Peoxisomes in skin health&disease by prof m.y.abdel mawla

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PPT to show effects of peroxisomes in skin biology&diseases

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  • Depending on developmental stage and environment, #, size, enzymes, metabolic function, varies. Grow on sugar: small peroxisomes Grow on methanol: large peroxisomes that oxidize methanol Grow on FA: large and break down FA to AcetylCoA by  -oxidation
  • Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (or PPARs) are members of the steroid receptor superfamily and were cloned only recently in the early 1990s. Three subtypes have been identified including  ,  , and  , each encoded by a separate gene and exhibiting unique tissue distribution. For example, PPAR  is found in high concentration in the liver, and as I will show you today has roles in both lipid metabolism and carcinogenesis. In contrast, PPAR  is ubiquitously expressed and no function for this receptor has been identified. PPAR  is found extensively in adipocytes and has been found to be involved in adipocyte differentiation.
  • As I eluded to, PPAR-dependent transcriptional regulation is actually a lot more complex than the previous slide. As shown in this slide, there are numerous sites that may be regulated including the presence or absence of ligands/activators, as well as intracellular levels of co-activators and co-repressors which may be different in different tissues. Once all of these regulatory mechanisms have been elucidated, we’ll have a more clear understanding of the diverse roles for the PPARs.
  • As I eluded to, PPAR-dependent transcriptional regulation is actually a lot more complex than the previous slide. As shown in this slide, there are numerous sites that may be regulated including the presence or absence of ligands/activators, as well as intracellular levels of co-activators and co-repressors which may be different in different tissues. Once all of these regulatory mechanisms have been elucidated, we’ll have a more clear understanding of the diverse roles for the PPARs.
  • As I eluded to, PPAR-dependent transcriptional regulation is actually a lot more complex than the previous slide. As shown in this slide, there are numerous sites that may be regulated including the presence or absence of ligands/activators, as well as intracellular levels of co-activators and co-repressors which may be different in different tissues. Once all of these regulatory mechanisms have been elucidated, we’ll have a more clear understanding of the diverse roles for the PPARs.
  • As I eluded to, PPAR-dependent transcriptional regulation is actually a lot more complex than the previous slide. As shown in this slide, there are numerous sites that may be regulated including the presence or absence of ligands/activators, as well as intracellular levels of co-activators and co-repressors which may be different in different tissues. Once all of these regulatory mechanisms have been elucidated, we’ll have a more clear understanding of the diverse roles for the PPARs.
  • As I eluded to, PPAR-dependent transcriptional regulation is actually a lot more complex than the previous slide. As shown in this slide, there are numerous sites that may be regulated including the presence or absence of ligands/activators, as well as intracellular levels of co-activators and co-repressors which may be different in different tissues. Once all of these regulatory mechanisms have been elucidated, we’ll have a more clear understanding of the diverse roles for the PPARs.
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