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130220 Edanz SUP 3

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130220 Edanz SUP 3

  1. 1. How to organize and structure your manuscript for publication Sharif University of Technology Warren Raye, PhD Senior Editor Edanz Group 20 February 2013
  2. 2. Manuscript structure You need to tell a story Beginning Middle End • Must be easy to read and easy to understand
  3. 3. Manuscript structure ‘Tell them three times’ • Beginning – Assertion – ‘tell them what you are going to tell them,’ • Middle – Evidence – ‘tell them,’ • End – Affirmation – ‘tell them again what you told them’.
  4. 4. Manuscript structure IMRaD • Introduction Assertion • Methods • Results Evidence • and • Discussion Affirmation
  5. 5. Manuscript structure The ‘write’ order • For maximum clarity and consistency: Methods Results During your research Introduction Discussion After selecting target journal Title Abstract Write last
  6. 6. Abstracts Who’s hungry?First impressions can make a difference
  7. 7. Abstracts First impressions count Relevance of Importance of Validity of your aims your results conclusions Your abstract Judge your Likely the only part writing style that will be read
  8. 8. Abstracts General guide • Concise – Aim for less than 250 words • Problem(s) addressed (10%) • Objectives/hypotheses (20%) • Techniques (10%) • Most important results (40%) • Concluding statement (20%)
  9. 9. Abstracts Sample abstractThe switching of focal adhesion maturation sites and actin filament activationfor MSCs by topography of well-defined micropatterned surfacesSecuring robust cell adhesion between cells and biomaterials is one of key considerationsfor tissue engineering. However, the cell adhesion investigation by the biophysical effectssuch as topography or rigidity of substrates has only been recently reported. In this study,we examined the spatial property of focal adhesions by changing the height ofmicropatterns in two kinds of microtopography (grid and post) and the stiffness of thesubstrates. We found that the focal adhesion localization is highly regulated bytopographical variation (height) of gird micropattens but not the rigidity of substrates orthe function of actin cytoskeleton, although the latters strongly influence the focal adhesionsize or area. In detail, the change of the height of the grid micropatterns results in theswitching of focal adhesion sites; as the height increases, the localization of focal adhesionis switched from top to bottom areas. This study demonstrates that the localization of focaladhesion on well-defined micropatterned substrates is critically determined by thetopographical variation in the micropatterns. Seo et al. Biomaterials 2012, 34:1764‒1771.
  10. 10. Abstracts Sample abstractSecuring robust cell adhesion between cells and biomaterials is one of key considerationsfor tissue engineering. However, the cell adhesion investigation by the biophysical effects Backgroundsuch as topography or rigidity of substrates has only been recently reported.
  11. 11. Abstracts Sample abstractSecuring robust cell adhesion between cells and biomaterials is one of key considerationsfor tissue engineering. However, the cell adhesion investigation by the biophysical effects Backgroundsuch as topography or rigidity of substrates has only been recently reported.In this study, we examined the spatial property of focal adhesions by changing the height ofmicropatterns in two kinds of microtopography (grid and post) and the stiffness of the Aims/Methodssubstrates.
  12. 12. Abstracts Sample abstractSecuring robust cell adhesion between cells and biomaterials is one of key considerationsfor tissue engineering. However, the cell adhesion investigation by the biophysical effects Backgroundsuch as topography or rigidity of substrates has only been recently reported.In this study, we examined the spatial property of focal adhesions by changing the height ofmicropatterns in two kinds of microtopography (grid and post) and the stiffness of the Aims/Methodssubstrates.We found that the focal adhesion localization is highly regulated by topographical variation(height) of gird micropattens but not the rigidity of substrates or the function of actincytoskeleton, although the latters strongly influence the focal adhesion size or area. In Importantdetail, the change of the height of the grid micropatterns results in the switching of focal resultsadhesion sites; as the height increases, the localization of focal adhesion is switched fromtop to bottom areas.
