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Pragmatic, Not
        Dogmatic TDD:
Rethinking How We Test
        Joseph W. Yoder
        The Refactory, Inc.

   Rebecc...
Introducing Joseph
Founder and Architect, The Refactory, Inc.
Pattern enthusiast, author and Hillside
   Board President
A...
Introducing Rebecca
President, Wirfs-Brock Associates
Agile enthusiast (involved with experience
   reports since 1st agil...
Some Agile Myths
  Simple solutions are always best.
  We can easily adapt to changing
  requirements (new requirements).
...
First
   Classic Test-Driven Development
Start                                                    Write
                  ...
TDD Promises
1 Tests help you build the right thing
2 Tests guide development
3 Tests keep you focused
4 Tests allow you t...
Question: Do tests help you
build the right things?
Common Misperceptions
 Tests verify program correctness
     3.1415926535…


 Tests enable and encourage
 well-designed c...
Understanding
        Tests
Test Target → the thing
T   we are trying to test.

    Action → changes environment
    or the Test Target.

    Assertio...
Test → a sequence
of at least one action
    and one assertion

          T       T’
Good Test Outline
1. Set up
2. Declare the expected results
3. Exercise the test
4. Get the actual results
5. Assert that ...
Pragmatic Testing Questions
 What is important to test?
 Who should write them?
 Who runs them?
 When are they run?
 How a...
What to Test
Significant scenarios of use, not
isolated methods.
The difficult parts: Complex interactions,
intricate algo...
What Not to Test
 Tests should add value,
 not just be an exercise.
 Do not test:
    setters and getters
      (unless t...
Different Tests Can Overlap…
                  Smoke
                   Tests   Quality
                           Scenari...
Question: Do tests help you
build the right things?

Answer: Yes. But …
Question: Do tests guide
development and keep you
focused?
Two Faces of Testing
Defining tests            But you may
helps limit               be missing
scope and                 ...
Thinking Fast vs. Slow
  Fast thinking:
  decisions based on
  intuition, biases,
  ingrained patterns,
  and emotions

  ...
Take Time For Both
  Slow thinking
     Pairing and discussion options
      are why you want to implement
      somethin...
Question: Do tests guide
development and keep
you focused?

Answer: Yes…but…
Ten Tenets of Testing
1. Test single complete scenarios
2. Do not create dependencies between tests
3. Only verify a singl...
Question: Do I always have
to write tests first?
You are not
  doing TDD!         Common Belief
You must create
                        You are not
 your tests first!     ...
Is it OK to write tests after
you write production code?
  Is this cheating?
  Does this result in bad code?
  Does it res...
Common Practice
     Tests don’t always get written first.
Start
                                                   Write
...
A Pragmatic Testing Cycle
 Code is only checked in with Valid Tests that verify
 that code works as expected (validate tes...
Pragmatic Testing Cycle
Alternate between writing
  test code and production
  in small steps.
Use feedback from tests
 to...
Question: Do I always have
to write tests first?

Answer: No, as long as tests are
checked in with production code!
Question: Do tests allow
you to change code safely
and quickly?
Test-Driven   Refactoring
Development
Common Wisdom
Work refactoring into your daily routine…

 “In almost all cases, I’m
 opposed to setting aside time
 for re...
Two Refactoring Types*
 Floss Refactorings—frequent,
 small changes, intermingled
 with other programming
 (daily health)
...
What if the Tests are an
Obstacle to Refactoring?
The design of test code
needs to evolve, just like
   production code!
Sometimes it is easier to throw
away tests, change the design
of your production code, and
then write new tests.
Question: Do tests allow
you to change code safely
and quickly?

Answer: Yes and no.
Question: Do tests help with
quality code and good design?
Agile Design Values
  Core values:
     Design Simplicity
     Communication
     Teamwork
     Trust
     Satisfying...
Classic Test-Driven
Development Rhythm
                 User story-by-story:
                     Write the simplest test...
Another View of
Test-Driven Development
  Requirements             Architecture
   Envisioning             Envisioning    ...
Spike Solutions
If some technical difficulty
  threatens to hold up the
  system's development,
Or you are not sure how to...
Other Techniques for
Improving Quality
Steve McConnell
http://kev.inburke.com/kevin/the-best-ways-to-find-bugs-in-your-cod...
Combine and Conquer
 The average is 40% for
    any one technique…
 No one approach is adequate
 Combining techniques give...
Question: Do tests help with
quality code and good design?

