eLearning Program 2013 Induction
ACPET ACPET Government  Thanks to - Vic  Thanks to ACPET      now onlye-learning Program 2011      now only Kryptonite can...
The Aim…..….for your RTO to acquireskills & knowledge to design,develop and deliver a trial ofa chosen unit of competencyt...
What is e-learning?e-learninguses electronic media to deliverflexible vocational education and training.It includes:access...
What is not e-learning?
One size fits all?
Why go down the e-learning road?• Learner Demand• Competitive Edge• More time for skills  assessment in F2F• Respond to In...
Introducing……………..Let’s head to Yammer to find out a bit more about eachother and your plans:http://www.yammer.comLog in w...
Introducing……………..•Unit you will attempt•How existing training is delivered for this unit•Why is elearning a good fit for ...
Blended Learning Modes   Face to   Face to    Face     Face              Self              Self             Paced         ...
Applying Blend to your course(s)                                           Online             Face to Face   Self Paced   ...
Face to Face examples•   Quiz•   Assessment•   Mobile•   Video & Audio•   Group work•   Digital Literacy
Self Paced examples• Compliance• Scenarios• Decision  making trees• Course Content• Assessment• Guided readings• RPL
Facilitated online examples• Group research projects• QnA of industry experts/past learners• Online lecture• Assessment ta...
Training TrendsModels of Delivery                         Knowledge Preparation                          Knowledge Prepara...
Blended Learning Modes   Face to   Face to    Face     Face              Self              Self             Paced         ...
Face to Face Learning Pedagogies• Singe location• Technology can be  integrated
Face to Face Infrastructure•   Furniture•   Whiteboard•   Interactive Whiteboards•   Computers/Tablets•   Video & Audio•  ...
Face to Face Assessment• Skills  Assessments• Group Project• Individual stories  from the  workplace
Face to Face Good PracticeSpend teaching time on demonstrating and assessingpractical skills.Incorporate technology throug...
Self Paced Pedagogy• Make it engaging• Pull versus Push• Activities with  workplace context• Problem Solving• Information ...
Self Paced Infrastructure• Learner Management  System• Vendor Course  Content• Consultant developed• Rapid eLearning in-  ...
Self Paced Assessment•   Problem Solving•   Multimedia•   Less reliance on text•   Decision making tree•   Reason to use c...
Self Paced Examples•   Problem Solving•   Multimedia•   Less reliance on text•   Decision making tree•   Reason to use con...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj5M4KCfTwo
Self Paced Good PracticeGive learners something to do with the content. Even if yourcourse is info heavy, provide opportun...
Online Facilitated Pedagogy• Synchronous• Asynchronous
Online facilitated Pedagogy(Synchronous)• Online workshops &  tutorials• Assessment Task  presentation• Group Work  presen...
Online Facilitated Infrastructure(Synchronous)• Virtual Classrooms• Telephone & Video  Conference Systems• VOIP
Online Facilitated Assessment(Synchronous)• Body Language• Mix of activities in  session• Peer Review• Assessment  Present...
Synchronous example - Webinar• Follow the link to  Blackboard Collaborate  in our Moodle
Blackboard CollaborateLogging into Elluminate – optimise your connection speed• Set your Connection  Speed to the Internet...
Blackboard Collaborate Sample session
Webinar Good PracticeKeep lecturing to a minimum. Use the group to workthrough scenarios and problems. Promote discussion ...
Online facilitated Pedagogy(Asynchronous)• Discussion• Sharing• Placement &  Assessment• Social Media• Group work
Online Facilitated Infrastructure(Asynchronous)• Email• Online Discussion and  or Voice Boards• Learner Management  System...
Online Facilitated Assessment(Asynchronous)• Activities need to be  linked to Assessment• Trainers need to  monitor and ac...
Asynchronous example - Discussions• Visit the Discussions in  Moodle:  - Introduce yourself  - FAQ  - Ideas, Resources &  ...
Discussions Good Practice•Link to assessment•Base on participants sharing experiences & priorknowledge – “learners stories...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM_Y2NSJcmE
Straw Poll –Which Blended Model is best for your RTO? A Face to Face, Self Paced & Online Facilitation B Face to Face and ...
eAssessment Assessment                  Assessment                 Assessment Distribution &                   Response   ...
Direct             Indirect demonstration          Productsdemonstration/observatio                                 Produc...
eAssessment  Learners need to know  1.What they must demonstrate to you as the  trainer to show workplace competency  2.Ho...
eAssessment evidenceDirect Evidence – things that we, as assessor,observes first-hand, e.g., observation, worksamplesIndir...
Mobile Evidence    eAssessment trends• Evidence Capture• Voice – Text – Video – Images• Student, 3rd Party, Assessor• How ...
QuizeAssessment trends• Knowledge retrieval• Student, 3rd Party, Assessor• How much evidence is  enough?
Decision making                                        treeseAssessment trends• Knowledge retrieval and  application• Prob...
SimulationeAssessment trends• Knowledge and Skills• Self Paced or Webinar• Workplace process and or  communication
Discussion &                                  Social learning    eAssessment trends•   Knowledge and Skills•   Group probl...
Placement    eAssessment trends•   Knowledge and Skills•   Workplace context•   Industry Knowledge•   Common issues•   Var...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hNlWGqkQ1o
eAssessment Activity 1
eAssessment Activity 2
Activity! Imagine your “blend” !                                           Online             Face to Face   Self Paced   ...
Copyright You will use a range of content in your learning resources. These content types may include: •Text, Images, Inte...
Copyright • If you use content that isn’t entirely your creation, you will   need to consider copyright. • Copyright laws ...
