Session1

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TAA eLearn Course Session 1 by yum productions

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  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information. 2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software. 3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • Organise Content into Small Chunks • Build Upon Prior Knowledge. Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience. (Case studies and practices exercises are good because they can be structured to combine the new information with the learner’s current understanding.) • Provide Real-World Context. (Create exercises and real-world scenarios that help the learner apply the new information into a workplace context. Problem-solving scenarios help develop thinking skills that can be transferred to the working environment) • Focus on meaning and not information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Session1

    1. 1. – CBAA
    2. 2. – CBAA <ul><li>Mood Meter – How are you feeling? </li></ul>Spring is in the air Any fitter would be dangerous Steady as she goes Starting to avoid eye contact On the edge of reality
    3. 3. Welcome – CBAA <ul><li>What is eLearning? </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging Strategies for eLearning </li></ul><ul><li>Pappas got a brand new Blog </li></ul>
    4. 4. Weekly Task – CBAA <ul><li>E Learning Teacher/ Trainer skills and abilities </li></ul>
    5. 5. Weekly Task – CBAA <ul><li>Taking a phlogging </li></ul>
    6. 6. Assessment Task One – CBAA <ul><li>Assessment Task 1 Organisational opportunities for eLearning (Due September 7 th 2010) </li></ul>
    7. 7. Assessment Task One – CBAA
    8. 8. – CBAA
    9. 9. – CBAA
    10. 10. – CBAA
    11. 11. – CBAA
    12. 12. – CBAA
    13. 13. – CBAA
    14. 14. – CBAA
    15. 15. – CBAA <ul><li>Change is constant! </li></ul>
    16. 16. eLearning Questions <ul><li>What can I deliver? (Course Content) </li></ul><ul><li>What methods can I use? (Tools) </li></ul><ul><li>How can I deliver? (Distribution) </li></ul><ul><li>How can I teach? (Facilitation) </li></ul>
    17. 17. What is eLearning? - Synchronous <ul><li>Any learning event where interaction happens simultaneously in real-time. </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual Classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>Shared Whiteboards </li></ul><ul><li>Application Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Teleconferencing </li></ul><ul><li>Videoconferencing </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual Worlds </li></ul><ul><li>Face to Face Workshops </li></ul>
    18. 18. What is eLearning? - Asynchronous <ul><li>Any learning event where interaction is delayed over time. This allows learners to participate according to their schedule, and be remote from the trainer </li></ul><ul><li>Email </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion Forums </li></ul><ul><li>CD ROMS </li></ul><ul><li>Textbooks </li></ul><ul><li>Video/Audio resources </li></ul><ul><li>Web searches/Social Networking sites </li></ul>
    19. 20. State of Play <ul><li>Totally online courses </li></ul><ul><li>Blended solutions with a mix of face-to-face and online elements </li></ul><ul><li>Learning management systems that manage students' learning </li></ul><ul><li>web conferencing systems, which support the delivery of scheduled online sessions </li></ul>
    20. 21. Fully Online Knowledge Preparation for F2F Skills Workshop Blended – Mix of online & F2F Skill recognition/currency/RPL Skills update on demand Collaborative Learning with Peers Potential Delivery Models
    21. 22. Model of e Learning Knowledge/Skills Industry Knowledge Staff Capacity Compliance eLearning Training Tools Collaboration Authentic Tasks Trainer/Learner Communication Model Self Paced eLearning Platform Structured
    22. 23. Describe what are – to you – the most important elements in Training/Teaching
    23. 24. Now, what elements that you value do you think would be diminished by an online training experience
    24. 25. For you, what elements would contribute to a successful eLearning experience?
    25. 26. Student expectations <ul><li>In 2009, a survey of more than 3,600 VET students revealed that: </li></ul><ul><li>90% of VET students say that they would like at least ‘a little’ e-learning in their course. </li></ul><ul><li>42% of VET students said that e-learning was a factor in their choice of training provider , with </li></ul><ul><li>47% saying that e-learning influenced their choice of course to some degree </li></ul>http://e-learningindicators.flexiblelearning.net.au/docs/09results/2009BenchmarkingSurveyReport.pdf
    26. 27. What are your learners expectations?
    27. 28. Purpose <ul><li>Most e learning courses purpose is to share information or change/improve job role performance. </li></ul><ul><li>However, most courses focus on sharing information rather than performance improvements. This happens because most people focus on delivering content rather than on changing job role performance. </li></ul>
