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Accessibility for AAC—toronto uxpa int'l

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Yossi Langer's June 2017 talk on user experience and interaction design for accessible access methods, specifically when designing for AAC devices.

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Accessibility for AAC—toronto uxpa int'l

  1. 1. Designing for Extreme Accessibility @yossilanger, East Side Strategy UXPA 2017 Toronto
  2. 2. How do you know when you’ve done good work?
  3. 3. What we’re talking about today Designing for assistive technology input devices Things I wish I’d known going in Constraints & heuristics
  4. 4. Specifically Accessing applications with switches Accessing applications with eye-gaze Accessing applications with touch, when the user’s degree of motor control can’t be assumed
  5. 5. Accessibility #a11y
  6. 6. P Perceivable Operable Understandable Robust O U R
  7. 7. Types of impairments Visual Hearing Motor Cognitive
  8. 8. 750 million people (10% of everyone*)
  9. 9. A A C
  10. 10. Augmentative Alternative Communication
  11. 11. ~450k ALS/MNB ~15mm Non-verbal from Autism ~6mm Cerebral Palsy~1.8mm Traumatic brain injury Who needs AAC devices?
  12. 12. Sidebar ...
  13. 13. 1. Double research time
  14. 14. Anyway
  15. 15. “The toolbox is for her”
  16. 16. “The toolbox is for me”
  17. 17. Our Mission: Improve ● Comprehension ● Recall ● Findability ● Access by ALL users and ALL access methods
  18. 18. 2. Move in with the support staff
  19. 19. Things to know
  20. 20. Disability ≠ Access Method ≠ Personality
  21. 21. Switches
  22. 22. 1 ms (that’s a thousandth of a second!)
  23. 23. Establish clear focus & selected states
  24. 24. VS. Limit selectable items per screen
  25. 25. Label all actions clearly VS. Straightforward, Logical Nonspecific, lack of context
  26. 26. Tab order & multi-select actions
  27. 27. Eyegaze & Head Tracking
  28. 28. Eyegaze trackers Our eyes like: ● Movement ● Shiny things, like contrasts ● Sharp things, like corners Using your eye to select things is unnatural and tiring
  29. 29. Avoid sharp corners VS.
  30. 30. Increase target size VS.
  31. 31. Selection and travel VS.
  32. 32. Avoid extreme corners VS.
  33. 33. Best Not Great Avoid High contrasts can trap the eye
  34. 34. Touch
  35. 35. 3. Accessibility is not a checklist
  36. 36. Allow room to make targets legible at distance VS.
  37. 37. PAUSE before accepting next input in same spot Watch for rapid-fire selection
  38. 38. Create non-actionable padding between actions VS.
  39. 39. Keyguards
  40. 40. Inaccessible Accessible Accessible Accessible AccessibleAccessible Accessible Accessible Accessible AccessibleAccessible Accessible Accessible Accessible AccessibleAccessible
  41. 41. Many keyguard variations 1. 2. 3.
  42. 42. 4. Get your hands dirty
  43. 43. Some autistic users prefer/need ...Others don’t prefer/need it No Images No Animations No Icons Calm colors
  44. 44. 5. One size will never fit all
  45. 45. 5.5 There are no edge cases
  46. 46. Design for calibration and customization Design modularly and test thoroughly ● How long a press is an acceptable touch? ● Show or hide icons? ● Size objects for a few centimeters or a meter and a half? ● Calming or high-contrast color palette? ● How fast does focus scan over objects?
  47. 47. 6. Ability is a continuum
  48. 48. 7. Seek out projects like this
  49. 49. Thanks! Find talk here
  50. 50. Suggested reading A WEB FOR EVERYONE: http://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/a-web-for-everyone/ JUST ASK: INTEGRATING ACCESSIBILITY THROUGH DESIGN: http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/ User research resources: http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/involve.html WCAG Guidelines: https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag

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