Juaniza evaluation on guidance services

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Juaniza evaluation on guidance services

  1. 1. EVALUATION ON GUIDANCE SERVICES Ayinne Erika Juaniza III-26 BS Pscyhology
  2. 2. COOPERATIVE SELF-STUDY
  3. 3. The Education Program The survey committee appointed to evaluate guidance service must be sure to examine certain elements of the educational program even though they cannot be expected to do a thorough evaluation of the entire program. • To what extent do teachers seem to understand the basic needs of the students? What are they doing to help their students satisfy these basic needs? • Do teachers help students develop good work habits and efficient study skills? To what extent do teachers help students develop proficiency in basic skill subjects? • What are counselors doing to help teachers improve affective education as well as student’s intellectual development? Who is helping teachers recognize, accept, express and enjoy their own and their student’s feelings in daily living together within their classroom?
  4. 4. Counseling Inasmuch as he tends to be assigned more duties than he can perform adequately, a counselor must continue to confront himself with these questions: • Of all the services that I am asked to provide, which are most essential? • Which can be provided only by a professional with my preparation? • Which of the request should I ignore or refuse to do because they damage my personal relationships with my students, teachers and parents?
  5. 5. The counselor may keep a log to determine whether he is using his time appropriately. • • • • • • • • Individual counseling Group counseling Counseling-related activities Consulting with teachers Counseling with parents Counseling parents Leading parent-education groups Arranging for referrals Academic advising activities Planning group-guidance activities Conducting guidance activities Providing placement services Performing clerical duties Doing committee work concerned with school policies or curriculum • Performing administrative duties • Doing research and/or other evaluation services • • • • • •
  6. 6. For other services, the committee charged with responsibility for evaluation of guidance services should obtain answers to the following questions: Child Study • What do the teachers feel they need to know about their students in order to teach them effectively. • What additional information is needed by those who provide guidance services? • To what extent are all the needs of these staff members and by child-study service? Information Service • For what questions do students want answers concerning themselves and their environment? Which of these questions should be answered by parents? Which of those questions should be answered by their parents? • What materials are available for student’s use? Are the materials appropriate for their use? What additional materials are needed? • What proportion of the students actually uses the materials?
  7. 7. Orientation • To what extent does the orientation program prepare students for their new school experiences? • How many students be encouraged to plan and revise the orientation program? • Why is orientation in the new setting preferred over new orientation prior to the move to the new setting Career Development • When do most students make their first career choice? • What do counselors do to motivate students to accept responsibility for their own career development? • What proportion of the students who graduated from high school last year left school with specific vocational and educational plans?
  8. 8. Follow-up Service • What follow-up studies have been completed recently? What suggestions did you obtain for improving guidance services? For improving the curriculum? How were these suggestions used? • What may be done to obtain responses from a more representative sample of former students? • What percentage of the former students who graduated five years ago implemented their high school vocational plans? Placement Services • Who has been served by your cooperative education programs? What other students could profit from them? How may these programs be changed to better serve college-bound students? • How could summer and part-time employment be coordinated with cooperative education programs more effectively to aid in the identification and development of salable skills for college-bound as well as non-college-oriented students? • What can be done to obtain more relevant part-time and summer employment?
  9. 9. Administration of Guidance Service • Are the guidance positions clearly defined, and are compatible duties assigned to individual workers? Do job descriptions include adequate definition of professional qualifications of workers? Are staff members selected with care? • Are members of the staff encouraged to share ideas, to grow on the job and to contribute to the development of appropriate school policies? • To what extent have individuals assumed responsibility for their own growth? How has the administration encouraged this self-development?
  10. 10. CASE-STUDY APPROACH
  11. 11. Client’s goal for counseling: The criteria which they developed with their counselors’ assistance, to help them decide when they had achieved goals; and the counselor’s notes to indicate the extent to which each client had achieved his goals. Sample Case Study: A fourth-grade boy complained to his counselor about his teacher rejecting him and being unfair to him. During the first counseling session he also questioned whether his parents liked him as much as they did his older sister. Although the boy and the counselor were able to define the first goal during the session, it took several sessions to help the boy do anything more about other goals than to complain about his parents’ unfairness and his sister’s bossy behavior.
  12. 12. Eventually the following goals for him were stated and accepted: 1. To tell his teacher how it hurts when he feels that he is rejected or treated unfairly (“She will listen to me and not get mad”) 2. In the counselor’s office, and with the counselor’s help, to tell his parents how it hurts to believe that they love his sister more than they love him, and how he would like their help in getting along with his sister (“They will listen, show me that they like me, and help me learn to get along my sister better- to have fewer fights with her”) 3. To help him make at least one good friend at school and at least one who lives close to his house (“Then these boys will choose me to play ball with them and teach me to play games better than I do”)
  13. 13. The teacher not only listened to the boy but asked to sit on his counseling session in which the boy learned to signal the teacher when he felt put down or rejected. Then the teacher arranged for a conference with the counselor in which they discussed what made the child react as he did, its impact on the teacher, and what each could do about it. His goals for improving his relationships with his parents also were achieved. They did learn to give him more individual attention and to enjoy him. With the counselor’s assistance in an Adlerian type of family counseling and his parents’ use of the family council, the boy also learned some new coping skills with his sister, and his sister learned to cope with him. Although he made one good friend at school, he did not achieve his third goal as fully as rest; he did not develop either his athletic skills or friend-making skills as fully as he hoped.

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