CopyrightAs you complete your detailed design blueprints, you should keep track of your content sources.The Copyright Regi...
Creative CommonsCreative Commons is a nonprofit thatoffers flexible copyright managementtools for creative work.Offering y...
Creative Common Licenses     Attribution - This applies to every Creative Commons     work. Whenever a work is copied or r...
Creative Commons LinksFlickr Creative Commons – http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/Open Source Music - http://www.opens...
Creative Commons                                          Audio                                                           ...
Web 2•Social Bookmarks•RSS and Google Reader
Google Reader• Using Google reader you can add RSS feeds from  websites you want to follow. RSS stands for "Really  Simple...
Set up RSS Reader
RSS Feeds to followhttp://clive-shepherd.blogspot.com.au/http://janeknight.typepad.com/pick/http://www.articulate.com/rapi...
Social Bookmarks• Social bookmarking systems are web-based services that  allow users to bookmark all manner of web based ...
Set up Diigohttp://www.diigo.com/
Implementing Blended Learning• Be proactive• Define your brand• Identify existing strengths &  opportunities• Demonstrate ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKxpzEWJ4Lk
Flexible Learning Frameworkhttp://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/ http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/
E-learning standardshttp://e-standards.flexiblelearning.net.au/ http://e-standards.flexiblelearning.net.au/
Cathy Moorehttp://blog.cathy-moore.com/ http://blog.cathy-moore.com/
Centre for Learning & PerformanceTechnologieshttp://c4lpt.co.uk/ http://c4lpt.co.uk/
Rapid e Learning Bloghttp://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/ http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/
eLearning Brothershttp://elearningbrothers.com/instructional-design-tips/ http://elearningbrothers.com/instructional-desig...
eLearning eXpertshttp://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/ http://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/
eLearning Academy – Connect Thinkinghttp://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/ http://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/
ElNethttp://www.elnet.com.au/ http://www.elnet.com.au/
List of useful links:http://e-learningindicators.flexiblelearning.net.au/docs/11results/2011_e-learnhttp://e-learningindic...
Any Questions?
Acpet eLearning Program 2013 Induction
Acpet eLearning Program 2013 Induction
Acpet eLearning Program 2013 Induction
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Acpet eLearning Program 2013 Induction

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Workshop for Victorian RTO's participating in the ACPET eLearning mentor program.

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  • 21/11/11 Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/12905355@N05/4293966039/
  • 21/11/11
  • A useful definition comes from the National VET eLearning Strategy Flexible Learning Framework – “ e­learning uses electronic media to deliver flexible vocational education and training. It includes:   access to, downloading & use of web, CD­ROM or computer based  learning resources in the  classroom, workplace or home   online access to and participation in course activities  (e.g. online simulations, online group discussions)   directed use of the internet, mobile and voice technologies for learning and research purposes   structured learning based email communication   online assessment activities. ” ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Most definitions stress training mediated by some type of electronic device including computers, tablets or mobile phones: Derek Stockley – “ The delivery of a learning, training or education program by electronic means. E-learning involves the use of a computer or electronic device (e.g. a mobile phone) in some way to provide training, educational or learning material. E-learning can involve a greater variety of equipment than online training or education, for as the name implies, "online" involves using the Internet or an Intranet. CD-ROM and DVD can be used to provide learning materials. Distance education provided the base for e-learning's development. E-learning can be "on demand".     Flexible delivery covers a broad range of learning events using a number of available technologies. e-learning is the use of any type of electronic technology to create, distribute and deliver valuable data, information, learning and knowledge to improve on the job performance . Links to paste: National VET e-learning strategy http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/ Photo Credit: "http://www.flickr.com/photos/82795201@N00/162593664/
  • e-learning  uses electronic media to deliver flexible  vocational education and training.  It does not include:   email dissemination of course information  email communication between a teacher/trainer and learner on a single learning issue  online administration of learning activities.  online repository of files These are considered support rather than learning events. Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/44124404848@N01/150068537/
  • e-learning  can use a variety of delivery methods to learners including Flexible, Self Paced, Trainer or computer assessed Blended Facilitated online Informal networks based on knowledge sharing There is no one size fits all with e-learning. Like all training the final model depends on the RTO ’s capacity to respond to Industry, Employer and Trainee needs and preferences. Photo Credit: "http://www.flickr.com/photos/18282040@N00/55134202/ Licensed under a creative commons license
  • Photo Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/25346522@N02/4732030995/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • It is easier to think of Elearning as a suite of Blended delivery choices available to RTOS: These modes can be any mix of face to face and either or a combination of online self paced, facilitated or group work sessions. Students participate in both traditional face to face classes and virtual classes such as online tutorials or discussion forum activities.   Face to Face – Trainers and learners participate in online activities or resources during face to face sessions. Flexible, Self Paced Trainer or computer assessed – Learner works through prepared learning content that is assessed as they progress. Access to trainer generally for support or higher level assessment task feedback. Facilitated online – learning is conducted entirely online through course material provision provided through a Learner Management System and online activities provided though either virtual classroom tutorials or discussion forums. Not such an attractive model for RTOs as it does not attract Government funding incentives for training placements.   Many RTOs commence using Elearning via the provision to learners of a Resource repository – learners access content online and refer to resources that are used in a face to face class. Not really considered elearning.     Informal networks based on knowledge sharing (also known as social learning) – “ The revolution that is social media means that now everyone can have access to the Social Web and a range of services and applications to support their own as well as their team ’ s learning, performance and productivity.  “ Jane Hart .  
  • For each course we can determine the best mix of delivery modes according to: Infrastructure available to deliver in each mode Capability of our organisation and our learners to teach and learn in each mode Strategic choices about how to package courses for blended learning The types of content we will need to delivery Learning activities Assessment methods and potential for assessment submission.