  13. 13. Abstracts Sample abstractSecuring robust cell adhesion between cells and biomaterials is one of key considerationsfor tissue engineering. However, the cell adhesion investigation by the biophysical effects Backgroundsuch as topography or rigidity of substrates has only been recently reported.In this study, we examined the spatial property of focal adhesions by changing the height ofmicropatterns in two kinds of microtopography (grid and post) and the stiffness of the Aims/Methodssubstrates.We found that the focal adhesion localization is highly regulated by topographical variation(height) of gird micropattens but not the rigidity of substrates or the function of actincytoskeleton, although the latters strongly influence the focal adhesion size or area. In Importantdetail, the change of the height of the grid micropatterns results in the switching of focal resultsadhesion sites; as the height increases, the localization of focal adhesion is switched fromtop to bottom areas.This study demonstrates that the localization of focal adhesion on well-definedmicropatterned substrates is critically determined by the topographical variation in the Conclusionmicropatterns.
  14. 14. Abstracts General rules References Abbreviations Do not include … Non-essentialJargon/slang numbers & statistics
  15. 15. Abstracts Standard abstracts Collagen type IV-specific tripeptides for selective adhesion of endothelial and smooth muscle cells Kanie et al. Biotechnol Bioeng 2012, 109:1808‒1816
  16. 16. Abstracts Graphical abstracts
  17. 17. Introductions Guide your reader What problem was studied?The answer to this question should be in your Introduction Beginning Middle End
  18. 18. Introductions Provide context General Specific Objectives
  19. 19. Introductions Beginning • Sufficient background information • Comprehensive literature review • Cite previous publications – Review articles – Original articles • What is the problem?
  20. 20. Introductions Middle• Rationale – The reason(s) for doing this work? – Why is it important the problem is addressed?• Explain how you addressed the problem• Do not state your results• General statement regarding methods
  21. 21. Introductions End• Clearly and explicitly state the specific aim(s) of your study
  22. 22. Customer Service Methods Methods• Subheadings• Order should be logical• New methods must be described in sufficient detail, so that they can be reproduced• Established methods can be referenced – Save yourself time and effort
  23. 23. Coverage and Results Your findings must beStaffing Plan clear • Past tense to describe your results • Do not explain the results • Avoid duplicating data among figures, tables and text
  24. 24. Coverage and Results Staffing Plan Display items• Present data quickly and efficiently• Keep it simple—use separate panels if necessary – Related data in panels• Label all parts of your figures• Legends must be able to ‘stand alone’
  25. 25. Coverage and Results Staffing Plan Tables Clear concise legend/caption ) Dataformattedfor clarity Abbreviations defined
  26. 26. Coverage and Results Staffing Plan Figures Separate panels Clear indicators Clear, ‘stand … shows silver staining of two representative glomeruli inalone’ legend biopsy specimens from patients. In Patient 4 (left), mesangiolysis (single arrow), prominent endothelial swelling (arrowhead), red-cell fragments (double arrows), and thrombi are visible in some capillary loops … Eremina et al. NEJM 2008, 358:1129–1136
  27. 27. Customer Service Discussions The explanation What do your findings mean?The answer to this question should be in your Discussion Beginning Middle End
  28. 28. Customer Service Discussions Beginning • Avoid just restating results • Answer the research question(s) posed • Emphasize the major finding(s) first • State your major conclusion – Based on results presented
  29. 29. Customer Service Discussions Middle • Interpret your results – Compare with other studies • Same or different? • Explain unexpected results • Describe limitations – How could experiments be improved?
  30. 30. Customer Service Discussions End• Restate major conclusion(s) – In summary … or In conclusion …• Possible applications and implications• Suggest future work“Clinical and research priorities include furthering our understanding of thepathogenesis of M. pneumoniae-associated CNS disease, development ofmore reliable serologic assays, and defining the role of quantitative PCR indistinguishing acute infection from asymptomatic carriage and prolongedpost-infection shedding” Bitun & Richardson Curr Infect Dis Rep 2010, 12:282–290
  31. 31. Any questions? Thank you!edanzediting.com/iran022013Download and further reading@JournalAdvisorFollow us on Twitterfacebook.com/JournalAdvisorLike us on Facebook

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