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Yonix presents: Business Analysis: Where transformation and innovation begins

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An introduction to Business Analysis for non-BAs.

Published in: Technology, Business
  • Very nice case for paying attention to this powerful role. Proves, the power of clear accountabilities, focused people in a clear role/ structure make a big difference. Thanks for posting this,
    Greg Thomson, Partner, CHRS
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Yonix presents: Business Analysis: Where transformation and innovation begins

  1. 1. Business Analysis: Where transformation and innovation begins<br />Presented By Jody Bullen<br />
  2. 2. Introduction<br /><ul><li>10+ years working in Software Development
  3. 3. Worked on both technical and business teams
  4. 4. Variety of projects
  5. 5. Business Technology Analyst
  6. 6. Founder and CEO of Yonix</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Liaison among stakeholders to identify business needs and determine solutions to business problems.
  7. 7. Solutions often include:
  8. 8. systems development,
  9. 9. process improvement , or
  10. 10. organisational change.
  11. 11. The person who carries out this task is called a Business Analyst or BA.</li></ul> <br /> <br /> <br />Business Analysis<br />
  12. 12. What's involved?<br />
  13. 13. <ul><li>Enterprise analysis
  14. 14. Requirements planning and management
  15. 15. Requirements elicitation
  16. 16. Requirements analysis
  17. 17. Requirements communication
  18. 18. Solution assessment</li></ul>Examples of business analysis<br />
  19. 19. <ul><li>Strategic Vision and Objectives
  20. 20. Programmes of work
  21. 21. Business Case
  22. 22. Execution Plan
  23. 23. Projects</li></ul>Where does it all start?<br />
  24. 24. Business Analyst Role and Responsibilities<br />Source: 2008 voke media<br />
  25. 25. Business Analyst Communication Lines<br />Source: 2008 voke media<br />
  26. 26. Capabilities, Skills, And Knowledge<br />Source: Forester Research Inc<br />
  27. 27. Business Analyst Reporting Lines<br />Source: Forester Research Inc<br />
  28. 28. <ul><li>Process rather than a documentation exercise
  29. 29. Extensive stakeholder involvement
  30. 30. Document business processes, high level, detailed and non-functional (Quality Assurance) requirements
  31. 31. Provide traceability, document and managed relationships between requirements
  32. 32. Requirements and business process reviewed and signed-off</li></ul>Approach: Requirements Gathering<br />
  33. 33. <ul><li>Realising the value of Business Analysts
  34. 34. Becoming a profession
  35. 35. The role is changing
  36. 36. Distributed software supply chain
  37. 37. Outsourcing
  38. 38. Push for agility</li></ul>Industry Trends<br />
  39. 39. <ul><li>Set of phases and activities that result in software products.
  40. 40. Phases collectively known as the Software Development Lifecycle, or SDLC
  41. 41. Different approaches to software development may result in these phases or activities being carried out in a different </li></ul>Introduction to Software Development<br />
  42. 42. Software Development Lifecycle <br />Business<br />Technical<br />
  43. 43. A Typical Project Team and Governance Structure<br />
  44. 44. Vast Majority of IT Software Development Projects Fail<br /><ul><li>US$500 billion invested last year to build new software
  45. 45. Software development project failure rates between 50% - 75%*
  46. 46. Failure rates, costs are frustrating and unacceptable
  47. 47. Failure is avoidable</li></ul>*2008 - The Standish Group, Gartner Group, VokeStream<br />
  48. 48. Failed Software Projects and poor IT alignment leads to:<br /><ul><li>Missed objectives, goals and market opportunities.
  49. 49. Loss of market share.
  50. 50. Reduced shareholder returns.
  51. 51. Damaged reputation and brands.</li></ul>Impact<br />
  52. 52. <ul><li>Software errors cost the US economy US$59.5 billion annually.
  53. 53. Impact to UK companies of re-work costs and abandoned systems upwards of US$75 billion annually.
  54. 54. In Australia failing, botched, re-scoped and cancelled projects are wasting around A$197,000 per week.
  55. 55. In 2004, software project failures cost the European Union €142 billion.</li></ul>Impact<br />
  56. 56. April 2009 we completed an extensive five month market validation and research exercise, which included:<br /><ul><li>A Market survey,
  57. 57. Interviews, and
  58. 58. Analysis and review of industry research</li></ul>Research<br />
  59. 59. <ul><li>84 Projects
  60. 60. 35% private, 33% government, 17% public and 15% were charity/non-profit.
  61. 61. 70% budget greater than $500k.
  62. 62. 45% had a team size between 6 and 15 people. 39% more than 15 people. 21% over 25 people.
  63. 63. 50% of project budgets between 500k and $5m, while 19% were $5m or over.</li></ul>Project Demographics<br />
  64. 64. <ul><li>Unrealistic schedules or inaccurate estimates,
  65. 65. Poor requirements and overall system specification.
  66. 66. Feature / scope creep, and
  67. 67. Inaccurate understanding of end-user needs.</li></ul>Top Problems in the SDLC<br />
  68. 68. Project Key Success Factors<br />Highest<br />Rated <br />2<br />3<br />Lowest <br />Rated <br />1<br />
  69. 69. <ul><li>Spend more time upfront
  70. 70. Understand the enterprise, business domain and stakeholders
  71. 71. Create a single source of project requirements
  72. 72. Understand that people don’t always know what they want
  73. 73. Help stakeholders visualise and understand the requirements</li></ul>Recommendations for your business<br />
  74. 74. Recommendations<br />IAG Group : 109 Fortune 500 Projects<br />
  75. 75. <ul><li>Frustrated with project failure rates
  76. 76. We are passionate about well run and successful IT software projects
  77. 77. Focus is software to support the early phases of projects where critical business and technical requirements are developed
  78. 78. Yonix ‘Calm’ used commercially for 3+ years
  79. 79. Animal Health Board’s VectorNet project won the premier NZ Computerworld award for Overall ICT Project Excellence
  80. 80. In CreativeHQ, High Growth Business Incubator </li></ul>About Yonix<br />
  81. 81. <ul><li>Focus on requirements and specification phases of the project lifecycle
  82. 82. Increases the odds of project success
  83. 83. Saves money from costly rework
  84. 84. Safe guards intellectual property and institutional knowledge
  85. 85. Improves communication between business and technical realms
  86. 86. Governance and assurance
  87. 87. Improved business outcomes
  88. 88. Bring best-practice to small / medium projects</li></ul>Yonix’s Approach<br />
  89. 89. <ul><li>$1bn USD market*
  90. 90. 20%+ growth per year*
  91. 91. Growth forecasted to continue
  92. 92. Enormous growth potential
  93. 93. Domestic and global opportunities</li></ul>Market Opportunity<br />*2008 – vokeStream, IDC<br />
  94. 94. <ul><li>Help more NZ businesses increase project success
  95. 95. Supporting industry associations promote best practice
  96. 96. Next-generation Software-as-Service (SaaS) version
  97. 97. Currently building and seeking partnerships with NZ and global consultancies to provide benefits to a wider market</li></ul>The Future of Yonix<br />
  98. 98. ?<br />Questions<br />www.yonix.com<br />Jody Bullen<br />Jody.bullen@yonix.com<br />

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