  • Some examples of how RTOs use learning technologies in the training room include: Conducting a quiz in the classroom Workplace assessment evidence using mobile Using video and audio Using Blogs & Wikis for group tasks Supporting students using digital tools in learning
  • Some examples of how RTOs use learning technologies to provide self paced content includes: Compliance testing Communication scenarios Application of policy & procedure decision making trees Course Content Assessment tasks and associated guided readings/resources/multimedia RPL
  • Some examples of how RTOs facilitate online learning interaction includes Group research projects QnA of industry experts/past learners Online lecture Assessment task pitch & presentation Peer Review of learners’ work Role play Group problem solving Remote trainee/third party assessor catch up Assessment verification and moderation RPL
  • A variety of blended learning modes are currently used by Australian RTOs for a variety of purposes.
  • Lets break down each component of Blended Learning (Face to Face, Self Paced and Online Facilitated ) to look in more detail at the Learning pedagogies (How can we teach and support learners using this mode of delivery?) Technology (What types of technology is required to teach and interact with learners? Assessment (How do learners submit assessment? How do RTOs retrieve activity and assessment attempts, grade and release content and new activities based on learner progress?)
  • A face to face training session is an example of synchronous learning.   These synchronous events can be integrated easily within a single location – for example: during a face-to-face session, industry leaders may join the class using Skype or a virtual classroom. Typical face to face learning events in a mature blended learning approach may include:   Face-to-face workshop, tutorial or skills training program conducted at an RTO or workplace. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions. Learners may also access resources online or submit assessment tasks electronically, collaborate on group tasks using Social Media, Learner Management systems or Blogs and Wikis. Resource for posting http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronous_learning Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/85471862@N00/5065479910/
  • Training rooms whether onsite at the RTO or clients premises/workplace. Basic infrastructure such as tables, chairs, adequate lighting, whiteboard and air-conditioning need to be provided. Additional resources to promote blending learning such as Interactive White Boards, desktop or laptop computer and iPads/Tablets. Video and audio streamed to the class is now a central consideration. Technologies for streaming live or recorded face to face sessions and or distribute session PowerPoint's integrated with short voice/video commentary. A Learner Management System is the central software infrastructure for organisations to flexibly deliver teaching and learning activities and resources to learners.   There are a number of options:   LMS – Used in RTOs, Universities, ACE and TAFE sector. Compliment all delivery strategies for elearning with a variety of tools to enable peer communication, content access, assessment provision and submission, resource sharing between trainers and learners. Most LMS are also – in part Content Management Systems. An example of a popular LMS system used by RTOs is Moodle   Enterprise LMS - These offer the traditional LMS tools but with stronger reporting tools for linking to HR systems that document staff results against employee profile. Used in larger corporations and those public sectors requiring compliance recording – e.g. clinical competencies of Nurses in the Health sector. An example of a popular LMS system used by RTOs is Totara Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/34284901@N05/5941422406/
  • Face to Face training is the ultimate for training and assessing skills and lends itself to all assessment methods: A blended learning approach gives RTOs more time to concentrate on skills demonstration and assessment during face to face training time. Knowledge and underpinning employability skills can be delivered using self pace or online facilitated modes . Direct demonstration/observation Indirect demonstration Products Workplace documents Questions -  written and oral Assignments Third party reports Self-assessment Simulation Portfolios Photo Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/41266898@N04/4588410548/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Many elearning implementations have failed for a variety of reasons. High amongst these is a lack of engaging content and activities for learners. For example: - Asking learners to read large slabs of text online or uploading PDFs and PowerPoint's for learners to read. Self Paced learner puts assessment at the heart of learning content. Writing content and developing learning activities requires an approach to take advantage of the medium, which favours reducing the amount of text, using multimedia (video, audio and graphics) and interactivity and feedback for user responses. Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “ How do we get the learners to pull this information? ” , "What do learners need to know to solve problems at work?", "How do we get learners to use information to solve problem based assessment and test their decision making?". Here the Activity/Assessment requires learners to explore provided content to solve the problem presented rather than as in traditional elearning and course manuals the need to read through a barrage of information before attempting an often-unrelated assessment task or activity. Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/89165847@N00/6951917119/  
  • Course Content   Repository systems for monitoring or managing information; (e.g. LMS, LCMS) For medium and larger RTOs managing and updating digital course materials and resources across the organisation becomes an issue for maintaining currency, consistency and ease of access. As more and more eLearning repositories are created to store and manage learning object content, end users will benefit by having effective ways to search against multiple repositories and conveniently access available content from them. While the material within different repositories may be varied in terms of data formats and instructional purposes, standardisation of methods for networked searching is crucial for enabling interoperability among multiple sites of content objects. Equella is an example of a repository system that will integrate with an RTOs LMS as a digital repository that provides one system to house your teaching and learning, research, media and library content. Purchasing LMS/Course content bundle Many LMS systems come from vendors who also develop digital course content. System users can purchase this content (and in some cases edit the course content to suit their own particular delivery) for delivery to their