Answer: They can but …
you need more than tests.
Pragmatic Test-Driven
 Development (core process)
 Tests written & must pass before checking in production code

Write som...
TDD Challenges
1. Unit Tests aren’t enough…
   should they be the main focus?
2. It is hard to know the “right” tests
3. D...
Dogmatic
Synonyms: bullheaded,
dictative, doctrinaire,
fanatical, intolerant

Antonyms: amenable,
flexible, manageable


 ...
Be Pragmatic…
Use tests to enhance your current practice!
Ask how best to validate that your
software meets its requiremen...
Keep It Focused
       Keep It Fresh
Expand your Horizons




       …Be Practical
Resources
Agile Myths: agilemyths.com
The Refactory: www.refactory.com
Joe’s website: joeyoder.com
Wirfs-Brock Associates:...
Pragmatic Not Dogmatic TDD Agile2012 by Joseph Yoder and Rebecca Wirfs-Brock
Pragmatic Not Dogmatic TDD Agile2012 by Joseph Yoder and Rebecca Wirfs-Brock
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Pragmatic Not Dogmatic TDD Agile2012 by Joseph Yoder and Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

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This presentation challenges the "norm" for TDD. Testing should be an integral part of your daily programming practice. But you don’t always need to derive your code via many test-code-revise-retest cycles to be test-driven. Some find it more natural to outline a related set of tests first, and use those test scenarios to guide them as they write code. Once they’ve completed a “good enough” implementation that supports the test scenarios, they then write those tests and incrementally fix any bugs as they go. As long as you don’t write hundreds of lines of code without any testing, there isn’t a single best way to be Test Driven. There’s a lot to becoming proficient at TDD. Developing automated test suites, refactoring and reworking tests to eliminate duplication, and testing for exceptional conditions, are just a few. Additionally, acceptance tests, smoke tests, integration, performance and load tests support incremental development as well. If all this testing sounds like too much work, well…let’s be practical. Testing shouldn’t be done just for testing’s sake. Instead, the tests you write should give you leverage to confidently change and evolve your code base and validate the requirements of the system. That’s why it is important to know what to test, what not to test, and when to stop testing.

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Pragmatic Not Dogmatic TDD Agile2012 by Joseph Yoder and Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

