICT as a flexible tool, so that learningbecomes collaborative and interactive
    29. 29. Present future nationalstrategic objectives
    30. 30. Present future national strategicobjectives Education is a basic human right; apathway to maximise individualpotential, extend freedoms, buildcapabilities and open up opportunities. And strategic actions need to be taken toimprove the quality of education. in the DFID’s Education Strategy 2010–2015 strategic objectives have beenmade to deal with such issues…
    31. 31. The document’s priorities ofaction are….ACCESS, QUALITY AND SKILLS pursue a vision of quality basic education forall. Their definition of a good school is one that isaccessible to every child in their locality. We will ensure that our education aid is wellaligned to the education MDGs and thebroader EFA goals. Girls and boys have equal rights to qualityeducation
    32. 32. Cont.. support the whole education sector wherewe can, through long-term flexible funding We will aim to support at least 5.5 millionchildren in school globally by 2010, throughour country programme support aloneRead more about these strategic actions in TheDFID’s Education Strategy 2010–2015Additional notes below
    33. 33. teacher competency standardsrelating to ICTs and professionalaptitude…
    34. 34. Standards and performanceindicators Effective teachers model and apply theNETS·S as they design, implement, andassess learning experiences to engagestudents and improve learning And all teachers have to meet certainstandards and performance indicators
    35. 35. Standards and performance indicators 1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning andCreativityTeachers use their knowledge of subjectmatter, teaching and learning, and technology tofacilitate experiences that advance studentlearning, and virtual environments. 2. Design and Develop Digital Age LearningExperiences and AssessmentsTeachers design, develop, and evaluate authenticlearning experiences and assessment incorporatingcontemporary tools and resources to maximizecontentlearning in context and to develop the knowledge,skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS·S.
    36. 36. Standards and performance indicators 3. Model Digital Age Work and Learningteachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and workprocesses representative of an innovativeprofessional in a global and digital society. 4. Promote and Model Digital Citizenshipand ResponsibilityTeachers understand local and global societalissues and responsibilities in an evolving digitalculture and exhibit legal and ethical behaviourin their professional practices
    37. 37. Standards and performance indicators 5. Engage in Professional Growth andLeadershipTeachers continuously improve their professionalpractice, model lifelong learning, and exhibitleadership in their school and professionalcommunity by promoting and demonstratingthe effective use of digital tools and resources.
    38. 38. In conclusion We need qualified teachers To enforce knowledge society And skilled teachers in using ICT INTEACHING AND LEARNING To improve the quality and equality ofeducation
    39. 39. THANK YOU…..
    40. 40. REFERENCES DOE: Guidelines for Teacher Training andProfessional Development in ICT (2007) EI analysis .Education For All by 2015: EducationInternational’s Response to the Global MonitoringReport (2008) Learning For All: DFID’s Education Strategy (2010–2015) NETST.PDF. Standards and performance indicators.(2008) NPC National development plan. Version for 2030

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