learners through the LMS. Examples include Catapult and Learning Seat and Small Print Developing bespoke content by third party vendors Many vendors offer customised content for elearning developed specifically for an RTO ’ s delivery context and qualifications. Examples include basic induction, VET courses as well as workplace simulations. RTOs need to be aware of the vendor having an essential understanding of instructional design principles that underpin engaging elearning as well as providing elearning content in a way that it easily editable and customised by third parties or in house (especially when competencies change!). The published material must work without the need for additional plugs ins (apart from Flash player, PDF reader and Silverlight ) when published on the RTO ’ s delivery system (for example LMS, Tablet or iPhone). Many vendors will develop content at competitive rates using rapid elearning software. Development of bespoke content in-house with rapid e earning software Rapid elearning software enables users to create slides in PowerPoint, record narration on top of the slides, insert video, audio and other flash interactions, add quizzes, interactive activities between the slides and then send the whole package (most often as an Adobe Flash file) to a learning management system or a website. Activities can be tracked when integrated with the LMS through the use of SCORM. Rapid elearning software is in a state of transition as vendors move to introduce versions that output to html5 enabling their display on smart phones that currently do not display flash – for example Articulate ’ s Storyline . Rapid elearning software is characterised by:   Short learning curve Navigation built in Instructional design encouraged through tools structure and visual queues Does not require any programming knowledge Advanced features such as creating links, tests, glossary, FAQ, drill down pages are built-in. Does not require any advanced skills, programming, or HTML knowledge Easy to import Multimedia SCORM is a set of technical standards for e-learning software products. SCORM tells programmers how to write their code so that it can “play well” with other e-learning software. It is the de facto industry standard for e-learning interoperability. Rapid eLearnng software is generally SCORM compliant as are most LMS – this means content can be seamlessly integrated, reused in other courses and learners interactions tracked and scored in the LMS while working through the rapid eLearnng software produced course. Typical learning activities that can be created with rapid elearning software include templates to create Problem Based Learning, Case Studies, Simulations, Decision making Trees Quizzing, Multimedia (Video, Audio, Flash etc) presentations
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • There are two modes of delivery using Online Facilitated learning: Synchronous learning refers to a group of people learning the same things at the same time in the same place. Asynchronous learning refers to a student-centered teaching method that uses online learning resources to facilitate information sharing outside the constraints of time and place among a network of people (e.g. students, workers, hobby enthusiasts, etc) Asynchronous learning is based on a student-centered approach that emphasises the importance of peer-to-peer interactions. Lets first look at Online Facilitated approaches using Synchronous learning. Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/trekkyandy/1511951150/sizes/l/in/photostream/ trekkyandy
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include: Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities.   Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions. learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMS Individual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google Chat Photo Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Synchronous Events The online learning infrastructure used to support synchronous learning include: Virtual Classrooms. Software applications for remote live teacher instruction and feedback online with learners that enables real-time voice interaction, whiteboard sharing, and breakout sessions to enhance a student's learning experience. This provides students an opportunity to interact with the trainer as well as classmates by oral and written communication. Examples of products include Blackboard Collaborate, Adobe Connect, GoToMeeting and Webex. Telephone conferencing systems and Video conferencing systems. These are not commonly used in VET apart from Queensland and Western Australian based TAFEs. Voice over internet protocol. While a range of formal organisational VOIP telephony systems are available, free and easy to use applications such as Skype and Google HangOuts enable participants to phone conference at no cost from computers, tablets and smart phones. Participants can text and voice chat and view a shared application (for example the trainers computer clarifying an assessment task through share of word document)
  • During synchronous online tutorials, the absence of body language removes one critical cue a trainer relies upon in face-to-face classes to continually monitor understanding of and engagement with the course material. There can be a steep learning curve for some learners to confidently and comfortably contribute vocally to sessions. Good trainers overcome this by ensuring online sessions of no more than an hours duration that include a lively mix of lecture, brainstorming, group work (learners can be added to break out rooms in virtual classrooms), student presentation, polling, quizzing, video presentations, web tours and resource sharing. Online tutorials provide a peer review forum for: Group problem solving (Case Studies & Scenarios) Brainstorming Assessment task pitching for review assistance by peers Role plays for communication events encountered on the job Assessment presentations Lets now look at Online Facilitated approaches using Asynchronous learning.
  • During synchronous online tutorials, the absence of body language removes one critical cue a trainer relies upon in face-to-face classes to continually monitor understanding of and engagement with the course material. There can be a steep learning curve for some learners to confidently and comfortably contribute vocally to sessions. Good trainers overcome this by ensuring online sessions of no more than an hours duration that include a lively mix of lecture, brainstorming, group work (learners can be added to break out rooms in virtual classrooms), student presentation, polling, quizzing, video presentations, web tours and resource sharing. Online tutorials provide a peer review forum for: Group problem solving (Case Studies & Scenarios) Brainstorming Assessment task pitching for review assistance by peers Role plays for communication events encountered on the job Assessment presentations Lets now look at Online Facilitated approaches using Asynchronous learning.