  1. 1. Pragmatic, Not Dogmatic TDD: Rethinking How We Test Joseph W. Yoder The Refactory, Inc. Rebecca Wirfs-Brock Wirfs-Brock Associates Copyright 2012 Joseph Yoder, Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, The Refactory, Inc. and Wirfs-Brock Associates
  2. 2. Introducing Joseph Founder and Architect, The Refactory, Inc. Pattern enthusiast, author and Hillside Board President Author of the Big Ball of Mud Pattern Adaptive systems expert (programs adaptive software, consults on adaptive architectures, author of adaptive architecture patterns, metatdata maven, website: adaptiveobjectmodel.com) Agile enthusiast and practitioner Business owner (leads a world class development company) Consults and trains top companies on design, refactoring, pragmatic testing Amateur photographer, motorcycle enthusiast, enjoys dancing samba!!!
  3. 3. Introducing Rebecca President, Wirfs-Brock Associates Agile enthusiast (involved with experience reports since 1st agile conference, board president Agile Open Northwest, past Agile Alliance Board member) Pattern enthusiast, author, and Hillside Board Treasurer Old design geek (author of two object design books, inventor of Responsibility- Driven Design, advocate of CRC cards, hot spot cards, & other low-tech design tools, IEEE Software design columnist) Consults and trains top companies on agile architecture, responsibility-driven design, enterprise app design, agile use cases, design storytelling, pragmatic testing Runs marathons!!!
  4. 4. Some Agile Myths Simple solutions are always best. We can easily adapt to changing requirements (new requirements). Because I’m following TDD, I can reliably change the system fast!!! TDD will ensure good Design. “www.agilemyths.com”
  5. 5. First Classic Test-Driven Development Start Write test fails Re(Write) Check if production a test test fails code 1 or more tests fail test succeeds all tests Clean up code succeed Check all tests (Refactor) succeed Ship Ready to it!!! Release? Short Cycles
  6. 6. TDD Promises 1 Tests help you build the right thing 2 Tests guide development 3 Tests keep you focused 4 Tests allow you to change code safely and quickly 5 Tests ensure what you build works 6 You will end up with quality code 7 You will end up with a good design
  7. 7. Question: Do tests help you build the right things?
  8. 8. Common Misperceptions Tests verify program correctness  3.1415926535… Tests enable and encourage well-designed code
  9. 9. Understanding Tests
  10. 10. Test Target → the thing T we are trying to test. Action → changes environment or the Test Target. Assertion → compares expected vs observable outcome of the action on the Test Target.
  11. 11. Test → a sequence of at least one action and one assertion T T’
  12. 12. Good Test Outline 1. Set up 2. Declare the expected results 3. Exercise the test 4. Get the actual results 5. Assert that the actual results match the expected results 6. Teardown
  13. 13. Pragmatic Testing Questions What is important to test? Who should write them? Who runs them? When are they run? How are they run?
  14. 14. What to Test Significant scenarios of use, not isolated methods. The difficult parts: Complex interactions, intricate algorithms, tricky business logic Required system qualities  Performance, scalability, throughput, security... How services respond to normal and exceptional invocations.
  15. 15. What Not to Test Tests should add value, not just be an exercise. Do not test:  setters and getters (unless they have side effects or are very complex)  every boundary condition; only test those with significant business value  every exception; only those likely to occur or that will cause catastrophic problems.
  16. 16. Different Tests Can Overlap… Smoke Tests Quality Scenarios Integration Tests Acceptance Tests Unit Tests Common to only focus on Unit Tests in TDD!!! We believe TDD is more than just Unit Tests
  17. 17. Question: Do tests help you build the right things? Answer: Yes. But …
  18. 18. Question: Do tests guide development and keep you focused?
  19. 19. Two Faces of Testing Defining tests But you may helps limit be missing scope and the bigger increases focus picture… Tests force you Might need to to implement consider how functionality current instead of functionality jumping around affects the and tweaking rest of the stuff system
  20. 20. Thinking Fast vs. Slow Fast thinking: decisions based on intuition, biases, ingrained patterns, and emotions Slow thinking: Reasoning, logical thinking
  21. 21. Take Time For Both Slow thinking  Pairing and discussion options are why you want to implement something a certain way  Sketching, noodling, design spikes Fast thinking  Fast turns of coding, testing and quick fixes… (Red/Green)
  22. 22. Question: Do tests guide development and keep you focused? Answer: Yes…but…
  23. 23. Ten Tenets of Testing 1. Test single complete scenarios 2. Do not create dependencies between tests 3. Only verify a single thing in each assertion 4. Respect class encapsulation 5. Test limit values and boundaries 6. Test expected exceptional scenarios 7. Test interactions with other objects 8. When you find a bug, write a test to show it 9. Do not duplicate application logic in tests 10. Keep your test code clean
  24. 24. Question: Do I always have to write tests first?
  25. 25. You are not doing TDD! Common Belief You must create You are not your tests first! practicing TDD correctly unless you write tests first, before writing any code that is tested.
  26. 26. Is it OK to write tests after you write production code? Is this cheating? Does this result in bad code? Does it result in a bad design? Does it reinforce “slacker” tendencies to not write tests?
  27. 27. Common Practice Tests don’t always get written first. Start Write test fails Re(Write) Check if production a test test fails code 1 or more tests fail test succeeds all tests Clean up code succeed Check all tests (Refactor) succeed Ship Ready to it!!! Release?
  28. 28. A Pragmatic Testing Cycle Code is only checked in with Valid Tests that verify that code works as expected (validate tests too)!!! Write some Check if Re(write) production test fails a test code Clean up code (Refactor) 1 or more tests fail Check all tests succeed all tests succeed Ship Ready to it!!! Release?