    28. 29. All shapes & sizes <ul><li>Learners exhibit a variety of learning style preferences </li></ul><ul><li>Active </li></ul><ul><li>Reflective </li></ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul><ul><li>Experiential </li></ul><ul><li>Auditory </li></ul><ul><li>Sensing </li></ul>
    29. 30. Engaging eLearning <ul><li>Organise Content into Small Chunks </li></ul><ul><li>Build Upon Prior Knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Real-World Context. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on meaning and not information </li></ul>
    30. 31. Engaging eLearning <ul><li>Tap into the learner’s motivation. </li></ul><ul><li>Have the learners do something with the information that you give them. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask learners how the course content is relevant. </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm that the scenarios are accurate and realistic </li></ul><ul><li>Use of Text with Images, Slideshows, PowerPoint presentations, Video and Audio </li></ul>
    31. 32. Engaging eLearning <ul><li>Get the learners to create the learning materials: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>quiz questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>decision making trees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>product manuals/resources </li></ul></ul>
    32. 33. Your Model needs to be fit with <ul><li>Your ability as a trainer/designer </li></ul><ul><li>Your learners abilities with technology </li></ul><ul><li>An analysis of your course delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Your ability to apply it to other training </li></ul><ul><li>Your organisation supports and infrastructure </li></ul>
    33. 34. Before 2003 he was the MAN!!
    34. 35. Blog! <ul><li>Well going back in time when the Interweb was young and computer screens needed a 3 month gym membership just to shift off your desk, you needed THE MAN to set up and build for you a website. </li></ul><ul><li>You also needed access to space on the internet to stash all your webpage stuff. </li></ul><ul><li>But it was impossible for people to interact with you and others on the site (unless you used email or murky chat sites). Sometime around 2003, Blogs and Wikis solved this problem! </li></ul>
    35. 36. Blog! <ul><li>A Blog (short for web log) is often used as a personal journal that can be updated frequently and is intended for general public consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs generally reflect the personality of the author. </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs can be easily maintained and updated through a standard web browser without the need for additional technologies. They are often free of charge to establish. </li></ul>
    36. 37. Blog! <ul><li>With their ease of use and personal appeal, the number of blogs and range of subject matter has exploded over recent years. Blogs can also draw upon content from other blogs (referred to as syndication from an RSS “feed” - so you can follow using your Google Reader that you just set up!). </li></ul><ul><li>For this reason, blogs have become a powerful medium for establishing web communities and special interest groups. </li></ul>
    37. 38. Blog! <ul><li>Here are 3 good blogs around e learning: </li></ul><ul><li>http://jennywood.edublogs.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://theedublogger.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://learningputty.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>If you are interested in setting up a blog check out: </li></ul><ul><li>edublogs.org.au </li></ul><ul><li>Blogger (part of Google) </li></ul>
    38. 39. Blog! <ul><li>As an informational/instructional resource </li></ul><ul><li>FAQs </li></ul><ul><li>As a tool for learners to establish their own journals, portfolios and personal reflections </li></ul><ul><li>A course/subject journal compiled over the period of delivery with course related reflections </li></ul><ul><li>To showcase personal works and achievements (eg an arts/multimedia portfolio) </li></ul><ul><li>To contribute to a wider body of knowledge (eg people from beyond your provider can benefit from reading your blog) </li></ul><ul><li>As a class portal for learners </li></ul><ul><li>As an ongoing content where materials and resources can be archived online for easy locating in the future. </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development resource </li></ul>
    39. 40. Resources <ul><li>Gallery of e learning strategies http://designing.flexiblelearning.net.au/gallery/all.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Australian Flexible Learning Framework http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/ </li></ul><ul><li>Jane Hart http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/jane.html </li></ul>
    40. 41. Thank you for playing

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