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Typical asynchronous learning events in a mature blended learning approach may include:   Discussion based activities accompanied by short readings or resources that elicit learners application of skills and knowledge to the workplace context Sharing of ideas and learning resources through discussion forum, social bookmarks or Twitter Blog or Wiki diary posts by learners to support work placement assessment, including participation and verification by third party or workplace assessor Use of social network tools such as social bookmarks, RSS Feeds, Blogs to collect and share electronic resources Group work projects using combination of discussion forums, SMS, Blog or Wiki post, Google Documents Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/71088059@N00/3050204663/  
  • Asynchronous Events The online learning infrastructure used to support asynchronous learning include: Email Many teachers will be familiar with using email for administrative functions with their learners. Email can be useful for queries, sharing of resources, requests for support, assessment task clarification or for tutors to follow up on outstanding matters with individual learners. Email can also be used to conduct a range of learning activities. In general these activities are easy to construct and deliver and do not require you or the learners to have access to sophisticated software and hardware. Online discussion boards Discussion activities can be text or voice based. These can be used to pose questions, share resources, provide reflections on applications of skills and knowledge delivered in the course to the students’ work or life context or as mechanism for group work and shared assessment. Typically learners can add images, embed video or add attachments to their posts. Other common forms of discussions include: Voice boards Are similar to discussion forums but allow you to create threaded discussions by recording your comments as audio messages. Like text discussion boards, users can post a voice message and then others can listen to it later and respond in voice and text. Learner Management Systems (LMS systems), including Moodle include a range of tools to support online interaction, allowing users to organise discussions, post and reply to messages, upload and access multimedia, contribute to group glossaries and content resources as well as peer review co learners contributions.   Blogs and Wikis Blogs are an easy to update web-based system that allows for online journals, diaries, portfolios and web communities. Wikis are a website resource which allows users to add and edit content collectively. Both blogs and wikis allow visitors (if permitted) and site members (e.g. trainers and students) to post comments and feedback to content posted there. Social networking systems. Course participants can be segregated into specific member only groups. Users can communicate with text-based comments. Many social networks allow you to communicate with co group members either by private e-mail-like correspondence, public message board-like posts, or both. Many social networks encourage participation through multi access – computer, smart phone or tablet. Examples of social networking systems include Edomodo (designed for use by learning organisations), Facebook , Ning , Yammer and LinkedIn . Links to paste Moodle https://moodle.org/ Edomodo http://www.edmodo.com/ Facebook http://www.facebook.com/ Ning http://www.ning.com/ Yammer http://www.yammer.com LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/71088059@N00/3050204663/  
  • Facilitation and teaching difficulties to overcome by the Trainer in synchronous environments include: Learners will often not participate in knowledge and resource sharing activities voluntarily. Discussion forum activities therefore should be tied some assessment weighting to encourage participation and cross pollination of ideas. Text based communication on instant messaging; SMS or text chat can often be full of misinformation or unformed ideas by learners. Trainers need to become facilitators of such interactions to synthesize and summaries ideas, as well as extend group think, make links to workplace application and to clarify the accuracy of ideas presented where needed. Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/71088059@N00/3050204663/  
  • During synchronous online tutorials, the absence of body language removes one critical cue a trainer relies upon in face-to-face classes to continually monitor understanding of and engagement with the course material. There can be a steep learning curve for some learners to confidently and comfortably contribute vocally to sessions. Good trainers overcome this by ensuring online sessions of no more than an hours duration that include a lively mix of lecture, brainstorming, group work (learners can be added to break out rooms in virtual classrooms), student presentation, polling, quizzing, video presentations, web tours and resource sharing. Online tutorials provide a peer review forum for: Group problem solving (Case Studies & Scenarios) Brainstorming Assessment task pitching for review assistance by peers Role plays for communication events encountered on the job Assessment presentations Lets now look at Online Facilitated approaches using Asynchronous learning.
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “ content ” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “ quiz ” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making. Some examples of engaging content includes: Video demonstration of a workplace process or communication An “ Ask my Co Workers ” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making tree The Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication   Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software.   These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource.   Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann . Links to paste in for participants: Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/ Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/ Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Here is a quick indicative guide to which assessment types compliment each of the delivery modes E –Assessments are now the norm. These can include: Quiz Decision making trees Written submission Provision of video, audio, images and text as evidence of competency with skills Portfolio of evidence of knowledge and skills Student placement diary and assessment A good understanding of Blended Delivery modes can help RTOs choose the best assessment method for their content and the technology that underpins it. Link to paste http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/shared/docs/e_assessment_guidelines_for_the_vet_sector.pdf
  • For each course we can determine the best mix of delivery modes according to: Infrastructure available to deliver in each mode Capability of our organisation and our learners to teach and learn in each mode Strategic choices about how to package courses for blended learning The types of content we will need to delivery Learning activities Assessment methods and potential for assessment submission.