  29. 29. Pragmatic Testing Cycle Alternate between writing test code and production in small steps. Use feedback from tests to verify code (integrate often). Don’t worry whether the chicken or the egg comes first. Sometimes development guides testing. Do what yields the most value!
  30. 30. Question: Do I always have to write tests first? Answer: No, as long as tests are checked in with production code!
  31. 31. Question: Do tests allow you to change code safely and quickly?
  32. 32. Test-Driven Refactoring Development
  33. 33. Common Wisdom Work refactoring into your daily routine… “In almost all cases, I’m opposed to setting aside time for refactoring. In my view refactoring is not an activity you set aside time to do. Refactoring is something you do all the time in little bursts.” — Martin Fowler
  34. 34. Two Refactoring Types* Floss Refactorings—frequent, small changes, intermingled with other programming (daily health) Root canal refactorings — infrequent, protracted refactoring, during which programmers do nothing else (major repair) * Emerson Murphy-Hill and Andrew Black in “Refactoring Tools: Fitness for Purpose” http://web.cecs.pdx.edu/~black/publications/IEEESoftwareRefact.pdf
  35. 35. What if the Tests are an Obstacle to Refactoring?
  36. 36. The design of test code needs to evolve, just like production code!
  37. 37. Sometimes it is easier to throw away tests, change the design of your production code, and then write new tests.
  38. 38. Question: Do tests allow you to change code safely and quickly? Answer: Yes and no.
  39. 39. Question: Do tests help with quality code and good design?
  40. 40. Agile Design Values Core values:  Design Simplicity  Communication  Teamwork  Trust  Satisfying stakeholder needs Keep learning Lots of Testing!!!
  41. 41. Classic Test-Driven Development Rhythm User story-by-story:  Write the simplest test  Run the test and fail  Write the simplest code that will pass the test  Run the test and pass Repeat until a “story” is tested and implemented “Design happens between the keystrokes”
  42. 42. Another View of Test-Driven Development Requirements Architecture Envisioning Envisioning Conceptual Modeling (days/weeks/...) (days/weeks/…) Iteration 0: Envisioning Iteration Modeling (hours) a little bit of modeling Model Storming then a lot of coding (minutes) Fast TDD(hours) Iteration n: Development
  43. 43. Spike Solutions If some technical difficulty threatens to hold up the system's development, Or you are not sure how to solve a particular problem… “Put a pair of developers on the problem for a week or two to reduce the potential risk”
  44. 44. Other Techniques for Improving Quality Steve McConnell http://kev.inburke.com/kevin/the-best-ways-to-find-bugs-in-your-code/
  45. 45. Combine and Conquer The average is 40% for any one technique… No one approach is adequate Combining techniques gives you much higher quality
  46. 46. Question: Do tests help with quality code and good design? Answer: They can but … you need more than tests.
  47. 47. Pragmatic Test-Driven Development (core process) Tests written & must pass before checking in production code Write some Check if Re(write) production test fails a test code Clean up code (Refactor) 1 or more tests fail Check all tests succeed all tests succeed Ship Ready to it!!! Release? Good Tests
  48. 48. TDD Challenges 1. Unit Tests aren’t enough… should they be the main focus? 2. It is hard to know the “right” tests 3. Deception that incrementally writing tests inductively proves software works… probably more deductive and example driven… 4. Tests can constrain code evolution and refactoring
  49. 49. Dogmatic Synonyms: bullheaded, dictative, doctrinaire, fanatical, intolerant Antonyms: amenable, flexible, manageable Pragmatic Synonyms: common, commonsense, logical, practical, rational, realistic, sensible Antonyms: idealistic, unrealistic
  50. 50. Be Pragmatic… Use tests to enhance your current practice! Ask how best to validate that your software meets its requirements. Develop the optimum set of tests to keep your system working, not only Unit Tests! Make time for slow thinking too.
  51. 51. Keep It Focused Keep It Fresh Expand your Horizons …Be Practical
  52. 52. Resources Agile Myths: agilemyths.com The Refactory: www.refactory.com Joe’s website: joeyoder.com Wirfs-Brock Associates: www.wirfs-brock.com Our Pragmatic TDD Course:  refactory.com/training/test-driven-development  wirfs-brock.com/pragmatictestdrivendevelopment.html Introducing Pragmatic TDD:  wirfs-brock.com/blog/2011/09/23/what-is-pragmatic- testing-all-about/  http://adaptiveobjectmodel.com/2012/01/what-is- pragmatic-tdd/
  • diveshkumar21

    Aug. 24, 2017
  • ssuser968fab

    Jul. 6, 2014

This presentation challenges the "norm" for TDD. Testing should be an integral part of your daily programming practice. But you don’t always need to derive your code via many test-code-revise-retest cycles to be test-driven. Some find it more natural to outline a related set of tests first, and use those test scenarios to guide them as they write code. Once they’ve completed a “good enough” implementation that supports the test scenarios, they then write those tests and incrementally fix any bugs as they go. As long as you don’t write hundreds of lines of code without any testing, there isn’t a single best way to be Test Driven. There’s a lot to becoming proficient at TDD. Developing automated test suites, refactoring and reworking tests to eliminate duplication, and testing for exceptional conditions, are just a few. Additionally, acceptance tests, smoke tests, integration, performance and load tests support incremental development as well. If all this testing sounds like too much work, well…let’s be practical. Testing shouldn’t be done just for testing’s sake. Instead, the tests you write should give you leverage to confidently change and evolve your code base and validate the requirements of the system. That’s why it is important to know what to test, what not to test, and when to stop testing.

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