ETJ Tokyo Expo 2010 TBL in primary schools

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This is a slideshow of my presentation on task-based language learning in Japanese primary schools. I presented at the ETJ Tokyo Expo 2010

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  • Going to look at two topics.
    You are going to undertake a task-based activity to review the structure of a TBL for primary school framework
  • This lesson was designed to teach opposites through quiz-making.
    In line to be published in Mar/Apr JALT “The Language Teacher”.

    Before we start, I’ll admit that it misses the opportunity to teach “a” and “the”.

    I completely ignored this element when making it.
  • This lesson will be looked at in detail
    “Are cheetahs fast or slow?” = is normal way of saying it.
    Language point not clear: Is a cheetah ... // Is the chicken ...
    Not to confuse them with things in general and specific items... the a/the is not looked at. For their level, it’s fine??
  • This lesson will be looked at in detail
    “Are cheetahs fast or slow?” = is normal way of saying it.
    Language point not clear: Is a cheetah ... // Is the chicken ...
    Not to confuse them with things in general and specific items... the a/the is not looked at. For their level, it’s fine??
  • This lesson will be looked at in detail
    “Are cheetahs fast or slow?” = is normal way of saying it.
    Language point not clear: Is a cheetah ... // Is the chicken ...
    Not to confuse them with things in general and specific items... the a/the is not looked at. For their level, it’s fine??
  • This lesson will be looked at in detail
    “Are cheetahs fast or slow?” = is normal way of saying it.
    Language point not clear: Is a cheetah ... // Is the chicken ...
    Not to confuse them with things in general and specific items... the a/the is not looked at. For their level, it’s fine??
  • This lesson will be looked at in detail
    “Are cheetahs fast or slow?” = is normal way of saying it.
    Language point not clear: Is a cheetah ... // Is the chicken ...
    Not to confuse them with things in general and specific items... the a/the is not looked at. For their level, it’s fine??
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • important to expose learners to lot of comprehensible input at the start of the lesson.
    words that they can use during tasks.
    Remember: we are working with students that have (close to) zero English knowledge.
    teacher-led listen and identify or memory game.

    In this example, we could ask children if they like things like hot or cold ice-cream, hard or soft fruit and then try to remember what each students liked.
  • practice language on their own -- new most interesting part of the class
    Opportunity to make own questions on material not covered in the lesson.

    Target language closer to the students. Things in the classroom, their homes etc.
    Brings the second language and real life closer together.

    MEXT guidlines = no FonF. However, exposure is good.
    Not forcing to learn rules or perform. Voluntary.
  • practice language on their own -- new most interesting part of the class
    Opportunity to make own questions on material not covered in the lesson.

    Target language closer to the students. Things in the classroom, their homes etc.
    Brings the second language and real life closer together.

    MEXT guidlines = no FonF. However, exposure is good.
    Not forcing to learn rules or perform. Voluntary.
  • practice language on their own -- new most interesting part of the class
    Opportunity to make own questions on material not covered in the lesson.

    Target language closer to the students. Things in the classroom, their homes etc.
    Brings the second language and real life closer together.

    MEXT guidlines = no FonF. However, exposure is good.
    Not forcing to learn rules or perform. Voluntary.
  • practice language on their own -- new most interesting part of the class
    Opportunity to make own questions on material not covered in the lesson.

    Target language closer to the students. Things in the classroom, their homes etc.
    Brings the second language and real life closer together.

    MEXT guidlines = no FonF. However, exposure is good.
    Not forcing to learn rules or perform. Voluntary.
  • An overview of the lesson sequence I use.


  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • I’m not saying don’t do PPP.
    Excellent for familiarizing students with the language
    Elem. Sch. -- TBL is best used to review language that is already known.
    With young learners, a lesson sequence could be PPP, PPP, TBL.

    no explicit grammar introduction until after the task

    Some people say that TBL is PPP on it’s head. I disagree when working in a YL context. They need some focus on vocab at least before they undertake the task. (Remember - no prior knowledge.)

    Repeat the lesson’s task as warm-up next time to confirm what has been learnt.
  • An overview of the lesson sequence I use.
    Opportunity to see grammar/vocabulary. Teacher-led tasks.
    Accomplish some sort of common goal. Focus on fluency.
    Report findings/results. Focus on accuracy.
    Double check understanding. Focus on accuracy.
    Students experiment with the language.
    Can you think which parts of the lesson can be considered each element here?


  • An overview of the lesson sequence I use.
    Opportunity to see grammar/vocabulary. Teacher-led tasks.
    Accomplish some sort of common goal. Focus on fluency.
    Report findings/results. Focus on accuracy.
    Double check understanding. Focus on accuracy.
    Students experiment with the language.
    Can you think which parts of the lesson can be considered each element here?


  • An overview of the lesson sequence I use.
    Opportunity to see grammar/vocabulary. Teacher-led tasks.
    Accomplish some sort of common goal. Focus on fluency.
    Report findings/results. Focus on accuracy.
    Double check understanding. Focus on accuracy.
    Students experiment with the language.
    Can you think which parts of the lesson can be considered each element here?


  • An overview of the lesson sequence I use.
    Opportunity to see grammar/vocabulary. Teacher-led tasks.
    Accomplish some sort of common goal. Focus on fluency.
    Report findings/results. Focus on accuracy.
    Double check understanding. Focus on accuracy.
    Students experiment with the language.
    Can you think which parts of the lesson can be considered each element here?


  • Reveal as the are said.
  • Reveal as the are said.
  • Reveal as the are said.
  • Reveal as the are said.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.


  • A focus on the grammar used in the lesson.
    MEXT does not recommend the explicit teaching of grammar.
    But, there is a way to do it without mentioning verbs, nouns, or adjectives!
    The next activity I will introduce is a focused activity that lasts a full lesson.



  • Through the use of “collaborative-learning tasks”
  • Through the use of “collaborative-learning tasks”
  • Through the use of “collaborative-learning tasks”
  • Through the use of “collaborative-learning tasks”
  • Through the use of “collaborative-learning tasks”

  • Before I show you the collaborative learning task for the focus on form lesson plan,
    i will outline the topic i used this in.
  • Before I show you the collaborative learning task for the focus on form lesson plan,
    i will outline the topic i used this in.





  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.
  • This was used for students to give their opinions on various subjects. Their partner wrote down their answers.

  • But, students cannot write.

    So....
  • But, students cannot write.

    So....
  • But, students cannot write.

    So....
  • But, students cannot write.

    So....









  • After doing the task though, I discovered that this was a bit too much cognitive suport and the students found it quite easy.



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