  • Implementation Proactive RTOs are remaining competitive and relevant by responding with strategies to enable elearning to meet the needs and expectations of learners and of industry. Key strategic issues include: Infrastructure Staff development Content design and management Determine your “ brand ” of e-learning and decide on your delivery strategy. Different courses might lend themselves to different strategies too – for example a blended learning approach with asynchronous access to online content and communication activities may be best for traineeships while a blended approach using a virtual classroom for collaboration and content sharing may suit a Certificate IV/Diploma style course aimed at existing professionals. Use pilots of strategies to evaluate the model and from which you can apply to other courses on your scope down the track. Identity opportunities from existing/proposed training Pick winners from existing courses where there is a strong model of facilitated learning and lively engaging assessment strategy. Courses that are already popular and have proven to be interactive, engaging and interesting to learners can make the transition to a great elearning course. Distil the essence of this success and adapt to both the limitations and possibilities elearning presents. Demonstrate value . Elearning often fails to progress in an organisation despite it success with learners and trainers because care has not been take to show Management value in an elearning approach. Without this data it can be easier for Management to cling to existing “ face to face ” training for which trusted evaluation data exists. Design specific quantitative and qualitative evaluation measures that report on workplace performance improvements, assessment outcomes, the development by learners of independent learning and problem solving and learner engagement. Measure during, post and six months after delivery to make links between elearning implementation and learning/performance improvements over time due to e-learning. Go further and demonstrate cost savings and efficiencies compared to traditional elearning (make sure you separate pilot delivery development costs which will reduce over time and course delivery costs). Be proactive in reporting these results with management.   Aligning to strategic plan, vision, goals Embedding a statement in your organisations strategic planning documents announces an intention to the whole organisation to support the implementation at all levels – technical, marketing, financial, trainers. Ensure you get Management commitment and understanding and sign off on an Implementation plan. Embed into the plan measures with the potential to demonstrate value of your elearning.   Identify the staff roles you will need and the PD model required to ensure a coordinated implementation: Department Managers usually will buy into elearning implementation but may need a supporting background briefing document to understand the full range of issues. They may also need to draft a change management strategy to encourage the RTO to implement new ways of delivering training and supporting learners through learning technologies. Subject Matter Experts will require support to understand and apply instructional design strategies to support the design of elearning delivery and content. They will need to work closely with both trainers and instructional designers (often one and the same role in small to medium RTOs) to develop consistent elearning, the use of common LMS tools and rapid elearning software. Administration staff will need to be developed to understand how to use the LMS to enrol and assist learners with support issues. Training staff will need to support Subject Matter Experts to develop effective assessment strategies including verification. Training will be required to support trainers to understand and apply synchronous facilitation and support methods in virtual classrooms as well as moderation methods for managing learners interactions in asynchronous deliveries that utilise discussion forums, text chat and social media.   Choose the infrastructure to suit your design strategy . Pick the LMS; Virtual Classroom and elearning content develop tools that compliment your implementation strategy. Investigate LMS systems that will bridge learner log ins and assessment outcomes with your existing or future Student Management System.   Audit current capacity and staff commitment to change . Take a comprehensive look at your staff and what they are already doing/investigating in the online sphere in the work and private life. Identify “ Champions ” who believe in the potential of elearning and match with subject matter experts to develop an instructional design approach that informs their contribution to designing elearning interactions, training and facilitation assessments and content engagement in the elearning course. Choose elearning content develop tools that compliment the instructional design approach you develop. A good elearning consultant can help you with this process, along with developing an implementation plan. Bring on board staff to be inducted as required and across different departments using your Champions as leaders. Don ’ t dismiss the capacity of staff with low IT literacy to be part of the implementation – their attitude to elearning potential is more important than their ability. Avoid vocal resistors to change and the use of learning technologies – they will stymie your implementation and sap energy and team motivation to succeed. Get Help! Seek out independent consultants who can give you strategic advice free from vendor influence. A good consultant should be able to help you with a whole of business elearning strategy to assist you with each element of the enrolment to certification cycle for each of your courses: Strategic Infrastructure Staffing Content and Assessment Facilitation and support Marketing Dealing with Vendors Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/14111752@N07/6588713715
  • Questions from the Floor Provide Links to ACPET PD Program http://www.acpet.edu.au/services/professional-development/ Victorian Providers remind of ementor program
  • Acpet eLearning Program 2013 Induction

    1. 1. eLearning Program 2013 Induction
    2. 2. ACPET ACPET Government Thanks to - Vic Thanks to ACPET now onlye-learning Program 2011 now only Kryptonite can stop Kryptonite can stop me from making e- me from making e- learning at will at learning at will at my RTO!!! my RTO!!!
    3. 3. The Aim…..….for your RTO to acquireskills & knowledge to design,develop and deliver a trial ofa chosen unit of competencythrough blended delivery…..
    4. 4. What is e-learning?e-learninguses electronic media to deliverflexible vocational education and training.It includes:access to, downloading & use of web, CD-ROM or computer, smart phone & tablet basedlearning resources in theclassroom, workplace or homeonline access to and participation incourse activities
    5. 5. What is not e-learning?
    6. 6. One size fits all?
    7. 7. Why go down the e-learning road?• Learner Demand• Competitive Edge• More time for skills assessment in F2F• Respond to Industry demand• Reduce reliance on paper from enrolment to assessment to certification• Meet time and distance pressures
    8. 8. Introducing……………..Let’s head to Yammer to find out a bit more about eachother and your plans:http://www.yammer.comLog in with Username and Password youcreated
    9. 9. Introducing……………..•Unit you will attempt•How existing training is delivered for this unit•Why is elearning a good fit for this unit?•Your vision for eLearning for this delivery (Be Bold!)•Existing e resources for this unit•Principles to make eAssessment a success•Resistance/Obstacles to overcome•The Big Question about eLearning!
    10. 10. Blended Learning Modes Face to Face to Face Face Self Self Paced Paced Online Online Facilitated Facilitated
    11. 11. Applying Blend to your course(s) Online Face to Face Self Paced FacilitatedContentActivitiesAssessment
    12. 12. Face to Face examples• Quiz• Assessment• Mobile• Video & Audio• Group work• Digital Literacy
    13. 13. Self Paced examples• Compliance• Scenarios• Decision making trees• Course Content• Assessment• Guided readings• RPL
    14. 14. Facilitated online examples• Group research projects• QnA of industry experts/past learners• Online lecture• Assessment task pitch & presentation• Peer Review of learners’ work• Role play• Group problem solving• Remote trainee/third party assessor catch up• Assessment verification and moderation• RPL
    15. 15. Training TrendsModels of Delivery Knowledge Preparation Knowledge Preparation Fully Online Fully Online for F2F Skills Workshop for F2F Skills Workshop Skill recognition/ Skill recognition/ Blended – Mix of Blended – Mix of currency/RPL currency/RPL online & F2F online & F2F Collaborative Collaborative Skills update on Skills update on Learning with Peers demand Learning with Peers demand
    16. 16. Blended Learning Modes Face to Face to Face Face Self Self Paced Paced Online Online Facilitated Facilitated
    17. 17. Face to Face Learning Pedagogies• Singe location• Technology can be integrated
    18. 18. Face to Face Infrastructure• Furniture• Whiteboard• Interactive Whiteboards• Computers/Tablets• Video & Audio• Electronic presentations
    19. 19. Face to Face Assessment• Skills Assessments• Group Project• Individual stories from the workplace
    20. 20. Face to Face Good PracticeSpend teaching time on demonstrating and assessingpractical skills.Incorporate technology through sharing demonstrationvideo, web resources, group work or knowledgeassessment.Capture skills demonstrations using smart phone video,audio and photos.
