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Australian Scientistso Identify practising male and female Australian scientists, the areas  in which they are currently w...
Fiona WoodCurrent work and information about her research:  Director of the Burn Service of Western Australia  Consultant ...
Wood’s work and it’s impact in society: Internationally recognised for her use of tissue engineering technology in clinica...
Barry MarshallCurrent work and information about his research:  Marshall has one session a week with his patients, half th...
Marshall’s work and it’s impact in society: In 2005, Barry Marshall and Robin Warren won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or...
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Australian Scientists - Karah

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Australian Scientists - Karah

  1. 1. Australian Scientistso Identify practising male and female Australian scientists, the areas in which they are currently working and information about their research: 1) Identify 1 male and 1 female Australian scientist 2) Outline the areas in which they are currently working 3) Information about their research 4) How does their work impact society and/or the environment?
  2. 2. Fiona WoodCurrent work and information about her research: Director of the Burn Service of Western Australia Consultant at Royal Perth Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital in Perth The co-founder and Director of AVITA Medical Co-founder and Chair of the McComb Foundation Through the McComb Foundation, Wood aims to conduct further research into tissue repair, regeneration and reconstruction with the aim of improving patient quality of life and return to pre-injury condition. Wood continues to consult on clinical trial and medical affairs She is also involved in a number of educational and disaster response programs Now, Woods is looking into an approach to healing burns patients, which she calls „scarless healing‟. In particular, Wood‟s has turned her attention to the impact of burns injuries on the nervous and immune systems.
  3. 3. Wood’s work and it’s impact in society: Internationally recognised for her use of tissue engineering technology in clinical burn practice and scar reconstruction, and has given more than 100 presentations at major burn, wound and plastic surgery conferences and medical centres worldwide. She has also contributed to more than forty research papers published in medical journals. Commonly recognised for her extensive work with 28 Bali bombing victims, who were evacuated to the Royal Perth Hospital after the disaster in 2002. The victims she treated had between 2 and 95% burnt skin, deadly infections and delayed shock – 25 patients survived. Spray-on skin: An alternative to painful traditional grafting techniques, the new approach took healthy cells from the patient and requires only 5 days to be cultured before tissue could be sprayed onto the wound.
  4. 4. Barry MarshallCurrent work and information about his research: Marshall has one session a week with his patients, half the day made up of physically treating them, and the other half looking after their prescriptions Marshall is currently working with the idea that, “half the world may have „Helicobacter‟ and are experiencing no symptoms.” You cannot get rid of Helicobacter, so Marshall is experimenting with the idea that we may be able to use it to our advantage, and prevent it from causing cancer. Current work involves a vaccine – by using Helicobacter, and removing all of the harmful and toxic parts, they are able to clone it into a vaccine. More specifically, they are looking into a vaccine for influenza. Marshall and co-workers are also experimenting with the idea of having the vaccine in foods, so as to save people from having to pay for the vaccine, and also ensure that everyone is exposed to the vaccine.
  5. 5. Marshall’s work and it’s impact in society: In 2005, Barry Marshall and Robin Warren won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, for their discovery of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. A germ that lives in the stomach and causes ulcers Significance: people with this disease, may be unaware of it as some people do not experience any symptoms. This discovery has allowed for people to be checked for this disease and henceforth prevent it from developing into cancer later in life. This disease is now widely recognised as the most common chronic infection in the world. Marshall‟s discovery of the infection and the medicine that kills Helicobacter and eliminated ulcers permanently, clearly identifies it‟s significance. His discovery is recognised as the most significant discovery in the history of gastroenterology (compared with the development of polio vaccine and the eradication of smallpox). Quote from the presentation of the Nobel Prize: “Your discovery has meant that this frequently chronic and disabling condition can now be permanently cured by antibiotics to the benefit of millions of patients. Your pioneering work has also stimulated research all around the world to better understand the link between chronic infections and diseases such as cancer.”

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