    21. 21. Self Paced Pedagogy• Make it engaging• Pull versus Push• Activities with workplace context• Problem Solving• Information acquisition• Employability Skills• Underpinning knowledge
    22. 22. Self Paced Infrastructure• Learner Management System• Vendor Course Content• Consultant developed• Rapid eLearning in- house
    23. 23. Self Paced Assessment• Problem Solving• Multimedia• Less reliance on text• Decision making tree• Reason to use content
    24. 24. Self Paced Examples• Problem Solving• Multimedia• Less reliance on text• Decision making tree• Reason to use content
    25. 25. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj5M4KCfTwo
    26. 26. Self Paced Good PracticeGive learners something to do with the content. Even if yourcourse is info heavy, provide opportunities to apply learning toworkplace context in the role they will occupy.When presenting a problem, “content” can be provided in avariety of forms using video, audio and some text.This gives more depth to typical “quiz” based assessmentwhich test memory rather than understanding, problemsolving and consequences of on the job of decision making.
    27. 27. Online Facilitated Pedagogy• Synchronous• Asynchronous
    28. 28. Online facilitated Pedagogy(Synchronous)• Online workshops & tutorials• Assessment Task presentation• Group Work presentations & peer review• Learner support (one on one or Group)
    29. 29. Online Facilitated Infrastructure(Synchronous)• Virtual Classrooms• Telephone & Video Conference Systems• VOIP
    30. 30. Online Facilitated Assessment(Synchronous)• Body Language• Mix of activities in session• Peer Review• Assessment Presentations
    31. 31. Synchronous example - Webinar• Follow the link to Blackboard Collaborate in our Moodle
    32. 32. Blackboard CollaborateLogging into Elluminate – optimise your connection speed• Set your Connection Speed to the Internet• Open the Preferences dialog under the Tools>> Preferences.• Select Connection choose the correct speed from the Connection Speed drop- down menu.
    33. 33. Blackboard Collaborate Sample session
    34. 34. Webinar Good PracticeKeep lecturing to a minimum. Use the group to workthrough scenarios and problems. Promote discussion andthe sharing of perspectives.Provide peer review opportunities for learners to feed backon each others projects, placements, issues at work etc.Give learners multiple ways of participating – voice,discussions, white board, brainstorming, break out rooms.
    35. 35. Online facilitated Pedagogy(Asynchronous)• Discussion• Sharing• Placement & Assessment• Social Media• Group work
    36. 36. Online Facilitated Infrastructure(Asynchronous)• Email• Online Discussion and or Voice Boards• Learner Management Systems• Blogs & Wikis• Social Networking
    37. 37. Online Facilitated Assessment(Asynchronous)• Activities need to be linked to Assessment• Trainers need to monitor and actively moderate
    38. 38. Asynchronous example - Discussions• Visit the Discussions in Moodle: - Introduce yourself - FAQ - Ideas, Resources & Links
    39. 39. Discussions Good Practice•Link to assessment•Base on participants sharing experiences & priorknowledge – “learners stories”•Application to workplace or experience•Make pre readings short•Mix of problems, case studies, reflections•Commenting/Building on postings•Use to demonstrate employability skills•Track to determine contribution to group•Peer Review
    40. 40. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM_Y2NSJcmE
    41. 41. Straw Poll –Which Blended Model is best for your RTO? A Face to Face, Self Paced & Online Facilitation B Face to Face and Self Paced C Self Paced only D Online facilitation only
    42. 42. eAssessment Assessment Assessment Assessment Distribution & Response Management Collection Assessment activities include the design of assessment tools, the delivery of Assessment assessments and the reporting, storing and Verification & transferring of assessment data. Moderation
    43. 43. Direct Indirect demonstration Productsdemonstration/observatio Products Questions - written and n oral Workplace documents Indirect demonstration Assignments Assignments Products Third party reports Third party reports Workplace documents Self-assessmentQuestions - written and oral Simulation Assignments Portfolios Third party reports Self-assessment Simulation Portfolios
    44. 44. eAssessment Learners need to know 1.What they must demonstrate to you as the trainer to show workplace competency 2.How they need to demonstrate competency 3.The methods the assessor will use to measure and assess their competency.
    45. 45. eAssessment evidenceDirect Evidence – things that we, as assessor,observes first-hand, e.g., observation, worksamplesIndirect Evidence – things that someone elsehas observed and reported to us, e.g., third partyreportsSupplementary Evidence – other things that canindicate performance, such as training records,questions, written work, portfolios
    46. 46. Mobile Evidence eAssessment trends• Evidence Capture• Voice – Text – Video – Images• Student, 3rd Party, Assessor• How much evidence is enough?• Skills & Knowledge• Content delivered through QR Codes
    47. 47. QuizeAssessment trends• Knowledge retrieval• Student, 3rd Party, Assessor• How much evidence is enough?
    48. 48. Decision making treeseAssessment trends• Knowledge retrieval and application• Problem Solving• Applying appropriate resources• Self paced or Group
    49. 49. SimulationeAssessment trends• Knowledge and Skills• Self Paced or Webinar• Workplace process and or communication
    50. 50. Discussion & Social learning eAssessment trends• Knowledge and Skills• Group problems• Application to workplace• Learner’s stories• Assessment carrot to ensure involvement
    51. 51. Placement eAssessment trends• Knowledge and Skills• Workplace context• Industry Knowledge• Common issues• Variety in the sector• Private V Shared• Ethics & Confidentiality
    52. 52. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hNlWGqkQ1o
    53. 53. eAssessment Activity 1
    54. 54. eAssessment Activity 2
    55. 55. Activity! Imagine your “blend” ! Online Face to Face Self Paced FacilitatedContentActivitiesAssessment
    56. 56. Copyright You will use a range of content in your learning resources. These content types may include: •Text, Images, Interactions and activities, •Theories and ideas. •Third party means the content was created by and is owned by another entity.
    57. 57. Copyright • If you use content that isn’t entirely your creation, you will need to consider copyright. • Copyright laws state that the creator (or copyright owner) of content owns the right to use and reproduce their work • You need to get their permission in writing before you include their material in your learning resources or you will be breaking the law. • What kind of places would you find copyrighted material? In books, on the Internet, in magazines.
    58. 58. CopyrightAs you complete your detailed design blueprints, you should keep track of your content sources.The Copyright Register enables you to list contentsources, contact details and track approval. It can be used as a record forfuture redevelopment of the resource you are making.Each row of your copyright register will be focused on a single instanceof third party materials.
    59. 59. Creative CommonsCreative Commons is a nonprofit thatoffers flexible copyright managementtools for creative work.Offering your work under a CreativeCommons license does not meangiving up your copyright. It meansoffering some of your rights to anytaker, and only on certain conditions.
    60. 60. Creative Common Licenses Attribution - This applies to every Creative Commons work. Whenever a work is copied or redistributed under a Creative Commons license, credit must always be given to the creator. Non commercial - Lets others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only. No Derivative Works - Lets others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it. Share Alike - Allows others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.
    61. 61. Creative Commons LinksFlickr Creative Commons – http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/Open Source Music - http://www.opensourcemusic.com/Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/Yahoo Creative Commons Search Toolhttp://search.yahoo.com/ccDesigning and implementing eLearning with Creative Commons(Australian Flexible Learning Framework)http://designing.flexiblelearning.net.au/gallery/activities/creative_commons.htmCreative Commons information Australia – http://creativecommons.org.au Creative Commons (Global) – http://creativecommons.org/
    62. 62. Creative Commons Audio Audio Content ••CCMixter Samples CC Mixter Samples ••Jamendo Jamendo ••Freesound FreesoundImages --Most pull from Flickrs Images Most pull from Flickrs ••InternetArchive Internet Archiveextensive collection extensive collection ••OwlMusic Search Owl Music Search ••SpinXpress SpinXpress••Flickr Flickr ••WikimediaCommons Wikimedia Commons(check the Creative Commons box at (check the Creative Commons box atthe bottom) the bottom) Video Video••FlickrCC FlickrCC••Compfight Compfight ••MODFilms MOD Films••FlickrStorm FlickrStorm ••InternetArchive Internet Archive••everystockphoto everystockphoto ••SpinXpress SpinXpress••OpenClipart Library Open Clipart Library••GeographBritish Isles Geograph British Isles••WikimediaCommons/ Wikimedia Commons/http://drapestakes.blogspot.com/2008/12/educators-guide-to-creative-commons.html
    63. 63. Web 2•Social Bookmarks•RSS and Google Reader
    64. 64. Google Reader• Using Google reader you can add RSS feeds from websites you want to follow. RSS stands for "Really Simple Syndication" and they allow for you to catch a "feed" from various websites, blogs, wikis, audio/video sites.• To find out if RSS feeds are available on websites look for this logo or something similar: Handout: Setting up Google Reader and adding RSS feeds
    65. 65. Set up RSS Reader
    66. 66. RSS Feeds to followhttp://clive-shepherd.blogspot.com.au/http://janeknight.typepad.com/pick/http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/http://blog.cathy-moore.com/http://connectthinking.com.au/category/blog/http://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/
    67. 67. Social Bookmarks• Social bookmarking systems are web-based services that allow users to bookmark all manner of web based resources, tag those resources with meaningful keywords, and share their bookmarks with others.• Your bookmarks available to you anywhere you have an internet connection• You can share your bookmarks with learners via a link.
    68. 68. Set up Diigohttp://www.diigo.com/
    69. 69. Implementing Blended Learning• Be proactive• Define your brand• Identify existing strengths & opportunities• Demonstrate Value• Align to strategic plan, vision, goals• Identify Staff & Building capability• Buy relevant infrastructure• Audit Capacity• Get Help!
    70. 70. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKxpzEWJ4Lk
    71. 71. Flexible Learning Frameworkhttp://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/ http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/
    72. 72. E-learning standardshttp://e-standards.flexiblelearning.net.au/ http://e-standards.flexiblelearning.net.au/
    73. 73. Cathy Moorehttp://blog.cathy-moore.com/ http://blog.cathy-moore.com/
    74. 74. Centre for Learning & PerformanceTechnologieshttp://c4lpt.co.uk/ http://c4lpt.co.uk/
    75. 75. Rapid e Learning Bloghttp://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/ http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/
    76. 76. eLearning Brothershttp://elearningbrothers.com/instructional-design-tips/ http://elearningbrothers.com/instructional-design-tips/
    77. 77. eLearning eXpertshttp://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/ http://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/
    78. 78. eLearning Academy – Connect Thinkinghttp://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/ http://www.theelearningexperts.com.au/blog/
    79. 79. ElNethttp://www.elnet.com.au/ http://www.elnet.com.au/
    80. 80. List of useful links:http://e-learningindicators.flexiblelearning.net.au/docs/11results/2011_e-learnhttp://e-learningindicators.flexiblelearning.net.au/docs/09results/2009Benchmhttp://e-learningindicators.flexiblelearning.net.au/survey_results_all.htmhttp://www.towardsmaturity.org/article/2009/03/23/building-skills-e-learninghttp://moodle.org/http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/shared/docs/e_assessment_guidelines_for_the_v
    81. 81. Any Questions?

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